Ivey Publishing

Performance Management: Building a High-Performance Workplace

Das, H.,1/e (Canada, Pearson, 2003)
Prepared By Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, PhD Candidate
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
The Importance of Performance Management

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AT THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT (CENTRAL INDIA CAMPUS) (B)
Ranjeet Nambudiri, K.R. Jayasimha

Product Number: 9B09C009
Publication Date: 5/22/2009
Revision Date: 9/22/2009
Length: 7 pages

The case describes existing performance management systems at a leading business school in India, the National Institute of Management (Central India campus) (NIM (CI campus)). The institution, which ranked among the top 20 business schools in India, is facing critical issues of attracting and retaining faculty members. The director of NIM (CI campus) has implemented a unit based performance measurement and incentive system that has worked favourably and enabled the institute to recruit top academicians. However, the management committee believes that the system has outlived its utility and desires to replace it with more robust systems that are less vulnerable to misuse. The faculty members, however, support retention of the existing system. The key teaching objective of this case is to understand performance management systems from perspectives of different stakeholders and develop a framework that meets all objectives of performance management. The case enables users to understand all steps in performance management and examine shortcomings at each stage. The role of incentive systems both as a tool to enhance individual performance and as a management control mechanism is also discussed. The case provides users an opportunity to evaluate the strategic significance of performance management. The case is to be used along with Performance Management at the National Institute of Management (Central India Campus) (A) No. 9B08C020.

Teaching Note: 8B08C20 (13 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Performance Measurement; Educational Administration; Management of Professionals; Incentives
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN MULTINATIONAL BANKS IN TANZANIA
Paul W. Beamish, Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi

Product Number: 9B07C040
Publication Date: 10/30/2007
Length: 18 pages

The case examines how the best practices of two banks were organized and managed to provide financial services to a small niche of foreign customers in the mining, tourism and construction sectors in Tanzania. The two banks claimed to be similar in many ways. They both were from countries whose economies were run broadly on neo-liberal lines, in that there was little state intervention in either economy, however, differences existed with respect to how they managed their operations. The case is ideally suited to illustrate the on-going tension and different types of best practices in cross-market integration. It provides opportunities to explore the challenges faced by multinational company banks in managing global workforces, the evolution of the banking sector, and the influence of technology in shaping work in organizations.

Teaching Note: 8B07C40 (16 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: International Management; Expatriate Management; Trade Unions; Management Training; Emerging Markets; Performance Evaluation; Recruiting; Subsidiaries; Career Development; Employee Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INSURETECH
James A. Erskine, Adam Kramer

Product Number: 9B04C020
Publication Date: 6/24/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 13 pages

InsureTech is an online insurance business focusing on the small business owner market. An analyst with the company was asked to investigate and determine a solution for the problem of tracking and reporting sales results, currently a manual process. The analyst assigned to the project would work independently and was aware that the success of this project would significantly benefit the company but would also boost his own career. After six months of working on the project, the analyst presented the new system to the management committee. The system was well received but there were some reservations; he felt these issues would be resolved within a year. The launch date was set for the following month and he prepared the plan to ensure a smooth implementation. Weeks after the launch, the analyst discovered that the sales staff was still using the manual process and feedback on the new system was not favourable. He must determine why the sales staff are reluctant to use the system and what steps to take to deal with this resistance to change.

Teaching Note: 8B04C20 (5 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Sales Management; Performance Measurement; Management of Change; Organizational Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Organizational Mission, Strategy, and Goals

NEW BALANCE: DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED CSR STRATEGY
Vesela Veleva

Product Number: 9B10M011
Publication Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 21 pages

This case focuses on New Balance, a privately held company and the fourth largest athletic footwear manufacturer in the world. Founded over 100 years ago, New Balance has a strong social responsibility culture and mission established by its owners. Its commitment to employees, for example, was expressed through maintaining domestic manufacturing in the United States (the only large footwear manufacturer to do so presently) and avoiding layoffs in the deep recession of 2007-2009. In the late 1990s, the company established the Responsible Leadership Steering Committee to address human rights issues in overseas factories. Throughout the years, private ownership had allowed New Balance to take risks and make choices that publicly held companies might not have been able to do; at the same time, private ownership also meant lower pressures to disclose social and environmental performance. The owners were also very humble and hesitant to talk aloud about social responsibility. As a global player, the present challenge for the company has become to move corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the next level from doing what's right to fully integrating CSR into the business strategy. The overall goal of the case is to use the provided information from a comprehensive company assessment to identify a few key areas where New Balance can focus on and demonstrate industry leadership while also supporting the bottom line. A set of key questions is included at the end of the paper to guide student's discussion around critical issues for building an integrated CSR strategy for New Balance, considering its culture, structure and present level of corporate citizenship management.

Teaching Note: 8B10M11 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Social Responsibility; Strategy Development; Business Sustainability; Performance Assessment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RESEARCH IN MOTION: MANAGING EXPLOSIVE GROWTH
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Daina Mazutis

Product Number: 9B08M046
Publication Date: 5/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 19 pages

Research in Motion (RIM) is a high technology firm that is experiencing explosive sales growth. David Yach, chief technology officer for software at RIM, has received notice of an impending meeting with the co-chief executive officer regarding his research and development (R&D) expenditures. Although RIM, makers of the very popular BlackBerry, spent almost $360 million in R&D in 2007, this number was low compared to its largest competitors, both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of sales (e.g. Nokia spent $8.2 billion on R&D). This is problematic as it foreshadows the question of whether or not RIM is well positioned to continue to meet expectations, deliver award-winning products and services and maintain its lead in the smartphone market. Furthermore, in the very dynamic mobile telecommunications industry, investment analysts often look to a firm's commitment to R&D as a signal that product sales growth will be sustainable. Just to maintain the status quo, Yach will have to hire 1,400 software engineers in 2008 and is considering a number of alternative paths to managing the expansion. The options include: (1) doing what they are doing now, only more of it, (2) building on their existing and satellite R&D locations, (3) growing through acquisition or (4) going global.

Teaching Note: 8B08M46 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Change Management; Globalization; Staffing; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JACQUES KEMP: TOWARDS PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE
Rod E. White, Andreas Schotter

Product Number: 9B06M084
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 19 pages

Over the past two years, ING Insurance Asia/Pacific had successfully implemented a new organizational and operational framework called Towards Performance Excellence (TPE), which was developed with inputs from functional heads, senior management and staff at the business unit level. TPE detailed and organized everything ING Asia/Pacific needed to execute its strategy effectively. TPE divided ING's business processes into six core categories: portfolio, marketing, organizational, operational, reputation and financial. Each category included aspects of execution known as drivers, which required managers to identify specific objectives and key performance indicators (KPIs) for each driver or sub-driver. The case includes many original exhibits and is ideally taught as the follow up case of the ING Insurance Asia/Pacific, Ivey product #9B06M083 or as a standalone case, which illustrates a real example of regional versus local organizational management.

Teaching Note: 8B06M83 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Organizational Design; Organizational Structure; International Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Process and Employee Performance

ELISE SMART
Jeffrey Gandz, Elizabeth Spracklin

Product Number: 9B03C010
Publication Date: 5/31/2003
Revision Date: 9/4/2013
Length: 7 pages

Elise Smart must decide what performance assessment to give one of her employees who has, uncharacteristically, failed to meet one of her key objectives for the year. The situation is difficult for several reasons; the causes of the unacceptable performance are not clear; the employee has previously received excellent appraisals, including a recent one by the vice-president; and the employee was absent for a good part of the year on maternity leave. The various factors that influence sustained performance (ability, motivation, resources, role clarity, reinforcement) are examined, as well as steps leaders can take in improving performance of those for whom they are responsible.

Teaching Note: 8B03C10 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Motivation; Performance Evaluation; Management Performance; Management Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CINDY SANDERS
James A. Erskine, Joanna Shostack

Product Number: 9B03C007
Publication Date: 5/1/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 25 pages

A consultant at a large consulting firm has found out that she will not be promoted even though her performance review was above average. She must determine what caused this situation and what her options are.

Teaching Note: 8B03C07 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Interpersonal Relations; Interpersonal Skills; Promotion Policy; Performance Evaluation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KATE ARCHER IN HAITI (A)
Joerg Dietz, Kate Archer

Product Number: 9B01C035
Publication Date: 4/25/2002
Revision Date: 12/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

Helped the Aged Canada, a non-profit organization, has hired Kate Archer to manage their prosthetic clinic in Haiti. After her arrival in Haiti she learns that its key employee does not meet her performance expectations. Communicating with the employee, a deaf-mute, however, was very difficult and required the use of another employee as translator. She must communicate her performance expectations to the employee. The supplement to this case, Kate Archer In Haiti (B), product number 9B01C036 describes how Kate develops a contract and finalizes the agreement with the employee.

Teaching Note: 8B01C35 (11 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Non-Profit Organization; Communications; International Management; Cross Cultural Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Rewards and Performance

KYLE EVANS AT RUFFIAN APPAREL: STAFFING A RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT
Ann C. Frost, Kevin Hewins

Product Number: 9B09C008
Publication Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 11 pages

Ruffian Kelowna, one of 19 British Columbia Ruffian Apparel locations, is underperforming. Recent management turnover and low unemployment in the region have left Kelowna short-staffed and in need of a new store manager to take over for the interim manager. Both sales and performance results are far below acceptable levels, and the store appears to be floundering. The newly hired B.C. regional manager for Ruffian Apparel is looking into the problem and needs to report back to Vancouver with his recommendations. This case can be used to demonstrate how different theories of motivation might apply to goal-setting and compensation plans. The case illustrates how an inappropriate or poorly structured compensation plan and motivational goals can lead to ineffective and detrimental results. Students who immediately attribute the problems of the case to the lack of a store manager will fail to explore the potential for increasing employee motivation and productivity across the board.

Teaching Note: 8B09C08 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Staffing; Compensation; Pay for Performance; Motivation
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



DR. JACK PERRY, DDS
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Eleni Mitsis

Product Number: 9B07C016
Publication Date: 5/15/2007
Length: 6 pages

Dr. Jack Perry, a sole practitioner dentist in a small town in Ontario, had a meeting with one of his employees who suggested that there were several problems in the office. These include: low morale, lack of motivation to grow the business, fill cancellations, follow up on collections, and engage in cross-sell procedures. He had noticed these problems previously but felt unsure about his personnel and business management skills. Using his notes from a presentation made by a business consultant at a dental conference, he must decide how to act in order to address these problems.

Teaching Note: 8B07C16 (5 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Morale; Motivation; Employee Attitude; Compensation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JINJIAN GARMENT FACTORY: MOTIVATING GO-SLOW WORKERS
Tieying Huang, Junping Liang, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M033
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 6 pages

Jinjian Garment Factory is a large clothing manufacturer based in Shenzhen with distribution to Hong Kong and overseas. Although Shenzhen had become one of the most advanced garment manufacturing centres in the world, managers in this industry still had few effective ways of dealing with the collective and deliberate slow pace of work by the employees, of motivating workers, and of resolving the problem between seasonal production requirements and retention of skilled workers. However, the owner and managing director of the company must determine the reasons behind the deliberately slow pace of the workers, the pros and cons of the piecework system and the methods he could adopt to motivate the workers effectively.

Teaching Note: 8B04M33 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Productivity; Employee Attitude; Piece Work; Performance Measurement; Work-Force Management; Peking University
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Designing Jobs to Enhance Employee Involvement

BAX GLOBAL LIMITED: STAFF TURNOVER IN MAINLAND CHINA
Jean-Louis Schaan, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B05C035
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 13 pages

The human resources manager for logistics and supply chain management at BAX China must consider her company's high rate of staff turnover. In her monthly report to the managing director, the turnover had reached 12 per cent in the first eight months of the year. The human resources manager must evaluate the company's current methods of dealing with turnover and consider what additional action should be taken. Logistics was a complex and rapidly growing industry, particularly in mainland China. Many multinational and domestic service providers were entering the marketing and expanding their operations; however, these companies had to respond to complex operational challenges and escalating customer demands. The resulting demand for skilled workers led to high turnover rates across the industry and at all organizational levels, and created margin pressure and other management challenges. The case offers a uniquely Chinese perspective on workforce recruitment, management and retention. The industry and the broader economy were growing rapidly. Skilled workers were in short supply because logistics was a new and developing discipline in the former command economy. Also, in the human resources manager's opinion, cultural attitudes resulted in low loyalty among the workers.

Teaching Note: 8B05C35 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: China; Employee Retention; Recruiting; Compensation; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WEIGHING CAREER CHOICES
Eric Morse, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05C009
Publication Date: 1/31/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 4 pages

A graduate of a business school must consider two options available to him with similar salary packages. The first is to accept an offer to start as an assistant marketing manager with a consumer packaged goods firm, the other is a consulting assignment with a small tool & die firm. The case provides students the opportunity to value different benefits based on their risk tolerance and career aspirations.

Teaching Note: 8B05C09 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Risk Analysis; Career Planning; Uncertainty
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STAFFING WAL-MART STORES, INC. (A)
Alison Konrad, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B04C006
Publication Date: 1/26/2004
Revision Date: 10/6/2009
Length: 9 pages

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. is a large Fortune 500 retail chain. The distinction of being the top-ranked company comes with intense scrutiny from the public and, especially, critics. Wal-Mart, a company lauded for its rapid response capability and stated commitments to gender equality is shown to be deficient in some glaring areas - the percentage of women compared to men at all levels of the company, and the compensation paid to women versus men at all levels of the company, to cite two examples. An executive vice-president must examine why these inequalities exist when the company seems to be doing everything else right. The company is the target of several gender discrimination lawsuits and the executive vice-president has the opportunity to obtain information that would be useful in the current situation, and must determine what information is needed. In the supplement, Staffing Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. (B), product 9B04C007, the executive vice-president receives information and must determine how to address the situation.

Teaching Note: 8B04C06 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Management Decisions; Pay Equity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Assessing Individual Team Performance

DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL PERSONNEL SELECTION SYSTEM
Diana E. Krause, Reiner Piske

Product Number: 9B07C041
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Length: 17 pages

The owner of a company with production plants in various regions in the world wants to standardize the methods of personnel selection for the Asian-Pacific region (APAC). A new system of personnel selection has to be developed for middle management positions in APAC. The owner delegates this task to a cross-functional, multinational project team that operates in Hong Kong headed by a human resources (HR) executive and expatriate from Germany. In terms of the new personnel selection system, he has two opposing goals in mind: the new personnel selection system should be highly specific for a particular country and simultaneously valid for different countries. A series of issues must be resolved in order for the project to be successful. Some of these issues are related to the personnel selection system; the job requirements to be assessed, the modules it must include, the stages and methods of each module, and the implementation of the system across countries in APAC. Other issues are interpersonal, such as the cultural differences and the heterogeneous perspectives that exist among the team members, and a conflict between the HR executive and the owner.

Teaching Note: 8B07C41 (9 pages)
Issues: Cross Cultural Management; Aptitude Diagnostics; International Personnel Selection; Teamwork
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEO BURNETT COMPANY LTD.: VIRTUAL TEAM MANAGEMENT
Joerg Dietz, Fernando Olivera, Elizabeth O'Neil

Product Number: 9B03M052
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 16 pages

Leo Burnett Company Ltd. is a global advertising agency. The company is working with one of its largest clients to launch a new line of hair care products into the Canadian and Taiwanese test markets in preparation for a global rollout. Normally, once a brand has been launched, it is customary for the global brand centre to turn over the responsibility for the brand and future campaigns to the local market offices. In this case, however, the brand launch was not successful. Team communications and the team dynamics have broken down in recent months and the relationships are strained. Further complicating matters are a number of client and agency staffing changes that could jeopardize the stability of the team and the agency/client relationship. The global account director must decide whether she should proceed with the expected decision to modify the global team structure to give one of the teams more autonomy, or whether she should maintain greater centralized control over the team. She must recommend how to move forward with the brand and determine what changes in team structure or management are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B03M52 (14 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ART AND PRACTICE OF LEARNING AT OAK VALLEY INC.
Allen Morrison, Cyril Bouquet

Product Number: 9A99M047
Publication Date: 5/9/2000
Revision Date: 1/21/2010
Length: 9 pages

Oak Valley Inc. is a $2.1 billion Toronto-based company operating in various consumer markets. In early 1993, the company launched a management development program with the objective of promoting a culture that thrived on best practices. Five years later, the chief executive officer is attempting to evaluate the impact of the program on participants. Hoping to generate new insights that could be applied to similar events in the future, he has asked a team of five past participants to meet to discuss what they learned. This short case deals with the attitudes and behaviors most conducive to individual and group-based learning. The case provides an excellent vehicle for discussing how people learn, how teams can accelerate the learning process, and how companies can create positive learning environments.

Teaching Note: 8A99M47 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Employee Training; Management Training; Personal Development; Group Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Training and Performance Enhancement

SUCCESSION PLANNING: SURVIVING THE NEXT GENERATION
Ilan Alon, Kimberley Howard

Product Number: 9B09C015
Publication Date: 7/16/2009
Length: 9 pages

In late May 2009, Albert Bohemier, CEO of Survival Systems Limited (SSL), located in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, paced the deck of the training pool at Survival Training Simulation Theatre wondering how best to transition the company to new leadership. During the past five years, attempts at succession planning had been unsuccessful. As the leader of the company for over 25 years, Bohemier was ready to retire, but there were many aspects of succession planning to consider. Bohemier's personal criteria for incoming leadership were threefold: it had to be good for SSL's existing clients, a positive move for the company as a whole and good for the current team.

Teaching Note: 8B09C15 (6 pages)
Industry: Educational Services, Manufacturing
Issues: Succession Planning; Organizational Change; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JOHN MEREDITH OF HUTCHISON PORT HOLDINGS
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Jeffrey Gandz, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B07C027
Publication Date: 6/4/2007
Revision Date: 5/24/2007
Length: 18 pages

This case examines the life, career and leadership style of John Meredith, the group managing director of Hutchison Port Holdings (HPH). Meredith established the company in 1972 based on his vision for more efficient global trade. Under his leadership, the company grew to become the world's largest container port operator. The company grew from owning and managing a single container port to owning and managing 45 container ports by May 2007. This case also examines the importance of leadership at all levels of organizations. When a company grows quickly and sets up operations around the world, it must constantly train new leaders. However, HPH had difficulty finding and training enough leaders who were willing to lead the company's new port operations in far-off destinations. The case examines HPH's actions thus far and asks what other measures may be appropriate in the future.

Teaching Note: 8B07C27 (7 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Management in a Global Environment; Management Development; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Counselling and Discipline

TECHNOSOFT RUSSIA
James A. Erskine, Fyodor Suzdalev

Product Number: 9B04C011
Publication Date: 6/24/2004
Revision Date: 10/6/2009
Length: 13 pages

A supervisor at a telesales office has received very low ratings on an employee survey and the marketing manager is concerned that this team leader is not performing well. The marketing manager must decide what actions are needed to improve the leadership skills of this supervisor.

Teaching Note: 8B04C11 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Human Resources Management; Contracting; Performance Evaluation; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CINATRON COMPUTING
James A. Erskine, Sylvia Smellie

Product Number: 9B03C009
Publication Date: 4/2/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 13 pages

Cinatron Computing is a leading producer and distributor of managing workload software. The newly hired marketing manager has just received a phone call from the travel department requesting authorization for an employee's trip to a workshop. She thought she had already addressed this issue with the employee and now it seems he is going over her head. Why did this occur and what is her next step?

Teaching Note: 8B03C09 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management Training; Employee Attitude; Performance Measurement; Management of Professionals
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DEXTER ST. JACQUES, CROSS-DOCK CO-ORDINATOR
James A. Erskine, Brodie McClellan

Product Number: 9B02C017
Publication Date: 4/29/2002
Revision Date: 11/9/2009
Length: 8 pages

A recently hired co-ordinator of a cross-docking facility has been assigned the task of designing an efficient layout for the facility, assessing the equipment requirements and workflows, and training and supervising the floor staff. Since this is his first managerial position, he is eager to prove himself. He wants to show senior management that they were correct in their decision to hire him, despite his young age. A long-term employee seems determined to thwart the co-ordinator's efforts at every turn. The much-older man never misses a chance to point out that the old company's system was superior to the one the co-ordinator is trying to implement. When a costly shipping error occurs twice in two days, the co-ordinator and the employee have a heated exchange the forces the co-ordinator to do some serious thinking about what his next move should be. Should he fire the employee? Should he rethink his system? Or should he simply try a more diplomatic approach to managing the employee?

Teaching Note: 8B02C17 (3 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Interpersonal Skills; Motivation; Discipline
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Review of Performance Management Process

SCHULICH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE: ENHANCING AND DEVELOPING A HIGH-PERFORMANCE CULTURE
Murray J. Bryant, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B09M014
Publication Date: 10/30/2009
Length: 3 pages

The newly appointed chair of the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology (department) at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry was thinking about how she would approach the next five years in her new role. The chair thought about two of the important issues she would face: building a cohesive department and nurturing a high performance culture. She became chair at a time when direction was needed. The department had formed in June 2002 as a result of the merger between the Department of Physiology and the small Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology. While the merger had gone well, the chair still sensed that some faculty members in Pharmacology felt as if their department had been taken over by Physiology. At present, it was sometimes difficult to assess performance between faculty members due to differences in workload composition and a lack of documentation. The current thinking was that the department had to move towards adopting best practices in their processes. The chair wanted to look at the issue from a broader perspective. She wondered how the issue could be best framed and what a potential solution might look like.

Teaching Note: 8B09M14 (3 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Human Resources Management; Health Administration; Team Building; Performance Evaluation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ORGANIZING FROM SCRATCH: THE LEARNING LAB DENMARK EXPERIENCE (A)
Claus Rerup, John Lafkas

Product Number: 9B06C006
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 14 pages

Learning Lab Denmark, a research and development institute, encountered many of the difficulties typically experienced by start-ups, especially obstacles that involve developing a set of routines for getting things done. In other respects LLD faced several distinct challenges that are specific to its charter. This case describes in detail the history behind the formation of Learning Lab Denmark, the goals and the organizing principles underlying LLD and its sub-components, the various personnel roles and issues, including performance problems, criticism and paradoxes that arose in the first couple of years. The supplement, Organizing from Scratch: The Learning Lab Denmark Experience (B) case, product 9B06C007, picks up the story and discusses significant organizational changes.

Teaching Note: 8B06C06 (18 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Visioning; Leadership; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Organizational Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WORLDWIDE EQUIPMENT (CHINA) LTD.: A SALES PERFORMANCE DILEMMA
June Cotte, Alan (Wenchu) Yang

Product Number: 9B02A028
Publication Date: 1/9/2003
Revision Date: 2/25/2003
Length: 15 pages

Worldwide Equipment Ltd. is one of the world's largest manufacturers of heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment. The Beijing regional sales manager has just heard that the sales performance of his office ranked the lowest among the sales offices in China. The sales Beijing force will not receive their year-end bonus unless the situation can be turned around quickly. He must determine whether the sales management process or a recent new hire on the sales force, whose hiring was strongly suggested by the manager's boss, are to blame for the poor sales performance and how to keep the situation from recurring.

Teaching Note: 8B02A28 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Organizational Behaviour; Sales Management; Sales Organization; Performance Evaluation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA