Ivey Publishing

Organizational Behavior and Management

Ivancevich, J.M., Konopaske, R.,9/e (United States, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2011)
Prepared By Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, PhD Candidate
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Introduction to Organizational Behavior

OTAGO MUSEUM
Ralph W. Adler, Jing Song

Product Number: 9B10B007
Publication Date: 7/29/2010
Length: 12 pages

In existence since 1868, the non-profit Otago Museum in New Zealand had undergone several changes and expansions during its history and was regarded as curator of a broad-based collection of Maori and South Pacific artifacts. In January 2010, the Otago Museum's chief financial officer (CFO) was instructed by the museum's chief executive officer (CEO) to create a balanced scorecard (BSC) for the museum. The current CEO had brought a sense of customer orientation and financial acumen to the general running of the museum, evidenced through examination of customer satisfaction via surveys and focus groups, and various efforts to diversify income streams. The development of a BSC was seen as a practical way to reinforce and further motivate employee behaviour congruent with the focus on customer service and financial acumen. The resulting BSC needed to clearly articulate the museum's objectives, and the cause-and-effect relationships linking BSC dimensions with the museum's strategic vision and mission.

Teaching Note: 8B10B07 (6 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Strategy; Balanced Scorecard; Organizational Culture; Strategic Planning; Non-Profit Organization; Management Accounting; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



VICTORIA HEAVY EQUIPMENT LIMITED
Tom A. Poynter, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M037
Publication Date: 4/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 12 pages

Victoria Heavy Equipment (Victoria) was a family owned and managed firm which had been led by an ambitious, entrepreneurial chief executive officer who now wanted to take a less active role in the business. Victoria had been through two reorganizations in recent years, which contributed to organizational and strategic issues which would need to be addressed by a new president.

Teaching Note: 8B08M37 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Growth Strategy; Organizational Structure; Leadership; Decentralization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DELOITTE & TOUCHE: INTEGRATING ARTHUR ANDERSEN
Gerard Seijts, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B04C004
Publication Date: 1/16/2004
Length: 14 pages

In 2002, approximately 1,000 Arthur Andersen employees joined Deloitte & Touche, effectively creating the largest professional services organization in Canada. The combined entity employed 6,600 people and represented annual billings of over $1 billion. A co-chair for the national integration team was faced with a huge challenge: to develop a company-wide plan to create support materials to aid the Deloitte staff in integrating the Andersen staff in the organization. The integration process was monitored through a monthly survey and would be used by the team to benchmark unit to unit over time, and to take remedial action at specific stages if the integration goals were not attained. The most recent survey indicated that Deloitte employees felt that in the company's haste to finalize the deal with Andersen, it was forgetting about its own employees. Some within the Deloitte organization did not understand the amount of attention given to Andersen employees, whom they viewed as damaged goods. The co-chair and integration team must determine the best way to deal with the feedback and the cultural differences that are surfacing.

Teaching Note: 8B04C04 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Change Management; Mergers & Acquisitions; Employee Attitude; Corporate Culture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Organizational Culture

NAMASTÉ SOLAR
Anne T. Lawrence, Anthony I. Mathews

Product Number: 9B10M049
Publication Date: 7/5/2010
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 12 pages

Should a fast-growing, employee-owned solar electric company accept a buyout offer from a private equity investor? Could it do so without sacrificing its distinctive, high-involvement culture? Namasté Solar, a 55-person firm based in Boulder, Colorado, designed and installed solar electric systems for residential, commercial, non-profit and government customers. In 2008, the company had been growing at breakneck speed for the past four years, since government incentives for the purchase of renewable energy had created a market for solar electric systems in Colorado. Now, two investors had approached the firm with serious buyout offers. A buyout would bring a new infusion of capital to the firm, enabling it to expand more quickly and install more solar systems, and employees with vested shares would benefit from an attractive sales price. However, Namasté, from the outset, had been committed to building a democratic, high-involvement culture. Ownership was widely shared, and all employees, whether or not they held equity, were encouraged to participate in strategic decisions facing the firm. Many were concerned that selling the company would mean sacrificing the firm's carefully crafted culture. What was the best way forward for Blake Jones and the green energy company that he and two partners had founded?

Teaching Note: 8B10M49 (8 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Solar Electric Industry; Employee Ownership; High-involvement Culture; Acquisitions
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WESTJET: BUILDING A HIGH-ENGAGEMENT CULTURE
Gerard Seijts, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B09C012
Publication Date: 9/1/2009
Length: 24 pages

WestJet Airlines had achieved a lot. The airline had taken to the skies only 13 years earlier, with three airplanes flying to five destinations. Now, with a market value at more than $2 billion, the carrier had more than 70 Boeing Next Generation 737s, employed 7,000 people and had played host to more than 12 million guests. WestJet's ambition was to become the dominant airline in Canada by 2013 and one of the five most successful international airlines in the world by 2016. Achieving these goals would mean continued expansion in the WestJet organization. How could WestJet continue to build a high engagement culture as it experienced high rates of growth? In April 2009, in light of the company's rosy predictions of further growth and success, WestJet's pilots seemed dissatisfied with elements of the new contract offer. The leadership team had met a crossroad.

Teaching Note: 8B09C12 (12 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Employee Engagement; Leadership; Culture; Employee Relations; Organizational Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ROARING DRAGON HOTEL
Stephen Grainger

Product Number: 9B08M004
Publication Date: 3/5/2008
Length: 7 pages

The case looks at the takeover of the Roaring Dragon Hotel (RDH), a state owned enterprise in south-west China, by global hotelier Hotel International (HI) and discusses the cultural collision and organizational adoptions resulting from the intersections of two significantly different business cultures. Specifically in this case, the focus is on the challenge involved with downsizing, redundancy, communication, cultural sensitivity, strategic planning and in developing strategy. In south-west China in 2002, the RDH business environment was just emerging from the shadow of the planned economy and had retained its guanxi-based organizational culture. At RDH, relationship development and the exchange of favors were still important and occurring on a daily basis and there was little system or efficiency in the hotel's domestic management style and processes. In comparison, Hotel International had a wealth of international experience in providing accommodation, marketing and professional management in servicing the needs of a global market steeped in corporate governance. At the commencement of the management contract there was a deep division separating the organizational cultures of RDH and HI.

Teaching Note: 8B08M04 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Cross Cultural Management; Strategic Planning; Cross Cultural Communication; Cultural Sensitivity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Individual Differences and Work Behavior

WAYNE EISENER'S CAREER CHOICE
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Jeremy Isenberg

Product Number: 9B07C031
Publication Date: 8/15/2007
Length: 6 pages

Wayne Eisener has received two job offers. The first offer is an executive vice-president position at Richmond Hill Mortgages (RHM). The second offer is a junior lawyer position at Weiler and Simons LLP, Barristers and Solicitors. The mortgage company offers a small base salary but potentially large commissions in the long run. The law firm offers a higher base salary and the opportunity to be promoted to partner within five years. However, Eisener would need to update his knowledge of law substantially. As he reflects on the advantages and disadvantages of each job, Eisener must consider his past and how each job will help him accomplish the goals of providing for his family and creating a resurgence in his career.

Teaching Note: 8B07C31 (10 pages)
Industry: Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services
Issues: Career Planning; Job Analysis; Job Satisfaction; Career Anchor; Career Choice; Professional Firms
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CINATRON COMPUTING
James A. Erskine, Sylvia Smellie

Product Number: 9B03C009
Publication Date: 4/2/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 13 pages

Cinatron Computing is a leading producer and distributor of managing workload software. The newly hired marketing manager has just received a phone call from the travel department requesting authorization for an employee's trip to a workshop. She thought she had already addressed this issue with the employee and now it seems he is going over her head. Why did this occur and what is her next step?

Teaching Note: 8B03C09 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management Training; Employee Attitude; Performance Measurement; Management of Professionals
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Perceptions, Attributions, and Emotions

S.P.E.E.D. CONSULTING
John S. Haywood-Farmer

Product Number: 9B05D017
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 11 pages

A consultant at an executive search and training firm must decide how to deal with the loss of seven of the firm's highly trained consultants who have decided to start their own consulting firm. As the consultants discuss the loss of their peers, there is a great deal of emotion including a sense of humiliation. Students are asked to take the position of the consultant, although they might also take the role of the firm's managers.

Teaching Note: 8B05D17 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Professional Firms; Employee Training; Ethical Issues; Management of Professionals
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OLLY RACELA IN BANGKOK
Hemant Merchant

Product Number: 9B04C010
Publication Date: 8/18/2004
Revision Date: 10/6/2009
Length: 15 pages

A recent MBA graduate describes the joys and frustrations of an expatriate life - both at personal and professional levels - as experienced by a young, single woman. She has been living in Bangkok for three years and is slowly adjusting to the local way of life when she receives a job offer that will relocate her back to her home in Hawaii. Reaching a decision, however, is not easy given career-related uncertainties in both countries as well as the array of conflicting emotions that confront her. She must decide how to sort through these issues. Should she remain in Bangkok or return home? Her decision is complicated by the fact that she had not entertained the idea of returning to the United States.

Teaching Note: 8B04C10 (15 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Women in Management; Expatriate Management; Emerging Markets; Global Manager
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Motivation

DR. JACK PERRY, DDS
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Eleni Mitsis

Product Number: 9B07C016
Publication Date: 5/15/2007
Length: 6 pages

Dr. Jack Perry, a sole practitioner dentist in a small town in Ontario, had a meeting with one of his employees who suggested that there were several problems in the office. These include: low morale, lack of motivation to grow the business, fill cancellations, follow up on collections, and engage in cross-sell procedures. He had noticed these problems previously but felt unsure about his personnel and business management skills. Using his notes from a presentation made by a business consultant at a dental conference, he must decide how to act in order to address these problems.

Teaching Note: 8B07C16 (5 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Morale; Motivation; Employee Attitude; Compensation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STEPHEN ZHANG'S OPPORTUNITY
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Alan (Wenchu) Yang

Product Number: 9B02D007
Publication Date: 4/25/2002
Revision Date: 11/9/2009
Length: 10 pages

A university graduate working as a project manager for a small Chinese consulting firm is in the middle of a very important project when he receives a call from a former colleague offering him an attractive package to move to a new company. His decision would affect many stakeholders and he wonders what might happen to the project he is working on. He has only three days to decide whether to stay with the firm or accept the offer.

Teaching Note: 8B02D07 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: China; Incentives; Motivation; Career Development; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Job Design, Work, and Motivation

KYLE EVANS AT RUFFIAN APPAREL: STAFFING A RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT
Ann C. Frost, Kevin Hewins

Product Number: 9B09C008
Publication Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 11 pages

Ruffian Kelowna, one of 19 British Columbia Ruffian Apparel locations, is underperforming. Recent management turnover and low unemployment in the region have left Kelowna short-staffed and in need of a new store manager to take over for the interim manager. Both sales and performance results are far below acceptable levels, and the store appears to be floundering. The newly hired B.C. regional manager for Ruffian Apparel is looking into the problem and needs to report back to Vancouver with his recommendations. This case can be used to demonstrate how different theories of motivation might apply to goal-setting and compensation plans. The case illustrates how an inappropriate or poorly structured compensation plan and motivational goals can lead to ineffective and detrimental results. Students who immediately attribute the problems of the case to the lack of a store manager will fail to explore the potential for increasing employee motivation and productivity across the board.

Teaching Note: 8B09C08 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Staffing; Compensation; Pay for Performance; Motivation
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



JINJIAN GARMENT FACTORY: MOTIVATING GO-SLOW WORKERS
Tieying Huang, Junping Liang, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M033
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 6 pages

Jinjian Garment Factory is a large clothing manufacturer based in Shenzhen with distribution to Hong Kong and overseas. Although Shenzhen had become one of the most advanced garment manufacturing centres in the world, managers in this industry still had few effective ways of dealing with the collective and deliberate slow pace of work by the employees, of motivating workers, and of resolving the problem between seasonal production requirements and retention of skilled workers. However, the owner and managing director of the company must determine the reasons behind the deliberately slow pace of the workers, the pros and cons of the piecework system and the methods he could adopt to motivate the workers effectively.

Teaching Note: 8B04M33 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Productivity; Employee Attitude; Piece Work; Performance Measurement; Work-Force Management; Peking University
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Evaluation, Feedback, and Rewards

KYLE EVANS AT RUFFIAN APPAREL: STAFFING A RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT
Ann C. Frost, Kevin Hewins

Product Number: 9B09C008
Publication Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 11 pages

Ruffian Kelowna, one of 19 British Columbia Ruffian Apparel locations, is underperforming. Recent management turnover and low unemployment in the region have left Kelowna short-staffed and in need of a new store manager to take over for the interim manager. Both sales and performance results are far below acceptable levels, and the store appears to be floundering. The newly hired B.C. regional manager for Ruffian Apparel is looking into the problem and needs to report back to Vancouver with his recommendations. This case can be used to demonstrate how different theories of motivation might apply to goal-setting and compensation plans. The case illustrates how an inappropriate or poorly structured compensation plan and motivational goals can lead to ineffective and detrimental results. Students who immediately attribute the problems of the case to the lack of a store manager will fail to explore the potential for increasing employee motivation and productivity across the board.

Teaching Note: 8B09C08 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Staffing; Compensation; Pay for Performance; Motivation
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



SCHULICH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE: ENHANCING AND DEVELOPING A HIGH-PERFORMANCE CULTURE
Murray J. Bryant, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B09M014
Publication Date: 10/30/2009
Length: 3 pages

The newly appointed chair of the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology (department) at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry was thinking about how she would approach the next five years in her new role. The chair thought about two of the important issues she would face: building a cohesive department and nurturing a high performance culture. She became chair at a time when direction was needed. The department had formed in June 2002 as a result of the merger between the Department of Physiology and the small Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology. While the merger had gone well, the chair still sensed that some faculty members in Pharmacology felt as if their department had been taken over by Physiology. At present, it was sometimes difficult to assess performance between faculty members due to differences in workload composition and a lack of documentation. The current thinking was that the department had to move towards adopting best practices in their processes. The chair wanted to look at the issue from a broader perspective. She wondered how the issue could be best framed and what a potential solution might look like.

Teaching Note: 8B09M14 (3 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Human Resources Management; Health Administration; Team Building; Performance Evaluation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TECHNOSOFT RUSSIA
James A. Erskine, Fyodor Suzdalev

Product Number: 9B04C011
Publication Date: 6/24/2004
Revision Date: 10/6/2009
Length: 13 pages

A supervisor at a telesales office has received very low ratings on an employee survey and the marketing manager is concerned that this team leader is not performing well. The marketing manager must decide what actions are needed to improve the leadership skills of this supervisor.

Teaching Note: 8B04C11 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Human Resources Management; Contracting; Performance Evaluation; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Managing Misbehavior

AGCHEMCO COMPANY
William J. Russell

Product Number: 9B08C001
Publication Date: 10/31/2008
Length: 14 pages

This case involves a personnel matter at an agricultural chemical industry mining complex. A middle-level supervisor has been accused of gender-based and other discrimination. The complaint has come primarily from one employee who works under that supervisor's direction, but is supported at least in part by the testimony of other employees. The evidence is typical of the sorts of evidence that usually attend human resource disputes. Company policy manuals bear on the propriety of the mill coordinator's conduct apart from the issue of discrimination. Ultimately, an appellate process is also integrated into the procedural tools. This case considers the process by which the employment discrimination complaint is investigated, considered and resolved, including the weighing and evaluation of information gathered from those in the workplace. Various practical, legal and ethical issues typical to such cases are apparent.

Teaching Note: 8B08C01 (12 pages)
Issues: Perception; Work-Force Management; Risk Management; Morale; Mining; Ethical Issues; Employee Grievances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BC METAL (A)
James A. Erskine, Aaron Anticic

Product Number: 9B07C020
Publication Date: 6/4/2007
Revision Date: 10/19/2007
Length: 5 pages

The president of a metal products manufacturer and distributor is informed that the company controller is having an affair with another employee who is married to the general manager of production. The president is in the process of selling the company and wonders what affect the affair, if true, will have. Three short supplementary cases are also available: 9B07C021, 9B07C022 and 9B07C023.

Teaching Note: 8B07C20 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Ethical Issues; Office Extramarital Affairs; Sexual Harassment; Employee Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Managing Individual Stress

FUZZY MATH
Gerard Seijts, Ivy Kyei-Poku

Product Number: 9B08C007
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Length: 15 pages

The case explains the ordeal of the newly appointed manager of planning and reporting at Connectco, an outbound call centre in Ontario, Canada, who suspected wrong-doing early on at work. After his fears were confirmed, he was very uncomfortable with the situation he found himself in. However, he had to make a choice about how he would respond. This case also portrays, among other things, how young professionals find themselves in situations that create moral distress when they are aware of unethical conduct but feel constrained from taking action to correct it.

Teaching Note: 8B08C07 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Ethical Issues; Leadership; Whistleblower; Accountability
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SADELLA CHOY'S DECISION
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Phil Hospod, Abby Yew, James Ha

Product Number: 9B06M079
Publication Date: 9/12/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 2 pages

Sadella Choy reflected upon her career at her dad's company Alan Choy's Engineering Incorporated. She had progressed far and had seen the company go through many of changes. However, she felt a great deal of stress and responsibility working for the family business. She was not satisfied with her social life which she believed was limited because of her work environment. Sadella had to make a decision soon and be ready to discuss it with her parents.

Teaching Note: 8B06M77 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: China; Family-Work Interaction; Small Business; Industry Analysis; Succession Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Groups and Teams

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIVISION AT THE HONG KONG JOCKEY CLUB
Anne Marie Francesco, Bee-Leng Chua

Product Number: 9B05C005
Publication Date: 3/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 10 pages

The Hong Kong Jockey Club, a non-profit gaming organization and social club founded in 1884, was unusual, for through its payment of taxes and donations to the community, it had over the years funded a sizeable portion of Hong Kong government expenses and charitable work. The newly hired director of the information technology department is concerned about inefficient operation. The IT division had been an established part of the club for many years, and throughout time, had been organized and reorganized to meet the changing needs of the club. A task force is put together and an external consultant is brought in to review the division's organization. Upon completion of the review, the director of the division learns that the person heading the review plans to resign and must decide what to do.

Teaching Note: 8B05C05 (8 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Organizational Structure; Group Behaviour; Corporate Culture; Change Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JUAN PEDRO'S SHRIMP FARM: OR THE 48-HOUR EXAM NIGHTMARE (A)
Gerard Seijts, Paul Szabunio

Product Number: 9B02C057
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 11/9/2009
Length: 6 pages

A learning team of five students must work together to complete a 48-hour team exam. One of the students has a reputation for being unreliable, disruptive and confrontational. When the team members convene to write their report, this student calls to say he will be late. He shows up eight hours later. The level of team tension and animosity reached a point of near-violence and the team member was expelled. The team wonders how to deal with this team member whose behaviour is dysfunctional to effective team performance, and what to do next given that there are several more team projects to come. Supplemental case Juan Pedro's Shrimp Farm: Or the 48-hour Exam Nightmare (B), product 9B02C058, discusses the first hour after the student arrives to work on the report. Supplement Juan Pedro's Shrimp Farm: Or the 48-hour Exam Nightmare (C), product 9B02C059, describes the student's attempt to contribute to the report and the subsequent confrontation. Supplement Juan Pedro's Shrimp Farm: Or the 48-hour Exam Nightmare (D), product 9B02C060, an interview, conducted several months later, provides the student's perspective on the events.

Teaching Note: 8B02C57 (5 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Group Behaviour; Case Method; Private Placement; Organizational Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Managing Conflict and Negotiations

ADCOCK INGRAM: DECISIONS AND MOTIVES THAT STEER ACQUISITIONS
Charlene C. Lew

Product Number: 9B10C008
Publication Date: 6/10/2010
Revision Date: 6/18/2010
Length: 16 pages

The case sketches the story of a charismatic and ambitious young business leader who, through value-adding commercial transactions, has helped set a South African pharmaceutical company, Adcock Ingram, on a trajectory of growth. In May 2009, he faces lack of closure and an ambiguous outcome to an offer to acquire a smaller pharmaceutical company. The case demonstrates the power of relationships, where the ambitions of different parties around the negotiations table and the incentives that shape their alliances can make or break a strategic business deal. The case presents students with an opportunity to analyze an unfavourable outcome of a business deal, and build a concept of behavioural requirements of success in business transactions. The case has been designed for class discussion and analysis of factors of leadership that underpin or influence acquisitions. It focuses on the behavioural components of leadership decision-making and their effect on business results. The case can provide a platform for the discussion of motives, interpersonal skills and relationships, and business activities in acquisitions.

Teaching Note: 8B10C08 (22 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Interpersonal Skills; Personal Values; Acquisition Strategy; Behaviours of effective negotiation; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL PERSONNEL SELECTION SYSTEM
Diana E. Krause, Reiner Piske

Product Number: 9B07C041
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Length: 17 pages

The owner of a company with production plants in various regions in the world wants to standardize the methods of personnel selection for the Asian-Pacific region (APAC). A new system of personnel selection has to be developed for middle management positions in APAC. The owner delegates this task to a cross-functional, multinational project team that operates in Hong Kong headed by a human resources (HR) executive and expatriate from Germany. In terms of the new personnel selection system, he has two opposing goals in mind: the new personnel selection system should be highly specific for a particular country and simultaneously valid for different countries. A series of issues must be resolved in order for the project to be successful. Some of these issues are related to the personnel selection system; the job requirements to be assessed, the modules it must include, the stages and methods of each module, and the implementation of the system across countries in APAC. Other issues are interpersonal, such as the cultural differences and the heterogeneous perspectives that exist among the team members, and a conflict between the HR executive and the owner.

Teaching Note: 8B07C41 (9 pages)
Issues: Cross Cultural Management; Aptitude Diagnostics; International Personnel Selection; Teamwork
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEO BURNETT COMPANY LTD.: VIRTUAL TEAM MANAGEMENT
Joerg Dietz, Fernando Olivera, Elizabeth O'Neil

Product Number: 9B03M052
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 16 pages

Leo Burnett Company Ltd. is a global advertising agency. The company is working with one of its largest clients to launch a new line of hair care products into the Canadian and Taiwanese test markets in preparation for a global rollout. Normally, once a brand has been launched, it is customary for the global brand centre to turn over the responsibility for the brand and future campaigns to the local market offices. In this case, however, the brand launch was not successful. Team communications and the team dynamics have broken down in recent months and the relationships are strained. Further complicating matters are a number of client and agency staffing changes that could jeopardize the stability of the team and the agency/client relationship. The global account director must decide whether she should proceed with the expected decision to modify the global team structure to give one of the teams more autonomy, or whether she should maintain greater centralized control over the team. She must recommend how to move forward with the brand and determine what changes in team structure or management are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B03M52 (14 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Power, Politics, and Empowerment

CHARLES FOSTER SENDS AN EMAIL (A)
Henry W. Lane

Product Number: 9B05C019
Publication Date: 8/12/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 5 pages

After the U.S. sales manager of a large multinational company emails his supervisor regarding the supply of a new product, the message is forwarded to two others. The final recipient, the president of the Franco-Japanese joint venture partner that is manufacturing the new product, is offended by what he perceives as unfair criticism. The supplemental case, Charles Foster Sends an Email (B), product number 9B05C020, includes the sales manager's response to the president, and the ensuing correspondence from the joint venture. Together, the (A) and (B) cases present a setting for discussing three issues; the relationship between a communication situation and the medium chosen to deliver it, the effects on business relationships when an inappropriate communications medium is chosen and the processes needed to communicate effectively in multicultural business relationships.

Teaching Note: 8B05C19 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Interpersonal Relations; International Business; Management Communication; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PRICE OF SPEAKING OUT AGAINST THE BETRAYAL OF PUBLIC TRUST: JOANNA GUALTIERI (A)
Gerard Seijts, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B04C029
Publication Date: 9/20/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 4 pages

A real estate analyst has been hired as a government employee to manage Canada's overseas property holdings, including its embassies and diplomatic residences. Despite strict government regulations regarding the procurement of overseas accommodations and policies relating to fiscal accountability, the analyst has witnessed the luxurious accommodations enjoyed by diplomatic staff posted abroad. She documents the abuses and reports the finding to her supervisor, who does nothing. The analyst must decide whether to take her finding further. The supplements Price of Speaking Out Against the Betrayal of Public Trust: Joanna Gualtieri (B), (C) and (D), products 9B04C030, 9B04C031 and 9B04C032 looks at her decision and the events that follow.

Teaching Note: 8B04C29 (9 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Whistleblower; Accountability in the Public Service; Ethical Issues; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Communication

JIM LANDER AT THAMESFORD LOGISTICS
Michael Sider, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B09M090
Publication Date: 12/11/2009
Length: 5 pages

An operating manager who as an equity stake in Thamesford Logistics is preparing himself for what he believes will be a difficult conversation with Thamesford Logistic's chief financial officer (CFO) on a current project despite the fact that the operating manager has a legal dispute with the CFO on another deal. In the recent past, the operating manager and the CFO were partners trying to package and sell a mining project on behalf of the mine owners. The agreement between the two expired and the CFO continued to push the project ahead, cutting the operating manager out of the proceeds. A disagreement over the ownership of the success fee led to the operating manager's lawsuit against the CFO. Meanwhile, Thamesford Logistics is trying to acquire a rival in Montreal. This pending transaction requires the operating manager and the CFO to cooperate on the deal. The operating manager is thinking about how he should approach a meeting with the CFO, what he should say, what he would not say and what he wanted to achieve by the end.

Teaching Note: 8B09M90 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Conflict Resolution; Management Behaviour; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ANITA JAIRAM AT METROPOLE SERVICES
Alison Konrad, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06C003
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/15/2009
Length: 5 pages

The senior project manager at Metropole Services is getting the sense that her business relationship with her software development group is taking a turn for the worse. According to her, she was their project manager and it seemed strange that her team members - all subordinates, were excluding her from an important client meeting. She must figure out what the issue is, and if something truly is wrong, take the appropriate steps to correct it immediately.

Teaching Note: 8B06C03 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Personnel Management; Leadership; Human Behaviour; Communications
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 14:
Decision Making

HERITAGE BUSINESS GROUP
Lynda St. Clair, Lori A. Coakley, James C. Segovis

Product Number: 9B09C019
Publication Date: 1/25/2010
Length: 1 pages

What would you do if you witnessed an act of vandalism by one employee toward the property of another? This is the situation that Pat, an employee at The Heritage Business Group, faces when she witnesses a co-worker, Mark, keying a car belonging to another co-worker, Fran. Initially, Mark does not know that Pat saw him vandalize Fran's car. Pat is aware that Fran and Mark had been arguing over the past few months. Part A of the case ends with Pat wondering what she should do. Following Part A are three more parts to the story (found in the teaching note) that can be handed out or projected for the students to read. Each part sequentially adds information about the decision the individual actually made, and presents another decision required by one of the key players (Harry, the owner, in parts B and D) and Mark, the antagonist, in part C). There are three teaching objectives for this case: 1) demonstrate that limitations of a rational decision-making approach when confronted with a complex, emotionally-charged conflict situation 2) analyze a conflict situation in terms of the types of conflict observed, including antisocial work behaviour, and the conflict handling styles used by different individuals in the situation 3) evaluate the short- and long-term implications of making decisions related to antisocial workplace behaviour using different ethical frameworks.

Teaching Note: 8B09C19 (14 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Ethical Issues; Decision Making; Conflict Resolution; Human Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE: THE CASE OF SUNCOR ENERGY AND THE ALBERTA OIL SANDS
Pratima Bansal, Jijun Gao

Product Number: 9B08M073
Publication Date: 9/22/2008
Revision Date: 11/18/2008
Length: 17 pages

The chief executive officer of an oil and gas company must decide whether he wants to invest heavily in reducing greenhouse gases. Specifically, Suncor Energy must evaluate whether it should invest $425 million in carbon capture and storage or wait until there is greater certainty in the political, social and business environment. The case will help students develop skills of analyzing business decisions under higher environmental uncertainty, especially when the outcome is a long-term goal. Further, the issues presented in the case open up discussions about climate change and the interaction between business actions and societal expectations. There is also an opportunity to speak about the interaction between business and public policy.

Teaching Note: 8B08M73 (8 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Decision Making; Tradeoff Analysis; Uncertainty
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Leadership

STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AT COCA-COLA: THE REAL THING
W. Glenn Rowe, Suhaib Riaz

Product Number: 9B08M040
Publication Date: 11/4/2008
Length: 15 pages

Muhtar Kent had just been promoted to the CEO position in Coca-Cola. He was reflecting upon the past leadership of the company, in particular the success that Coca-Cola enjoyed during Robert Goizueta's leadership. The CEOs that had followed Goizueta were not able to have as positive an impact on the stock value. When his promotion was announced, Kent mentioned that he did not have immediate plans to change any management roles but that some fine-tuning might be necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B08M40 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Performance Evaluation; Management Style; Leadership; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEADERS WANTED: CHINESE ATHLETIC VANCOUVER ASSOCIATION
Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, Francine Schlosser, Philip Law, Clement Chu

Product Number: 9B08C008
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Length: 14 pages

After 10 years of rapid growth, the Chinese Athletic Vancouver Association (CAVA) was threatened with a leadership vacuum. To deal with the recent loss of their president, the vice-president had to devise a plan that would sustain CAVA's benefit to the Vancouver Chinese community, by locating and developing leaders who could carry this organization forward. As the vice-president was expected to assume the president's role at the end of 2005, he needed to develop and implement leadership and succession planning strategies for CAVA.

Teaching Note: 8B08C08 (10 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Non-Profit Organization; Leadership; Board of Directors
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Organizational Structure and Design

YOLA: MANAGING MULTIPLE CHALLENGES
Helena Barnard, Bryan Muir

Product Number: 9B10M031
Publication Date: 8/20/2010
Length: 15 pages

The South-African founder of Yola, a San Francisco-based company that provides simple website creation software, has developed a vibrant business that went from eight to more than 40 employees in only a year. He has secured two rounds of funding from a South African venture capitalist, and the growth in the Yola user base has been exceeding that predicted in the business plan. Yet the business faces multiple challenges. There are offices in both Cape Town (because of both personal ties and a substantial cost advantage) and San Francisco (because of the need to be connected to the heart of the industry), but managing across a 10-hour time difference is challenging. The rapid growth in employees is also placing demands on the company in terms of integrating people into the culture, and in finding an appropriate organization structure. The business model for online offerings is also not yet established, and Yola has to deal with substantial complexity in terms of its revenue models. In addition, the market place is heating up, and Yola may be losing its relative position in the market place.The case maps the challenges of managing a successful company in an emerging and fast-growing industry, and specifically focuses on the integrated decisions that an entrepreneur has to take.

Teaching Note: 8B10M31 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Location Strategy; Competition; Startups; Organizational Structure; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ALICE SADDY: CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY
Colleen Sharen

Product Number: 9B08C016
Publication Date: 8/11/2008
Revision Date: 5/6/2014
Length: 10 pages

The human resources manager at the Alice Saddy Association (Alice Saddy), a non-profit agency in London, Ontario, Canada, supporting people with developmental disabilities who lived independently rather than in group homes, informed the executive director that some of the support workers believed that the current organizational structure caused confusion, slowed decision making and created potential risk for the people served by Alice Saddy. The executive director agreed that there were some problems related to the structure of the organization. However, the structure reflected the mission of Alice Saddy and changes were likely to be resisted by the management team for that reason. The executive director had to decide how to proceed.

Teaching Note: 8B08C16 (8 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Organizational Structure; Corporate Culture; Mission Statements; Organizational Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHRISTINA GOLD LEADING CHANGE AT WESTERN UNION
Alison Konrad, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06M007
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 11 pages

The chief executive officer of Western Union had just begun implementing a new organization structure. Changing the structure set out a clear message of Gold's desire to change the company's mindset to a new more global culture. Already the CEO was finding that leaders in the United States were reluctant to give up control of product lines. At the regional level, she had keen leaders in place who wanted to push out the responsibility within their own regions and move towards a decentralized plan. While the CEO supported this notion in principle, she wanted to ensure that the right leaders could be placed in decentralized offices in order to execute on the six strategic pillars that she had laid out for the organization. One thing was certain - the CEO had made it clear that no revenue decreases would be forgiven amidst the change. Many considerations had arisen: What pace of change should she take? How would she deal with resistance to change? How could she ensure that the new structure would support Western Union's global expansion?

Teaching Note: 8B06M07 (13 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Organizational Change; Globalization; Organizational Design; Corporate Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 17:
Managing Organizational Change and Innovation

ORGANIZATION, FOUNDER AND CLIENTELE TRANSFORMATION AT VGKK
G. Ramesh, L. Prasad, G.S. Goutham

Product Number: 9B09C022
Publication Date: 7/29/2010
Length: 17 pages

The literature on change and transformation mostly focuses on for-profit organizations, even though not-for-profit organizations offer a richer context for study, and social entrepreneurs are most often at the forefront of large-scale change. The case is an attempt to examine the evolution of a development organization. It centres on a medical professional and his thirty-year struggle in ushering in social transformation in the BR Hills of Southern India, working for tribal and forest development based on a foundation of ethics, self-organization and the assertion of human and individual rights. In 1994, he was awarded the Right Livelihood Award (also known as the Alternative Nobel Prize) for his efforts.

This case can teach the evolution of a) a social entrepreneur into a leader; b) an amorphous service entity into an institution with a network of organizations and c) a low-profile, undemanding clientele with no voice to a demanding clientele expecting choices and rights. The case can also be used to explore the growth of a social enterprise (in terms of objectives, service delivery, roles, scale, etc.); concepts of change and social transformation; and the organizational life cycle and evolution of systems over the cycle. The case highlights the path civic service organizations (CSOs) and social actors tread over time in undertaking to provide public service.


Teaching Note: 8B09C22 (11 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Organizational Change; Evolution of Social Organization; Leadership Development; Social Entrepreneurship
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SUCCESSION PLANNING: SURVIVING THE NEXT GENERATION
Ilan Alon, Kimberley Howard

Product Number: 9B09C015
Publication Date: 7/16/2009
Length: 9 pages

In late May 2009, Albert Bohemier, CEO of Survival Systems Limited (SSL), located in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, paced the deck of the training pool at Survival Training Simulation Theatre wondering how best to transition the company to new leadership. During the past five years, attempts at succession planning had been unsuccessful. As the leader of the company for over 25 years, Bohemier was ready to retire, but there were many aspects of succession planning to consider. Bohemier's personal criteria for incoming leadership were threefold: it had to be good for SSL's existing clients, a positive move for the company as a whole and good for the current team.

Teaching Note: 8B09C15 (6 pages)
Industry: Educational Services, Manufacturing
Issues: Succession Planning; Organizational Change; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ISTOCKPHOTO.COM: TURNING COMMUNITY INTO COMMERCE
Rebecca A. Grant, Meghan Stothers

Product Number: 9B07E013
Publication Date: 1/26/2007
Revision Date: 5/28/2007
Length: 12 pages

When the founder of iStockphoto.com started the company in 2000, his objective was to share his vast collection of stock photography with graphic designers worldwide, and, in the process, help others do the same. By 2002, the organization was a respected and successful online community, but the founder and his partners now had to consider the profitability of their company. iStock was founded on community and collaboration - not commerce. Should the model change and if so, what would it take to make a significant culture change work? The case examines the culture and business opportunities for this start-up. It demonstrates the challenges of generating profit from an online community, as well as the key factors needed to build a community that can be turned into a profitable business.

Teaching Note: 8B07E13 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Organizational Change; E-Business Models; Strategy Implementation; E-Commerce
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA