Ivey Publishing

Marketing: An Introduction - An Asian Perspective

Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., da Silva, G.,1/e (United Kingdom, Pearson Education, 2006)
Prepared By Fabrizio Di Muro, Ph.D. Candidate (Marketing)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Marketing - Managing Profitable Customer Relationships

CARVEL ICE CREAM - DEVELOPING THE BEIJING MARKET
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A017
Publication Date: 8/5/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 12 pages

The manager of business development for Carvel Asia Limited is trying to determine how best to increase ice cream cake sales in Beijing. In doing so, he needs to develop a complete marketing program which includes decisions about product offerings, pricing, placement (distribution) and promotion - the 4 Ps. Carvel Asia was a 50-50 joint venture between Carvel (USA) and China's Ministry of Agriculture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A17 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Pricing Strategy; Product Concept; Marketing Communication; Distribution
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 2:
Company and Marketing Strategy - Partnering to Build Customer Relationships

PLASTICS R US LTD.
Terry H. Deutscher, Ying-Ru Chen

Product Number: 9B02A016
Publication Date: 8/28/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 16 pages

A Taiwanese plastic manufacturer exports one of its products, bathtub covers, solely to Japanese distributors. The company's president has been approached to form a partnership in a new production facility in China with its second largest customer, a Japanese distributor that also produces bathtub covers. The president must assess the company's options: turn down the proposal and expand on its own in Taiwan, form a partnership and produce bathtub covers exclusively for the other company in China or turn down the proposal and invest in its own factory in China. The president considers the company's long-term strategies, the political future of a Taiwanese company in China, status of its intellectual property under a partnership and the potential loss of its second largest customer. He also needs to address plans for the company's other products and decide whether the company should be more actively pursuing a sales strategy to expand its market share.

Teaching Note: 8B02A16 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Relationship Management; Strategic Planning; Marketing Channels; Partnership
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BEN & JERRY'S - JAPAN
James M. Hagen

Product Number: 9A99A037
Publication Date: 4/13/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 17 pages

The CEO of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc. needed to give sales and profits a serious boost; despite the company's excellent brand equity, it was losing market share and struggling to make a profit. The company's product was on store shelves in all U.S. states, but efforts to enter foreign markets had only been haphazard with non-U.S. sales accounting for just three per cent of total sales. The CEO needed to focus serious attention on entering the world's second largest ice cream market, Japan. An objective of Ben & Jerry's was to use the excess manufacturing capacity it had in the U.S., and it found that exporting ice cream from Vermont to Japan was feasible from a logistics and cost perspective. The company identified two leading partnering options. One was to give a Japanese convenience store chain exclusive rights to the product for a limited time. The other was to give long-term rights for all sales of the product in Japan to a Japanese-American who would build the brand. For the company to enter Japan in time for the upcoming summer season, it would have to be through one of these two partnering arrangements.

Teaching Note: 8A99A37 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Market Entry; International Marketing; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
The Marketing Environment

NEW WORLD MOBILITY: JOCKEYING FOR POSITION
Kersi Antia, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B00A014
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 1/6/2010
Length: 12 pages

The chief executive officer of New World Mobility, a cellular phone operator in Hong Kong, had gathered the senior management team to discuss the current state of the mobile phone industry in Hong Kong. The double digit growth seen over the past few years was slowing, and with new entrants and changes in the external environment, the industry had become fiercely competitive; each operator was trying to better the pricing and marketing promotions that other operators had designed to lure customers away from their competition. Matching or beating these various promotions ended up being a money-losing proposition, and encouraged customers to switch operators with every new promotion, thus increasing the industry churn rate. As a result, loyalty among users was very low, and each mobile operator in Hong Kong was either losing money or had suffered a significant decline in revenues. This leads to discussions of how to compete in an environment of intense competition, including offering innovative value-added services, and investment in leading edge technology.

Teaching Note: 8B00A14 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: China; Compensation; Market Analysis; Industry Analysis; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MIDEA: GLOBALIZATION CHALLENGE FOR A LEADING CHINESE HOME APPLIANCE MANUFACTURER
Niraj Dawar, Peter Yuan

Product Number: 9B00A031
Publication Date: 3/5/2001
Revision Date: 1/7/2010
Length: 19 pages

The managing director and director of overseas marketing of Midea Group, China's largest air conditioner manufacturer, had concerns about the company's domestic and global competitive position. They felt the company needed to develop a strategy to defend its home market in the wake of more liberalized imports, and simultaneously, develop the resources and skills required to play in a global market where its cost advantages had been nullified because international players were also exporting from China. To do so, they needed to review the company's current international strategy and examine both branding and private label options.

Teaching Note: 8B00A31 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Strategy Development; Resource Allocation; Globalization; Competition
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 4:
Managing Marketing Information

ASIA CITY PUBLISHING LTD.
John R. Kennedy, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A97A001
Publication Date: 4/18/1997
Revision Date: 2/2/2010
Length: 12 pages

HK Magazine was a Hong Kong magazine created by three expatriate Americans. It was launched as a monthly magazine after two years of planning. The editorial tone of the publication can best be described as irreverent. Four years later, HK Magazine is now published twice a month and is very successful financially. The three owners are looking at the decision to start a comparable publication in Singapore. There are four principal issues involved in this decision: consumer acceptance, editorial tone, financial risk, and cash flow considerations. At the same time, the trio must examine the potential changes they might have to make in the editorial policy of their Hong Kong publication after China assumes control of the colony on July 1, 1997.

Teaching Note: 8A97A01 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cash Flow; Consumer Analysis; Product Concept; Profit Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHAI-NA-TA (ASIA) LTD.
John R. Kennedy, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A98A022
Publication Date: 10/30/1998
Revision Date: 11/16/2017
Length: 13 pages

Chai-Na-Ta (Asia) Ltd. is the Hong Kong-based operating arm of Canada's Chai-Na-Ta Corporation, an integrated ginseng firm. The decision has been made to enter the mainland China market and the general manager must make decisions on the entry city, target market(s), product(s) focus, distribution and pricing. Although he has significant knowledge of the Hong Kong market, he is unsure of the degree to which this can be transferred to the mainland markets. The case pushes the student to develop a marketing strategy in a situation in which there is imperfect market information.

Teaching Note: 8A98A22 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Market Entry; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Consumer and Business Buyer Behavior

PACIFIC WESTERN BREWING COMPANY - GOING ORGANIC
John R. Kennedy, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A006
Publication Date: 3/31/1999
Length: 20 pages

The president of Canadian-based Pacific Western Brewing Co. Ltd. is preparing a Japan market entry strategy for the company's newly developed organic beer. Although she has considerable experience in Japan, several factors are at play which make this product entry particularly challenging. First, the product is unlike any other in the market. Second, Japanese consumer behaviour is undergoing a revolution. Third, the company's last product launch in Japan failed. Therefore, there is a higher than normal level of risk associated with the product launch.

Teaching Note: 8A99A06 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Pricing; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WALT DISNEY INTERNET GROUP JAPAN'S DIMO PROJECT
Philip Sugai

Product Number: 9B04A026
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 25 pages

The Walt Disney Internet Group Japan has recently launched an entirely new set of interactive mobile character/agents for the NTT DoCoMo iMode platform, called Dimo. Having built Japan's most successful mobile entertainment business using traditional Disney-branded characters and related content, these Dimo characters have been designed to go well beyond entertainment and become valuable guides, assistants and friends for users of the continuously evolving Mobile Internet and the increasingly complex tasks enabled by this platform. Although the Walt Disney Internet Group Japan team feels strongly that these types of character/agents will be the future of human-device interactions, subscription figures six months after Dimo's launch suggest that Japan's mobile consumers may not share this belief.

Teaching Note: 8B04A26 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: E-Business; Brand Management; Competitive Advantage; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning - Building the Right Relationships with the Right Customers

SHANGHAI COS SOFTWARE LTD.
Kenneth G. Hardy, Bin Zhang, Patrick Zhu

Product Number: 9B03A031
Publication Date: 11/5/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 19 pages

Shanghai COS Software Ltd. designs and develops smart card operating systems. The company's marketing manager must decide the best basis for segmenting the burgeoning market for smart cards for wireless devices in China. She has excellent data on this duopoly market, the segments and their buying criteria. In fact, she already has received significant orders for low-end cards from each of the two large customers. However, she and the senior management team must decide on a market positioning for this young high-tech start up. She must select one of the two major customers whose size, structure and procedures are quite different. She must also decide whether the company should market low margin/high volume or high margin/low volume products. Both products seem to have a very short life expectancy in the face of rapidly changing customer expectations. The investors in the company want it to achieve profitability fairly quickly and still adopt sustainable positioning in the marketplace.

Teaching Note: 8B03A31 (12 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: China; Market Segmentation; Segmentation; Positioning; Product Life Cycle
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TINPLATE COMPANY OF INDIA: NEED FOR A CONCEPTUAL FOCUS
S. Ramesh Kumar, Mohan Kuruvilla

Product Number: 9B01A011
Publication Date: 3/11/2002
Revision Date: 4/26/2011
Length: 11 pages

Tinplate Company of India is a leading manufacturer of tin packaging for food and beverage products and batteries. Changes in government policy on importing materials, new types of packaging products and customer dissatisfaction present challenges for the company. The company must decide whether to continue with its current market strategy, determine how it can compete with foreign companies or determine if they are missing other strategic opportunities based on organizational buying behaviours.

Teaching Note: 8B01A11 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Segmentation; Competitiveness; Market Strategy; Product Management
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 7:
Product, Services, and Branding Strategy

COLA WARS IN CHINA: THE FUTURE IS HERE
Niraj Dawar, Nancy Dai

Product Number: 9B03A006
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 18 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case won the Emerging Chinese Global Competitors, 2003 EFMD Case Writing Competition. The Wahaha Hangzhou Group Co. Ltd. is one of China's largest soft-drink producers. One of the company's products, Future Cola, was launched a few years ago to compete with Coca Cola and PepsiCo and has made significant progress in the soft-drink markets that were developed by these cola giants. The issue now is to maintain the momentum of growth in the face of major competition from the giant multinationals, and to achieve its goal of dominant market share.

Teaching Note: 8B03A06 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Market Strategy; Competition; Brand Management; Emerging Markets
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SANTA FE RELOCATION SERVICES: REGIONAL BRAND MANAGEMENT
Niraj Dawar, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B05A029
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 15 pages

Sante Fe Relocation Services was a premium provider of relocation services based in Hong Kong. Founded in 1980, the company had built a reputation as a reliable, high-quality packer and mover of household goods. By 2000, the company also offered a full range of relocation support services including visa and immigration applications, home searching and cultural and language training. Santa Fe relocated expatriates and their families between Asian countries and between Asia and other regions. The company had its own staff and assets in Asia and managed its international operations through a network of partners. In 2005, the chief operating officer faced three key challenges: differentiating and positioning the brand in a crowded and often price-driven market; incorporating an expanded service line under the original brand and gaining market recognition for those additional services; and managing the brand across the Asian region with an effective balance of standardization versus local adaptation.

Teaching Note: 8B05A29 (6 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: International Marketing; Competitor Analysis; Brand Positioning; Brand Extension; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



YUNNAN BAIYAO: TRADITIONAL MEDICINE MEETS PRODUCT/MARKET DIVERSIFICATION
Paul W. Beamish, George Peng

Product Number: 9B06M088
Publication Date: 1/23/2007
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 17 pages

In 2003, 3M initiated contact with Yunnan Baiyao Group Co., Ltd. to discuss potential cooperation opportunities in the area of transdermal pharmaceutical products. Yunnan Baiyao (YB), was a household brand in China for its unique traditional herbal medicines. In recent years, the company had been engaged in a series of corporate reforms and product/market diversification strategies to respond to the change in the Chinese pharmaceutical industry and competition at a global level. By 2003, YB was already a vertically integrated, product-diversified group company with an ambition to become an international player. The proposed cooperation with 3M was attractive to YB, not only as an opportunity for domestic product diversification, but also for international diversification. YB had been attempting to internationalize its products and an overseas department had been established in 2002 specifically for this purpose. On the other hand, YB had also been considering another option namely, whether to extend its brand to toothpaste and other healthcare products. YB had to make decisions about which of the two options to pursue and whether it was feasible to pursue both.

Teaching Note: 8B06M88 (12 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Product Diversification; Internationalization; Brand Extension; Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
New-Product Development and Product Life-Cycle Strategies

DHARMALA MANULIFE - A MARKETING STRATEGY
John S. Hulland, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9A99A022
Publication Date: 2/9/2000
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 17 pages

The president director of Dharmala Manulife, a large, successful Canadian-Indonesian joint venture life insurance company, faced a significant disruption to operations due to social unrest in Jakarta. Moreover, the Asian financial crisis had resulted in a massive devaluation of the rupiah, in terms of the U.S. dollar. Thus, premiums on U.S.-dollar denominated policies had become prohibitively expensive almost overnight. Policy surrenders, redemptions, and lapses were occurring at an alarming rate. This erosion of the company's client base also meant that sales agents (who worked solely on commissions) were not only losing clients, but were also facing a tremendous challenge in writing new policies in light of the economic, political, and social chaos. Given the external situation, the president director and his senior management team were forced to develop effective strategic marketing decisions. The case asks students to consider the marketing plan for the launch of a new product designed to address the market realities and how to manage the commissioned salesforce in light of the disruption to operations.

Teaching Note: 8A99A22 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Sales Strategy; New Products; Market Strategy; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Pricing Considerations and Strategies

ROUGEMONT FRUIT NECTAR: DISTRIBUTING IN CHINA
Paul W. Beamish, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A016
Publication Date: 7/20/1999
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 14 pages

Gervais Lavoie, managing director of the Canadian-Chinese joint venture, Beijing Oasis High Nutrition Food Co., needs to decide what means of distribution is most appropriate for the company's newly-developed fruit nectars. The decision is complicated by the fact that different means of distribution have different implications for the ultimate pricing and promotion of the products.

Teaching Note: 8A99A16 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Distribution; Pricing; Promotion Policy; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



AIR DECCAN (A): CHANGING THE FACE OF INDIAN AVIATION
Srinivas Sridharan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07A001
Publication Date: 12/12/2006
Revision Date: 9/12/2007
Length: 10 pages

The founder and chief executive officer of Air Deccan, India's first low-cost airline, ponders the imminent launch of the airline. His mind goes back to his passion and vision of empowering every Indian to fly, a bold dream in a country of one billion people who travelled predominantly by buses and trains. Would Air Deccan fly?

Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Pricing Strategy; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Emerging Markets; Brand Positioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Marketing Channels and Supply Chain Management

ZHONGDA OPTICAL CABLE ENGINEERING
Terry H. Deutscher, Alan (Wenchu) Yang

Product Number: 9B03A008
Publication Date: 6/26/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 16 pages

Zhongda Optical Cable Engineering Company is a small company that provides optical cable engineering services to contractors who are installing intranet applications in a province in China. As an early entrant in the market and a high quality service provider, the company had been able to charge premium prices, however, the market has changed. There are now many competitors who provide similar services. Furthermore, contractors - and sometimes end-users - were learning how to do Zhongda's major task, optical cable welding, for themselves. Zhongda has three options: aggressively target end-user accounts; retreat from cable engineering services and focus on distributing cable components or start manufacturing optical cable welding machines. None of these is a perfect match for Zhongda's capabilities, but the prospects for continued prosperity in its current role are bleak.

Teaching Note: 8B03A08 (13 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: China; Marketing Channels; Market Strategy; Marketing Management; Industrial Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GINO SA: DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL MANAGEMENT
Terry H. Deutscher, Alan (Wenchu) Yang

Product Number: 9B02A013
Publication Date: 4/25/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 15 pages

Gino SA was a major European-based manufacturer of burner units that are sold in China through exclusive contracts with three distributors. As a result, the three Chinese distributors have significant bargaining power with Gino. A leading boiler manufacturer, who is currently purchasing through a distributor, has approached Gino to receive OEM treatment (a further discount by purchasing the burners direct from the manufacturer, in return for a commitment to purchase a percentage of their burners from Gino). In deciding whether or not to pursue the company's first direct OEM relationship, the marketing manager must consider the impact of his decision on the distributors, the competition and the company's corporate management.

Teaching Note: 8B02A13 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Distribution; Emerging Markets; Marketing Channels; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Retailing and Wholesaling

SOUTH AFRICAN BREWERIES INTERNATIONAL: DEVISING A CHINA MARKET STRATEGY
Niraj Dawar, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B00A024
Publication Date: 10/31/2000
Revision Date: 1/7/2010
Length: 20 pages

South African Breweries (SAB) was the only profitable international brewer in the crowded and hyper-competitive beer market in China. SAB's keen understanding of emerging market environments allowed it to develop a unique strategy for the Chinese market. This resulted in large market shares in each of the provinces in which it was present. However, SAB and its joint venture partner, China Resources Enterprise, only served five per cent of China's immense population. The managing director was faced with decisions: how to expand to other markets where SAB's approach would be replicated, how SAB could expand its successful business model to new markets, and what would happen when it ran head-to-head with a global giant or a well-positioned local competitor.

Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: China; Corporate Strategy; Emerging Markets; Brand Positioning; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



LOOKS.COM (A): BUILDING ASIA'S FIRST HEALTH, BEAUTY AND FASHION E-TAILER
John S. Hulland, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B00A007
Publication Date: 6/19/2000
Revision Date: 1/6/2010
Length: 16 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case was one of the winning cases in the 2000 Regional Asia-Pacific Case Writing Competition. Looks.com is an Asian e-commerce site for brand name cosmetics, fragrances, skin care products and fashions. It has been well received among investors; the site had a viable business strategy and a solid first-mover advantage. The founder and managing director is ready to launch looks.com within weeks to capitalize on the upcoming Christmas shopping rush and the intense dot.com fever that caught Hong Kong in late 1999. The biggest challenge the company now faces is persuading brand name cosmetic manufacturers to list their products for sale on the site. Look.com's managing director and buyer are finding that manufacturers' concerns about cannibalizing their existing sales channels and antagonizing their licensed distributors are dampening their enthusiasm for dealing with looks.com. The challenge to the company is to develop strategies to convince manufacturers that using this alternative distribution channel can increase their revenue and the profile of their brands in Asia, with little impact on their current distribution network. This case has universal appeal, given that similar concerns have developed around the world as the Internet becomes an increasingly viable alternative distribution channel.

Teaching Note: 8B00A07 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Supplier Relations; Licensing; Brands; Startups
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Integrated Marketing Communications - Advertising, Sales Promotion, and Public Relations

GREY CHINA
John S. Hulland, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9A99A014
Publication Date: 10/28/1999
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 15 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case was one of the winning cases in the 1999 Regional Asia-Pacific Case Writing Competition. Grey China is a subsidiary of Grey Advertising, based in New York. Established in 1917, Grey Advertising offered a variety of marketing and corporate services through its 377 branches in 88 countries, which employed 10,000 people. The case provides an overview of how an advertising agency functions, as well as illustrating timely advertising industry issues such as specialization and globalization. The CEO of Grey China must decide whether or not to launch an interactive services department to capitalize on the potential for a first mover advantage. Many marketing managers in Hong Kong and China were unaware of how interactive marketing could be integrated into their marketing communications programs. Grey China had the daunting task of building primary market demand for interactive marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8A99A14 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: China; Advertising; Market Analysis; Marketing Mix; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HOW ADVERTISING WORKS
Peter Voyer

Product Number: 9B07A011
Publication Date: 8/3/2007
Length: 15 pages

This note explores how advertising works from a consumer behavior perspective. Following an overview of some of the traditional hierarchical approaches to studying advertising and limitations associated with these models, the elaboration-likelihood model (ELM) is introduced as a means of addressing some of these deficiencies. The ELM is then examined within an advertising context. Subsequently, subliminal advertising is briefly considered. Lastly, issues related to measurement of advertising effectiveness are discussed.

Issues: Elaboration Likelihood Model; Hierarchical Models of Advertising; How Advertising Works
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Integrated Marketing Communications - Personal Selling and Direct Marketing

WORLDWIDE EQUIPMENT (CHINA) LTD.: A SALES PERFORMANCE DILEMMA
June Cotte, Alan (Wenchu) Yang

Product Number: 9B02A028
Publication Date: 1/9/2003
Revision Date: 2/25/2003
Length: 15 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case was one of the winning cases in the 2002 Regional Asia-Pacific Case Writing Competition. Worldwide Equipment Ltd. is one of the world's largest manufacturers of heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment. The Beijing regional sales manager has just heard that the sales performance of his office ranked the lowest among the sales offices in China. The sales Beijing force will not receive their year-end bonus unless the situation can be turned around quickly. He must determine whether the sales management process or a recent new hire on the sales force, whose hiring was strongly suggested by the manager's boss, are to blame for the poor sales performance and how to keep the situation from recurring.

Teaching Note: 8B02A28 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Organizational Behaviour; Sales Management; Sales Organization; Performance Evaluation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Marketing in the Digital Age

JEWELLWORLD.COM - ONLINE JEWELRY SHOPPING IN CHINA
Shige Makino, Anthony Fong

Product Number: 9B05A009
Publication Date: 9/23/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 19 pages

The marketing manager of Jewellworld.com was faced with the problem of a saturated Hong Kong market, and has to consider ways in which to expand the business. In a meeting with the marketing director, who was responsible for the development of the Hong Kong and Chinese Jewelry markets, one of the main topics was the expansion of the online shopping strategy into the B2C area in China; however, the staff of the marketing department held different views. The immediate question was whether Jewellworld.com should move into the B2C area at full speed or wait and see how other competitors fared in the China online market. The other issue was the segmentation that Jewellworld should employ if they decide to enter the B2C market in China. A competitor had established retail stores across China. The question was whether Jewellworld should aim to cover all market segments and product lines, or target young people who tend to use the Internet more frequently.

Teaching Note: 8B05A09 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Internet; Retail Marketing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LOOKS.COM (A) - A GREY ISSUE
Kersi Antia, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B00A012
Publication Date: 8/29/2000
Revision Date: 1/6/2010
Length: 13 pages

The founder and managing director of looks.com, a soon-to-be-launched Hong Kong based e-commerce site for brand name cosmetics, fragrances, skin care products and fashion aimed at Asian women, had to make a key strategic decision - should he engage in parallel importing? He considered this decision one that would likely have the largest impact on the success, or failure, of his dream. Parallel importing, also known as grey marketing, involves the legal, though disturbing practice (to many manufacturers and distributors) of sourcing products wholesale from unauthorized distributors. The case issue has universal appeal, given the ever-increasing prevalence of parallel importing throughout the world. Students are introduced to the Internet industry in Hong Kong, and are provided the background information for an in-depth analysis of the positives and negatives of engaging in parallel importing. A short supplement is available: Looks.com (B), 9B00A013.

Teaching Note: 8B00A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Startups; International Trade; Pricing Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
The Global Marketplace

GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEIJING TORONTO INTERNATIONAL HOSPITAL
Kenneth G. Hardy, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01A006
Publication Date: 3/5/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 16 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case was one of the winning cases in the 2001 Regional Asia-Pacific Case Writing Competition. Beijing Toronto International Hospital was a new private facility being built in Beijing that would offer a full range of general and specialized Western-quality medical services to a very specific market segment: expatriates and wealthy Chinese families. Membership cards were sold that entitled each member to a distinct level of hospital service. The chief executive officer found that as the building neared completion, only a few memberships had been sold which resulted in a cash shortage. He did not know why sales failed to materialize as expected, but felt that he must redirect and revitalize the marketing campaign. He considered several options and had to determine what would work best in the Chinese market.

Teaching Note: 8B01A06 (9 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; International Marketing; Market Entry; Health Administration; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Marketing and Society - Social Responsibility and Marketing Ethics

LOOKS.COM (B) - A TEMPTING OFFER
Kersi Antia, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B00A013
Publication Date: 8/29/2000
Revision Date: 1/6/2010
Length: 1 pages

A leading French cosmetics house has told the founder and managing director of looks.com that they wouldn't be able to sell products directly to looks.com due to the potential conflicts with existing retailers, but has suggested that they could buy the products on the parallel markets instead. Looks.com will have to weigh the benefits and risks of sourcing these products from an unauthorized distributor. This case is a supplement to the looks.com (A)-A Grey Issue case, 9B00A012.

Teaching Note: 8B00A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Startups; International Trade; Pricing Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BROAD AIR CONDITIONING AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Zhi Yi He, Meng Sun, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M034
Publication Date: 6/24/2004
Revision Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 12 pages

Broad Air Conditioning is a Chinese company with a proactive environmental attitude, but suffering from deteriorating financial results. The company founder and chief executive officer must decide whether to start producing electricity powered air conditioners to improve its financial results easily or stick to its ideal and only manufacture machines powered by heat. The major theme of this case is to understand corporate social responsibility, by discussing how an enterprise can find a way to harmonize the relationship between benefitting the company and protecting the environment, especially in developing countries.

Teaching Note: 8B04M34 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Corporate Responsibility; Sustainable Development; Environment; Energy; Peking University
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA