Ivey Publishing

Marketing: Real People, Real Decisions

Solomon, M.R., Stuart, E.W., Smith, J.B., Sirsi, A.K.,2C/e (Canada, Pearson Education, 2006)
Prepared By Fabrizio Di Muro, Ph.D. Candidate (Marketing)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
What is Marketing?

SUNRIPE MARKETPLACE: A PRIVATE LABEL STRATEGY
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B07A003
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 9 pages

The founder/owner of Sunripe Marketplace (Sunripe) is thinking about the stores' product offerings. He has two fresh produce-focused stores and a unique set of distribution and store-level systems that differentiate Sunripe from other supermarkets. Being a small retailer allows the owner to only choose the best and freshest products for his two stores. His stores have several private labels that customers like. Sunripe's owner must now consider how to improve the marketing of these private labels.

Teaching Note: 8B07A03 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Merchandising; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JILL'S TABLE: SET TO SERVE
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06A001
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/8/2009
Length: 11 pages

The founder and owner of Jill's Table, a specialty food and housewares store is thinking about the challenges ahead of her. As a small business operating in the same arena as the mass merchandising chains, she has to decide how to position her service offerings so as to survive and even thrive in a highly competitive environment. As a Retailer of the Year award winner (2004 Canadian Gift and Tableware Association, Housewares and Gourmet Division), she knows that her challenges go beyond competition and touch on areas such as customer service, associate training, buying and finance.

Teaching Note: 8B06A01 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing Management; Leadership; Small Business; Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Making Strategic Marketing Decisions

WIND TO ENERGY: W2E
Kenneth G. Hardy, Ken Mark, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B05A004
Publication Date: 1/31/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 20 pages

An engineer for Wind to Energy has led the creation of the North American division of a German start-up company that designs wind-energy electric power generation units - wind turbines. The engineer and his fellow engineers have licensed the technology to a small-share assembler of wind turbines and are about to receive their first payment from this firm. As they look ahead, they see opportunities for revenue in possibly supplying spare parts to wind farms, or even operating their own wind farm. The challenge is to focus this start-up company.

Teaching Note: 8B05A04 (8 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Market Strategy; Market Entry; Vendor Selection; Visioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE LONDONER (A)
Kenneth G. Hardy, Darroch A. Robertson

Product Number: 9B05A007
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 20 pages

A city politician and the former editor of the city's daily newspaper assess the potential for a weekly, controlled circulation newspaper to succeed in the city's $50 million market. They know that the incumbent paper will react strongly to drive out new competitors as it has over many years. The challenge for them is to put together a strategy and a team to enter the market. They will be starting with a mere $250,000 in capital so this operation will have to generate cash very quickly. A second case, The Londoner (B) describes a decision to be made regarding a new service (product 9B05A008).

Teaching Note: 8B05A07 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Analysis; Competitiveness; Market Entry; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK: THE MARKETING AND BRANDING CHALLENGES OF A START-UP
Gavin Chen, Derrick Deslandes

Product Number: 9B05A012
Publication Date: 6/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 17 pages

FirstCaribbean International Bank was the new banking entity created from the combination of the Caribbean operations of two foreign banks, Barclays Bank plc of the United Kingdom and headquarters in London, England and CIBC - formally the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce - of Canada and headquartered in Toronto, Ontario. A marketing team was formed with the specific responsibility of developing the marketing function and the brand strategy, as well as guiding the branding process of the new entity. The head of the marketing team has a number of concerns: Would geography, history and commercial practices support or mitigate against a single, centralized marketing strategy for the entire region, what should the new brand be and how should it be articulated, should the new brand reflect one or both of the heritage banks or should the new brand break with the past and reflect a totally new identity, and how quickly could the new brand be rolled out? This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the five additional Cross-Enterprise cases that deal with various functional issues associated with the eventual merger: Human Resources - Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean, product 9B04C053; Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032; General Management - CIBC-Barclays: Should Their Caribbean Operations Be Merged?, product 9B04M067; Accounting and Finance - CIBC-Barclays: Accounting For Their Merger, product 9B04B022; FirstCaribbean International Bank: The Marketing and Branding Challenges for a Start-up, product 9B05A012; and technical note - Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B05A12 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Brand Management; Brand Positioning; Market Strategy; Marketing Planning; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Market Segmentation and Position

INVESTORSOFT
Robin Ritchie, Alim Merali

Product Number: 9B05A030
Publication Date: 10/13/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 19 pages

InvestorSoft is preparing to launch its one and only product, a subscription-based software service that will make it convenient and economical for companies to manage the investor relations portion of their website. The company's founder faces an uphill battle in establishing InvestorSoft as a credible supplier to buyers who prefer dealing with large, reputable firms. His immediate challenge is to settle on a set of target customers, and determine whether InvestorSoft would be better off selling to them directly or through resellers who would bundle the software with other services. He must also develop pricing and promotional strategies that will secure a strong base of customers early on, in order to position the company for future growth. The case provides the basis for discussing core marketing concepts such as customer analysis, target market selection, and marketing mix decisions in an entrepreneurial context.

Teaching Note: 8B05A30 (12 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: New Products; Marketing Management; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INVESTMENT FUNDS INSTITUTE OF CANADA
Robert J. Fisher, Christina A. Cavanagh, Stephen R. Foerster, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B04A008
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 16 pages

The vice-president of regulation at the Investment Funds Institute of Canada is reviewing the monthly statistics. It shows the continuance of three trends, prevalent during the last 12 months in the Canadian mutual funds industry. Net sales of mutual funds were declining, fund redemptions were rising and the rate of growth in mutual fund assets had been marginal. The vice-president must determine how the Investment Funds Institute, as the industry trade association for mutual funds, can influence these trends. He must decide on the message, who he should target with the message and the media through which he should reach his target audience, and present his plan at the next executive committee meeting.

Teaching Note: 8B04A08 (5 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Services; Marketing Management; Market Segmentation; Investment Funds
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD OF ONTARIO (A): MARKET SEGMENTATION
Michael R. Pearce, Brad Hause

Product Number: 9B00A020
Publication Date: 8/28/2002
Revision Date: 1/7/2009
Length: 29 pages

The project manager for the Liquor Control Board of Ontario faces store network decisions in southeast Toronto. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario has developed a new five-year strategy in which all of their stores will be revamped into one of the four new formats, which has led to a review of every one of their nearly 600 retail locations. With a store within five minutes of 86% of the population of Ontario, the project manager's task is not about expanding coverage but rather improving the performance of the retail network. The (A) case focuses on what to do about a particular store in the area. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario (B): Market Segmentation, product 9B00A021 is a short follow-up about further decisions on store layout and merchandising. (A higher price applies to this case due to color exhibits.)

Teaching Note: 8B00A20 (14 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Analysis; Retailing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD OF ONTARIO (B): MARKET SEGMENTATION
Michael R. Pearce, Brad Hause

Product Number: 9B00A021
Publication Date: 8/28/2002
Revision Date: 1/7/2010
Length: 3 pages

This supplement to Liquor Control Board of Ontario (A): Market Segmentation, product 9B00A020 looks at the decisions the project manager must make on store layout and merchandising.

Teaching Note: 8B00A20 (14 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Analysis; Retailing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Marketing Research

ONTARIO MACHINERY RING (A) - PROBLEM DEFINITION
Thomas Funk

Product Number: 9B04A021
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 9 pages

The Ontario Machinery Ring is a cooperative set up to perform a matchmaking service for farmers who want to have custom work done and farmers who want to do custom work. This concept is widespread in Europe but has not been tried in North America. The general manager of the organization has set up a prototype operation and is looking at expansion opportunities. Expansion will take more funds than are available and the general manager has sought financial assistance from the provincial Ministry of Agriculture and Food. Before committing funds to this project, the ministry requires marketing research to measure demand for the machinery ring concept. Supplemental cases, Ontario Machinery Ring (B) and (C), product 9B04A022 and 9B04A023 look at questionnaire development and data analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B04A21 (7 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Marketing Planning; Data Analysis; Sales Forecasting; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ONTARIO MACHINERY RING (B) - RESEARCH DESIGN
Thomas Funk

Product Number: 9B04A022
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 3 pages

The general manager of Ontario Machinery Ring - a cooperative developed to match farmers with someone to do custom work - must develop a marketing research proposal and design a questionnaire to determine the demand of machinery ring concept. This is a supplement to Ontario Machinery Ring (A) - Problem Definition, product 9B04A021.

Teaching Note: 8B04A21 (7 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Marketing Research; Data Analysis; Sales Forecasting; Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ONTARIO MACHINERY RING (C) - DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
Thomas Funk

Product Number: 9B04A023
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 15 pages

The general manager of Ontario Machinery Ring is looking at expansion opportunities but limited funding requires him to obtain financial assistance from the Ministry of Agriculture and Food. The ministry requires an assessment of the demand for this marketing concept before they will provide any funding. He had developed a questionnaire and now must analyze the data that has been collected to prepare the marketing research proposal. This is a supplement to Ontario Machinery Ring (A) - Problem Definition, product 9B04A021. Data file is available, product 7B04A023.

Teaching Note: 8B04A21 (7 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Marketing Planning; Marketing Research; Data Analysis; Sales Forecasting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Consumer Buying Behavior

PRAEDA MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS INC.
Kenneth G. Hardy

Product Number: 9B06A003
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 5/1/2014
Length: 8 pages

A venture fund has approached an entrepreneur to sell one of its poorly performing holdings, or if there is no reasonable sale opportunity, turn the company around. He finds no acceptable offers for the company. He searches to find more information on how buyers purchase and use the product, which is a software system for police and courts to lay charges and manage them across the court process. The case illustrates the leverage available from understanding customer budgeting and buying processes, and fitting the service to meet the mind of the customer.

Teaching Note: 8B06A03 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Marketing Planning; Consumer Behaviour; Market Strategy; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PACIFIC WESTERN BREWING COMPANY - GOING ORGANIC
John R. Kennedy, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A006
Publication Date: 3/31/1999
Length: 20 pages

The president of Canadian-based Pacific Western Brewing Co. Ltd. is preparing a Japan market entry strategy for the company's newly developed organic beer. Although she has considerable experience in Japan, several factors are at play which make this product entry particularly challenging. First, the product is unlike any other in the market. Second, Japanese consumer behaviour is undergoing a revolution. Third, the company's last product launch in Japan failed. Therefore, there is a higher than normal level of risk associated with the product launch.

Teaching Note: 8A99A06 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Pricing; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Organizational Buying Behavior

GLOBAL HEALTHCARE EXCHANGE CANADA: TRADE EXCHANGE ADOPTION
Terry H. Deutscher, Dana Gruber

Product Number: 9B02A023
Publication Date: 12/9/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 14 pages

Global Healthcare Exchange Canada is a business-to-business exchange that connects hospitals and their major suppliers through an electronic procurement process. Founded as a subsidiary of its global parent, the exchange has become the leading health-care exchange in the country, but it is still far short of break-even. It must develop a compelling value proposition if it is going to drive adoption among hospitals and suppliers to the target levels. To do so, it must overcome considerable inertia among hospitals that are often very reluctant to change from frequently inefficient purchasing processes. Although there are major benefits to be realized from automating supply chain operations in the industry, the adoption decision process among hospitals is highly complex, but very idiosyncratic. In confronting these challenges, the exchange must also re-examine its own business model, in particular its pricing strategy for both suppliers and hospitals.

Teaching Note: 8B02A23 (15 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: E-Business; Market Strategy; Purchasing; Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRITISH COLUMBIA BOX LIMITED (REVISED)
Kenneth G. Hardy, J. Brock Smith

Product Number: 9A99A021
Publication Date: 10/8/1999
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 10 pages

The Vancouver plant manager of British Columbia Box Limited was about to make a half-million dollar decision. The plant required a new $500,000 machine, and the manager must decide which manufacturer will get the order. The case illustrates many concepts in industrial buying.

Teaching Note: 8A99A21 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Capital Investment; Sales Strategy; Industrial Marketing; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Product Strategy

THE LONDONER (B)
Kenneth G. Hardy, Darroch A. Robertson

Product Number: 9B05A008
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 10 pages

The publisher of an 18-month old, controlled-circulation weekly newspaper, The Londoner, is contemplating the addition of a web-based searchable data base of classified ads for used cars. It would seem to add value to the readership but it does appeal to readers well beyond the original trading area for the weekly, and it also offers some new timing issues for a weekly paper to create a feature with large weekend readership. The issue is whether or not the publisher should add this auto classified feature section and if so, how to market it to the greatest advantage. This case may be used with The Londoner (A), product 9B05A007).

Teaching Note: 8B05A08 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Market Strategy; Product Strategy; Partnership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FORD WINDSTAR
Robert J. Fisher, David J. Sharp, Satish Jha

Product Number: 9B03A005
Publication Date: 5/1/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 22 pages

Ford of Canada is a division of the Ford Motor Company - one of the Big Three automobile manufacturers in North America. The brand manager of the Windstar was concerned that its only brand in the minivan category would not meet its annual sales target. Since the Windstar's launch in the early 1990s, it had become one of the largest selling auto brands in Canada and was synonymous with safety and family travel. During the past few years, the popularity of purchasing a Windstar had declined with the minivan market becoming very competitive, the recession, quality problems and several product recalls. The brand manager must create a promotional strategy that will maintain Windstar sales and profitability and attempt to maintain the brand image. (Also available is the video, Ford Windstar product # 7B03A005.)

Teaching Note: 8B03A05 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Product Management; Product Strategy; Costs; Advertising
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ING BANK OF CANADA (A): LAUNCH OF A DIRECT BANK
Adrian B. Ryans

Product Number: 9A99A010
Publication Date: 8/25/1999
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 20 pages

The management team at ING Bank of Canada was preparing to launch Canada's first discount bank. Initially, the bank planned to serve its customers using mail and telephone. Later, it planned to supplement the telephone banking service with an interactive voice response system and an Internet-based service. ING hoped to attract customers by offering significantly higher interest rates on its savings products than any of its competitors. There was some skepticism about the viability of the proposed business model. At the time of the case, the president and CEO of ING Bank was reviewing the proposed launch strategy.

Teaching Note: 8A99A10 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Financial Institutions; Market Entry; Market Strategy; Product Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LAUNCH OF MBANX
Donald W. Barclay

Product Number: 9A98A025
Publication Date: 9/23/1998
Revision Date: 1/22/2010
Length: 19 pages

From a strategic perspective, the Bank of Montreal, a major Canadian bank, has committed to entering the 'virtual banking' marketplace in Canada. There is also the potential to launch later in the USA and Mexico. They plan to do this in a preemptive fashion to gain first mover advantage. This means no extensive pilots and a short time to launch. The decision makers are charged with developing a complete launch strategy. They have two years of tentative ideas to work with, but a number of major decisions on product line, pricing, communications, salesforce, etc. are still to be made. The purpose of the case is to introduce students to the entire scope of marketing decisions to be made in such a situation, including fundamental decisions around targeting and positioning. It also drives students to make decisions in the face of incomplete information and short time horizons. To date, the case has been successfully used to set the stage for marketing management courses, and to kick off marketing management modules in executive development programs. (A nine-minute video can be purchased with this case, video 7A98A025.)

Teaching Note: 8A98A25 (11 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Consumer Marketing; Market Entry; Market Strategy; New Products
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 8:
Product Management

LEVI STRAUSS CANADA HOLDING AN EMBER: THE GWG BRAND
Michael R. Pearce, Ken Mark, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B04A007
Publication Date: 10/13/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 16 pages

The director of marketing for Levi Strauss Canada needs to decide the future fate of the GWG brand, a fallen giant in the Canadian jeans market. For the last three years, GWG had been licensed to a small manufacturer, who has failed to meet the requirements in the license agreement. While the director is keen to use some of the latent brand equity in GWG, she know that Levi's and Dockers brands come first and that she can not divert marketing dollars towards the brand's revival. As well, she must be careful to manage her small but powerful portfolio of brands in the five main channels without cannibalizing the already declining volumes of the Levi's brand.

Teaching Note: 8B04A07 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Management; Licensing; Marketing Channels; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PROCTER & GAMBLE CANADA: DAYQUIL BRAND SAMPLING
Niraj Dawar, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9A98A029
Publication Date: 6/16/1999
Revision Date: 1/22/2010
Length: 13 pages

DayQuil Brand Sampling is part of a three-case series about the execution of a sampling project for the DayQuil brand of cold medication made by Procter & Gamble. The Brand Sampling case focuses primarily on brand management issues. The case serves to introduce students to the implementation aspects involved in a sampling program as well as to some tricky decisions regarding use of samples from a different country. In particular, the use of samples from the United States in the Canadian market requires over-stickering the expiry date and using one which is one year longer. While the use of the extended expiry date was perfectly legal and safe, the potential for consumer confusion was significant. (The other cases in this Procter & Gamble series are Managing DayQuil Sampling, case 9A98C015, and DayQuil Sampling Operations, case 9A98D020.)

Teaching Note: 8A98A29 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Crisis Management; Promotion Policy; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Pricing Strategy

STORAGEONE
Kenneth G. Hardy, Joe Bubel

Product Number: 9B04A027
Publication Date: 10/13/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 18 pages

Two partners have converted an abandoned bingo hall into a 40,000 square foot self-storage unit. It appears to be filling up quickly. The father wants to build four or five similar self-storage units each year in the surrounding cities and towns, by converting former factories and supermarkets into self-storage units. The partners want to build one unit each year in order to retain a larger ownership stake and a smaller debt component. In either situation, there are pricing and feasibility issues that must be considered.

Teaching Note: 8B04A27 (4 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Market Strategy; Pricing; Market Segmentation; Real Estate
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HAYWARD & GUZMAN: DISPOSABLE CONTACT LENSES
Niraj Dawar, Eric Dolansky

Product Number: 9B03A020
Publication Date: 6/26/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 4 pages

Hayward & Guzman researches and develops contact lens products and has recently developed a new disposable contact lens. Two segments with different price sensitivity have been identified. In order to reach these segments, the products will need to be packaged and sold differently. A marketing representative for Hayward & Guzman must develop a marketing mix for the two segments and determine pricing for each product.

Teaching Note: 8B03A20 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Segmentation; Ethical Issues; Pricing; Marketing Mix
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MARKETING NUMBERS: SHORT PROBLEMS
Michael R. Pearce, Liz Gray

Product Number: 9A99A028
Publication Date: 5/2/2000
Length: 6 pages

This series of 14 exercises is intended to provide practice in the typical arithmetic challenges faced by marketers. Each exercise focuses on different calculations, including margin calculations, contribution analysis, profit analysis, price calculations and break-even calculations.

Teaching Note: 8A99A28 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Commodity Pricing; Pricing; Pricing Strategy; Cost Accounting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Channels and Supply Chain Strategy

TVONTARIO
Paul W. Beamish, Gail Robertson

Product Number: 9B01M041
Publication Date: 7/11/2001
Length: 22 pages

TVOntario is a non-profit television station owned by the Ontario government that provides educational programming commercial-free. TVOntario is recognized as a world leader in quality educational programming for all ages as well as providing programming on important issues within the province. However, the television broadcasting industry is very competitive, and larger networks have greater cash flows to produce programs that encourage advertising and increase revenues. TVOntario's Sales and Licensing Department revenues continue to decline, and the managing director of revenue and development is faced with determining the future of the department. The station's board of directors has put pressure on him to make a decision and he needs to come up with a plan before they decide to shut the department down.

Teaching Note: 8B01M41 (8 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Licensing; Industry Analysis; Government and Business; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RESEARCH IN MOTION LTD. (A)
Adrian B. Ryans

Product Number: 9A99A036
Publication Date: 2/9/2000
Revision Date: 1/13/2010
Length: 17 pages

Top management at Research in Motion (RIM) were considering a significant change in strategic direction. RIM manufactured two-way pager, wireless PC card and OEM radio products. With the anticipated convergence of wireless and Internet e-mail, RIM saw an opportunity to sell end users a two-way, e-mail end-to-end solution, including both hardware and telecommunication service. Management had to assess whether this was an attractive opportunity. If they did enter the market, RIM would have to decide whether to target individual users or corporate information technology departments and select channels to reach its targeted customers. RIM also faced some challenging marketing communication issues, since about 50 per cent of potential users showed no interest in a mobile e-mail solution.

Teaching Note: 8A99A36 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: High Technology Products; Marketing Communication; Market Strategy; Marketing Channels
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Retailing and E-Tailing

LOBLAW COMPANIES LIMITED: PREPARING FOR WAL-MART SUPERCENTERS
Kenneth G. Hardy, Veronika Papyrina

Product Number: 9B07A012
Publication Date: 8/3/2007
Revision Date: 5/15/2009
Length: 21 pages

In February 2007, Loblaw Companies Limited (Loblaw) was far and away the dominant food retailer in Canada with a market share of 35 per cent across its various retailing formats. As part of its long term retailing strategy and in a bid to reduce the impact of Wal-Mart Canada's entry into food retailing, in 2004 Loblaw began to build new The Real Canadian Superstores in Ontario and position them as blockers that resembled Wal-Mart's U.S. combination food and general merchandise superstores. It overhauled its entire logistical system to improve its cost structure and it brought in new senior executives in 2006. Unfortunately, The Real Canadian Superstores appeared to be disappointing some customers, retail analysts, industry experts and even former Loblaw executives. Meanwhile, Wal-Mart entered the retail food market in 2006 with distinctive emphasis on fresh produce and deli offerings on top of its low prices and wide assortment. The question for Loblaw's executive team was whether or not to make any strategic changes, and, if so, in what direction.

Teaching Note: 8B07A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Competitiveness; Management Performance; Market Strategy; Retail Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SMART CO-OPERATIVE MARKETING
Kyle Murray, Jianping Liang

Product Number: 9B06A030
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Length: 11 pages

The owner of Cherished Scrapbooks (CS) had just decided to go ahead with the development of an industry-level marketing program. In January 2006, the chief executive officer of SMART Group (SMART), a scrapbook trade group based in California, advised the owner of CS that the next step in the evolution of her business was to co-operate with her direct competitors. Initially the CS owner had rejected the idea out-right: The retailers in my area don't like me and besides it seems it would be contrary to my competitive position. However, just one month later, she asked SMART's CEO if he would come to Toronto to lead the formation of a cooperative marketing plan team for 68 scrapbook retailers within 100 miles of Toronto. She now wondered how she could help grow this grass roots initiative? SMART planned to launch 20 cooperatives in North America for 2006. How could CS's owner help support and grow this initiative? She also wondered what her exit strategy would be; she hoped to grow her business and either sell or franchise it.

Teaching Note: 8B06A30 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; Exit Strategy; Retail Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON THE STATE OF CANADIAN RETAILING
Michael R. Pearce

Product Number: 9B01A022
Publication Date: 4/8/2002
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 9 pages

This note, intended for background in a marketing or retailing course, reviews the key numbers, trends and issues in Canadian retailing as of 2001.

Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Integrated Marketing Communications

MMI PRODUCT PLACEMENT, INC.
Robin Ritchie, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07A006
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 9 pages

The president of a national placement agency is preparing to make a final pitch to sign Greyhound Canada as a client. Greyhound wants to reposition its brand as a mainstream travel option, particularly for suburban commuters, and needs cost-effective ways to get its message to consumers. The company views product placement as a viable tool for building brand awareness, but worries about losing control over its brand image. Even more serious are concerns about the absence of reliable metrics to assess the overall effectiveness of product placement. The case covers fundamentals of product placement, particularly with respect to strengths and weaknesses, and provides an excellent basis for discussing its value as part of an overall marketing communications strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B07A06 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brand Positioning; Marketing Communication; Advertising
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WILLIAMS COFFEE PUB
Kenneth G. Hardy

Product Number: 9B04A006
Publication Date: 10/13/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 19 pages

Two brothers have developed Williams Coffee Pub into a 44-unit, quick service restaurant franchise in Southwestern Ontario. Williams Coffee Pub has a very broad positioning with different segments frequenting it in different parts of the day. The brothers have hired a new chief executive officer and they are about to hand significant operational and strategic control to this new executive and the new board of directors. The broad positioning is an issue and the future communications campaign is also an issue.

Teaching Note: 8B04A06 (5 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Franchising; Marketing Communication; Strategic Planning; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Communications Mix and Tactics

CAPITAL ONE: LAUNCHING A MASS MEDIA CAMPAIGN
Robert J. Fisher, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06A005
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/9/2009
Length: 18 pages

The senior Brand Manager for Capital One Canada is developing the firm's strategy for its first mass media advertising campaign in Canada. He had been provided with a menu of U.S. and U.K. advertisements - with test results for each - which he can adapt for a Canadian audience. The key decisions the Senior Brand Manager faces includes which customer segment to focus on, what value proposition to signal to this segment, what advertisements should be used to deliver these messages, and what customization efforts are necessary. He has a presentation to Capital One's senior management team and needs to back up his recommendations with numbers and logic.

Teaching Note: 8B06A05 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brand Management; Advertising Media; Advertising Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PENNZOIL-QUAKER STATE CANADA: THE ONE-TO-ONE DECISION (A)
Terry H. Deutscher, Christopher Spalding

Product Number: 9B04A010
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 22 pages

The director of Lubricants business for Pennzoil-Quaker State Canada is faced with a significant challenge - overcoming the apathy that many consumers had about changing their motor oil. Increasing the frequency of oil changes and improving retention of its customers was critical for the financial success of the company. In response to this challenge, the director had to make a recommendation on adoption and implementation of a major new promotional program. The program, called One-to-One, was designed to create closer relationships among consumers, retailers and Pennzoil-Quaker State. Making the program work required active cooperation from the retail installers who actually performed the oil changes. The supplement Pennzoil-Quaker State Canada: The One-To-One Decision (B), product 9B04A011, focuses on the 240-day field trial of the program.

Teaching Note: 8B04A10 (16 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Marketing Communication; Sales Promotion; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PENNZOIL-QUAKER STATE CANADA: THE ONE-TO-ONE DECISION (B)
Terry H. Deutscher, Christopher Spalding

Product Number: 9B04A011
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 4 pages

This supplement to Pennzoil-Quaker State Canada: The One-To-One Decision (A), product 9B04A010 looks at the 240-day field trail of a program designed to build loyalty among consumers, and to increase frequency of oil changes.

Teaching Note: 8B04A10 (16 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Marketing Communication; Sales Promotion; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NIKE INC.: DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE PUBLIC RELATIONS STRATEGY
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9A99C034
Publication Date: 5/29/2000
Revision Date: 1/14/2010
Length: 20 pages

It had been almost a decade since the first article surfaced in the media alleging that factories sub-contracted by Nike in China and Indonesia were forcing workers to work long hours for low pay, and for physically and verbally abusive managers. The article was the seed of a media campaign that created a public relations nightmare for the company. A financial crisis in Asia and intense competition in the domestic market contributed to a decline in Nike's revenue and market share after three years of record performance. Though no direct correlation could be proven between the consumer's negative perceptions of Nike and the company's decline in market share and stock, it certainly did not help in their efforts to establish themselves as the global leader in a hotly competitive industry. A linear overview of the adverse publicity that Nike received, and the perspectives of Nike senior management, demonstrates to students the importance and elements of the timely development of an effective media and consumer relations campaign.

Teaching Note: 8A99C34 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Public Relations; Consumer Relations; Management Philosophy; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Developing and Implementing a Marketing Plan

MICROSOFT CANADA: MARKETING XBOX
Michael R. Pearce, Tanya Mark

Product Number: 9B03A023
Publication Date: 11/10/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 26 pages

The group product manager for Xbox Canada was working on his marketing plan for the product's second year in the Canadian market. Xbox is a video game console and trailed Sony's PlayStation 2 in the marketplace. The group product manager must present his plan at the Microsoft Global Briefing. He knew the gaming market was turbulent and fickle and he wondered what he might do as an encore to the Xbox launch program.

Teaching Note: 8B03A23 (11 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Consumer Marketing; Competitor Analysis; Consumer Analysis; Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CREEMORE SPRINGS BREWERY: BRANDING WITHOUT ADVERTISING
Niraj Dawar, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9A99A024
Publication Date: 2/15/2000
Revision Date: 1/13/2010
Length: 12 pages

The vice president of marketing at Creemore Springs Brewery needs to develop a marketing plan to absorb the doubling of brewing capacity without hurting the brand. According to him, the Creemore brand has been successful and has had such committed and loyal consumers because it was known only to a select few. Its reputation had grown mainly through word of mouth. However, with the brewing capacity increase in progress, Creemore would need to double sales. Would this hurt the brand?

Teaching Note: 8A99A24 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing without Advertising; Brand Management; Managing a Small Firm
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NINTENDO - THE LAUNCH OF GAME BOY COLOR
Robert J. Fisher, Adrian B. Ryans

Product Number: 9B01A013
Publication Date: 10/18/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 14 pages

Nintendo Co. Ltd. is a worldwide leader in the retail video game industry. In 1998 the color version of Nintendo Game Boy would be launched simultaneously in North America and Europe and would be one of Nintendo's most important launches. The president of Nintendo, Canada must develop a marketing plan that would generate the most profit.

Teaching Note: 8B01A13 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Marketing Management; Market Strategy; Marketing Mix
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF MARKETING PLANS
Michael R. Pearce, Elizabeth Spracklin

Product Number: 9B03A007
Publication Date: 9/25/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 17 pages

This note is a discussion of the major considerations for a marketer faced with implementing a marketing plan. A five-part framework is offered to integrate concepts ranging from capacity of the marketing team to managing commitment to change.

Issues: Marketing Planning; Marketing Execution; Marketing Organization; Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Customer Satisfaction and Retention

INDIGO BOOKS & MUSIC INC.: OPTIMIZING ITS LOYALTY PROGRAM
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B07A005
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Revision Date: 9/27/2007
Length: 9 pages

This case allows for a discussion on loyalty programs. How should irewards, a consumer loyalty program, take advantage of the new capabilities promised by Indigo's new customer relationship management (CRM) system. Would adjustments to the pricing structure or the membership discounts be appropriate? Ultimately, how could Indigo ensure that its irewards program was both meaningful to customers and contributed to sales growth? The basis of the irewards program was an annual membership that afforded the member discounts on books. Members were assigned a membership card with a specific number that referred to their account; an annual membership fee was the cost of the program to the customer.

Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing Research; Marketing Planning; Customer Loyalty; Customer Relationship Management; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANDYM ENTERPRISES: FALLING SALES IN TERRITORY #61
June Cotte, Megan McCrae

Product Number: 9B04A014
Publication Date: 9/20/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 9 pages

Candym Enterprises is a wholesaler specializing in producing, importing and exporting giftware, and selling these items through independent sales representatives. The president and founder has discovered that performance in one territory is falling. A major trade-show is approaching, and changes need to be made in the territory quickly. The president feels he has several options, including replacing an independent sales rep with a company sales rep, which would be a new strategy for the company. Learning objectives include understanding the pros and cons of salary-based relationship building, the importance of excellent customer relationship management, and recognizing that using distributors/independent sales reps has some risk.

Teaching Note: 8B04A14 (5 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Sales Organization; Sales Strategy; Compensation; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FUTURE SHOP: RETAIL CUSTOMER RESEARCH
Michael R. Pearce, Alykhan Alidina, Morley Ivers, Rachel Kay

Product Number: 9B01A018
Publication Date: 12/10/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 7 pages

Future Shop is a large retail store chain that specializes in audio, video, computer equipment and software, and appliances. A student group has conducted a research study of Future Shop customers' perception of the strengths and weaknesses of the chain and submitted their findings.

Teaching Note: 8B01A18 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing Research; Consumer Satisfaction; Retail Marketing; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA