Ivey Publishing

Principles of Marketing

Kotler, P., Armstrong G.,13/e (United States, Pearson, 2010)
Prepared By Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, PhD Candidate (Marketing)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Marketing: Creating and Capturing Customer Value

CINEPLEX ENTERTAINMENT: THE LOYALTY PROGRAM
Kenneth G. Hardy, Renee Zatzman

Product Number: 9B08A008
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Revision Date: 5/15/2009
Length: 17 pages

In 2007, the marketing director for Cineplex Entertainment is trying to decide whether or not to proceed with a loyalty program that would provide incentives for customers to see more movies and events, and spend more on concessions. An important by-product would be the collection of detailed customer buying data. She has crafted four possible combinations of rewards and received proposals from three suppliers with experience in managing customer data banks. She must decide the structure and richness of the program, the supplier, the likely response rate to determine financial feasibility, and whether to launch regionally or nationally.

Teaching Note: 8B08A08 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: New Product Launch; Customer Relationship Management; Loyalty Programs
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE WII: NINTENDO'S VIDEO GAME REVOLUTION
Gloria Barczak, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B08A004
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 26 pages

In 2007, Nintendo's inexpensive and quirky Wii video game console had become all the rage. Despite its underpowered processor and comparatively basic graphics, it outsold both the Sony PlayStation 3 and the Microsoft Xbox 360. Nintendo's handheld system, known as the DS, also outsold Sony's more advanced PlayStation Portable. Nintendo's products were so successful, retail stores in North America and Japan quickly sold out whenever new shipments arrived, and many consumers were forced to pay premium prices on the grey market. The case examines the characteristics of a successful new product launch, particularly product features, brand loyalty, content availability, third-party support, and adherence to industry standards. The case also considers how radical innovations can be used to win market share from technically superior products focused on incremental innovations. Finally, a 4P marketing analysis is used to compare video game systems offered by Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo. The case may be used with The Launch of the Sony PlayStation 3 (Ivey Case 9B07A014) and A Note on Video and Computer Games (Ivey Case 9B07A013).

Teaching Note: 8B08A04 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Strategy; New Products; Generating Profit from New Technology; Product Design/Development; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



QUEST FOODS ASIA PACIFIC AND THE CRM INITIATIVE
Allen Morrison, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B01M011
Publication Date: 4/30/2001
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 15 pages

Quest Foods International is one of the world's largest manufacturers of fragrances, flavors and textures for the food, beverage and consumer products industries. Quest Foods' regional vice-president is in the process of implementing a business process re-engineering project for the company. His current efforts focus on developing an information technology-based customer relationship management (CRM) system that he believes could give the company a sustainable competitive advantage with customers in the region and throughout the world. His ultimate goal is to bring Quest to the next phase of e-business. Despite high ambitions, his initiatives are making little headway. Internal opposition to change is significant and some key customers are growing concerned that Quest's CRM plans might miss the mark. Faced with considerable time and resource pressures, he is wondering how to set priorities and where to focus his energies.

Teaching Note: 8B01M11 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Leveraging Information Technology; Business Process Re-Engineering; Customer Relations
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



CARVEL ICE CREAM - DEVELOPING THE BEIJING MARKET
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A017
Publication Date: 8/5/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 12 pages

The manager of business development for Carvel Asia Limited is trying to determine how best to increase ice cream cake sales in Beijing. In doing so, he needs to develop a complete marketing program which includes decisions about product offerings, pricing, placement (distribution) and promotion - the 4 Ps. Carvel Asia was a 50-50 joint venture between Carvel (USA) and China's Ministry of Agriculture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A17 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Pricing Strategy; Product Concept; Marketing Communication; Distribution
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 2:
Company and Marketing Strategy: Partnering to Build Customer Relationships

MARKETING PLANNING AT JUST US! CAFÉS
Sara Loudyi, Julia Sagebien, Normand Turgeon, Ian McKillop

Product Number: 9B09A014
Publication Date: 9/10/2009
Revision Date: 6/9/2010
Length: 21 pages

Jeff and Debra Moore are the founders of Just Us!, a fair trade coffee cooperative, retailer and wholesaler. Just Us!’s mission is to actively promote fair trade and its benefits for producers in developing countries. The Moores have maintained a strong commitment to educating consumers while building strong brand identity and upholding constant growth. To support the main distribution channel in grocery stores, management opened four cafés (two each in Wolfville and Halifax) and distributed products on university campuses. Just Us!’s overall sales continued to grow, but sales were leveling off. In addition, the prevailing economic climate in Canada and increasing competition were worrying the founders. Recently, the Moores hired a new marketing director who was required to incorporate unique knowledge of fair trade practices, ethical purchasing and social entrepreneurship, combine it with typical growth-driven marketing decisions and ultimately propose a marketing plan that would consolidate coffee shop operations.

Teaching Note: 8B09A14 (15 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Services; Marketing Planning; Marketing Management; Fair Trade; Social Entrepreneurship
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SAT & CO.: MARKET ORIENTATION
Satyendra Singh

Product Number: 9B08A006
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Length: 10 pages

The Sat & Co. case demonstrates how market orientation can be achieved and how its implementation can lead to superior business performance in the context of the machine tool industry. Sat & Co. consisted of two divisions: the lathe division that manufactured the lathe machines, and the computer numerical control (CNC) division that assembled CNC machines. The capacity of both divisions was underutilized. The problem was that the lathe division manufactured very basic lathe machines and the CNC division assembled very technologically advanced machines. As a result, both divisions failed to satisfy their customers' needs. The lathe division was poorly market-oriented, whereas the CNC division was overly market-oriented. The chairperson of the board of directors was adamant that both divisions must survive, and that a market orientation must be achieved, i.e. the company must meet customers' needs and must improve its business performance.

Teaching Note: 8B08A06 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Performance Measurement; Market Strategy; Machinery and Equipment; Customer Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INVESTORSOFT
Robin Ritchie, Alim Merali

Product Number: 9B05A030
Publication Date: 10/13/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 19 pages

InvestorSoft is preparing to launch its one and only product, a subscription-based software service that will make it convenient and economical for companies to manage the investor relations portion of their website. The company's founder faces an uphill battle in establishing InvestorSoft as a credible supplier to buyers who prefer dealing with large, reputable firms. His immediate challenge is to settle on a set of target customers, and determine whether InvestorSoft would be better off selling to them directly or through resellers who would bundle the software with other services. He must also develop pricing and promotional strategies that will secure a strong base of customers early on, in order to position the company for future growth. The case provides the basis for discussing core marketing concepts such as customer analysis, target market selection, and marketing mix decisions in an entrepreneurial context.

Teaching Note: 8B05A30 (12 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: New Products; Marketing Management; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TELUS MOBILITY - WHAT TO DO WITH MIKE
Donald W. Barclay, Jack Wong

Product Number: 9B02A010
Publication Date: 7/23/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 20 pages

TELUS Corporation is a leading telecommunications company. The vice-president of sales and marketing has reviewed the company's existing strategy for Mike (an enhanced specialized mobile radio system based on integrated digital enhanced network). As a unique digital wireless network, Mike offered users the traditional features of personal communication services, plus the added functionality of a digital two-way radio. However, technological advantages do not always translate into market advantages. In light of the dynamic changes in the wireless industry (such as the emergence of new technologies), the vice-president is faced with the challenge of defining a market strategy to grow TELUS's Mike business.

Teaching Note: 8B02A10 (6 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: High Technology Products; Telecommunication Technology; Market Strategy; Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Analyzing the Marketing Environment

ARTS & CRAFTS
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Nick Kuzyk

Product Number: 9B08A011
Publication Date: 8/14/2008
Length: 15 pages

The vice-president of marketing at Arts & Crafts was reflecting on the company's extremely successful year in the music business. New artists had been added to the company's roster, experiments with digital releases and marketing campaigns had been successful, and plenty of international licensing opportunities were emerging. In addition, one of the company's artists, Leslie Feist, had received multiple music awards. On the other hand, the music industry was facing some difficulties and most analysts predicted nothing but doom and gloom. The vice-president of marketing had to consider the future strategy of Arts & Crafts while considering the overall health of the industry.

Teaching Note: 8B08A11 (4 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Market Analysis; Marketing Management; Operations Management; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FAIRMONT CHATEAU LAKE LOUISE
Robin Ritchie, Paul Artiuch

Product Number: 9B03A032
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 20 pages

An historic hotel faces the twin challenges of seasonal demand and a decline in its most important market. The hotel's general manager is considering several expansion/renovation proposals to address these problems, each of which implies a different strategic focus. The decision is complicated by the fact that the hotel is located in world-renowned Banff National Park, an environmentally sensitive area administered by the Canadian government. Growing public concern over development in national parks implies that an overly ambitious expansion plan is likely to be rejected, yet this may be the hotel's last chance to add significant capacity for the long-term. The case demonstrates the role of social and political forces in business decisions, while underscoring the interdependency of target market, positioning and marketing mix decisions.

Teaching Note: 8B03A32 (14 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Analysis; Marketing Management; Sustainable Development; Tourism
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Managing Marketing Information to Gain Customer Insights

THE PIERCER
Colleen Sharen, Nicole Nolan

Product Number: 9B08M057
Publication Date: 4/7/2009
Length: 8 pages

Jessica Pierce and Ashley Mound have developed an innovative product for an entrepreneurship class assignment to be presented to potential investors. They now need to determine 1) which target markets have the most potential, 2) which distribution channels to use and 3) a sales volume estimate. The purpose of the case is to teach students how to use secondary research resources from a typical library to research the nature of the market for a new product. This case is appropriate for introductory business, entrepreneurship, business planning, introductory marketing or marketing research courses. It may also be used as an assessment tool.

Teaching Note: 8B08M57 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: New Venture Management; Digital Literacy; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



VINCOR: PROJECT TWIST
Niraj Dawar, Kelly Kretz, Eric Singer

Product Number: 9B08A002
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 12/2/2015
Length: 22 pages

The alcohol cooler (refreshment) market in Canada was already crowded, but the marketing manager at Vincor believed there was still room for a new entrant, provided it was sufficiently differentiated. The case provides market research information on which the decision-maker relies to develop a product positioning. Trade-offs need to be made between various positioning options and costs. The case deals with marketing issues from the perspective of the brand manager launching a new product.

Teaching Note: 8B08A02 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Positioning and Differentiation; New Product Development; Brand Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KIDS MARKET CONSULTING
Paul W. Beamish, Stephanie Taylor, Oleksiy Vynogradov

Product Number: 9B04M065
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 8 pages

The founder of Kids Market Consulting, a market research firm dedicated to the kids, tweens and teens segment, was faced with increasing competition and slowing revenue, and was exploring a variety of possibilities for the future strategic direction of the business. In particular, she had to formulate the best plan for protecting the niche market and decide how aggressively to pursue expansion. In addition, there was the existing relationship with her business partner, and Kids Market Consulting was part of his group of marketing firms. Any changes the founder chose had to respect this relationship and she was therefore restricted to a limited number of options. The over-arching corporate objective for the company was to defend the market from larger businesses who were trying to increase their share of the market research industry.

Teaching Note: 8B04M65 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Strategy Development; Strategic Planning; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ONTARIO MACHINERY RING (A) - PROBLEM DEFINITION
Thomas Funk

Product Number: 9B04A021
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 9 pages

The Ontario Machinery Ring is a cooperative set up to perform a matchmaking service for farmers who want to have custom work done and farmers who want to do custom work. This concept is widespread in Europe but has not been tried in North America. The general manager of the organization has set up a prototype operation and is looking at expansion opportunities. Expansion will take more funds than are available and the general manager has sought financial assistance from the provincial Ministry of Agriculture and Food. Before committing funds to this project, the ministry requires marketing research to measure demand for the machinery ring concept. Supplemental cases, Ontario Machinery Ring (B) and (C), product 9B04A022 and 9B04A023 look at questionnaire development and data analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B04A21 (7 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Marketing Planning; Data Analysis; Sales Forecasting; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



3M CHILE - HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS (A)
Terry H. Deutscher, Daniel D. Campbell

Product Number: 9A99A004
Publication Date: 5/5/1999
Revision Date: 11/7/2002
Length: 17 pages

Looking for a creative option to promote 3M products to medical professionals, a 3M Chile sales manager developed the idea of a first-aid kit or botiquin that could be used as a promotional gift. Managers at the company's world headquarters had not previously focused on branded first-aid kits. It was the same all over the world, a plain white box with the red cross in front. You just can't brand a first-aid kit! they replied. At the same time, the Chilean managers lacked the resources necessary for adequate market research. Should they go ahead with the botiquin concept anyway? If they did, questions such as channels, packaging, promotion, and pricing, would still have to be addressed. (A sequel to this case is available, titled 3M Chile - Health Care Products (B), case 9A99A005.)

Teaching Note: 8A99A04 (11 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Management in a Global Environment; Marketing Channels; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Consumer Markets and Consumer Buyer Behavior

WALT DISNEY INTERNET GROUP JAPAN'S DIMO PROJECT
Philip Sugai

Product Number: 9B04A026
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 25 pages

The Walt Disney Internet Group Japan has recently launched an entirely new set of interactive mobile character/agents for the NTT DoCoMo iMode platform, called Dimo. Having built Japan's most successful mobile entertainment business using traditional Disney-branded characters and related content, these Dimo characters have been designed to go well beyond entertainment and become valuable guides, assistants and friends for users of the continuously evolving Mobile Internet and the increasingly complex tasks enabled by this platform. Although the Walt Disney Internet Group Japan team feels strongly that these types of character/agents will be the future of human-device interactions, subscription figures six months after Dimo's launch suggest that Japan's mobile consumers may not share this belief.

Teaching Note: 8B04A26 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: E-Business; Brand Management; Competitive Advantage; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHANTALE AND CLINTON CALL FOR SERVICE
Christopher A. Ross

Product Number: 9B09A005
Publication Date: 4/7/2009
Length: 8 pages

Chantale and Clinton have purchased a new refrigerator from The Canadian, one of the largest department store chains in Canada. It subsequently began to malfunction. After receiving poor service from the vendor's repair division, they were wondering what to do next. Do nothing, and assume it was an isolated incident? Vow never again to deal with this vendor and brand? Write a letter of complaint to the vendor and demand an apology or other compensation? Underlying all these questions was the issue: Was it worth the trouble? The case can be used to illustrate consumer behaviour in marketing management, with emphasis placed on controllable and uncontrollable factors that influence individual buyer behaviour. It can also be used in a service marketing setting, where issues of service failure and recovery can be emphasized.

Teaching Note: 8B09A05 (10 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Customer Service; Service Recovery; Service Quality
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KRAFT FOODS: THE COFFEE POD LAUNCH (A)
Robin Ritchie, Aleem Visram

Product Number: 9B06A019
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Revision Date: 5/27/2014
Length: 19 pages

The product manager for coffee development at Kraft Canada must decide whether to introduce the company's new line of single-serve coffee pods or await results from the United States. Key strategic decisions include which target market to focus on and what value proposition to signal. Important questions are also raised as to how the new product should be branded, which flavors to offer, whether Kraft should use traditional distribution channels or direct-to-store delivery, and what forms of advertising and promotion to use. The case provides a basis for discussing consumer decision making, and stresses the importance of providing a clear incremental benefit when introducing a new product in an established category. It may be used independently or with the supplement, Kraft Foods: The Coffee Pod Launch (B).

Teaching Note: 8B06A19 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Consumer Behaviour; Consumer Marketing; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOYOTA: DRIVING THE MAINSTREAM MARKET TO PURCHASE HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES
Jeff Saperstein, Jennifer Nelson

Product Number: 9B04A003
Publication Date: 1/16/2004
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 23 pages

Toyota is a large, international automobile manufacturer headquartered in Japan, with plans to become the largest worldwide automaker, striving for 15 per cent of global sales. Toyota is committing itself to be the leader of the hybrid-electric automotive industry, and is relying on changes in the industry and customer perceptions to bring its plan to fruition. Toyota's challenge is to develop consumer attitude and purchase intent, from an early adopter, niche market model into universal mainstream acceptance.

Teaching Note: 8B04A03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Product Design/Development; Multinational; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE WIRELESS STRATEGY
Mike Wade, David Hamilton

Product Number: 9B01E001
Publication Date: 3/7/2001
Revision Date: 12/17/2009
Length: 23 pages

The director of business development of the electronic banking division of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) had just won a long-fought battle to implement a wireless banking initiative for customers with mobile devices such as cell phones and personal digital assistants. Now he had to make a number of key decisions relating to the strategy. These decisions included which services to offer (banking as well as non-related services), which devices and standards to support and whether to partner with a third-party content supplier. An extensive glossary of wireless technology terminology is included with this case.

Teaching Note: 8B01E01 (3 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Strategy Implementation; Technological Change; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Business Markets and Business Buyer Behavior

CONCENTRIC NETWORK CORPORATION
Frederik Lindkvist Karavoulias, Elliot Maltz

Product Number: 9B02A011
Publication Date: 6/21/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 32 pages

Concentric Network Corporation provided a full range of Internet services to small- and medium- size businesses. This market was potentially very lucrative, and the demand for full Internet solutions was growing, but the uncertain rate of Internet adoption made the growth trajectory difficult to determine. Success in this market required three fundamentals: product, distribution and capital-intensive infrastructure. Concentric's strength was in the first two. Concentric faced a number of rivals that offered similar services at similar costs. Due to the competitive environment and the need for infrastructure, cooperation and partnerships were of great importance. Concentric's management team recognized that to complete - or even to survive - in the maturing industry, it needed to become more vertically integrated. Concentric announced a merger with Nextlink Communications Inc., a voice and high-speed Internet provider specializing in the business-to-business market. The issue facing the company's chief executive officer and the senior vice-president of marketing was how to compete in the small- and medium-size business market through leveraging the joint capabilities of the merger.

Teaching Note: 8B02A11 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Market Strategy; Value Analysis; Telecommunication Technology; Alliances; Monitor
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GLOBAL SOURCES LTD. - THE EVOLUTION OF B2B
Allen Morrison, Tom Gleave, John Beck

Product Number: 9B01M065
Publication Date: 12/7/2001
Revision Date: 4/25/2012
Length: 21 pages

Global Sources Limited is Asia's leading publisher of business-to-business (B2B) trade-related magazines. In the latter half of the 1990s, the Internet became a powerful force for change in the business world, leading to an explosion of Internet-related activities by both traditional bricks and mortar companies, as well as countless upstart dot.coms. The chairman and chief executive officer of Global Sources had foreseen the opportunities afforded by the Internet early on, and had made it an integral part of the company's strategy. Currently, the level of activity in the B2B portal space has evolved so quickly that a noticeable degree of confusion among suppliers, buyers and investors about the merits and drawbacks of these portals has arisen. Moreover, the sustainability of these ventures has been brought into question, which is causing a dramatic reversal of fortunes for many companies. The result is that there are strong signs that the industry will experience a significant consolidation. This has left Global Sources chairman with the key challenge of generating greater visibility among users and potential users of the companies services, as well as greater interest from the investment community in order to remain viable. The company must be able to educate and convey its value proposition to its users, as well as determine whether it should continue to remain an independent player, purchase a competitor, or enter into a strategic alliance.

Teaching Note: 8B01M65 (21 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Managing Industry Change; Competitor Analysis; Strategic Positioning; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRITISH COLUMBIA BOX LIMITED (REVISED)
Kenneth G. Hardy, J. Brock Smith

Product Number: 9A99A021
Publication Date: 10/8/1999
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 10 pages

The Vancouver plant manager of British Columbia Box Limited was about to make a half-million dollar decision. The plant required a new $500,000 machine, and the manager must decide which manufacturer will get the order. The case illustrates many concepts in industrial buying.

Teaching Note: 8A99A21 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Capital Investment; Sales Strategy; Industrial Marketing; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy: Creating Value for Target Customers

HYUNDAICARD'S MARKETING STRATEGY
Chansoo Park, Ronald D. Camp

Product Number: 9B09A028
Publication Date: 12/23/2009
Length: 20 pages

In the competitive South Korean credit card market, a review of the past decade of HyundaiCard's marketing strategies and evaluation of anticipated possible difficulties of being a market follower revealed several challenges for senior management. Despite a tremendously successful creative business model based on customer needs, innovative products and integration of online and offline customers, the company's performance had not progressed in the past seven years. HyundaiCard had difficulty relating its creative business model to the strong personas of the leading players in the credit card industry. How could HyundaiCard, a market follower, successfully position itself as a market leader? Could HyundaiCard's marketing strategy keep enhancing its competitive edge in the market? What future strategy would be best for HyundaiCard?

Teaching Note: 8B09A28 (9 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Market Analysis; Market Segmentation; Consumer Marketing; Credit Card Business; Marketing Management; Promotion Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



YOUR HOME IS A GOOD PLACE, INC.
Kevin Coulson, Zane Swanson

Product Number: 9B09A025
Publication Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 8 pages

Your Home is a Good Place, Inc. was a unique business. It brought together homeowners, contractors and other service suppliers in a one-stop shopping environment that emphasized convenience as a marketing strategy. Your Home is a Good Place, Inc. (YHGP) needed to know more about the demand in the area and to decide how to attract both suppliers of services and customers as well as promote the business and build a brand identity. The owner has decided to hire a consultant to: 1) identify target market demographics in Michiana developed from the census data provided 2) provide a general description of potential competitors for YHGP 3) develop a marketing plan focused on bringing in clients as well as contractors and facilitators as partners. Discussion of building a brand identity for a new business will be a consideration here. This case will fit with upper-level marketing strategy or entrepreneurship courses, a management capstone course or within an MBA-level marketing course. The objectives for this case are for the students to learn SWOT analysis, to apply the data to complete a marketing plan, and to advise a difficult client. It is best suited for team applications although individuals can complete the exercises. Additionally, students should consider the implications of, and how to deal with, a client who is in need of advice but is reluctant to accept ideas that are not his own.

Teaching Note: 8B09A25 (7 pages)
Industry: Construction, Manufacturing, Other Services
Issues: Market Strategy; Human Resources Management; Strategy and Resources; Strategic Alliances; Management Science and Info. Systems; Distribution Channels; Segmentation; Brand Positioning; New Product Development; Target Segment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SHOPPERS STOP: TARGETING THE YOUNG
Shanker Krishnan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A011
Publication Date: 5/14/2009
Length: 23 pages

The case deals with how Shoppers Stop, a home-grown Indian retailer of branded apparel and accessories closely identified with the adult segment of customers for a decade and a half since inception, looked at the growing segment of the youth population. Against the backdrop of an aging demographic, particularly among countries in North America and Europe, India had an advantage of a largely young population. Thirty-five per cent of Indian were under 15 years of age and 70 per cent under 35 years of age - a profile likely to remain so for the next two decades. Topics of discussion include: Is there a risk for an adult company in targeting the young? Is there a risk in not targeting the young? Is there a business opportunity in the youth segment? What should Shoppers Stop do if it were to seize the opportunity? What is the addressable segment? Is a change in strategy required now or will tweaking the current strategy do? An interview with the Shoppers Stop chief executive officer is available on DVD.

Teaching Note: 8B09A11 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Customer Relationship Management; Retailing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DEXIT - A MARKETING OPPORTUNITY
Robin Ritchie, Sohail Lalani

Product Number: 9B05A002
Publication Date: 2/21/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 15 pages

Dexit is a new electronic payment system that offers a convenient alternative to cash for small-value retail transactions. The chief executive officer is faced with some critical target market and marketing mix decisions as she prepares for launch. The situation is complicated by the fact that action is needed on two fronts: Dexit must not only recruit end-consumers to use the service, it also has to convince merchants to install the payment terminals. Since paying with cash is free, the company will need to persuade both groups that the added convenience of Dexit justifies a transaction fee. Although the concept appears to have good potential, the recent test market failures of two similar offerings suggest that success is far from guaranteed. The case reinforces the importance of solid consumer analysis when selecting a target market, demonstrates the concept of value to the customer, and provides a basis for discussing push versus pull marketing strategies.

Teaching Note: 8B05A02 (16 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Target Marketing; New Products; Marketing Management; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEVI STRAUSS CANADA HOLDING AN EMBER: THE GWG BRAND
Michael R. Pearce, Ken Mark, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B04A007
Publication Date: 10/13/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 16 pages

The director of marketing for Levi Strauss Canada needs to decide the future fate of the GWG brand, a fallen giant in the Canadian jeans market. For the last three years, GWG had been licensed to a small manufacturer, who has failed to meet the requirements in the license agreement. While the director is keen to use some of the latent brand equity in GWG, she know that Levi's and Dockers brands come first and that she can not divert marketing dollars towards the brand's revival. As well, she must be careful to manage her small but powerful portfolio of brands in the five main channels without cannibalizing the already declining volumes of the Levi's brand.

Teaching Note: 8B04A07 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Management; Licensing; Marketing Channels; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Products, Services, and Brands: Building Customer Value

BEST BUY INC. - DUAL BRANDING IN CHINA
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A016
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Revision Date: 5/11/2010
Length: 17 pages

A month after Best Buy Inc. (Best Buy), the largest retailer of consumer electronics in the United States, acquired Five Star, the third largest retailer of appliances and consumer electronics in China in May 2006, the management of Best Buy is weighing in on a branding option. Should Five Star lose its identity and be marketed as Best Buy? Or should Best Buy retain the Five Star brand and let the two brands compete with each other in the Chinese market? The option has a sense of déjà vu because, when it first stepped out of its home turf in January of 2002 by acquiring Future Shop, the largest consumer electronics retailer in Canada, Best Buy was facing a similar dilemma. The company had decided, at the time, in favour of dual brand strategy. It had worked. There was no evidence of cannibalization, the single largest risk in dual branding. Best Buy and Future Shop had both grown together as independent brands in Canada. But, does dual brand strategy work in the vastly different retail environment of China?

Teaching Note: 8B09A16 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Brand Management; Retailing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHERRIES WITH CHARM: TURKEY'S ALARA AGRI
Michael R. Pearce, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B09A019
Publication Date: 6/25/2009
Revision Date: 7/15/2009
Length: 20 pages

The chief executive officer (CEO) and owner of Alara Agri, a major Turkish cherry and fig producer, wants to convince retailers in Belgium and Germany (and, later, other parts of Europe) to change cherries from a bulk product to a higher-end luxury product packaged in small carry bags. The move from bulk to small packages has been highly successful in the United Kingdom where retailers reduced waste and increased margins. The German and Belgian retailers are resisting the change, claiming greater price sensitivity in their consumer base. The CEO thinks he needs a detailed test marketing plan to offer to selected retailers.

Teaching Note: 8B09A19 (13 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Consumer Marketing; Agriculture; Test Marketing; Market Analysis; International Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK: THE MARKETING AND BRANDING CHALLENGES OF A START-UP
Gavin Chen, Derrick Deslandes

Product Number: 9B05A012
Publication Date: 6/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 17 pages

FirstCaribbean International Bank was the new banking entity created from the combination of the Caribbean operations of two foreign banks, Barclays Bank plc of the United Kingdom and headquarters in London, England and CIBC - formally the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce - of Canada and headquartered in Toronto, Ontario. A marketing team was formed with the specific responsibility of developing the marketing function and the brand strategy, as well as guiding the branding process of the new entity. The head of the marketing team has a number of concerns: Would geography, history and commercial practices support or mitigate against a single, centralized marketing strategy for the entire region, what should the new brand be and how should it be articulated, should the new brand reflect one or both of the heritage banks or should the new brand break with the past and reflect a totally new identity, and how quickly could the new brand be rolled out? This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the five additional Cross-Enterprise cases that deal with various functional issues associated with the eventual merger: Human Resources - Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean, product 9B04C053; Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032; General Management - CIBC-Barclays: Should Their Caribbean Operations Be Merged?, product 9B04M067; Accounting and Finance - CIBC-Barclays: Accounting For Their Merger, product 9B04B022; FirstCaribbean International Bank: The Marketing and Branding Challenges for a Start-up, product 9B05A012; and technical note - Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B05A12 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Brand Management; Brand Positioning; Market Strategy; Marketing Planning; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OTOYOL MOTOR COMPANY
Jim Kayalar

Product Number: 9B09M053
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 24 pages

Otoyol Motor Company, a large commercial vehicle manufacturer, is on the verge of being liquidated by its shareholders. Despite all efforts to maintain its competitive position, the company has been caught in a downward spiral. Erosion of its first mover advantages, shifts in industry core competencies and changes in consumer preferences have depreciated the company's value proposition and deteriorated its market share. Utilizing empirical data, this case illustrates the evolution of the commercial vehicle industry in Turkey, changes in industry conditions, and competitive strategies employed by the incumbent and its Japanese rivals in various life cycle stages. Puppy dog ploy, market penetration, product strategy, long term market share acquisition stratagems employed by challengers, and the incumbent's counter moves are chronicled.

Teaching Note: 8B09M53 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Strategy; Competitiveness
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
New-Product Development and Product Life-Cycle Strategies

MICROSOFT WINDOWS: THE LAUNCH OF WINDOWS 7
Miranda R. Goode, Matthew Ball

Product Number: 9B09A023
Publication Date: 8/14/2009
Length: 25 pages

In early 2009, Microsoft began preparing for the launch of its next operating system, Windows 7. Successfully marketing Windows 7 had become essential for the company, which had faced numerous challenges in recent years, including a commercial and public relation failure of its last operating system, Windows Vista. While Windows 7 had received strong pre-release reviews, its success depended on Microsoft's ability to overcome the lingering skepticism and resentment of Windows Vista. The case presents students with the opportunity to perform a rich analysis of the difficulties in launching a new product following the commercial and public relations failure of the predecessor and provides a platform from which to explore the psychology (from both a consumer and managerial perspective) behind new product adoption. The case is structured to promote an analysis of Vista's relations failure using a psychological framework. Based on this analysis, students are challenged to devise a strategy for the launch of Windows 7 and to make decisions related to advertising communications, pricing, product, target market selection and brand image.

Teaching Note: 8B09A23 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Advertising; Marketing Communication; New Products; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ACME MEDICAL IMAGING
Donald A. Pillittere

Product Number: 9B08D004
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 6 pages

After negotiations with a key supplier for lower prices and quicker turnaround go nowhere, two employees of Acme Medical Imaging realize there's no more low-hanging fruit to pick to keep their project on time and on budget -- no more concessions from external parties, no more superficial, short-term fixes. They have to convince their chief executive officer and the project team to take a hard look at internal processes. From the perspective of Operations, this case examines the challenges that can arise - and some steps that can be taken - when the greatest obstacles to a project are the people and procedures responsible for its success.

Teaching Note: 8B08D04 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Commercialization Process; Project Objective; New Product Development; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMERON AUTO PARTS (A) - REVISED
Harold Crookell, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M015
Publication Date: 1/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

This case is about a small American auto parts producer trying to diversify his way out of dependence on the major automakers. A promising new product is developed and the company gets a chance to license it to a Scottish manufacturer. The issue of whether to license or go it alone in international markets is central to the case. (A sequel to this case is available titled Cameron Auto Parts (B) - Revised, case 9B06M016.)

Teaching Note: 8B06M15 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Exports; Licensing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BONITA BAY MARINA
Geoffrey Burgerhoff, John Fitch, William J. Ritchie

Product Number: 9B05M006
Publication Date: 12/20/2004
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 10 pages

The Bonita Bay Marina, founded 20 years ago by the Bonita Bay Group, established a reputation of high quality service delivery. According to the marina's manager, customers' high regard for their services was due to the organization's adherence to well-defined customer service philosophy known as the E5 Customer Service Philosophy. The manager must decide whether the benefits of pursuing a Clean Marina certification program would bolster the level of service quality and ultimately the reputation of Bonita Bay Group in the marketplace. Further evaluation of the current customer service program must be conducted to determine whether the clean marina certification would complement the existing E5 Customer Service Philosophy and create synergies that would enhance customer perceptions of their services as well as contribute to profit margins for years to come.

Teaching Note: 8B05M06 (8 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Quality; Quality Management; Personnel Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Pricing: Understanding and Capturing Customer Value

SASKTEL
Elizabeth M.A. Grasby, Marsha Watson

Product Number: 9B09A009
Publication Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 9 pages

The executive committee of SaskTel had recently approved a proposal to launch its LifeState health monitoring system to the Canadian marketplace. The company's senior director of marketing must develop a marketing plan, including distribution and promotion, for the proposed product launch in six months' time. She will have to make decisions quickly in order to present a proposal to the executive committee within two weeks.

Teaching Note: 8B09A09 (13 pages)
Issues: Marketing Communication; Marketing Channels; Market Analysis; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 1 - Introductory



TERRA BITE LOUNGE: PAY WHAT YOU WANT CAFÉ
June Cotte, Remi Trudel

Product Number: 9B09A013
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Length: 4 pages

In April 2009, the founder and owner of Terra Bite Lounge was considering opening another location. The Terra Bite Lounge was a Kirkland, Washington café with no prices and voluntary payment. The owner believed that Terra Bite was a demonstration of a high level of honesty and trust, between himself and the customer. There were several considerations to evaluate in deciding to open a new location. Where should the new location be? The current location was in an affluent suburb but the owner believed that several types of neighbourhoods would be receptive. What types of consumer characteristics would best be suited towards this model of trusting that payment would be made? Is there anything that could be added to the current model to make Terra Bite more successful? He was careful to consider those changes or additions that were consistent with the current social trust component of the original Terra Bite model.

Teaching Note: 8B09A13 (4 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Marketing Management; Consumer Behaviour; Pricing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CONTAINER TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
Peter C. Bell, Bai Xiaodong, Michael Zhang

Product Number: 9B08E005
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Revision Date: 11/9/2011
Length: 4 pages

The regional manager of the Container Transportation Company, and his colleagues were looking for a new strategy to allocate containers for transportation from Korea and China to the Middle East. All the business departments had been challenged by top management to optimize their revenues and profit. The regional manager wondered whether he could improve pricing or apply other revenue management techniques to enhance revenues without negatively affecting customer service.

Teaching Note: 8B08E05 (8 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Revenue Management; Transportation; Pricing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HUDSON NUPTIALS (A)
Stewart Thornhill, Ryan Little

Product Number: 9B07M001
Publication Date: 3/16/2007
Revision Date: 10/11/2013
Length: 8 pages

Hudson Nuptials is a Toronto-based company created to take advantage of Canada's exclusive worldwide status as a provider of marriages to non-resident, same-sex couples. The company's president is struggling with whether to provide standardized wedding packages or to provide customized experiences to each client.

Teaching Note: 8B07M01 (7 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Product Mix; Pricing Strategy; Balancing Products and Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Pricing Strategies

BECK TAXI
Srinivas Krishnamoorthy, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09M058
Publication Date: 9/23/2009
Length: 7 pages

Beck Taxi is Toronto's leading cab brokerage. In May 2009, the company's chief executive officer (CEO) is wondering whether the company could change the radio fee for the limited duration of summer, usually a lean season for the cab trade. The fee, paid by drivers for the dispatch service connecting them to customers in waiting, has not been increased in over a decade. That is enough reason to go for a straight upward revision on a permanent basis. The CEO is also considering introducing a variable component to pricing - a novelty in the cab trade. There are several forces at stake in the trade and any decision by Beck Taxi, as the market leader, will shake it up. Status quo is therefore an option in its own right for the CEO. The case provides the background against which the CEO will have to make a call on pricing Beck's service.

Teaching Note: 8B09M58 (6 pages)
Issues: Entrepreneurial Problem Solving; Pricing; Spreadsheet Modeling
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



PETS.COM INC.: THE RISE AND DECLINE OF A PET SUPPLY RETAILER
Omar Merlo

Product Number: 9B09A021
Publication Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 16 pages

The case follows the rise and decline of Pets.com from its inception in 1994 until 2000. It starts with a look at the birth of Pets.com, followed by a discussion of the market, consumer behaviour and key competitors. It then focuses on Pets.com's business strategy and marketing mix. The case study provides the basis for class discussion of a number of key issues, including but not limited to a) the decision whether to enter a strategic partnership, b) the pursuit of an aggressive growth strategy, c) the design and management of the marketing mix, d) the use of aggressive communication and pricing strategies, and e) brand-building decisions. Pets.com is often cited alongside the Edsel, New Coke, Betamax and others as one of the biggest marketing blunders of all times. As such, students find it a fascinating story. The case study also asks students to reflect on some common challenges faced by organizations, such as entry and survival in a highly competitive market, how to deal with a dominant player, venture capital and entrepreneurial issues, business model design, brand management, marketing mix decisions, and the benefits and perils of a growth strategy. The case has been used successfully in the following courses: a) an MBA elective course dealing with popular marketing mistakes and failures, b) a postgraduate strategic marketing course dealing with growth strategies, c) a marketing management course at the undergraduate level focused on the design and management of the marketing mix, and d) a services marketing module at the undergraduate level on the topic of online marketing.

Teaching Note: 8B09A21 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing Mix; Business Growth; Online Retail; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SY.MED DEVELOPMENT, INC.
Randle Raggio

Product Number: 9B09A010
Publication Date: 6/10/2009
Length: 20 pages

In March of 2001, the president of Sy.Med Development, Inc. (Sy.Med), a small health-care software firm, was concerned about his company's sales performance in the year-to-date. Nine units were projected, but only three had been sold. As a result, Sy.Med was 66 per cent below the president's unit forecast, 210 per cent below his net income forecast, and had lost $40,000. The president wondered whether a change to the base price of the software was necessary to boost sales. The case introduces the concept of value pricing, that is, pricing on the basis of value received by customers, not pricing on the basis of the cost of providing the product or service. The concept of value pricing at Sy.Med requires the simultaneous consideration of customer segments and sales force allocation in a high-tech setting. With careful calculation, students can determine the benefit to a particular customer of using the OneApp software. Some sensitivity analysis is required because not all practice sizes are equivalent, nor do they face the same labour costs. Although the pricing decision is the focus of the case, strategy (e.g. relating to customer selection, strategic focus) and sales force issues are inextricably linked to this decision. After the class discussion is complete, students should understand that pricing decisions cannot be made in isolation; the strategy and structure of the market must be considered. The case works well in the core MBA marketing course to introduce the concept of value pricing, and equally well in a course focused on pricing to emphasize the interrelations among organizational issues, the competitive market and the pricing decision. The case can also be used in an orientation program or as an introductory case to help train students in the art of preparing a quantitative case analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B09A10 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Value Analysis; Pricing Strategy; Sales Organization; Sales Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INTELLIBYTE INC.'S EUROLOADER SOFTWARE
Niraj Dawar, Cameron Bramwell

Product Number: 9B00A023
Publication Date: 9/26/2000
Revision Date: 1/7/2010
Length: 10 pages

As cable operators across Europe go digital, they will require a means of remotely upgrading the applications software on subscribers' digital set-top boxes, using some kind of loader software to do so. Intellibyte Inc., a small Canadian software firm, has developed the only remote loader software that currently meets the specifications of the European Cable Communications Association. However, it must sell the software to manufacturers of set-top boxes before cable operators can use it. The competition is no more than two years behind. The president must decide among several pricing and positioning alternatives for intellectual property products in a complex industry.

Teaching Note: 8B00A23 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: New Products; Intellectual Properties; Market Strategy; Pricing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Marketing Channels: Delivering Customer Value

MARKET STRETCH
Gavin Price, Margaret Sutherland

Product Number: 9B09M046
Publication Date: 6/25/2009
Length: 11 pages

Bio-Oil is a multi-purpose skin care product that has gone from being sold only in South Africa to being the No. 1 scar treatment product in 16 of the 17 countries in which it is distributed. Retail sales have jumped from R3 million per annum to R1 billion from 2000 to 2008. Justin and David Letschert made key decisions to eliminate all of the other 119 products that were being manufactured by the company that they took over in 2000, and focused on the mainstay product of Bio-Oil. Union-Swiss accomplished its successful sales through the use of a hybrid distribution model that compelled its distributors in each country to communicate and share knowledge with each other. Union-Swiss also ensured that it remained focused on building the brand through limiting its activities in the value chain to that of marketing. It did this to such an extent that it created a separate entity to run the distribution of Bio-Oil in South Africa.

Teaching Note: 8B09M46 (8 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Market Entry; International Business; Supply Chain Management; Strategic Positioning; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



CANADA GOOSE INC.: AT A RETAIL CROSSROADS
June Cotte, Jesse Silvertown

Product Number: 9B09A012
Publication Date: 5/14/2009
Length: 12 pages

In June 2008, the president and owner of Canada Goose Inc. (Canada Goose), a producer of luxury sport jackets, was contemplating the future of his company. Despite recent years' steady growth in both his company and the industry in general, the president believed that a significant opportunity existed for Canada Goose to further cement itself as a market leader for this industry. The president was intrigued by two separate offers from national retailers in Canada. Both were in the form of long-term contracts; in the past Canada Goose had used such contracts to maintain successful relationships with its many distributors. The offers were lucrative; however, the president needed to consider whether the offers aligned with the company's current marketing strategy. Agreeing to stock its product through a national chain would be a departure from its current method of distribution through independently-owned regional retailers. Accepting either of the offers would not only potentially price these retailers out of the market but could also lead to the devaluation of the brand.

Teaching Note: 8B09A12 (3 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Brand Positioning; Brand Management; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PHILLIPS FOODS, INC. - INTRODUCING KING CRAB TO THE TRADE
Frederic Brunel, Deborah Utter

Product Number: 9B09A004
Publication Date: 4/7/2009
Revision Date: 4/29/2010
Length: 20 pages

By 2006, Phillips Food Inc. had grown into one of the largest seafood businesses in the United States and was the number one U.S. brand for crab meat. The company comprised a restaurant division, a foodservice products division that sold to restaurants, and a retail products division that sold to grocery stores. In August, 2006, Phillips' product manager was responsible for defining the communication strategy decisions required to launch its new product: first-to-market pasteurized king crab. The product manager had already spent half of his advertising budget promoting the product to buyers in the foodservice and restaurant channels. He had to decide how to spend the remaining portion of his budget to best reach seafood buyers in the consumer retail channel. He had an opportunity to showcase the product at an upcoming major industry food show; however, he had already planned to spend his budget on advertising in a trade publication for the retail grocery channel. He had to examine the relative merits of each option and present an overall recommendation on how to best launch and sell the product. Qualitative, quantitative and financial aspects were to be considered; as well, the product manager had to determine the costs, returns and qualitative benefits that each option provided.

Teaching Note: 8B09A04 (19 pages)
Issues: Sales Management; Distribution; Trade Advertising; New Product Development; Trade Show
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TSC STORES: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT FOR PROFITABLE GROWTH
P. Fraser Johnson

Product Number: 9B09D005
Publication Date: 3/9/2009
Length: 10 pages

In May 2007, the chief operating officer at TSC Stores in London, Ontario, asked the director of distribution to evaluate the company's supply chain strategy and make recommendations to the board of directors. The chief operating officer was concerned about the ability of the company's supply chain to support the corporate business plan, which called for 20 per cent annual growth over the next three years. Preliminary analysis indicated that TSC would need more distribution capacity by first quarter 2008, which gave the director of distribution only six to eight months to evaluate options and implement a plan. The chief operating officer and the board would want to know the process and schedule that the director of distribution intended to follow to deal with the evolving capacity demands in distribution.

Teaching Note: 8B09D05 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Supply Chain Strategy; Capacity Planning; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Retailing and Wholesaling

LOBLAW COMPANIES LIMITED: PREPARING FOR WAL-MART SUPERCENTERS
Kenneth G. Hardy, Veronika Papyrina

Product Number: 9B07A012
Publication Date: 8/3/2007
Revision Date: 5/15/2009
Length: 21 pages

In February 2007, Loblaw Companies Limited (Loblaw) was far and away the dominant food retailer in Canada with a market share of 35 per cent across its various retailing formats. As part of its long term retailing strategy and in a bid to reduce the impact of Wal-Mart Canada's entry into food retailing, in 2004 Loblaw began to build new The Real Canadian Superstores in Ontario and position them as blockers that resembled Wal-Mart's U.S. combination food and general merchandise superstores. It overhauled its entire logistical system to improve its cost structure and it brought in new senior executives in 2006. Unfortunately, The Real Canadian Superstores appeared to be disappointing some customers, retail analysts, industry experts and even former Loblaw executives. Meanwhile, Wal-Mart entered the retail food market in 2006 with distinctive emphasis on fresh produce and deli offerings on top of its low prices and wide assortment. The question for Loblaw's executive team was whether or not to make any strategic changes, and, if so, in what direction.

Teaching Note: 8B07A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Competitiveness; Management Performance; Market Strategy; Retail Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SUNRIPE MARKETPLACE: A PRIVATE LABEL STRATEGY
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B07A003
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 9 pages

The founder/owner of Sunripe Marketplace (Sunripe) is thinking about the stores' product offerings. He has two fresh produce-focused stores and a unique set of distribution and store-level systems that differentiate Sunripe from other supermarkets. Being a small retailer allows the owner to only choose the best and freshest products for his two stores. His stores have several private labels that customers like. Sunripe's owner must now consider how to improve the marketing of these private labels.

Teaching Note: 8B07A03 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Merchandising; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SMART CO-OPERATIVE MARKETING
Kyle Murray, Jianping Liang

Product Number: 9B06A030
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Length: 11 pages

The owner of Cherished Scrapbooks (CS) had just decided to go ahead with the development of an industry-level marketing program. In January 2006, the chief executive officer of SMART Group (SMART), a scrapbook trade group based in California, advised the owner of CS that the next step in the evolution of her business was to co-operate with her direct competitors. Initially the CS owner had rejected the idea out-right: The retailers in my area don't like me and besides it seems it would be contrary to my competitive position. However, just one month later, she asked SMART's CEO if he would come to Toronto to lead the formation of a cooperative marketing plan team for 68 scrapbook retailers within 100 miles of Toronto. She now wondered how she could help grow this grass roots initiative? SMART planned to launch 20 cooperatives in North America for 2006. How could CS's owner help support and grow this initiative? She also wondered what her exit strategy would be; she hoped to grow her business and either sell or franchise it.

Teaching Note: 8B06A30 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; Exit Strategy; Retail Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RONA INC.- DEALING WITH RECESSION
Darren Meister, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09M076
Publication Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 19 pages

In September 2009, the president and chief executive officer (CEO) of Rona Inc. was reviewing the company's progress in relation to the ongoing economic recession. Rona was the largest retailer of hardlines in Canada. Rona had noticed definitive signs of slowdown in the third quarter of 2007 and had launched Strategic Plan 2008 - 2011 as a response. The two-phase program was nearing the completion of its first phase of Productivity, Efficiency and Profitability (PEP) and was gearing up for the 24 month-long Recovery Program. The Strategic Plan had been tweaked since its launch, all with a view towards strengthening the core platform. The objective of the Recovery Plan was to restore focus on growth vectors from which the company had become distracted. On the eve of commencement of the Recovery Plan, the CEO began to wonder if Rona was ready to act on increasing sales, recruiting independents, constructing new stores and pursuing acquisitions. Or was it necessary to redesign and relaunch the PEP program, thus deferring the Recovery Plan?

Teaching Note: 8B09M76 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Strategy Development; Retailing; Managing Recession; Strategy Execution
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate


Chapter 14:
Communicating Customer Value: Integrated Marketing Communications Strategy

DO IT SHOW: A NEW MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE IN KOREA
Youngchan Kim, Changjo Yoo

Product Number: 9B08A012
Publication Date: 8/28/2008
Revision Date: 5/12/2010
Length: 18 pages

This case presents points of contention and issues in the brand launch of a new telecommunication service of KTF, one of Korea's mobile telecommunication companies. As the second-place player in the 2G service market, which offered voice and text-messaging services, KTF decided to be the number one player in the new 3G service market, which offered stable video communication and high-speed data transmission as well as voice and text-messaging services. To do so, KTF developed a new brand, called SHOW, and implemented various integrated marketing communication (IMC) strategies to attract customers. After only four months since its launch, KTF had successfully attracted more than one million members. Several critical points for successfully launching a new brand in the mobile telecommunication service can be determined from this case. The introduction highlights the success of KTF's new brand launch strategy. Then the mobile telecommunication service market situation in South Korea is summarized. The next section provides a brief explanation of KTF and its new brand launch strategy in the 3G service market, covering topics from the market survey for 3G service to the brand-building processes. This is followed by an examination of how KTF used marketing-integrated communication for its new SHOW 3G service brand. Finally, the competitor's reaction to KTF's successful brand launch is summarized.

Teaching Note: 8B08A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Mobile Communication Industry; Brands; New Brand Launching Strategy; Integrated Marketing Strategy; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WILLIAMS COFFEE PUB
Kenneth G. Hardy

Product Number: 9B04A006
Publication Date: 10/13/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 19 pages

Two brothers have developed Williams Coffee Pub into a 44-unit, quick service restaurant franchise in Southwestern Ontario. Williams Coffee Pub has a very broad positioning with different segments frequenting it in different parts of the day. The brothers have hired a new chief executive officer and they are about to hand significant operational and strategic control to this new executive and the new board of directors. The broad positioning is an issue and the future communications campaign is also an issue.

Teaching Note: 8B04A06 (5 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Franchising; Marketing Communication; Strategic Planning; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MMI PRODUCT PLACEMENT, INC.
Robin Ritchie, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07A006
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 9 pages

The president of a national placement agency is preparing to make a final pitch to sign Greyhound Canada as a client. Greyhound wants to reposition its brand as a mainstream travel option, particularly for suburban commuters, and needs cost-effective ways to get its message to consumers. The company views product placement as a viable tool for building brand awareness, but worries about losing control over its brand image. Even more serious are concerns about the absence of reliable metrics to assess the overall effectiveness of product placement. The case covers fundamentals of product placement, particularly with respect to strengths and weaknesses, and provides an excellent basis for discussing its value as part of an overall marketing communications strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B07A06 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brand Positioning; Marketing Communication; Advertising
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NASHVILLE PREDATORS: MARKETING STRATEGY FOR AN NHL FRANCHISE
June Cotte, Jamie Duncan

Product Number: 9B09A006
Publication Date: 4/6/2009
Revision Date: 7/26/2010
Length: 30 pages

In summer 2008, the Nashville Predators' management team was considering the strategy behind marketing the team. They thought it prudent to investigate the feasibility of opportunities in other hockey markets throughout North America, should a new owner want to move the team. Management had to consider both financial returns and on-ice success. They needed to create a comprehensive strategy, starting from a recommended location, and moving through specific recommendations on promotions, pricing and customer focus. To help create their strategy, the management team performed the following: developed a comprehensive tactical marketing plan, including income projections; identified the marketing challenges of operating in very different markets; recognized that the choice of a city location largely constrained the remaining decisions and tactics. Using this information, the management team could now identify their next steps, and what future plans should include.

Teaching Note: 8B09A06 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Site Selection; Market Strategy; Sports; Promotion Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Advertising and Public Relations

THE POWER OF PERSUASION: AN EXERCISE IN CREATING PERSUASIVE ADVERTISING
Michael Parent, Leyland Pitt, Stacey Morrison

Product Number: 9B09A001
Publication Date: 1/14/2009
Length: 1 pages

Do subliminal cues have an effect on behaviour? This question is at the heart of many debates in advertising. In this exercise, students can determine, through their own experience, the impact of subconscious cues on their decisions. In this simulation, the instructor places a number of specific cues throughout the building. Students, in turn, are tasked with creating an advertising poster for a chain of children's play centres. Inevitably, their posters incorporate some, and sometimes all, of the cues. The exercise can lead to a deep and constructive discussion on the effect of subconscious cues on consumers.

Teaching Note: 8B09A01 (9 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Advertising Effectiveness; Marketing Communication; Consumer Behaviour; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



AIR MILES CANADA: REBRANDING THE AIR MILES REWARDS PROGRAM
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07A009
Publication Date: 11/21/2007
Revision Date: 4/3/2008
Length: 11 pages

Air Miles, the largest third party loyalty program in Canada, has more than nine million subscribers. Competition in the loyalty card market is heating up with the entry of Aeroplan and myriad proprietary loyalty programs launched by retailers and other brands, and Air Miles seeks to tighten its relationship with customers. Paradoxically, for a data-driven company focused on influencing consumers individually, Air Miles opts to develop and launch a mass advertising campaign to reconnect with consumers, and just as importantly, to re-energize internally.

Teaching Note: 8B07A09 (4 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Advertising; Customer Loyalty; Brand Repositioning; Data-driven Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAPITAL ONE: LAUNCHING A MASS MEDIA CAMPAIGN
Robert J. Fisher, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06A005
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/9/2009
Length: 18 pages

The senior Brand Manager for Capital One Canada is developing the firm's strategy for its first mass media advertising campaign in Canada. He had been provided with a menu of U.S. and U.K. advertisements - with test results for each - which he can adapt for a Canadian audience. The key decisions the Senior Brand Manager faces includes which customer segment to focus on, what value proposition to signal to this segment, what advertisements should be used to deliver these messages, and what customization efforts are necessary. He has a presentation to Capital One's senior management team and needs to back up his recommendations with numbers and logic.

Teaching Note: 8B06A05 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brand Management; Advertising Media; Advertising Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FORD WINDSTAR
Robert J. Fisher, David J. Sharp, Satish Jha

Product Number: 9B03A005
Publication Date: 5/1/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 22 pages

Ford of Canada is a division of the Ford Motor Company - one of the Big Three automobile manufacturers in North America. The brand manager of the Windstar was concerned that its only brand in the minivan category would not meet its annual sales target. Since the Windstar's launch in the early 1990s, it had become one of the largest selling auto brands in Canada and was synonymous with safety and family travel. During the past few years, the popularity of purchasing a Windstar had declined with the minivan market becoming very competitive, the recession, quality problems and several product recalls. The brand manager must create a promotional strategy that will maintain Windstar sales and profitability and attempt to maintain the brand image. (Also available is the video, Ford Windstar product # 7B03A005.)

Teaching Note: 8B03A05 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Product Management; Product Strategy; Costs; Advertising
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NIKE INC.: DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE PUBLIC RELATIONS STRATEGY
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9A99C034
Publication Date: 5/29/2000
Revision Date: 1/14/2010
Length: 20 pages

It had been almost a decade since the first article surfaced in the media alleging that factories sub-contracted by Nike in China and Indonesia were forcing workers to work long hours for low pay, and for physically and verbally abusive managers. The article was the seed of a media campaign that created a public relations nightmare for the company. A financial crisis in Asia and intense competition in the domestic market contributed to a decline in Nike's revenue and market share after three years of record performance. Though no direct correlation could be proven between the consumer's negative perceptions of Nike and the company's decline in market share and stock, it certainly did not help in their efforts to establish themselves as the global leader in a hotly competitive industry. A linear overview of the adverse publicity that Nike received, and the perspectives of Nike senior management, demonstrates to students the importance and elements of the timely development of an effective media and consumer relations campaign.

Teaching Note: 8A99C34 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Public Relations; Consumer Relations; Management Philosophy; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Personal Selling and Sales Promotion

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT INC. IN SAUDI ARABIA
Joerg Dietz, Ankur Grover, Laura Guerrero

Product Number: 9B07C042
Publication Date: 3/17/2008
Revision Date: 3/24/2009
Length: 14 pages

A recently hired U.S.-trained sales account manager at Medical Equipment Inc. (Medical Equipment) returned to his office after meeting with the head of the cardiology department at a specialist hospital and research center in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He had worked very hard to secure his first sale of US$725,000 for healthcare equipment, but was disheartened when the head of cardiology told him that the hospital's purchasing director intended to give the order to Medical Equipment's main competitor. The competition's sales representative and the purchasing director had known each other for 10 years and the head cardiologist implied that there might be side payments involved. The sales account manager knew Medical Equipment's product was superior and wondered how he could secure the order without having a history with the purchasing director or without engaging in practices he found ethically questionable.

Teaching Note: 8B07C42 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Sales Management; International Business; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPECTRUM BRANDS, INC. - THE SALES FORCE DILEMMA
Donald W. Barclay, Joe Falconi

Product Number: 9B06A035
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 20 pages

In 2005, the vice-president of sales and marketing for the Canadian division of Spectrum Brands Inc. must determine his next steps regarding the structure of his sales force. Spectrum Brands (Spectrum), a global consumer products company formerly known as Rayovac Corporation, had made a number of acquisitions to diversify and expand its product and brand portfolio. With these changes, Spectrum had become a leading supplier of consumer batteries, lawn and garden care products, specialty pet supplies, and shaving and grooming products. The vice-president of sales and marketing was charged with the task of creating a national sales force from the teams of the newly merged companies. Knowing the importance of the sales function to each of these companies, he wanted to ensure; despite the differences among the diverse groups, that he still maintained a team which would effectively and efficiently continue to increase the sales of each business unit.

Teaching Note: 8B06A35 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales Organization; Acquisitions; Change Management; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BOOTS: HAIR-CARE SALES PROMOTION
Robert J. Fisher, Murray J. Bryant, Pankaj Shandilya

Product Number: 9B05A022
Publication Date: 9/1/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 11 pages

Boots Group PLC, one of the best known and respected retail names in the United Kingdom, provided health and beauty products and advice that enhanced personal well being. The marketing manager at Boots was planning his sales promotion strategy for a line of professional hair-care products. The professional hair-care line consisted primarily of shampoos, conditioners and styling products (gels, wax, mousse, etc.) developed in collaboration with United Kingdom's top celebrity hairdressers. The marketing manager's challenge was to select one of three promotional alternatives - get three for the price of two, receive a gift with purchase or an on-pack coupon - for the Christmas season. He realized that the alternative he selected would have both immediate effects on costs and sales, but also long-term implications for the brands involved. His primary objective was to drive sales volumes and trade-up consumers from lower-value brands, while retaining or building brand equity.

Teaching Note: 8B05A22 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Sales Promotion; Advertising Management; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANDYM ENTERPRISES: FALLING SALES IN TERRITORY #61
June Cotte, Megan McCrae

Product Number: 9B04A014
Publication Date: 9/20/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 9 pages

Candym Enterprises is a wholesaler specializing in producing, importing and exporting giftware, and selling these items through independent sales representatives. The president and founder has discovered that performance in one territory is falling. A major trade-show is approaching, and changes need to be made in the territory quickly. The president feels he has several options, including replacing an independent sales rep with a company sales rep, which would be a new strategy for the company. Learning objectives include understanding the pros and cons of salary-based relationship building, the importance of excellent customer relationship management, and recognizing that using distributors/independent sales reps has some risk.

Teaching Note: 8B04A14 (5 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Sales Organization; Sales Strategy; Compensation; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ALCHEMY TRAINING FIRM
June Cotte, Alan (Wenchu) Yang

Product Number: 9B04A015
Publication Date: 9/20/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 14 pages

The top sales person for Alchemy Training Firm has visited three potential clients, an existing customer, a warm call referral and a cold call, to sell a new offering from the company. While the company was well-known for providing top quality sales management training programs, the owners have decided to branch out with a new offer of supply chain management/purchasing training courses. The sales person must prepare a report of these sales calls for a planning session, and is concerned that the outcome may not be successful. He wonders what he could have done differently. The case highlights the difficulties in selling a new intangible service when firm reputation, trainer reputation, and course customization opportunities compete with cost as main buyer priorities. The differing opinions of the owners on the firm's growth strategy are an issue, as well.

Teaching Note: 8B04A15 (5 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: China; Sales Management; Corporate Strategy; Sales Strategy; Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 17:
Direct and Online Marketing: Building Direct Customer Relationships

SELLING GREEN DOTS IN SECOND LIFE
Wade Halvorson, Michael Parent, Leyland Pitt

Product Number: 9B09A033
Publication Date: 12/8/2009
Length: 10 pages

An Irish Air Lines pilot has re-created his home city of Dublin on Second Life. His Second Life alter ego, Ham Rambler, is busy running the site, and selling office space and advertisement on the property. The property includes a popular bar, a venue for live music performances, as well as a realistic rendering of Dublin's core. Second Life residents flock to the site for its entertainment and to experience Dublin. Mahon/Rambler needs to decide if the innovative business model he has developed is sustainable, or whether he should sell the business to other developers. The case is useful to introduce the concept of immersive Internet-based environments, and Internet advertising and selling.

Teaching Note: 8B09A33 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Advertising Effectiveness; Internet Culture; Internet; Sales Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PACIFICLINK IMEDIA: BECOMING A FULL SERVICE INTERACTIVE AGENCY
Andrew Karl Delios

Product Number: 9B09M023
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 13 pages

This case presents the decisions facing the managing director/executive director of PacificLink iMedia (PacificLink), more than 10 years after he founded the company. The company had experienced periods of growth and decline since its founding and was facing a period of uncertain growth given the turmoil in world markets in 2009, following several years of strong growth and expansion. The director anticipated that the company could continue to grow into new geographic or product markets, or perhaps become fundamentally altered in its governance structure and financial resource base, through an initial public offering. The case involves analysis of these alternatives for growth. It can be used to teach about sources of competitive advantage and evaluations of growth alternatives. See also the first and third cases in the three-part series, 9B00M024 and 9B16M202.

Teaching Note: 8B09M23 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Internet Marketing; International Business; Growth Strategy; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LONDON JETS
Michael R. Pearce, Joel Bycraft, Chad Hensler

Product Number: 9B02A022
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 11 pages

The marketing manager for a hockey team has been told by senior management that revenues for the next season must increase or the franchise will be sold. The previous year's high-budget advertising campaign did not bring in the single-ticket sales results he expected. A database of past ticket holders is available and the question arises how to use this database. Using pivot tables, and recency, frequency and monetary value analyses, he must determine how to increase the return on the marketing investment. An Excel spreadsheet, product 7B02A022, is also available.

Teaching Note: 8B02A22 (26 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Database Marketing; Sports Marketing; Analysis; Direct Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DOUBLECLICK INC.: GATHERING CUSTOMER INTELLIGENCE
Scott L. Schneberger, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01E005
Publication Date: 3/5/2001
Length: 16 pages

DoubleClick Inc., with global headquarters in New York City and over 30 offices around the world, was a leading provider of comprehensive Internet advertising solutions for marketers and Web publishers. It combined technology, media and data expertise to centralize planning, execution, control, tracking and reporting for online media companies. DoubleClick was able to track Internet-users' surfing habits (but not the surfers' identities) allowing it to personalize ads for specific market groups. When DoubleClick announced it was merging with Abacus Direct, a direct marketing company with a database of consumer names, addresses and retail purchasing habits of 90 per cent of American households, it raised many privacy-related questions and concerns. Several Internet privacy activists had filed a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission after being informed by media sources that DoubleClick had the ability to divulge a person's identity by merging the databases of the two companies and matching the information in cookies with a surfer's profile. The president of DoubleClick was confident that its internal practices were sound, but he wondered if they would placate advertising clients afraid of consumer backlash, the concerns of Internet surfers and the company's investors.

Teaching Note: 8B01E05 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: High Technology Products; E-Commerce; Privacy Issues; Risk Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 18:
Creating Competitive Advantage

STRATEGIC PLANNING AT APPLE INC.
Kyle Murray, Miranda R. Goode, Fabrizio Di Muro

Product Number: 9B09A026
Publication Date: 1/11/2010
Length: 12 pages

Apple Inc. is one of the world's most successful and most recognizable companies. Over its 30 year existence, the company had seen a lot of changes in the computer industry. What would the future hold for the computer giant in a rapidly changing world? How should the company allocate resources between its more traditional offerings (computers) and its newer products (iPods, iPhones, Apple TV, etc.) in order to maintain and improve its market position. Also, how should Apple's unique retail strategy be used to support the company's product decisions, and by capitalizing on new and emerging trends thus further maintaining its competitive advantage.

Teaching Note: 8B09A26 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Competitive Advantage; Strategic Planning; Retailing; New Products
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WESTJET: THE PEARSON DECISION
Rod E. White, Derek Lehmberg

Product Number: 9B05M054
Publication Date: 10/28/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 22 pages

In early 2003, WestJet's management was reviewing its plans for growth, and specifically considering whether WestJet should move its eastern Canada base of operations from Hamilton's Munro airport to Toronto Pearson airport. WestJet had grown rapidly since its launch in 1996, and was now the second largest airline in Canada. WestJet had originally focused on Western Canada, but had entered eastern Canada in March of 2000, with an eastern base of operations in Hamilton, a secondary airport in the greater Toronto area. Pearson was Canada's largest domestic and international airport, the primary commercial airport for the greater Toronto area, and a hub of WestJet's largest competitor, Air Canada. Compared with Pearson, Hamilton was less congested and charged much lower fees. WestJet's operations had been closely modeled upon Southwest Airlines. The use of a secondary airport such as Hamilton as a base of operations was consistent with Southwest's low cost, high utilization features. With higher costs and longer turnaround times due to congestion, a base at Pearson was arguably not consistent with the Southwest business model, however, it was hard for WestJet to ignore the growth potential.

Teaching Note: 8B05M54 (25 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Growth Strategy; Competitor Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SCANDINAVIAN AIRLINES: THE GREEN ENGINE DECISION
Jennifer Lynes

Product Number: 9B09M028
Publication Date: 6/11/2009
Length: 11 pages

Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) is an innovator of strategic environmental management in the airline industry. Being a first-mover can have both its advantages and disadvantages. This case looks at the airline's decision of whether they should invest in the best available environmental technology for a fleet of new aircraft that would serve them for the next 25 years. While the technology for these low-emission engines had been around since the 1970s, it had never really been commercialized. SAS was feeling pressure from the regulatory authorities with regards to potential new charges and taxes that could affect the future operating costs of the fleet. Despite these anticipated future costs, at the time of the decision, the director of aircraft and engine analysis for SAS could not make an economic case for the more expensive engines. The challenge was for the fleet development team to try to convince the SAS management team to spend the extra kr5 million (Swedish Kronor) per aircraft for the dual combustor engine. Given that corporations are faced with increasing pressure with regards to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, this case study presents an opportunity for discussion and analysis of various environmental concepts including strategic environmental management, adoption of best available environmental technologies, the role of internal environmental leadership in a large corporation and the effect of market-based mechanisms to improve a sector's environmental performance. The case illustrates the complexities of environmental decisions in striking a balance between meeting ambitious commitments and dealing with real capabilities of companies and external pressures.

Teaching Note: 8B09M28 (14 pages)
Issues: Corporate Culture; Management Decisions; Competitive Advantage; Environment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEN & JERRY'S - JAPAN
James M. Hagen

Product Number: 9A99A037
Publication Date: 4/13/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 17 pages

The CEO of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc. needed to give sales and profits a serious boost; despite the company's excellent brand equity, it was losing market share and struggling to make a profit. The company's product was on store shelves in all U.S. states, but efforts to enter foreign markets had only been haphazard with non-U.S. sales accounting for just three per cent of total sales. The CEO needed to focus serious attention on entering the world's second largest ice cream market, Japan. An objective of Ben & Jerry's was to use the excess manufacturing capacity it had in the U.S., and it found that exporting ice cream from Vermont to Japan was feasible from a logistics and cost perspective. The company identified two leading partnering options. One was to give a Japanese convenience store chain exclusive rights to the product for a limited time. The other was to give long-term rights for all sales of the product in Japan to a Japanese-American who would build the brand. For the company to enter Japan in time for the upcoming summer season, it would have to be through one of these two partnering arrangements.

Teaching Note: 8A99A37 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Market Entry; International Marketing; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 19:
The Global Marketplace

A SPEED RACE: BENELLI AND QJ COMPETE IN THE INTERNATIONAL MOTORBIKE ARENA
Francesca Spigarelli, Ilan Alon, William Wei

Product Number: 9B09M097
Publication Date: 12/23/2009
Revision Date: 9/30/2010
Length: 16 pages

In 2005, the Qianjiang Group (QJ), a large-scale Chinese state-owned group, acquired the Italian company Benelli to expand its business in Western markets beyond Italy. Benelli's brand advantage was intended to provide the core competency for QJ to compete in the global motorbike markets; in addition, Benelli's capabilities and know-how in motorbike and scooter engineering also helped QJ complete its product portfolio. After a successful start, the many cultural differences related to an Italian business model and a Chinese company became problematic. Problems arose in integrating Chinese and Italian cultures and in coping with a completely different way of doing business, and the company was facing stiff competition from Japanese competitors. Despite excellent press and large industrial investments aimed at gaining efficiency and reducing prices, penetration of Western markets was difficult.

Teaching Note: 8B09M97 (18 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Competitiveness; Mergers & Acquisitions; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAKING WAVES IN RURAL KENYA
Sebastian Herrmann, Glenn Brophey, Denyse Lafrance-Horning

Product Number: 9B09A015
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 10 pages

The developers of a simple, inexpensive, locally produced rain water harvesting system tackle the social marketing issues in the undeveloped market of rural Kenya. The benefits of the product are obvious but the poverty levels and entrenched traditions create significant and unique marketing challenges.

Teaching Note: 8B09A15 (7 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: New Products; International Marketing; Market Entry; Marketing Communication; Marketing Channels; Marketing without Advertising; International Management; Decision Making
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DABUR INDIA LTD. - GLOBALIZATION
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A017
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Length: 18 pages

Dabur, an Indian consumer package goods company, had established a strong brand equity in India by offering, for decades, a vast portfolio of over-the-counter products. In seeking international expansion in 1987, it first took the export route. It also followed the customer, targeting the Indian diaspora in the Middle East, Africa and the United States, already familiar with the brand. By 2006, Dabur had set up five manufacturing facilities outside India. In June 2007, Dabur had to make, in countries such as Nigeria for example, some critical choices. It had to choose between sticking to the diaspora, a market it understood best, and targeting the mainstream population. It had to choose its growth options between categories like personal care, in which it had built up competencies, and categories such as oral care and home care, which were the new engines of growth in its international markets but in which the company had no track record, either on the home front or overseas. The case study helps students deal with issues of growth and consolidation in a global market from the perspective of the company's chief executive officer and the head of its international operations.

Teaching Note: 8B09A17 (4 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Growth Strategy; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 20:
Sustainable Marketing: Social Responsibility and Ethics

NEW BALANCE: DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED CSR STRATEGY
Vesela Veleva

Product Number: 9B10M011
Publication Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 21 pages

This case focuses on New Balance, a privately held company and the fourth largest athletic footwear manufacturer in the world. Founded over 100 years ago, New Balance has a strong social responsibility culture and mission established by its owners. Its commitment to employees, for example, was expressed through maintaining domestic manufacturing in the United States (the only large footwear manufacturer to do so presently) and avoiding layoffs in the deep recession of 2007-2009. In the late 1990s, the company established the Responsible Leadership Steering Committee to address human rights issues in overseas factories. Throughout the years, private ownership had allowed New Balance to take risks and make choices that publicly held companies might not have been able to do; at the same time, private ownership also meant lower pressures to disclose social and environmental performance. The owners were also very humble and hesitant to talk aloud about social responsibility. As a global player, the present challenge for the company has become to move corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the next level from doing what's right to fully integrating CSR into the business strategy. The overall goal of the case is to use the provided information from a comprehensive company assessment to identify a few key areas where New Balance can focus on and demonstrate industry leadership while also supporting the bottom line. A set of key questions is included at the end of the paper to guide student's discussion around critical issues for building an integrated CSR strategy for New Balance, considering its culture, structure and present level of corporate citizenship management.

Teaching Note: 8B10M11 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Social Responsibility; Strategy Development; Business Sustainability; Performance Assessment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SAMSUNG TESCO HOMEPLUS AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Youngchan Kim, Kwangho Ahn

Product Number: 9B09M040
Publication Date: 7/13/2009
Revision Date: 7/29/2009
Length: 17 pages

Samsung Tesco Homeplus (STH), one of Korea's large hypermarkets, increased its investment in social contribution activities and systemized the organization in charge in the aftermath. It especially focused on education and cultural services, saving the environment and sharing with others. As a consequence, by December 2008, STH was considered one of the most innovative companies and one that realized true customer value. It had won a variety of awards, such as the Green Management award, Social Contribution Company award and the Eco-friendly Management award. After creating a corporate social responsibility (CSR) team in 2005, it won the CSR award given by the British Chamber of Commerce in Korea and was selected as one of Korea's Most Admired Companies. While much progress had been made, company executives wondered what factors would be the keys to their continuing CSR activities. This case presents points of contention and issues in the practice of corporate social responsibility by STH. Social contribution activities and STH were aligned with both sustainable management and customer value-oriented management. Various activities in extended education, environment and charity ultimately led customers to view STH as not just a discount store that simply sold products, but a value store. STH conducted systematic programs and activities in the areas of extended education environment and charity after having declared itself a social contribution company. This case illustrates how a company can develop its social contribution activities. In addition, discussion will centre on the long-term impacts that social contribution activities have on enterprises.

Teaching Note: 8B09M40 (10 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Corporate Social Responsibility; Customer Value Management; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIJI WATER AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - GREEN MAKEOVER OR "GREENWASHING"?
James McMaster, Jan Nowak

Product Number: 9B09A008
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

This case analysis traces the establishment and subsequent operation of FIJI Water LLC and its bottling subsidiary, Natural Waters of Viti Limited, the first company in Fiji extracting, bottling and marketing, both domestically and internationally, artesian water coming from a virgin ecosystem found on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. The case reviews the growth and market expansion of this highly successful company with the brand name FIJI Natural Artesian Water (FIJI Water). The company has grown rapidly over the past decade and a half, and now exports bottled water into many countries in the world from its production plant located in the Fiji Islands. In 2008, FIJI Water was the leading imported bottled water brand in the United States. In the context of great marketing success of the FIJI brand, particularly in the U.S. market, the case focuses on how the company has responded to a number of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, including measuring and reducing its carbon footprint, responsibilities to key stakeholders, and concerns of the Fiji government with regard to taxation and transfer pricing issues. The case provides a compelling illustration of how CSR challenges may jeopardize the sustainability of a clever marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B09A08 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environment; Corporate Responsibility; Marketing Communication; Transfer Pricing; International Marketing; Greenwashing; Green Marketing; Brand Positioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OQOQO: SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS FASHIONS
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark, Megan Sherritt

Product Number: 9B06A023
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Length: 8 pages

Chip Wilson, founder of lululemon athletica, a Vancouver-based manufacturer, distributor and retailer of high quality yoga apparel, started a new streetwear line of apparel that would combine fashion with social consciousness. The apparel sold at OQOQO was made from natural and organic materials, under safe and fair working conditions, and it was produced in a way to reduce environmental impact. There were some problems regarding the sourcing of materials and the customer's perception of certain materials such as soy and hemp. Chip must decide whether to expand the number of OQOQO stores.

Teaching Note: 8B06A23 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Decision Theory; Decision Analysis; Corporate Responsibility; Retailing; Product Strategy; Growth Strategy; Market Strategy; Decision Trees; Decision Support Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NESTLE'S NESCAFE PARTNERS' BLEND: THE FAIRTRADE DECISION (A)
Niraj Dawar, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06A020
Publication Date: 7/27/2006
Revision Date: 1/9/2008
Length: 24 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Corporate Social Responsibility Award, 2006 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. In early 2005, Nestle is in the midst of a decision: whether or not the Fairtrade mark should be applied on Partners' Blend, a new instant coffee product to be marketed in the growing UK 'ethical' coffee segment. Application of the Fairtrade mark on the Partners Blend product means that Nestle must go against its historical position of not offering minimum guaranteed prices to coffee farmers. As part of their deliberations, Nestle executives must consider their coffee sourcing program at large, their corporate social responsibility framework, Nescafe and corporate Nestle branding, the UK market and the potential consumer benefits or backlash that could result from releasing such a product.

Teaching Note: 8B06A20 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Corporate Responsibility; Brand Management; Product Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA