Ivey Publishing

Management

Williams, C., Kondra, A., Vibert, C.,2/e (Canada, Cengage Learning, 2008)
Prepared By Dan E. Woodward, Professor
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Introduction to Management

SURGERY WITH BLUNT TOOLS: RESTRUCTURING AND AMBIGUITY AT UMBRA HEALTH PARTNERS
Claus Rerup, Jim Tuan

Product Number: 9B07C038
Publication Date: 7/7/2008
Length: 26 pages

This case explores the transformation of Umbra Health Partners (Umbra), a privately owned Canadian healthcare organization, as it undergoes an extensive restructuring, through the perspective of the branch manager, who is a recent graduate of a master of business administration program in health services administration. The first part of the case examines the branch manager's role and the last part of the case examines his new role in the corporate office. When he is first hired at Umbra, he assesses the organizational problems inherent in the branch office and in the organization as a whole. As branch manager, he attempts to find solutions to those problems and improve the reliability of his branch. Later, he is promoted to a position in the corporate office, where he addresses the organizational problems at the corporate level (some of which mirror those at the branch office), such as a lack of interdependence and a vague sense of the direction in which the organization is headed. Taken together, the case offers a host of material to discuss the complexities of organizational change.

Teaching Note: 8B07C38 (22 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Collective Mind; Operations Management; Leadership; Success and Failure; Ambiguity of Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL PERSONNEL SELECTION SYSTEM
Diana E. Krause, Reiner Piske

Product Number: 9B07C041
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Length: 17 pages

The owner of a company with production plants in various regions in the world wants to standardize the methods of personnel selection for the Asian-Pacific region (APAC). A new system of personnel selection has to be developed for middle management positions in APAC. The owner delegates this task to a cross-functional, multinational project team that operates in Hong Kong headed by a human resources (HR) executive and expatriate from Germany. In terms of the new personnel selection system, he has two opposing goals in mind: the new personnel selection system should be highly specific for a particular country and simultaneously valid for different countries. A series of issues must be resolved in order for the project to be successful. Some of these issues are related to the personnel selection system; the job requirements to be assessed, the modules it must include, the stages and methods of each module, and the implementation of the system across countries in APAC. Other issues are interpersonal, such as the cultural differences and the heterogeneous perspectives that exist among the team members, and a conflict between the HR executive and the owner.

Teaching Note: 8B07C41 (9 pages)
Issues: Cross Cultural Management; Aptitude Diagnostics; International Personnel Selection; Teamwork
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING SOFTWARE - ONGOING MAINTENANCE COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS
Mike Canniff

Product Number: 9B06E012
Publication Date: 3/16/2007
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 14 pages

At this point, the Oracle acquisition of PeopleSoft in 2005 seems like ancient history (at least in technology years). In fact, the PeopleSoft acquisition is not even Oracle's latest major acquisition (Siebel was acquired in September 2005). One of the primary reasons that Oracle acquired PeopleSoft was to gain access to the 10,000+ customer base of PeopleSoft (and JD Edwards), which provides more than $1 billion in annual revenue. This customer base is a gift that keeps on giving in the form of a lucrative maintenance stream. This case study discusses options that PeopleSoft customers and, by extension, other enterprise software owners pursue to minimize enterprise resource planning (ERP) ongoing costs of ownership. The case encourages students to evaluate several criteria that can be used to lower ERP costs. There are no material requirements to run the case (other than Internet access).

Teaching Note: 8B06E12 (7 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Outsourcing; Cost Control; Management Decisions; Enterprise Resource Planning; Strategic Balance; Vendor Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SUBTLE BIASES AND COVERT PREJUDICE IN THE WORKPLACE
Joerg Dietz, Leah K. Hamilton

Product Number: 9B08C005
Publication Date: 2/13/2008
Length: 21 pages

Subtle biases and covert prejudice affect interactions in the workplace. Subtle biases are automatically activated associations or stereotypes that relate groups (e.g. men and women) with attributes or characteristics (e.g. career or household), often outside of our awareness. Covert prejudice refers to concealed negative opinions about members of other groups. Managers and business leaders can benefit both from understanding how subtle biases and covert prejudices can translate into discriminatory behaviors and from learning to manage in a way that avoids such biases and prejudices. The note has four sections, each of which can be read individually: Managerial Relevance, Subtle Biases, Covert Prejudice, and Managing to Avoid Subtle Biases and Covert Prejudice.

Issues: Personnel Management; Discrimination
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Organizational Environments and Cultures

CHICKEN AND EGG: A STUDY OF THE POULTRY GENETICS INDUSTRY
Patrick F. O'Leary

Product Number: 9B06A022
Publication Date: 10/12/2006
Revision Date: 9/30/2008
Length: 13 pages

At the beginning of 2006, the president of Ullman International (Ullman), a leading producer of hybrid chicks for both the American and world egg industry was facing many challenges: his imminent retirement, the threat of the Asian bird flu, zero or negative growth in primary markets, increasing pressure from the animal rights movement and a strained relationship with Ullman's European parent company. 2006 marked the end of an era for this $200 million company as it enters a period of revolutionary organizational and environmental change, the resolution of which will determine its fate for the next decades.

Teaching Note: 8B06A22 (10 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Ethical Issues; Succession Planning; International Business; Industry Analysis; Biotechnology; Cross Cultural Management; Industry Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAPITAL COAST HEALTH LIMITED: BEING A GOOD EMPLOYER IN THE MIDST OF CHANGE (A)
Anne Marie Francesco, Alvin Hwang

Product Number: 9B05M009
Publication Date: 2/21/2005
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 6 pages

Capital Coast Health Limited is a public healthcare facility in central New Zealand. The new chief executive is confronted with serious internal problems and a persistent annual financial deficit that has been with the organization since its inception. Working in an uncertain and rapidly changing healthcare environment and constrained by government regulations, the chief executive officer must find a way to deliver quality care to the community and at the same time, motivate a large team of professionals who were already weary after years of change. The supplement Capital Coast Health Limited: Being a Good Employer in the Midst of Change (B), product 9B05M010 looks at one of the policies the chief executive officer must focus on.

Teaching Note: 8B05M09 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Environmental Change; Strategy Development; Change Management; Employment Equity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAPITAL COAST HEALTH LIMITED: BEING A GOOD EMPLOYER IN THE MIDST OF CHANGE (B)
Anne Marie Francesco, Alvin Hwang

Product Number: 9B05M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2005
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 7 pages

The new chief executive officer of Capital Coast Health Limited, a government funded healthcare provider, has made many changes and succeeded in substantially reducing the financial deficit in his first year and a half. However, there were still a number of pressing concerns that needed to be addressed. The governing board of Capital Coast Health Limited has requested information about the Equal Employment Opportunity policies and practices in the organization. The request serves as a reminder to the CEO that internal issues should be a priority in the future. This is a supplement to Capital Coast Health Limited: Being a Good Employer in the Midst of Change (A), product 9B05M009.

Teaching Note: 8B05M10 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Strategy Development; Employment Equity; Environmental Change; Change Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ROARING DRAGON HOTEL
Stephen Grainger

Product Number: 9B08M004
Publication Date: 3/5/2008
Length: 7 pages

The case looks at the takeover of the Roaring Dragon Hotel (RDH), a state owned enterprise in south-west China, by global hotelier Hotel International (HI) and discusses the cultural collision and organizational adoptions resulting from the intersections of two significantly different business cultures. Specifically in this case, the focus is on the challenge involved with downsizing, redundancy, communication, cultural sensitivity, strategic planning and in developing strategy. In south-west China in 2002, the RDH business environment was just emerging from the shadow of the planned economy and had retained its guanxi-based organizational culture. At RDH, relationship development and the exchange of favors were still important and occurring on a daily basis and there was little system or efficiency in the hotel's domestic management style and processes. In comparison, Hotel International had a wealth of international experience in providing accommodation, marketing and professional management in servicing the needs of a global market steeped in corporate governance. At the commencement of the management contract there was a deep division separating the organizational cultures of RDH and HI.

Teaching Note: 8B08M04 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Cross Cultural Management; Strategic Planning; Cross Cultural Communication; Cultural Sensitivity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Ethics and Social Responsibility

KILLER COKE: THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST COCA-COLA
Henry W. Lane, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B07C003
Publication Date: 1/31/2007
Revision Date: 2/24/2010
Length: 23 pages

The CEO of Coca-Cola is faced with increasing criticism over the company's handling of alleged human rights abuses in Colombia. A grass roots protest movement known as The Campaign to Stop Killer Coke has built international support for a boycott of Coca-Cola products on college campuses. The campaign centers specifically on the intimidation and murder of union leaders at a specific Coca-Cola bottling plant in Colombia. Coca-Cola asserted that it was not responsible for such abuses. Rather, the violence at the Coca-Cola plant was the product of a political situation that was beyond the company's control. The company further argued that it was in compliance with local labor laws, and had been dismissed as the defendant in lawsuits filed in Colombia and U.S. courts. At the time of the case, Coca-Cola is faced with anti-Coke campaigns at more than 100 college campuses worldwide and official boycotts of its products at a number of large well-known campuses in the United States. In response, the company has undertaken an audit of its bottling plants in Colombia. It also launched a public relations campaign aimed at refuting accusations of human rights violations. The case can be used to discuss corporate ethics, extraterritoriality, marketing and public relations.

Teaching Note: 8B07C03 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Trade Unions; Ethical Issues; Emerging Markets; Supplier Selection; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A MINOR ASSIGNMENT
Charlene Zietsma

Product Number: 9B05C006
Publication Date: 1/31/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 2 pages

This case is designed to stimulate students' reflections on ethics. The context of the case is a familiar one to most students (plagiarism on a student essay); it therefore allows them to experience more personally the range of emotions and perspectives involved in ethical issues. Yet the parallels to business ethics situations are strong, and can be discussed in depth. Students are assigned to one of two roles in advance of class (a student who has plagiarized text for an assignment and a professor), supplement cases A Minor Assignment: Role of Rob Thatcher and A Minor Assignment: Role of Lydia Katz, products 9B05C007 and 9B05C008 are given out to support the roles.

Teaching Note: 8B05C06 (8 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Classroom Management; Discipline; Ethical Issues; Personnel Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PHIL CHAN (A)
Paul W. Beamish, Jean-Louis Schaan

Product Number: 9B08M038
Publication Date: 4/18/2008
Length: 8 pages

The case deals with a scam that has been run out of Nigeria since 1990. In it, foreign companies are approached for their assistance in facilitating an international transfer of funds in order to receive a very large but unearned commission. In the case, a Hong Kong-based manager who is travelling to Nigeria is unaware that he is walking into a situation where his company is about to be cheated. The objective of the case is to raise the issue of ethics in the conduct of international business. A follow-up case (9B08M039) is available.

Teaching Note: 8B08M38 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Negotiation; Human Behaviour; Ethical Issues; Personal Values
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PHIL CHAN (B)
Paul W. Beamish, Jean-Louis Schaan

Product Number: 9B08M039
Publication Date: 4/18/2008
Length: 4 pages

En route to Nigeria the decision maker learns that he is walking into a scam and must decide whether to show up for the scheduled meetings or to return home immediately. The case illustrates ways of being drawn into unethical situations, and the severe implications for both the individual and organization if they do participate. This (B) case can be distributed part way through the class (with undergraduates) or at the same time as the (A) case(9B08M038) with more experienced students.

Teaching Note: 8B08M38 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Job Assignments; Personal Values; Ethical Issues; Crisis Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Planning

INFINET COMMUNICATIONS INC. (D)
Kenneth G. Hardy, Meredith Lamb

Product Number: 9B06A009
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/9/2009
Length: 9 pages

A partner in an early stage entrepreneurial company wants to revolutionize the way pharmaceutical companies communicate with medical doctors. He created eRep, an online site for a doctor to interact with a pharmaceutical company's sales representatives. Unfortunately, after two years of trying to entice a key pharmaceutical company to support the development of an eRep working prototype, he has not been able to find such a co-developer with $1 million. Sales executives expressed interest in the concept, but seemingly no one wants to be the first mover. How should he overcome these obstacles and launch this product?

Teaching Note: 8B06A09 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Sales Strategy; Product Strategy; Product Design/Development; New Products
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NCSOFT CORPORATION
Ho-Geun Lee, Sang-Hoon Lee, Hyung-Jin Kim

Product Number: 9B07M061
Publication Date: 3/26/2008
Revision Date: 8/26/2008
Length: 27 pages

The case presents the points of contention and issues facing NCsoft Corporation (NCsoft) as of 2007. As the leader in online games, NCsoft has the greatest future growth potential inside and outside of Korea. The president has a number of issues to consider: What is NCsoft's most effective plan for maintaining its top position in Korea and its competitiveness in the world market? How should the company pursue diversification of its game offerings from a small number of major games to other online game genres, such as casual games? What are the important factors NCsoft needs to consider to achieve globalization as a basis for building a global online game development and publishing company? What should be NCsoft's response to the diversified connection channels and game platforms and the rise of a ubiquitous computing environment? How should the negative perceptions and side effects of playing online games be dealt with? In addition, how should NCsoft prepare to compete with other industries that are expected to become competitors with digital-content online games?

Teaching Note: 8B07M61 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Online Game Business; Visioning; Competitiveness; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WEATHERING THE STORM: AWARDING AN HONORARY DEGREE TO CANADA'S PIONEER ABORTION DOCTOR (A)
Gerard Seijts, Michael Sider, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05C033
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 15 pages

The president of the University of Western Ontario was contemplating how to best handle a potentially explosive issue: the planned award of an honorary degree to Dr. Henry Morgentaler, a prominent abortion-rights activist and operator of six abortion clinics in Canada. The pressure from various interest groups opposing the award continued to grow and attracted considerable local and national media attention. The chair of the university's board of governors went on record stating his disagreement with award decision. With university's reputation at stake, the president knew that he had to plan for the worst, yet hope for the best. The supplement Weathering the Storm: The Fallout of the Decision to Award an Honorary Degree to Canada's Pioneer Abortion Doctor (B), product 9B05C034, looks at the events on the day of convocation.

Teaching Note: 8B05C33 (4 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Communications; Stakeholder Analysis; Ethical Issues; Contingency Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WEATHERING THE STORM: AWARDING AN HONORARY DEGREE TO CANADA'S PIONEER ABORTION DOCTOR (B)
Gerard Seijts, Michael Sider, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05C034
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 3 pages

The president of the University of Western Ontario was contemplating how best to handle a potentially explosive issue: the planned award of an honorary degree to Dr. Henry Morgentaler. In this supplement to Weathering a Storm: Awarding an Honorary Degree to Canada's Pioneer Abortion Doctor (A), product 9B05C033, the events of the day of convocation are highlighted.

Teaching Note: 8B05C33 (4 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Contingency Planning; Stakeholder Analysis; Ethical Issues; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Managing Information

SWIMMING IN THE VIRTUAL COMMUNITY POOL WITH PLENTYOFFISH
Michael Parent, Wilfred Cheung, Chris Ellison, Prarthana Kumar, Jeremy Kyle, Stacey Morrison

Product Number: 9B08M015
Publication Date: 3/6/2008
Revision Date: 11/17/2014
Length: 9 pages

PlentyofFish.com is the world's most profitable website on a per capita basis, the 96th most popular website in terms of page views, and the most popular online dating site in existence. Remarkably, it is managed by its owner and founder and only one other employee. It is a free dating site that generates $10 million in ad revenues per year, and a profit to the owner in excess of $9 million. The case describes PlentyofFish.com's stellar growth in the face of stringent competition, and asks students to consider whether it is sustainable. A number of possible alternatives are offered for analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B08M15 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Strategic Planning; Staffing; Decision Making; Sustainability; Growth
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RICHTER: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AT HUNGARY’S LARGEST PHARMA
Deborah Compeau, Jordan Mitchell, Gyorgy Drotos, Emma Incze, Gyorgy Vas

Product Number: 9B07E021
Publication Date: 5/7/2008
Revision Date: 11/28/2008
Length: 23 pages

The director of information technology (IT) at Ritcher, a major Hungarian pharmaceutical company with operations throughout Eastern Europe, is planning for the IT department for the near future. The three main considerations for the coming year are: Is the current IT structure appropriate to meet the growing demands of the organization? To what extent should IT affiliates be centrally controlled? How can IT best serve the rest of the company?

Teaching Note: 8B07E21 (11 pages)
Issues: Information Systems; Enterprise Resource Planning; Corporate Governance; Organizational Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SECURITY BREACH AT TJX
Nicole R.D. Haggerty, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B08E003
Publication Date: 3/12/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 12 pages

The chief security officer of TJX Companies Inc. (TJX) faces a dilemma on his first day on the job. The company has discovered in December 2006, a computer intrusion dating back to 2005. There is an ongoing investigation, involving the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) into the attacks. The company is also in the middle of several class action law suits over losses suffered by financial institutions due to breaches of customer privacy. The chief security officer has to focus on plugging the loopholes in the company's information technology (IT)security, in the short term, and taking steps to ensure in the long term that the attack does not recur. He also had to get the management of TJX to start looking at IT security not as a technology issue but as a business issue.

Teaching Note: 8B08E03 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Computer Management; Security Systems; Retailing; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WATERLOO REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES: REASSESSING THE CIMS PROJECT
Deborah Compeau, Jane Gravill

Product Number: 9B07E010
Publication Date: 4/12/2007
Length: 10 pages

It had been four years since the chief of the Waterloo Regional Police Services (WRPS) met with the board to discuss critical next steps regarding vendor management for the Common Information Management System (CIMS) project. CIMS was an information systems project originally involving the WRPS and seven other police organizations. Since then, considerably more resources had been invested into the CIMS project by all stakeholders involved. The relationship with the current vendor, ITG, was growing less productive and the chief knew it was time to reassess the project to determine the best next steps toward successful project implementation. It was September 2005 and the chief found himself preparing for an important board meeting to discuss the fate of the CIMS project.

Teaching Note: 8B07E10 (7 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Information Systems; Relationship Management; Management of Technology; Project Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WATERLOO REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES: THE CIMS PROJECT (C)
Jane Gravill, Deborah Compeau

Product Number: 9B07E009
Publication Date: 4/12/2007
Length: 5 pages

The chief of the Waterloo Regional Police Services (WRPS) found himself preparing for an important board meeting to discuss the fate of the CIMS project. Earlier that year he had recommended that the contract with ITG be cancelled and negotiations toward this end were proceeding. Now the chief was faced with the task of recommending an alternative vendor and approach for completing this important project. WRPS needed to install a suitable computer-automated dispatch and record management system - key CIMS components - prior to December 31, 2005 as 2006 was the federally mandated deadline for implementing this functionality within police agencies. The chief knew that WRPS resources would be heavily tasked to meet the December 31, 2005 deadline, even if a vendor was chosen as soon as possible. The chief was well aware that a decision needed to be made regarding the best vendor to manage the next phase of the CIMS project as quickly as possible to allow WRPS and the vendor project team time to implement the required solution. The chief believed that the first step was to select the best vendor and then present the recommended solution to the board.

Teaching Note: 8B01E13 (10 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Management of Technology; Information Systems; Project Management; Relationship Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Decision-Making

THE IRAQ WAR CASE
Claus Rerup, Jordan Mitchell, Robin Cooper

Product Number: 9B07C034
Publication Date: 7/4/2008
Length: 22 pages

In March 2003, the U.S.-led coalition forces waged war on Iraq. After a few months, President George W. Bush declared Mission Accomplished. However, five years later, in 2008, the United States and other coalition forces remain in Iraq and are facing increased violence and casualties. The U.S. death toll is approximately 4,000 people whereas Iraqi deaths are estimated by conflicting sources to range from 150,000 to 1,033,000. This case examines the U.S. government's engagement in Iraq over the last four years and offers a brief background of the conflict. Next, it examines the statements made by the U.S. government to explain the purpose and aim of the war to the American people and the international community. The case describes the progress of the war as well as the U.S. government's response to that progress. The case is used to illustrate the ways in which ambiguous outcomes (the war in Iraq) are experienced by and responded to by actors (the U.S. government). This case has been developed to address two related issues: first, at business schools we teach students about success more than we teach them about failure. The case is written to make students more mindful about the way they use success, failure and the grey zone between success and failure to frame and make sense of events and experiences; the second issue is that students are not usually taught about the grey zone that exist between success and failure. The central idea of this theory is that although the success/failure dichotomy of evaluating organizational performance is simple and as a result, appealing, organizational life does not always comply with these categories.

Teaching Note: 8B07C34 (25 pages)
Issues: Decision Making; Visioning; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GOOGLE'S WAY - DON'T BE EVIL
Pratima Bansal, Marlene J. Le Ber

Product Number: 9B07M067
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Revision Date: 7/3/2008
Length: 14 pages

Wall Street's darling, Google Inc., offered more than a pretty financial picture. Poverty, communicable diseases and climate change - some of the world's largest problems - were also key interests of Google's cofounders. By applying innovation and significant resources, Google's cofounders hoped that their efforts in these areas would one day eclipse Google itself in worldwide impact. On February 22, 2006, Google Inc. announced the appointment of an executive director of the newly created Google.org. With one per cent of Google Inc.'s equity and profit as seed money, Google.org's mandate was to address climate change, global public health, economic development and poverty. Although charity by successful entrepreneurs was not unusual, this press release signaled a new organizational form, a for-profit philanthropic company. The new executive director's task ahead was unprecedented. How could he leverage the company's for-profit status to make the biggest impact possible with the resources trusted to Google.org? What decision-making criteria should be used for strategic investments? How would he measure Google.org's success?

Teaching Note: 8B07M67 (11 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Corporate Governance; Strategic Decision Making; Business Sustainability; New Organizational Forms
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KRAFT FOODS: THE COFFEE POD LAUNCH (A)
Robin Ritchie, Aleem Visram

Product Number: 9B06A019
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Revision Date: 5/27/2014
Length: 19 pages

The product manager for coffee development at Kraft Canada must decide whether to introduce the company's new line of single-serve coffee pods or await results from the United States. Key strategic decisions include which target market to focus on and what value proposition to signal. Important questions are also raised as to how the new product should be branded, which flavors to offer, whether Kraft should use traditional distribution channels or direct-to-store delivery, and what forms of advertising and promotion to use. The case provides a basis for discussing consumer decision making, and stresses the importance of providing a clear incremental benefit when introducing a new product in an established category. It may be used independently or with the supplement, Kraft Foods: The Coffee Pod Launch (B).

Teaching Note: 8B06A19 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Consumer Behaviour; Consumer Marketing; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OQOQO: SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS FASHIONS
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark, Megan Sherritt

Product Number: 9B06A023
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Length: 8 pages

Chip Wilson, founder of lululemon athletica, a Vancouver-based manufacturer, distributor and retailer of high quality yoga apparel, started a new streetwear line of apparel that would combine fashion with social consciousness. The apparel sold at OQOQO was made from natural and organic materials, under safe and fair working conditions, and it was produced in a way to reduce environmental impact. There were some problems regarding the sourcing of materials and the customer's perception of certain materials such as soy and hemp. Chip must decide whether to expand the number of OQOQO stores.

Teaching Note: 8B06A23 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Decision Theory; Decision Analysis; Corporate Responsibility; Retailing; Product Strategy; Growth Strategy; Market Strategy; Decision Trees; Decision Support Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Control

LONDON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Vaughan S. Radcliffe, Ian Nichol

Product Number: 9B07B005
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 14 pages

The chief executive officer (CEO) of the London Public Library (LPL) had developed and had begun to implement a strategic plan to improve the LPL. The strategic plan was based on a balanced scorecard. The four perspectives measured by the balanced scorecard were: the community perspective, the internal processes perspective, the organizational readiness perspective and the financial perspective. With two years before the deadline to achieve the plan, the CEO had to decide on what she would focus next.

Teaching Note: 8B07B05 (3 pages)
Industry: Public Administration, Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Development of Balanced Scorecard; Financial and Nonfinancial Performance Measures; Performance Assessment; Management Control; Performance Measurement; Accountability in the Public Service; Performance Evaluation; Management Accounting; Accounting Methods
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PART KING, INC.
Mary Gillett, Lindsay Brock

Product Number: 9B08B001
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Length: 10 pages

A newly appointed operations manager was expected to provide his expertise in the planning, launch and ongoing operations for three corporately-owned Part King stores, the first of which was scheduled to open in December 2005. The operations manager wondered if moving to a corporate model made sense at all or whether it was better to retain the franchise structure that was already in place. He was particularly concerned about how best to motivate the managers of a corporate-owned store given that they did not share in its ownership. Were there some components of the control system that was currently in place in the franchise store model that would also be appropriate for the corporate-owned store model that was in the works? Were there some components of the existing control system that needed improvements as well?

Teaching Note: 8B08B01 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Transfer Pricing; Incentives; Control Systems; Budgeting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SAT & CO.: MARKET ORIENTATION
Satyendra Singh

Product Number: 9B08A006
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Length: 10 pages

The Sat & Co. case demonstrates how market orientation can be achieved and how its implementation can lead to superior business performance in the context of the machine tool industry. Sat & Co. consisted of two divisions: the lathe division that manufactured the lathe machines, and the computer numerical control (CNC) division that assembled CNC machines. The capacity of both divisions was underutilized. The problem was that the lathe division manufactured very basic lathe machines and the CNC division assembled very technologically advanced machines. As a result, both divisions failed to satisfy their customers' needs. The lathe division was poorly market-oriented, whereas the CNC division was overly market-oriented. The chairperson of the board of directors was adamant that both divisions must survive, and that a market orientation must be achieved, i.e. the company must meet customers' needs and must improve its business performance.

Teaching Note: 8B08A06 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Performance Measurement; Market Strategy; Machinery and Equipment; Customer Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ARLA FOODS AND THE CARTOON CRISIS (A)
Henry W. Lane, Mikael Sondergaard, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B08M005
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 12 pages

After a Danish newspaper publishes cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad, consumers across the Middle East decide to boycott Danish goods. Arla Foods (Arla) is one of Europe's largest dairy companies. Suddenly, it finds itself caught in the middle of a crisis that appears to be beyond its control. Prior to the boycott, the Middle East was Arla's fastest growing region and represented an important component of the company's long-term growth strategy. As the largest Danish company in the region, it stands to lose up to $550 million in annual revenues. Students are asked to take the role of the communication director for Arla, who, along with other members of the newly formed Crisis and Communication Group, must decide on a course of action to deal with the crisis. The case addresses a variety of topics, including culture and religion, international management, risk management, crisis communications, and managing in a boycott situation. It also creates an opportunity to discuss doing business in the Middle East and management in an Islamic context.

Teaching Note: 8B08M05 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Boycott; Crisis Management; Women in Management; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Global Management

MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (B)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M011
Publication Date: 2/25/2008
Revision Date: 9/15/2014
Length: 9 pages

This case, which outlines the product recall, is a supplement to Mattel and the Toy Recalls (A).

Teaching Note: 8B08M11 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ASIAN PAINTS LTD. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE
Jean-Louis Schaan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07M056
Publication Date: 10/24/2007
Length: 13 pages

The president of Asian Paints Ltd., India's largest paint manufacturer, was wondering how he could improve the way the company's International Business division was managing its team of 120 global managers. The company had operations throughout Asia in various locations such as China, Singapore and Thailand; throughout Africa in countries such as Oman, Egypt and Mauritius; and in the Americas in Jamaica. The team of global management was critical to the success of the company's globalization endeavour, which was expected to gather momentum once the ongoing consolidation was complete. The president must decide how to structure the management of this global team.

Teaching Note: 8B07M56 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Manager; Growth; Management Systems; Organizational Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JOHN MEREDITH OF HUTCHISON PORT HOLDINGS
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Jeffrey Gandz, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B07C027
Publication Date: 6/4/2007
Revision Date: 5/24/2007
Length: 18 pages

This case examines the life, career and leadership style of John Meredith, the group managing director of Hutchison Port Holdings (HPH). Meredith established the company in 1972 based on his vision for more efficient global trade. Under his leadership, the company grew to become the world's largest container port operator. The company grew from owning and managing a single container port to owning and managing 45 container ports by May 2007. This case also examines the importance of leadership at all levels of organizations. When a company grows quickly and sets up operations around the world, it must constantly train new leaders. However, HPH had difficulty finding and training enough leaders who were willing to lead the company's new port operations in far-off destinations. The case examines HPH's actions thus far and asks what other measures may be appropriate in the future.

Teaching Note: 8B07C27 (7 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Management in a Global Environment; Management Development; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CITY WATER TANZANIA (A): WATER PARTNERSHIPS FOR DAR ES SALAAM
Oana Branzei, Kevin McKague

Product Number: 9B07M025
Publication Date: 6/15/2007
Length: 17 pages

This case examines how the Tanzania government intends to address a pressing deterioration in the infrastructure and services of Dar es Salaam's Water and Sewage Authority. The decision process unfolds in the spring of 2002, on the heels of the Cochabamba uprising in Bolivia and an increasing dispute over the involvement of the International Finance Corporation and the World Bank in other water development projects in Ghana, Mauritania and South Africa. At that time, the World Bank was already sponsoring similar projects in Angola, Benin, Guinea-Bissau, Niger, Rwanda Sao Tome and Senegal, despite some vocal local opposition. This multi-part case series is ideally suited for core or elective courses in strategy and sustainability to illustrate the types of ongoing tensions and divergent decision angles that influence the formation and performance of public-private partnerships and managing in a global context. It also provides a rich and graphic account of the special threats and opportunities in the water sector - a wealth of complementary teaching resources can also stimulate larger debates by juxtaposing the case decision with a broader crisis of confidence in for-profit solutions to water and sewage provision in Africa and in Latin America.

Teaching Note: 8B07M25 (13 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Partnership; Strategic Alliances; Management in a Global Environment; Sustainable Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Organizational Strategy

ECCO A/S - GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN MANAGEMENT
Bo Bernhard Nielsen, Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt

Product Number: 9B08M014
Publication Date: 5/29/2008
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

ECCO A/S (ECCO) had been very successful in the footwear industry by focusing on production technology and assuring quality by maintaining full control of the entire value chain from cow to shoe. As ECCO grew and faced increased international competition, various value chain activities, primarily production and tanning, were offshored to low-cost countries. The fully integrated value chain tied up significant capital and management attention in tanneries and production facilities, which could have been used to strengthen the branding and marketing of ECCO's shoes. Moreover, an increasingly complex and dispersed global value chain configuration posed organizational and managerial challenges regarding coordination, communication and logistics. This case examines the financial, organizational and managerial challenges of maintaining a highly integrated global value chain and asks students to determine the appropriateness of this set-up in the context of an increasingly market-oriented industry. It is suitable for use in both undergraduate and graduate courses in international corporate strategy, international management, international marketing, supply-chain management, cross-border strategic management and international business studies in general.

Teaching Note: 8B08M14 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Management; Operations Management; Global Strategy; Vertical Integration; Value Chain; Competitor Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON THE GLOBAL HOTEL INDUSTRY
Gevork Papiryan

Product Number: 9B08M028
Publication Date: 5/28/2008
Length: 23 pages

The hotel industry has experienced tremendous growth since the 1980s and has emerged as a global industry. During the expansion period, multinational, multi-brand corporations, such as Hilton Hotels Corporation, were in the process of finding new markets and setting priorities. In emerging markets, such as Russia, most of the national hotel industry had been formed under the pressure of foreign hotel chains. In addition to competing with foreign firms in their own markets, local Russian companies were also planning to enter international markets. In this environment, where competition was strengthening within the global hotel industry and new players were emerging, a number of questions and challenges existed: 1) How could firms effectively leverage their competencies and increase their competitiveness? 2) Would the multinational hotel corporations continue to expand their brand portfolios? 3) How could hotel chains maintain their integrity during the expansion on a global scale? 4) What strategies might apply to convince Western hotel companies to compete in emerging markets? 5) Which direction would further develop the hotel industries in emerging economies?

Teaching Note: 8B08M28 (12 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Emerging Markets; Corporate Strategy; Industry Analysis; Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A TECHNICAL NOTE ON RISK MANAGEMENT
Donna Fletcher, Susan Newell

Product Number: 9B07M043
Publication Date: 8/15/2007
Length: 11 pages

This technical note focuses on risk management in a project-based organization. Risk management is discussed at the organizational and project levels. Three components of risk management are mentioned: risk assessment, risk management plan, and risk monitoring. Recent thinking in risk management has gone beyond financial risk management and incorporates enterprise risk management (ERM). Finally, the technical note links risk management to strategy, and notes the importance that the implementation of both has on the performance of the firm.

Teaching Note: 8B07M44 (5 pages)
Issues: Risk Management; Product Management; Corporate Strategy; Knowledge Management; Strategy; Corporate Governance
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



APPLE'S IPOD SYSTEM: IPOD, ITUNES AND FAIRPLAY
Rod E. White, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06M080
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Revision Date: 2/7/2007
Length: 7 pages

In July 2006, Apple Computer Inc. (Apple) is enjoying increased sales due to its popular iPod portable digital music player. The iPod and iTunes, Apple's online music store, each have about 70 per cent of the market share. In the 1980's, Apple had a great deal of success in the personal computer (PC) business. However, Apple saw its market share fall from over 30 per cent to less than five per cent. Most experts agree that this occurred because Apple had control over the production and distribution of its hardware, software and operating system. The Windows and Intel computers eventually took Apple's lead in the market. Analysts are starting to wonder if Apple will face the same problems as it uses the same business model for its iPod and iTunes products.

Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Industry Analysis; Corporate Strategy; Expansion; Market Strategy; System Design; Product Strategy; Strategic Positioning; Competitive Advantage
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Innovation and Change

PRONIX, INC.
Paul Croke, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B03M032
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 10/22/2009
Length: 14 pages

After an ill-fated acquisition of a Linux development company, Pronix finds itself in a financial crisis that could lead to bankruptcy. The board has decided to recruit a new chief executive officer from outside the company who has experience turning around enterprise software companies and strategic business units. Despite its flagging performance, Pronix produced some of the most advanced enterprise software available and was one of the few suppliers of real-time software capable of integrating entire corporations. By refocusing software development on a single integrated platform, the new chief executive officer hoped to transform the company's prospects. Others, however, were less enthusiastic. Some recommended that the entire Pronix product line be sold piecemeal. The case describes the process of implementing a turnaround during an economic downturn and the leadership issues associated with managing resistance to change among senior members of a management team.

Teaching Note: 8B03M32 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Board of Directors; Management Information Systems; Leadership; Crisis Management; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SURGERY WITH BLUNT TOOLS: RESTRUCTURING AND AMBIGUITY AT UMBRA HEALTH PARTNERS
Claus Rerup, Jim Tuan

Product Number: 9B07C038
Publication Date: 7/7/2008
Length: 26 pages

This case explores the transformation of Umbra Health Partners (Umbra), a privately owned Canadian healthcare organization, as it undergoes an extensive restructuring, through the perspective of the branch manager, who is a recent graduate of a master of business administration program in health services administration. The first part of the case examines the branch manager's role and the last part of the case examines his new role in the corporate office. When he is first hired at Umbra, he assesses the organizational problems inherent in the branch office and in the organization as a whole. As branch manager, he attempts to find solutions to those problems and improve the reliability of his branch. Later, he is promoted to a position in the corporate office, where he addresses the organizational problems at the corporate level (some of which mirror those at the branch office), such as a lack of interdependence and a vague sense of the direction in which the organization is headed. Taken together, the case offers a host of material to discuss the complexities of organizational change.

Teaching Note: 8B07C38 (22 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Collective Mind; Operations Management; Leadership; Success and Failure; Ambiguity of Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE WII: NINTENDO'S VIDEO GAME REVOLUTION
Gloria Barczak, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B08A004
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 26 pages

In 2007, Nintendo's inexpensive and quirky Wii video game console had become all the rage. Despite its underpowered processor and comparatively basic graphics, it outsold both the Sony PlayStation 3 and the Microsoft Xbox 360. Nintendo's handheld system, known as the DS, also outsold Sony's more advanced PlayStation Portable. Nintendo's products were so successful, retail stores in North America and Japan quickly sold out whenever new shipments arrived, and many consumers were forced to pay premium prices on the grey market. The case examines the characteristics of a successful new product launch, particularly product features, brand loyalty, content availability, third-party support, and adherence to industry standards. The case also considers how radical innovations can be used to win market share from technically superior products focused on incremental innovations. Finally, a 4P marketing analysis is used to compare video game systems offered by Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo. The case may be used with The Launch of the Sony PlayStation 3 (Ivey Case 9B07A014) and A Note on Video and Computer Games (Ivey Case 9B07A013).

Teaching Note: 8B08A04 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Strategy; New Products; Generating Profit from New Technology; Product Design/Development; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GOOGLE'S WAY - DON'T BE EVIL
Pratima Bansal, Marlene J. Le Ber

Product Number: 9B07M067
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Revision Date: 7/3/2008
Length: 14 pages

Wall Street's darling, Google Inc., offered more than a pretty financial picture. Poverty, communicable diseases and climate change - some of the world's largest problems - were also key interests of Google's cofounders. By applying innovation and significant resources, Google's cofounders hoped that their efforts in these areas would one day eclipse Google itself in worldwide impact. On February 22, 2006, Google Inc. announced the appointment of an executive director of the newly created Google.org. With one per cent of Google Inc.'s equity and profit as seed money, Google.org's mandate was to address climate change, global public health, economic development and poverty. Although charity by successful entrepreneurs was not unusual, this press release signaled a new organizational form, a for-profit philanthropic company. The new executive director's task ahead was unprecedented. How could he leverage the company's for-profit status to make the biggest impact possible with the resources trusted to Google.org? What decision-making criteria should be used for strategic investments? How would he measure Google.org's success?

Teaching Note: 8B07M67 (11 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Corporate Governance; Strategic Decision Making; Business Sustainability; New Organizational Forms
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



UPS AND HP: VALUE CREATION THROUGH SUPPLY CHAIN PARTNERSHIPS
Mark O. Lewis, Arun Rai, David Forquer, Dan Quinter

Product Number: 9B07D002
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 14 pages

This case is about managing large supply change outsourcing relationships over time. The focus is on the challenges service providers and their customers face as they seek to continually find new sources of value as the relationships change. Emphasis is placed on issues related to coordinated capabilities across functional boundaries, information sharing and developing information technology readiness.

Teaching Note: 8B07D02 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Relationship Management; Outsourcing; Innovation
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 11:
Organizational Structures and Processes

VICTORIA HEAVY EQUIPMENT LIMITED
Tom A. Poynter, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M037
Publication Date: 4/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 12 pages

Victoria Heavy Equipment (Victoria) was a family owned and managed firm which had been led by an ambitious, entrepreneurial chief executive officer who now wanted to take a less active role in the business. Victoria had been through two reorganizations in recent years, which contributed to organizational and strategic issues which would need to be addressed by a new president.

Teaching Note: 8B08M37 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Growth Strategy; Organizational Structure; Leadership; Decentralization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LAKE ERIE PAPER
Peter C. Bell, Jing Chen

Product Number: 9B07E002
Publication Date: 8/3/2007
Length: 3 pages

The production manager at Lake Erie Paper (LEP) was considering installing a moisture meter to test the water content of the wood chips used to make corrugated paper. Use of a moisture meter would speed up the testing process and could reduce costs and/or improve paper quality, but the manager wanted to be sure that the meter provided a consistent and reliable measure of the water content of the arriving woodchips.

Teaching Note: 8B07E02 (3 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Quality; Process Analysis; Process Design/Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EAGLE SERVICES ASIA
Edward D. Arnheiter

Product Number: 9B07D019
Publication Date: 10/10/2007
Length: 13 pages

This case chronicles the creation and transformation of a Singaporean joint venture, Eagle Services Asia (ESA). It describes some early start-up problems, including a forced shutdown by the Civilian Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). The resulting shakeup of the ESA management team provides a fresh start and an opportunity to reinvigorate the company using lean management principles. Managerial decisions play a key role in ESA's success, together with the discipline and training of the workforce. Students will gain an understanding of cultural difficulties associated with international joint ventures, and learn fundamental aspects of lean management including how to create and sustain a lean culture. The case also provides insight into the worldwide aircraft engine business, the engine overhaul process and cultural barriers that may arise when managing operations in foreign countries.

Teaching Note: 8B07D19 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Expatriate Management; Cultural Customs; Organizational Behaviour; Joint Ventures; Management of Change; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL PERSONNEL SELECTION SYSTEM
Diana E. Krause, Reiner Piske

Product Number: 9B07C041
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Length: 17 pages

The owner of a company with production plants in various regions in the world wants to standardize the methods of personnel selection for the Asian-Pacific region (APAC). A new system of personnel selection has to be developed for middle management positions in APAC. The owner delegates this task to a cross-functional, multinational project team that operates in Hong Kong headed by a human resources (HR) executive and expatriate from Germany. In terms of the new personnel selection system, he has two opposing goals in mind: the new personnel selection system should be highly specific for a particular country and simultaneously valid for different countries. A series of issues must be resolved in order for the project to be successful. Some of these issues are related to the personnel selection system; the job requirements to be assessed, the modules it must include, the stages and methods of each module, and the implementation of the system across countries in APAC. Other issues are interpersonal, such as the cultural differences and the heterogeneous perspectives that exist among the team members, and a conflict between the HR executive and the owner.

Teaching Note: 8B07C41 (9 pages)
Issues: Cross Cultural Management; Aptitude Diagnostics; International Personnel Selection; Teamwork
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SELKIRK GROUP IN ASIA (CONDENSED)
Paul W. Beamish, Lambros Karavis

Product Number: 9B02M041
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 10 pages

Selkirk Group is a family-owned brick manufacturer which has built an export business to Japan and other Asian markets from zero to 10% of its volume in seven years. The managing director of the company raises the question of whether it is time to change their regional export strategy and organizational structure in light of the Asian economic crisis and the reasons for their competitive success in both Australia and Asia.

Teaching Note: 8A99M03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Exports; Organizational Structure; International Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Managing Teams

THE 1996 EVEREST TRAGEDY
Khushwant K. Pittenger

Product Number: 9B04C012
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 7 pages

In May 1996, two world renowned climbers, along with some of their clients and guides, perished on Mount Everest in the mountain's deadliest tragedy to date. The accounts of survivors imply that biased decision making contributed to the tragedy. Did a decision lead to this tragedy or was it an unfortunate mountaineering accident? The case provides the opportunity to explore decision biases such as framing, escalation of commitment, anchoring, and over confidence and the issues of leadership style, group behaviour, team management and communication.

Teaching Note: 8B04C12 (6 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Decision Analysis; Management Decisions; Organizational Behaviour; Group Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEO BURNETT COMPANY LTD.: VIRTUAL TEAM MANAGEMENT
Joerg Dietz, Fernando Olivera, Elizabeth O'Neil

Product Number: 9B03M052
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 16 pages

Leo Burnett Company Ltd. is a global advertising agency. The company is working with one of its largest clients to launch a new line of hair care products into the Canadian and Taiwanese test markets in preparation for a global rollout. Normally, once a brand has been launched, it is customary for the global brand centre to turn over the responsibility for the brand and future campaigns to the local market offices. In this case, however, the brand launch was not successful. Team communications and the team dynamics have broken down in recent months and the relationships are strained. Further complicating matters are a number of client and agency staffing changes that could jeopardize the stability of the team and the agency/client relationship. The global account director must decide whether she should proceed with the expected decision to modify the global team structure to give one of the teams more autonomy, or whether she should maintain greater centralized control over the team. She must recommend how to move forward with the brand and determine what changes in team structure or management are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B03M52 (14 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN? AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD’S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B07M041
Publication Date: 4/10/2007
Length: 11 pages

This team-building and familiarization activity can be used in the initial class or session of an international management program. It assesses one's exposure to the rest of the world's peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a classes' collective exposure to the world's people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one's business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

Teaching Note: 8B07M41 (6 pages)
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Team Building; Internationalization; Career Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RICHARD IVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS - THE LEADER PROJECT (A)
Joerg Dietz, Krista Ewing

Product Number: 9B03C046
Publication Date: 11/5/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 13 pages

A student-run, not-for-profit program, Leading Education and Development in Emerging Regions (LEADER) sent teams of business students to teach western business practices in the former Soviet Union. In preparation for the three-week assignment at the end of the school term, the students were expected to participate in social events to build team spirit, as well as practical work, such as preparing teaching materials, making travel arrangements and fundraising. The program's annual budget was $110,000 and each team member was expected to provide a minimum of $250. Despite efforts to raise the needed funds, the program failed to reach its goal. As a result, team members were required to contribute $1,800, substantially more than originally anticipated. Some of the team members quit, expressing their dissatisfaction with the increased financial obligation. Other team members are boasting about the little time they spent working on the project. The once successful program is facing a dilemma. How can it sustain enthusiasm, raise the needed funds and recruit members who are willing to work to ensure its success? Supplement Richard Ivey School of Business - The LEADER Project - Kiev Site (B), product 9B03C047 explores a personality conflict that begins when one team begins preparation for its trip. The problem escalates when the team is teaching in Kiev, Ukraine. One of the team members wonders what role she can play in resolving the situation that threatens the success of the teaching assignment.

Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Human Resources Management; Funding; Team Building; Non-Profit Organization
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate


Chapter 13:
Managing Human Resource Systems

AVOIDING DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT SELECTION AND RETENTION: SOME LEGAL ISSUES
Lyn Purdy, Paula Puddy

Product Number: 9B01C026
Publication Date: 4/1/2002
Revision Date: 12/16/2009
Length: 7 pages

This note provides background information on legal issues in employment selection and retention. Presented are some of the restrictions that are placed on how employers conduct the recruitment process. The human rights legislation that governs the entire employment process is introduced. In addition, the issues of reasonable and bona fide job requirements, medical testing in pre-employment and current employment situations are discussed. Issues that interviewers need to be aware of to avoid discrimination during the hiring process are also highlighted.

Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Job Requirements; Medical Testing; Interviewing Skills; Employee Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BLINDS TO GO: STAFFING A RETAIL EXPANSION
Fernando Olivera, Ann C. Frost, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01C020
Publication Date: 10/18/2001
Revision Date: 12/16/2009
Length: 9 pages

Blinds To Go is a manufacturer and retailer of customized window coverings. The company has been steadily expanding the number of stores across North America. The vice chairman is concerned with the lack of staff in some of these newly expanded stores. With plans of an initial public offering within the next two years, senior management must determine what changes need to be made to the recruitment strategy and how to develop staff that will help them achieve the company's growth objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B01C20 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Human Resources Management; Corporate Culture; Action Planning and Implementation; Employee Retention
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HARMONIZATION OF COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS FOR FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK
Edward Akhentoolove Corbin, Betty Jane Punnett

Product Number: 9B04C053
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 9 pages

The merger of the Caribbean holdings of Barclays Bank Plc. and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) is going ahead, and the reality of integration of very diverse systems and procedures has to be faced. The case deals with understanding the current situation in terms of existing policies and designing policies that would be acceptable to employees from both banks in the organization - FirstCaribbean International Bank - which would be created by the merger. A critical aspect of the merger is the harmonization of compensation and benefits that must be resolved as a matter of priority. This case may be taught on a stand alone basis, or in combination with any of four additional cases that deal with various functional issues: 1) General Management - CIBC and Barclays: Should Their Operations be Merged, product 9B04M067. 2) Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032. 3) Accounting and Finance: CIBC Barclays: Accounting for Their Merger, product 9B04B022 4) Technical note: Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B04C53 (6 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Consolidations and Mergers; Benefits Policy; Compensation; Change Management; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BIOMED CO., LTD.: DESIGNING A NEW SALES COMPENSATION PLAN
Donald W. Barclay, Ponlerd Chiemchanya

Product Number: 9B06A037
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 9/14/2009
Length: 13 pages

A recent MBA graduate was about to return to the family business, Biomed Co., Ltd. as its general manager. Biomed's parent company, Thai Drugs Co., Ltd. has just revised Biomed's market strategy, a change that created the need to align the sales compensation system to fit with the new strategy. The new general manager was charged with this responsibility. Students will work through the path from strategy to a powerful sales compensation plan that will support the strategy and encourage to execute the role of the salesforce within this strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B06A37 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Human Resources Management; Compensation; Managing Implementation; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Managing Service and Manufacturing Operations

WILKINS, A ZURN COMPANY: AGGREGATE PRODUCTION PLANNING
Eric Olsen, Carol Prahinski, Jenni Denniston

Product Number: 9B06D017
Publication Date: 10/12/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 11 pages

The general manager of the Wilkins plant in Paso Robles, California has received instructions from head office to reduce inventory by 30 per cent in the next quarter. Although inventory had been accumulating over the past years, this has been seen as a benefit to the company for a couple of reasons. One is that the cost of raw materials has risen in the past year. The second is that the company has a policy of no layoffs, so having inventory in stock allows the company to minimize the use of overtime and temporary workers. The general manager wondered whether revising the production planning process would be enough to solve Wilkins' inventory problems.

Teaching Note: 8B06D17 (22 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Manufacturing Strategy; Inventory Planning/Control; Logistics; Operations Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WILKINS, A ZURN COMPANY: MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS PLANNING
Carol Prahinski, Eric Olsen

Product Number: 9B06D005
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 16 pages

The materials manager at the Wilkins plant in California is surprised to find out that an auditor's report recommends a second annual physical inventory count. He had concerns about the level of the inventory that was conducted, he knew changes were needed and must decide what alternatives to consider. Students are exposed to the difficulties of managing inventory as well as typical problems that occur in growing businesses. Students will diagram the bill of material, conduct a materials requirement planning explosion and determine appropriate levels of safety stock, and address concerns associated with the high level of inventory.

Teaching Note: 8B06D05 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Inventory Planning/Control; Material Requirements Planning; Materials Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BENCHMARKING AT ULJANIK SHIPYARD
David M. Currie, Giorgio Sinkovic

Product Number: 9B05D011
Publication Date: 4/26/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 5 pages

A junior executive is given the task of calculating a benchmark common in the ship building industry - cost per compensated gross ton. Although raw data is available for its components, the executive must formulate relationships between the data to determine the benchmark. The case is designed to provide: 1) an introduction to the construction and use of benchmarks in quality management; 2) practice in conceptualizing a problem and designing a basic spreadsheet model to solve the problem. The modeling procedure uses an influence diagram as the basis for constructing the spreadsheet model, this spreadsheet model is available, product 7B05D011.

Teaching Note: 8B05D11 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Quality Management; Spread Sheet Application; Models
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOTALLINE TRANSPORT
Larry Menor, Ken Mark, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B05D001
Publication Date: 6/14/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 18 pages

The vice-president and general manager of Totalline Transport wants to eliminate late appointment fees in delivering to one of Canada's premier electronic shops - Electronics International. Totalline Transport is hired by suppliers of electronics goods to deliver to retailers. The vice-president sees an opportunity to solve the problem of congestion in the parking lot of Electronics International's warehouse and eliminating unnecessary soft costs such as missed appointment fees and detention charges. The bottleneck in the process is the waiting time for all of the trucks to unload. If the carrier arrives late, the retailer will charge the carrier $1,000. If the carrier is waiting in line due to a backlog at the warehouse, the carrier will levy a charge of $50 to $60 per hour. Beyond these costs, the vice-president realizes that suppliers and retailers are spending one day per week investigating problems with shipments. He is eager to make his customers (suppliers) successful. He sees three central options in cutting down traffic: to request two dedicated doors at the warehouse; cut down on time for Electronics International by applying stickers at Totalline's consolidation point on all the deliveries so that Electronics International could immediately accept shipments into inventory without handling; or deliver direct to Electronics International stores.

Teaching Note: 8B05D001 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Services; Operations Management; Service Operations; Supplier Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Motivation and Leadership

ROBERT'S CENTER OF PERFORMING ARTS
James A. Erskine, Felix Gernburd

Product Number: 9B08M023
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Length: 8 pages

Robert's Center of Performing Arts (RCPA), founded and owned by Robert Gernburd, was a music school. In addition to individual instrument lessons and group lessons in music theory and music history, the RCPA sold second-hand pianos. It was difficult to find a supplier of used pianos but after a great deal of research, Gernburd found a supplier in Japan. Recently, an invoice containing supplier information had been temporarily misplaced. Since then, Gernburd had learned that his in-house piano tuner had been selling pianos without his knowledge. Gernburd was unsure how to proceed.

Teaching Note: 8B08M23 (4 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Management of Professionals; Ethical Issues; Conflict Resolution; Small Business
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



DICKINSON COLLEGE: INSPIRATION FOR A LEADERSHIP STORY (IN THE VISION OF A FOUNDING FATHER)
Michael J. Fratantuono

Product Number: 9B08M012
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 23 pages

In January 1999, William Durden was named the 27th president of his alma mater, Dickinson College. He quickly came to understand that for much of the 20th century, the Dickinson community had lacked a strong sense of organizational purpose. By autumn, Durden had turned to the life and writings of Dr. Benjamin Rush, the man responsible for securing the college charter in 1783, as the inspiration for the story. After introducing Durden and the challenges confronting Dickinson, the case describes the early history of the college and the ideas and accomplishments of Rush. It then provides students with a brief overview of the strategic challenges that had surfaced for Dickinson by the mid1990s. Finally, the conclusion indicates that Durden still had to resolve many issues associated with the identity story.

Teaching Note: 8B08M12 (19 pages)
Industry: Educational Services, Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Leadership; Management of Change; Management Style; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ANUPAM MAJUMDAR: RELATIONSHIP MANAGER
James A. Erskine, Unnat Kohli

Product Number: 9B07C032
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Length: 8 pages

Anupam Majumdar, relationship manager, and Aditya Mehta, regional head of Hindustan Neon General Insurance Limited, India, were meeting an important client. Mehta asked Majumdar to serve them tea. This really embarrassed and infuriated Majumdar. It was not the first time that Mehta, Majumdar's boss, had treated him like a peon. Majumdar was about to take a three-week leave of absence to attend his brother's wedding in New York so he was not sure if this was the right time, if ever, to do anything about the situation.

Teaching Note: 8B07C32 (4 pages)
Issues: Management Style; Interpersonal Skills; Conflict Resolution; Morale; Action Planning and Implementation; Managing Your Boss
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STEVE JONES - STONEHILL CAPITAL
James A. Erskine, Dan Nir

Product Number: 9B07C009
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 6 pages

Steve Jones, senior investment analyst at Stonehill Capital, among other responsibilities, had to ensure that his team prepared a pitch book which presented all the numbers and graphs necessary to acquire a client's business. Jones was already overworked so he enlisted his intern, Joe Livingston, to help with the task. As the deadline approached, Jones and Livingston worked 18-hour days preparing the pitch book and were very tired and sleep deprived. The morning after the day of the pitch, Jones received an email from the vice-president of Investment Banking telling him that the bank's deal team had been embarrassed by having to explain an error in the pitch book during their meeting to try to secure the deal. Jones is now being asked to explain what happened.

Teaching Note: 8B07C09 (3 pages)
Issues: Management Style; Management of Professionals; Interpersonal Skills; Relationship Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LOUISE CHEN
Jeffrey Gandz, Elizabeth Spracklin

Product Number: 9B06C013
Publication Date: 10/2/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 7 pages

Louise Chen must decide what performance assessment to give one of her employees who has, uncharacteristically, failed to meet one of her key objectives for the year. The situation is difficult for several reasons; the causes of the unacceptable performance are not clear; the employee has previously received excellent appraisals, including a recent one by the vice-president; and the employee was absent for a good part of the year on maternity leave. The various factors that influence sustained performance (ability, motivation, resources, role clarity, reinforcement) are examined, as well as steps leaders can take in improving performance of those for whom they are responsible.

Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Management Behaviour; Motivation; Performance Evaluation; Management Performance
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Managing Communication

EPCOR UTILITIES INC. (A): A CRITICAL COMMUNITY CONSULTATION
Pratima Bansal, Tom Ewart

Product Number: 9B07M009
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Length: 10 pages

In January 2003, EPCOR Utilities (EPCOR) was facing great pressure from a radical community group that wanted the company out of its community of Rossdale - where EPCOR was founded in 1891 and had been operating since. The pressure had mounted to the point that EPCOR's sole shareholder, the City of Edmonton, had asked that EPCOR prepare a long-term plan for its operations in Rossdale as part of a formal review of the land use at the site. Operations of EPCOR were $3 billion. The case encourages students to think through the senior vice-president of public and government relations job of engaging (or at least placating) the community from a philosophical level to the practical details of implementation.

Industry: Utilities
Issues: Communications; Stakeholder Analysis; Conflict Resolution; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MONSANTO AND ROUNDUP READY WHEAT
Michael Sider, Brian Dunphy

Product Number: 9B06M030
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 8 pages

Monsanto is a large chemical manufacturing company specializing in chemical products for agricultural use. This case explores the company's attempt from 2002-2004 to launch a version of genetically-modified wheat in Canada. It details opposition to the launch from farmers and environmentalists, and focuses on how these groups used communications to resist Monsanto's product launch.

Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Agriculture; Communications; Accountability
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ACME MEDICAL IMAGING
Donald A. Pillittere

Product Number: 9B08D004
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 6 pages

After negotiations with a key supplier for lower prices and quicker turnaround go nowhere, two employees of Acme Medical Imaging realize there's no more low-hanging fruit to pick to keep their project on time and on budget -- no more concessions from external parties, no more superficial, short-term fixes. They have to convince their chief executive officer and the project team to take a hard look at internal processes. From the perspective of Operations, this case examines the challenges that can arise - and some steps that can be taken - when the greatest obstacles to a project are the people and procedures responsible for its success.

Teaching Note: 8B08D04 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Commercialization Process; Project Objective; New Product Development; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CARNEGIE INDUSTRIAL: THE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CENTRE
Michael Sider, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B08C002
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Length: 6 pages

A director within the leadership development program of a large multinational organization must decide how to manage a very difficult conversation she must have with her assistant director. The assistant director, who is older and more experienced (although less educated), interviewed for the director's position and didn't get it. The assistant director has never been happy reporting to her much younger boss, and has felt consistently left out of major decisions. The assistant director had confronted the director about her feelings and threatened to resign. How should the director handle this difficult conversation?

Teaching Note: 8B08C02 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Conflict Resolution; Career Development; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA