Ivey Publishing

Global Strategy

Peng, M.W.,2/e (United States, Cengage Learning, 2009)
Prepared By Bassam Farah, Ph.D. Student (International Business and Strategy)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Strategizing Around the Globe

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?: AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B09M086
Publication Date: 10/19/2009
Length: 11 pages

This team-building and familiarization activity can be used in the initial class or session of an international management program. It assesses one's exposure to the rest of the world's peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a classes' collective exposure to the world's people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one's business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

Teaching Note: 8B09M86 (6 pages)
Issues: Career Development; Intercultural Relations; Team Building; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RESEARCH IN MOTION: MANAGING EXPLOSIVE GROWTH
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Daina Mazutis

Product Number: 9B08M046
Publication Date: 5/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 19 pages

Research in Motion (RIM) is a high technology firm that is experiencing explosive sales growth. David Yach, chief technology officer for software at RIM, has received notice of an impending meeting with the co-chief executive officer regarding his research and development (R&D) expenditures. Although RIM, makers of the very popular BlackBerry, spent almost $360 million in R&D in 2007, this number was low compared to its largest competitors, both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of sales (e.g. Nokia spent $8.2 billion on R&D). This is problematic as it foreshadows the question of whether or not RIM is well positioned to continue to meet expectations, deliver award-winning products and services and maintain its lead in the smartphone market. Furthermore, in the very dynamic mobile telecommunications industry, investment analysts often look to a firm's commitment to R&D as a signal that product sales growth will be sustainable. Just to maintain the status quo, Yach will have to hire 1,400 software engineers in 2008 and is considering a number of alternative paths to managing the expansion. The options include: (1) doing what they are doing now, only more of it, (2) building on their existing and satellite R&D locations, (3) growing through acquisition or (4) going global.

Teaching Note: 8B08M46 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Change Management; Globalization; Staffing; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBALIZATION OF WYETH
Munir Mandviwalla, Jonathan Palmer

Product Number: 9B08M017
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 19 pages

During the last decade, Wyeth transformed itself from a holding company to a global company using information technology (IT) as an important enabler. The first half of the case details the importance of global integration and how globalization was initiated at Wyeth. The original role of IT is introduced along with the challenges and barriers of starting a globalization strategy. This is followed by a discussion of how the role of IT started changing at Wyeth. An ambitious IT globalization plan is outlined. The second half of the case details the implementation of the IT globalization plan. The implementation started slowly, faced many challenges, and took longer than expected. The original plan was modified several times to address funding and management challenges. The case ends by discussing how Wyeth was able to complete the IT globalization plan. The case is anchored in the United States but considers global issues. The case includes issues and concepts that make it suitable for teaching management information systems, international business and strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B08M17 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Globalization; Process Design/Change; Information Technology; Strategy Implementation; Management Science and Info. Systems
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



STRATEGIZING AT MONARCHIA MATT INTERNATIONAL (MMI)
Michael J. Rouse, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B07M014
Publication Date: 3/16/2007
Revision Date: 8/14/2007
Length: 24 pages

As of late 2004, the chief executive officer (CEO) of New York-based wine distributor Monarchia Matt International (MMI) is looking at his portfolio of wines and wondering what advantage Hungarian wine could provide in becoming a powerful niche player in the highly fragmented and complicated U.S. wine industry. The CEO is cognizant of Hungarian wine's reputation in the United States as an inexpensive, mass-quantity produced and low quality drink. At the same time, the CEO is aware of Hungary's rich wine making tradition and is confident that the country's wine varieties could prove to be a key differentiator and help him grow revenues from $6 million in 2004 to $50 million by 2010. This case serves as an introduction to many of the core course frameworks in strategy, and can be used to cover the following topics: PEST (political, economic, social and technological factors); Porter's five forces; resource-based view of the firm using VRIO framework; value proposition; SWOT; and value frontier.

Teaching Note: 8B07M14 (13 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Growth Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Product Mix; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS (A): ENTERING INDIA
Sumit Chakraborty, Sushil K. Sharma, Sougata Ray

Product Number: 9B06M034
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 21 pages

Samsung Electronics (Samsung) managing director had presented the new management philosophy for achieving leadership in a global market. The three-part strategy would prioritize quality, globalization, and multifaceted integration, in that order. After a restructuring effort, Samsung had emerged as a leader in the global electronics industry. Now, considering the new management philosophy and several other factors, the managing director faced the decision of whether Samsung should enter the Indian market.

Teaching Note: 8B06M34 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Foreign Entry Strategy; International Business Operations; Global Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS (B): IN INDIA
Sumit Chakraborty, Sushil K. Sharma, Sougata Ray

Product Number: 9B06M035
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 18 pages

In part A of this case, Samsung's managing director had to decide whether Samsung should enter the Indian market. Now, three years later, he was ready to relinquish the position. The three years had been very successful and the managing director was promoted to vice-president of global sales and marketing of display products. One of the first decisions facing the new managing director as he takes the position is what type of products Samsung should compete with in India. One option is to compete in the low and medium segments. Another option is to take the high end segment.

Teaching Note: 8B06M35 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Strategy; Foreign Entry Strategy; International Business Operations
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 2:
Managing Industry Competition

NOTE ON THE GLOBAL HOTEL INDUSTRY
Gevork Papiryan

Product Number: 9B08M028
Publication Date: 5/28/2008
Length: 23 pages

The hotel industry has experienced tremendous growth since the 1980s and has emerged as a global industry. During the expansion period, multinational, multi-brand corporations, such as Hilton Hotels Corporation, were in the process of finding new markets and setting priorities. In emerging markets, such as Russia, most of the national hotel industry had been formed under the pressure of foreign hotel chains. In addition to competing with foreign firms in their own markets, local Russian companies were also planning to enter international markets. In this environment, where competition was strengthening within the global hotel industry and new players were emerging, a number of questions and challenges existed: 1) How could firms effectively leverage their competencies and increase their competitiveness? 2) Would the multinational hotel corporations continue to expand their brand portfolios? 3) How could hotel chains maintain their integrity during the expansion on a global scale? 4) What strategies might apply to convince Western hotel companies to compete in emerging markets? 5) Which direction would further develop the hotel industries in emerging economies?

Teaching Note: 8B08M28 (12 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Emerging Markets; Corporate Strategy; Industry Analysis; Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MICHELIN IN THE LAND OF THE MAHARAJAHS (A): NOTE ON THE TIRE INDUSTRY IN INDIA
Pierre-Xavier Meschi

Product Number: 9B07M030
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 20 pages

As opposed to other emerging countries, the tire market in India was almost exclusively dominated by local players: 90 per cent of all tires on the Indian market were made and sold by local Indian companies. It is important to note that the big names of the world tire industry - Michelin, Bridgestone, Goodyear and Continental - were hardly visible in India. Michelin was absent from the Indian tire market and it is very surprising that the world leader of the tire industry had neither a production facility nor a distribution network in India. Why such an absence? Why did Michelin have so little presence in Asian emerging countries and especially in India? This case presents the main features of the tire industry in India. The case allows students to carry out a comprehensive strategic evaluation of the industry's attractiveness as well as an in-depth analysis of the structure of competition. Students will also conduct performance analysis for each company.

Teaching Note: 8B07M30 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Industry Analysis; International Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MICHELIN IN THE LAND OF THE MAHARAJAHS (B)
Pierre-Xavier Meschi

Product Number: 9B07M031
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 9 pages

This is a supplement to Michelin in the Land of the Maharajahs (A): A Note on the Tire Industry in India, product 9B07M030. This case presents the performance and the geographic positioning of Michelin as well as its international expansion strategy. The information provided allows students to analyse Michelin's strategy and performance.

Teaching Note: 8B07M30 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Strategy; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON THE CUBAN CIGAR INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish, Akash Kapoor

Product Number: 9B03M001
Publication Date: 2/27/2003
Revision Date: 10/21/2009
Length: 20 pages

The cigar industry in Cuba has a mythical aura and renown that give it unparalleled recognition worldwide. The relationship between Cuba and the United States makes the situation in this industry particularly intriguing. Cuban cigars cannot currently be sold in the United States, even though it is the largest premium cigar market in the world. This note provides an opportunity for a structured analysis using Porter's five forces model and to consider several scenarios including the possible lifting of the U.S. embargo and the relaxation of Cuba's land ownership laws.

Teaching Note: 8B03M01 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Government and Business; Internationalization; International Business; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Leveraging Resources and Capabilities

MARKET STRETCH
Gavin Price, Margaret Sutherland

Product Number: 9B09M046
Publication Date: 6/25/2009
Length: 11 pages

Bio-Oil is a multi-purpose skin care product that has gone from being sold only in South Africa to being the No. 1 scar treatment product in 16 of the 17 countries in which it is distributed. Retail sales have jumped from R3 million per annum to R1 billion from 2000 to 2008. Justin and David Letschert made key decisions to eliminate all of the other 119 products that were being manufactured by the company that they took over in 2000, and focused on the mainstay product of Bio-Oil. Union-Swiss accomplished its successful sales through the use of a hybrid distribution model that compelled its distributors in each country to communicate and share knowledge with each other. Union-Swiss also ensured that it remained focused on building the brand through limiting its activities in the value chain to that of marketing. It did this to such an extent that it created a separate entity to run the distribution of Bio-Oil in South Africa.

Teaching Note: 8B09M46 (8 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Market Entry; International Business; Supply Chain Management; Strategic Positioning; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



DEPOSITA - WHETHER TO DOMINATE THE VALUE CHAIN OR NOT
Helena Barnard

Product Number: 9B08M072
Publication Date: 10/24/2008
Length: 13 pages

Post-Apartheid South Africa has been characterized by high levels of crime, but also by sustained increases in the income levels of the previously disadvantaged black community. Cash is the preferred method of payment for new entrants into an economy, but it is also an attractive target for criminals. Deposita has seized the business opportunity presented by this tension, and developed an automated banking machine, basically an ATM in reverse. As soon as businesses feed their cash into the machine on their premises, information about the deposit is relayed via a cellphone network to the Deposita database. With the realization that Deposita offers a cash management system that not only eliminates the time, cost and inaccuracies of manual cash counting, but also gives businesses remote visibility into the movement of cash, interest in Deposita grew rapidly, both within South Africa and internationally. The case highlights the systemic nature of innovation, technology-enabled innovation at the base of the pyramid, hyper-mediation, and the tension between product and geographic expansion as the owners of Deposita redirect their strategic focus to the entire cash value chain in South Africa or to international markets or both.

Teaching Note: 8B08M72 (5 pages)
Issues: Innovation; Expansion; Home Country Advantages; Expansion Option; Hypermediation; Product versus Geographic Expansion; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PAY ZONE CONSULTING: A GLOBAL VIRTUAL ORGANIZATION
Malcolm Munro, Sid L. Huff

Product Number: 9B08C004
Publication Date: 1/14/2008
Revision Date: 2/16/2008
Length: 11 pages

Pay Zone Consulting is a small, highly specialized global consulting group providing information management solutions for the exploration and production sector of the oil and gas industry. The company operates entirely virtually with consultants and software developers in different parts of the world. The principals are considering growth options but are intent on preserving the quality of life provided by their virtual business model. The case examines the communication technologies employed by the principals in support of their virtual teamwork and describes the administrative information technology infrastructure that enables the firm to operate with no administrative staff or office. The case also discusses the organizational and personal factors underlying the company’s ability to operate successfully virtually.

Teaching Note: 8B08C04 (9 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BIOCON LTD.: BUILDING A BIOTECH POWERHOUSE
Alison Konrad, Charlene L. Nicholls-Nixon, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B06M070
Publication Date: 10/12/2006
Length: 15 pages

The founder chairman and managing director wants to make Biocon, Ltd. one of the top 10 biotech firms by 2015. The company has dealt in low-risk enzymes and generic drugs for many years. In order for the company to grow, the chairman believes that Biocon must enter the riskier business of drug discovery and development. Without making large investments into new capabilities, the company cannot become a top 10 biotech firm.

Teaching Note: 8B06M70 (5 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Globalization; Growth Strategy; Biotechnology Management; Strategic Scope
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SUN LIFE FINANCIAL: ENTERING CHINA
Paul W. Beamish, Ken Mark, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B04M066
Publication Date: 12/20/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 17 pages

Sun Life Financial is a large insurance conglomerate with $14.7 billion in annual revenues. The vice-president for China must formulate an approach for his company's entrance into China. Sun Life has achieved two important milestones: the right to apply for license and the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding for Joint Venture with China Everbright, a local securities company. The financial vice-president must consider strategic options for entry and choose a city in which to focus his efforts in getting a license. In doing so, he needs to consider Sun Life's overall priorities, strategic direction and how he will sell the concept to senior management in Canada. Intended for use in an introduction to international business course, the case includes assessing internal capabilities against an environmental scan, formulating strategy and making operational decisions relating to city selection. It also introduces the idea of joint venture management and government relations.

Teaching Note: 8B04M66 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: China; Joint Ventures; Market Entry; Risk Analysis; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Emphasizing Institutions, Cultures, and Ethics

CORRUPTION: THE INTERNATIONAL EVOLUTION OF NEW MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES
David W. Conklin

Product Number: 9B09M065
Publication Date: 10/21/2009
Length: 21 pages

Many countries have become increasingly concerned with the subject of corruption, and managers today must deal with changes in ethical norms and laws. New laws and international agreements seek to create a worldwide shift towards the reduction of corruption, and so management responsibilities are continually evolving. Both Transparency International and the World Bank provide estimates of the relative pervasiveness of corruption in different countries. Yet this subject is ambiguous and complex, creating significant challenges for managers. Both Volkswagen and Siemens have recently experienced public criticism and legal prosecution over corruption issues, some relating to internal and inter-corporate relations. Some cultures appear to accept corrupt practices as part of normal business-government relations. In China, guanxi is widely seen as a requirement for business success with the establishment of personal relationships that include an ongoing exchange of gifts and personal favours. Some managers may argue that the giving of gifts is acceptable, that bribes to expedite decisions may be necessary, and that only certain types of bribes should be seen as inappropriate corruption. However, this perspective involves the difficulty of drawing a line to guide decisions of corporate employees, and for many managers it is now necessary to implement clear corporate guidelines in regard to what they consider to be corruption. In this context, some managers may decide to avoid investing in certain countries until the culture of corruption has changed.

Teaching Note: 8B09M65 (3 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Globalization; International Business; Business and Society
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SINYI REAL ESTATE IN TAIWAN
Terence Tsai, Borshiuan Cheng, Shubo Philip Liu

Product Number: 9B08M077
Publication Date: 1/12/2009
Revision Date: 6/11/2009
Length: 20 pages

As the economies of Greater China continued the process of rapid transformation and industrialization, newly industrialized countries (NICs), such as Taiwan and mainland China, experienced dramatic changes in their business settings. Accompanying the industrialization of east Asian economies, business ethics were in a state of flux, as traditional values were often swept aside to justify profit maximization. In this ever-changing business environment, what were the characteristics and benefits of Chinese business ethics? What role did they play? Could an integrity-based business practice serve as a source of competitive advantage? What business settings were supporting business ethics? Few studies have paid attention to these kinds of questions. Sinyi was one of the most successful real estate agent companies in Taiwan and mainland China. From a Confucian perspective, Sinyi's founder cultivated a people-centered culture for both its customers and employees. By applying business ethics as a central differentiating strategy, Sinyi established an excellent corporate image and was regarded by many as the role model of responsible business. Sinyi service was regarded as premier in Taiwan. Its customer satisfaction rating was also far above the industry average. Trustworthiness and fair dealing were the company's guiding principles. This was in contrast to the-then chaotic environment of the real estate industry in Taiwan, where basic trust between buyers and sellers was rare and deceit existed everywhere. Focusing on using business ethics as a central differentiating strategy, Sinyi had grown into Sinyi Group, which successfully integrated upstream, midstream and downstream industries and established a highly-acclaimed business model. Over the past two decades, Sinyi Group had expanded its operations to mainland China and forged an alliance with global real estate brokerage Coldwell Banker. The case can be used for MBA and EMBA courses in business ethics (in a module on culture and business ethics) and strategic management (in a module on strategic business ethics). This case should provoke holistic thinking and discussion on sustainable business, Confucian entrepreneurship and the relationship between business ethics and competitive advantages.

Teaching Note: 8B08M77 (13 pages)
Industry: Real Estate and Rental and Leasing
Issues: Ethical Issues; Sustainability; Management Science and Info. Systems; Human Resources Management; Corporate Social Responsibility; Differentiation; Strategy; CEIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BRITISH PETROLEUM (PLC) AND JOHN BROWNE: A CULTURE OF RISK BEYOND PETROLEUM (A)
Murray J. Bryant, Trevor Hunter

Product Number: 9B08M002
Publication Date: 7/29/2008
Length: 13 pages

The year 2007 had to have been one of the worst in the history of British Petroleum plc (BP). In the span of four months, two separate independent reports (the first one commissioned by BP itself) had identified a deeply rooted "culture of risk" within BP where money and profits were valued above worker and environmental safety. These reports were in response to an explosion in 2005 at an oil refinery in Texas City, in the United States, which killed 15 people and injured more than 180, but the reports also referred to pipeline leaks in Alaska as well as other serious safety lapses throughout BP's global operations. The Texas City explosion was the worst but not the first major incident at a BP facility, and the revelations in the reports severely damaged the credibility the so-called super-major oil company had earned over the last decade. The job of restoring investor and stakeholder confidence as well as the firm's reputation fell to the BP board and its star group chief executive, Lord John Browne. The B case, product 9B08M003, examines the role played by the board with respect to the personal integrity of Lord Browne. The teaching objectives are to introduce students to examining the role of the board with respect to risk management as well as its social responsibilities to various stakeholders.

Teaching Note: 8B08M02 (11 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Governance; Stakeholder Analysis; Risk Management; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BRITISH PETROLEUM (PLC) AND JOHN BROWNE: A CULTURE OF RISK BEYOND PETROLEUM (B)
Murray J. Bryant, Trevor Hunter

Product Number: 9B08M003
Publication Date: 7/29/2008
Length: 4 pages

This supplement to product 9B08M002 examines the role played by the board with respect to the personal integrity of Lord Browne, who had been several times identified as the chief executive officer of the year by the Financial Times.

Teaching Note: 8B08M02 (11 pages)
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



HONG KONG DISNEYLAND
Michael N. Young, Dong Liu

Product Number: 9B07M013
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 16 pages

Disney began internationalizing its theme park operations with the opening of Tokyo Disneyland in 1983, which is regarded as one of the most successful amusement parks in the world. Disney attempted to replicate this success in France, which is the largest consumer of Disney products outside of the United States. In 1992, they opened Disneyland Resort Paris, which is largely regarded to be much less successful than the park in Japan. This case explores Disney's efforts to open its third park outside the United States; Hong Kong Disneyland. It begins by discussing the experience of Tokyo and Paris Disneylands, and then discusses the opening of Hong Kong Disneyland, including the structure of the deal, and how the operations, human resources management and marketing were tailored to fit the Chinese cultural environment. The case also discusses the tourism industry in Hong Kong and the particular problems that were encountered during the first year of operations. The stage is set for students to discuss whether Disney's strategic assets have a good semantic fit with Chinese culture.

Teaching Note: 8B07M13 (5 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Industry Positioning; Cross Cultural Management; International Expansion; Competitive Dynamics
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EAGLE SERVICES ASIA
Edward D. Arnheiter

Product Number: 9B07D019
Publication Date: 10/10/2007
Length: 13 pages

This case chronicles the creation and transformation of a Singaporean joint venture, Eagle Services Asia (ESA). It describes some early start-up problems, including a forced shutdown by the Civilian Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). The resulting shakeup of the ESA management team provides a fresh start and an opportunity to reinvigorate the company using lean management principles. Managerial decisions play a key role in ESA's success, together with the discipline and training of the workforce. Students will gain an understanding of cultural difficulties associated with international joint ventures, and learn fundamental aspects of lean management including how to create and sustain a lean culture. The case also provides insight into the worldwide aircraft engine business, the engine overhaul process and cultural barriers that may arise when managing operations in foreign countries.

Teaching Note: 8B07D19 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Expatriate Management; Cultural Customs; Organizational Behaviour; Joint Ventures; Management of Change; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 5:
Growing and Internationalizing the Entrepreneurial Firm

PACIFICLINK IMEDIA: BECOMING A FULL SERVICE INTERACTIVE AGENCY
Andrew Karl Delios

Product Number: 9B09M023
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 13 pages

This case presents the decisions facing the managing director/executive director of PacificLink iMedia (PacificLink), more than 10 years after he founded the company. The company had experienced periods of growth and decline since its founding and was facing a period of uncertain growth given the turmoil in world markets in 2009, following several years of strong growth and expansion. The director anticipated that the company could continue to grow into new geographic or product markets, or perhaps become fundamentally altered in its governance structure and financial resource base, through an initial public offering. The case involves analysis of these alternatives for growth. It can be used to teach about sources of competitive advantage and evaluations of growth alternatives. See also the first and third cases in the three-part series, 9B00M024 and 9B16M202.

Teaching Note: 8B09M23 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Internet Marketing; International Business; Growth Strategy; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DABUR INDIA LTD. - GLOBALIZATION
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A017
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Length: 18 pages

Dabur, an Indian consumer package goods company, had established a strong brand equity in India by offering, for decades, a vast portfolio of over-the-counter products. In seeking international expansion in 1987, it first took the export route. It also followed the customer, targeting the Indian diaspora in the Middle East, Africa and the United States, already familiar with the brand. By 2006, Dabur had set up five manufacturing facilities outside India. In June 2007, Dabur had to make, in countries such as Nigeria for example, some critical choices. It had to choose between sticking to the diaspora, a market it understood best, and targeting the mainstream population. It had to choose its growth options between categories like personal care, in which it had built up competencies, and categories such as oral care and home care, which were the new engines of growth in its international markets but in which the company had no track record, either on the home front or overseas. The case study helps students deal with issues of growth and consolidation in a global market from the perspective of the company's chief executive officer and the head of its international operations.

Teaching Note: 8B09A17 (4 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Growth Strategy; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NETCARE'S INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Saul Klein, Albert Wöcke

Product Number: 9B09M005
Publication Date: 5/22/2009
Revision Date: 6/2/2010
Length: 22 pages

In 2008, the acquisition of the General Healthcare Group (GHG) in the United Kingdom had propelled Netcare Limited (Netcare) from a predominantly South African operation into one of the largest private hospital groups in the world. One of Netcare's key long-term goals was to deliver innovative, quality health-care solutions to patients in every continent. Recent South African parliamentary legislation had introduced the potential for regulated pricing and collective bargaining in medical centres, which could change the industry structure and possibly affect Netcare's strategy. As acquisition at home would be increasingly subject to stringent scrutiny from competition regulators, Netcare wondered what the impact of global acquisition would have on executing its strategy. What lessons could be learned from the GHG acquisition, how could those lessons be leveraged for further international growth, and what continent would be best suited to expansion? The case illustrates the international expansion strategies of Netcare, and illustrates the challenges of operating in an emerging market. The ability to overcome these challenges is the basis of a competitive advantage when entering developed markets.

Teaching Note: 8B09M05 (4 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Business and Society; Global Strategy; Emerging Markets; Hospitals; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



POLARIS 2008
Darren Meister, Rua-Huan Tsaih

Product Number: 9B08E011
Publication Date: 3/16/2009
Length: 12 pages

The chairman of Taiwan-based Polaris Securities Co. Ltd. (Polaris Securities), announced approval of Polaris' investment plans in Singapore, Vietnam and Abu Dhabi. The chairman's name was known in Taiwan as synonymous with innovation and entrepreneurship. He had experienced great success in launching an information technology strategy and related complementary assets for online stock trading and online transactions. With a prominent performance, the chairman had made Polaris Securities stand out conspicuously in Taiwan's securities market. He also copied Polaris Securities experiences, such as computational finance, trading platform and customer service, to Polaris Securities (Hong Kong) Ltd. (Polaris Securities HK) to expand his business scope. The chairman contemplated whether Polaris Securities and Polaris Securities HK experiences could be duplicated in Singapore, Vietnam and Abu Dhabi.

Teaching Note: 8B08E11 (4 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Leveraging Information Technology; Internationalization; Information Technology Strategy; Computational Finance; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ASIAN PAINTS LTD. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS DIVISION
Jean-Louis Schaan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B06M058
Publication Date: 6/21/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 24 pages

Asian Paints, recognized as one of the best managed companies in India, has recently embarked on a significant push to internationalize its activities. The president of the international division is faced with the challenge of simultaneously meeting sales volumes expected, and to contribute to the company's goal of becoming one of the top five decorative paint companies in the world.

Teaching Note: 8B06M58 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Mergers & Acquisitions; Emerging Markets; International Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Entering Foreign Markets

CADIM: THE CHINA AND INDIA REAL ESTATE MARKET ENTRY DECISIONS
Stephen R. Foerster, Marc Folch

Product Number: 9B09N003
Publication Date: 1/30/2009
Revision Date: 7/6/2009
Length: 17 pages

The president and chief operating officer of Cadim, the real estate arm of the Caisse de Dépôt et Placement du Québec, Canada's largest pension fund management firm, was considering whether Cadim should enter India, China or both on a long-term basis to diversify its global real estate holdings and take advantage of the growth these two countries were experiencing. The fund's investment would potentially amount to hundreds of millions of dollars and could lead to substantial returns; however, these investments carried considerable risks. The case introduces many of the issues involved with managing an international portfolio of real estate and provides a detailed overview of the business environment and culture of both China and India. In doing so, the case exposes students to the complicated nature of regional risk assessment and the challenges of doing business in developing countries. Students must assess whether the complexity and risk levels involved with entering a new developing country are worth the potential returns.

Teaching Note: 8B09N03 (9 pages)
Industry: Real Estate and Rental and Leasing
Issues: China; International Strategy; International Joint Venture; Investments
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TALISMAN ENERGY INC.: THE DECISION TO ENTER IRAQ
Pratima Bansal, Natalie Slawinski

Product Number: 9B09M035
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 7/2/2009
Length: 17 pages

In June 2008, the chief executive officer of Talisman Energy Inc. (Talisman) and his senior executive team met with the company's board of directors. The purpose of this meeting was to debate Talisman's proposed entry into the oil-rich Kurdistan region of Iraq. This move was potentially very lucrative for Talisman but was fraught with risks. These risks were exacerbated by Talisman's previous foray into Sudan; during that expansion Talisman had been accused of complicity in human-rights abuses, stemming from industry-accepted royalties and fees it had paid to the government. This payment of fees was held as an example by public interest groups to allege that Talisman was indirectly funding the Sudanese civil war. Talisman's reputation had suffered to the point where the ire of investors and U.S. and Canadian governments was sufficient for Talisman to exit Sudan in 2003. There were many questions about the proposed move to Iraq, including the political situation, the views of the U.S. and Canadian government, and especially the US$220 million fee payable to the Kurdistan Regional Government. Should Talisman enter Iraq, and if so, could they avoid experiencing the same outcome as Sudan?

Teaching Note: 8B09M35 (11 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Corporate Responsibility; Risk Management; Political Environment; Sustainable Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SCHIBSTED (A): SHOULD WE LAUNCH 20 MINUTES?
Jean-Louis Schaan, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B07M019
Publication Date: 11/21/2007
Length: 20 pages

The executive vice-president of newspapers for Schibsted was about to meet with his colleagues to discuss the company's plan to release an internally developed free daily newspaper concept called 20 Minutes. Over the past couple of years, Schibsted's executive team had kept a watchful eye on the free newspaper industry, which was enjoying tremendous popularity. Earlier in the year, Schibsted had launched Avis 1, a free paper with direct delivery to homes in Oslo, Norway. Looking to expand beyond their home country of Norway, Schibsted's executives had developed a proposal to simultaneously launch 20 Minutes in Zurich, Switzerland, and Cologne, Germany. The executive vice-president of newspapers and his colleagues were scheduled to present this recommendation to Schibsted's board of directors within a month. They were in the midst of preparing a financial and strategic analysis, since they were certain the board of directors would ask some tough questions. The supplemental case Schibsted (B): Should We Start Up 20 Minutes Cologne Again?, product #9B07M020 describes the events folllowing.

Teaching Note: 8B07M19 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; Market Entry; Cost/Benefit Analysis; Strategic Scope
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SCHIBSTED (B): SHOULD WE START UP 20 MINUTES COLOGNE AGAIN?
Jean-Louis Schaan, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B07M020
Publication Date: 11/21/2007
Length: 2 pages

On December 1999, Schibsted, Norway's largest media company, launched a free daily newspaper, 20 Minutes simultaneously in Zurich, Switzerland, and Cologne, Germany. As of February 2000, the launch of 20 Minutes in Zurich had been considered a success, whereas the Cologne launch had been fraught with difficulty. Schibsted had been caught up in a lawsuit filed by two prominent German publishers. The Cologne edition had been shut down for five weeks. After an appeal, Schibsted had been granted approval to restart distribution. Now the question was: Should Schibsted launch 20 Minutes in Cologne again? This is a supplemental case to Schibsted (A): Should We Launch 20 Minutes?, product #9B07M019.

Teaching Note: 8B07M19 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Scope; Market Entry; Cost/Benefit Analysis; Global Product
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RUTH'S CHRIS: THE HIGH STAKES OF INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Ilan Alon, Allen H. Kupetz

Product Number: 9B06A034
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 8 pages

In 2006, Ruth's Chris Steak House was fresh off of a sizzling initial public offering and was now interested in growing their business internationally. With restaurants in just four countries outside the United States, a model to identify and rank new international markets was needed. This case provides a practical example for students to take quantitative and non-quantitative variables to create a short list of potential new markets.

Teaching Note: 8B06A34 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Strategy; International Business; International Strategy; Market Entry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMERON AUTO PARTS (A) - REVISED
Harold Crookell, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M015
Publication Date: 1/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

This case is about a small American auto parts producer trying to diversify his way out of dependence on the major automakers. A promising new product is developed and the company gets a chance to license it to a Scottish manufacturer. The issue of whether to license or go it alone in international markets is central to the case. (A sequel to this case is available titled Cameron Auto Parts (B) - Revised, case 9B06M016.)

Teaching Note: 8B06M15 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Exports; Licensing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMERON AUTO PARTS (B) - REVISED
Harold Crookell, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M016
Publication Date: 1/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

Two years after signing a license agreement in the U.K., the company now faces an opportunity to establish with another firm a joint venture in France for the European market. However, the prospect upsets the U.K. licensee who is clearly doing very well, and who even wants Cameron to consider joint venturing with him in Australia. The case ends with Cameron, run off its feet in North America, trying to decide whether to enter Europe via licensing, joint venture or direct investment. (This case is a sequel to Cameron Auto Parts (A) - Revised, case 9B06M015.)

Teaching Note: 8B06M16 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Licensing; Joint Ventures; International Business; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Making Strategic Alliances and Networks Work

GIANT INC.: FORMATION OF THE A-TEAM
Paul W. Beamish, Chwo-Ming (Joseph) Yu

Product Number: 9B09M044
Publication Date: 5/25/2009
Length: 10 pages

This case describes the history and activities of the A-Team, a major alliance of bicycle assembly firms and parts suppliers in Taiwan, which was created in 2003. A strategic alliance with competitors posed challenges. For the A-Team, it was more complicated because the alliance was between both competing bicycle assembly firms and between parts suppliers. By 2006, progress had been made in making the alliance work but the senior executives were wondering what they could do to ensure future progress. The case can be used in a strategy module or course on alliances/joint ventures in a section examining the competition versus cooperation challenge.

Teaching Note: 8B09M44 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Networks; Location Strategy; Learning; Competitive Strategy; Alliances; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SYSTEM@TIC: THE RACE FOR PARTNERS
Anthony Goerzen, Ana Colovic

Product Number: 9B09M047
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 13 pages

The international affairs manager was responsible for developing and implementing an alliance strategy for System@tic Paris Region, a "pôle de compétitivé" (industry cluster) based in the Paris Region, France. The critical point was that, although inter-clusteral alliances had become essential to the success of a cluster - and the firms within them, many of the world's most prestigious clusters were highly sought after and, as a result, increasingly unavailable as alliance partners. Given limited time and resources, the result appeared to be an emerging race for partners in which clusters competed with each other to establish a productive and viable inter-clusteral alliance network. Within the next two weeks, the manager's goal was to establish the outline of a plan to develop an inter-clusteral alliance network that was both achievable and productive for his cluster member firms.

Teaching Note: 8B09M47 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Internationalization; Industry Globalization; Alliances; Globalization; Industry Clusters
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BP IN RUSSIA: SETTLING THE JOINT VENTURE DISPUTE
Gevork Papiryan

Product Number: 9B08M099
Publication Date: 12/15/2008
Length: 22 pages

In September 2003, British Petroleum (BP) formed a 50/50 international joint venture (JV) company, TNK-BP, with a group of Russian investors: Alfa Group, Access Industries and Renova (AAR). This JV was established as a result of the merger of Russian oil companies TNK and Sidanko, owned by AAR, with the majority of BP's Russian oil assets. On May 26, 2008, TNK-BP's chief executive officer, Robert Dudley, told Vedomosti, Russia's leading business daily, about a conflict between British and Russian shareholders. During this dispute, AAR declared that BP treated TNK-BP as its subsidiary and not as a JV. Also, the Russian shareholders criticized the JV's leadership of the company's expansion strategy and climate. As the conflict escalated, BP's leadership needed to decide whether to walk away or continue its participation in the JV.

Teaching Note: 8B08M99 (8 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Emerging Markets; Globalization; Joint Ventures
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NORA-SAKARI: A PROPOSED JV IN MALAYSIA (REVISED)
Paul W. Beamish, R. Azimah Ainuddin

Product Number: 9B06M006
Publication Date: 11/30/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2012
Length: 16 pages

This case presents the perspective of a Malaysian company, Nora Bhd, which was in the process of trying to establish a telecommunications joint venture with a Finnish firm, Sakari Oy. Negotiations have broken down between the firms, and students are asked to try to restructure a win-win deal. The case examines some of the most common issues involved in partner selection and design in international joint ventures.

Teaching Note: 8B06M06 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Third World; Negotiation; Joint Ventures; Finland; Malaysia
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELI LILLY IN INDIA: RETHINKING THE JOINT VENTURE STRATEGY
Charles Dhanaraj, Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M016
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 3/13/2017
Length: 18 pages

Eli Lilly and Company is a leading U.S. pharmaceutical company. The new president of intercontinental operations is re-evaluating all of the company's divisions, including the joint venture with Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, one of India's largest pharmaceutical companies. This joint venture has run smoothly for a number of years despite their differences in focus, but recently Ranbaxy was experiencing cash flow difficulties due to its network of international sales. In addition, the Indian government was changing regulations for businesses in India, and joining the World Trade Organization would have an effect on India's chemical and drug regulations. The president must determine if this international joint venture still fits Eli Lilly's strategic objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B04M16 (20 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Joint Ventures; Emerging Markets; International Management; Strategic Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Managing Global Competitive Dynamics

SCANDINAVIAN AIRLINES: THE GREEN ENGINE DECISION
Jennifer Lynes

Product Number: 9B09M028
Publication Date: 6/11/2009
Length: 11 pages

Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) is an innovator of strategic environmental management in the airline industry. Being a first-mover can have both its advantages and disadvantages. This case looks at the airline's decision of whether they should invest in the best available environmental technology for a fleet of new aircraft that would serve them for the next 25 years. While the technology for these low-emission engines had been around since the 1970s, it had never really been commercialized. SAS was feeling pressure from the regulatory authorities with regards to potential new charges and taxes that could affect the future operating costs of the fleet. Despite these anticipated future costs, at the time of the decision, the director of aircraft and engine analysis for SAS could not make an economic case for the more expensive engines. The challenge was for the fleet development team to try to convince the SAS management team to spend the extra kr5 million (Swedish Kronor) per aircraft for the dual combustor engine. Given that corporations are faced with increasing pressure with regards to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, this case study presents an opportunity for discussion and analysis of various environmental concepts including strategic environmental management, adoption of best available environmental technologies, the role of internal environmental leadership in a large corporation and the effect of market-based mechanisms to improve a sector's environmental performance. The case illustrates the complexities of environmental decisions in striking a balance between meeting ambitious commitments and dealing with real capabilities of companies and external pressures.

Teaching Note: 8B09M28 (14 pages)
Issues: Corporate Culture; Management Decisions; Competitive Advantage; Environment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEST BUY INC. - DUAL BRANDING IN CHINA
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A016
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Revision Date: 5/11/2010
Length: 17 pages

A month after Best Buy Inc. (Best Buy), the largest retailer of consumer electronics in the United States, acquired Five Star, the third largest retailer of appliances and consumer electronics in China in May 2006, the management of Best Buy is weighing in on a branding option. Should Five Star lose its identity and be marketed as Best Buy? Or should Best Buy retain the Five Star brand and let the two brands compete with each other in the Chinese market? The option has a sense of déjà vu because, when it first stepped out of its home turf in January of 2002 by acquiring Future Shop, the largest consumer electronics retailer in Canada, Best Buy was facing a similar dilemma. The company had decided, at the time, in favour of dual brand strategy. It had worked. There was no evidence of cannibalization, the single largest risk in dual branding. Best Buy and Future Shop had both grown together as independent brands in Canada. But, does dual brand strategy work in the vastly different retail environment of China?

Teaching Note: 8B09A16 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Brand Management; Retailing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



H&R SEWING MACHINE COMPANY
Stephen Hummel, Kenneth Harling

Product Number: 9B08M082
Publication Date: 11/10/2008
Length: 20 pages

This case deals with H&R, a company that distributes sewing equipment in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Its future is in jeopardy because of fundamental changes in the global sewing industries stemming from changes in trade restrictions. The consequence is that Canadian sewing activities are in decline as activities in low-cost foreign countries grow rapidly. As Canadian activities decline, H&R's performance has been suffering. But the management of the family-owned company has had trouble seeing the challenge it faces because it has been highly successful for two generations. The case asks what the new CEO and third generation owner should do to save the company.

Teaching Note: 8B08M82 (7 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Competition; Strategy Development; Managing Industry Change; Tariffs
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GUAM VISITORS' BUREAU
Jim Kayalar

Product Number: 9B08M087
Publication Date: 12/15/2008
Revision Date: 7/14/2016
Length: 25 pages

The general manager of the Guam Visitors' Bureau, a destination marketing organization, faces the challenge of running the island's tourism industry. There are strong interest groups, who have structured the competitive field in Guam, and the island's mature industry faces ever-increasing competition from rival destinations. The general manager must formulate a realistic strategy that acknowledges the internal and external constraints his organization faces and safeguards the competitive position of Guam.

Teaching Note: 8B08M87 (11 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: International Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Strategy Development; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ECCO A/S - GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN MANAGEMENT
Bo Bernhard Nielsen, Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt

Product Number: 9B08M014
Publication Date: 5/29/2008
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

ECCO A/S (ECCO) had been very successful in the footwear industry by focusing on production technology and assuring quality by maintaining full control of the entire value chain from cow to shoe. As ECCO grew and faced increased international competition, various value chain activities, primarily production and tanning, were offshored to low-cost countries. The fully integrated value chain tied up significant capital and management attention in tanneries and production facilities, which could have been used to strengthen the branding and marketing of ECCO's shoes. Moreover, an increasingly complex and dispersed global value chain configuration posed organizational and managerial challenges regarding coordination, communication and logistics. This case examines the financial, organizational and managerial challenges of maintaining a highly integrated global value chain and asks students to determine the appropriateness of this set-up in the context of an increasingly market-oriented industry. It is suitable for use in both undergraduate and graduate courses in international corporate strategy, international management, international marketing, supply-chain management, cross-border strategic management and international business studies in general.

Teaching Note: 8B08M14 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Management; Operations Management; Global Strategy; Vertical Integration; Value Chain; Competitor Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Diversifying, Acquiring, and Restructuring

ACQUISITION AND RESTRUCTURING OF KIA MOTORS BY HYUNDAI MOTORS
Seungwha (Andy) Chung, Sunju Park

Product Number: 9B09M015
Publication Date: 2/9/2009
Length: 16 pages

In recent years, greater competition and diminished profits, due to domestic and global oversupplies as well as higher development costs, have led the automobile industry to engage in domestic and international mergers and strategic collaboration. This case examines one of the largest mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the Korean automobile market in recent years: the acquisition of Kia Motors (Kia) by Hyundai Motors (Hyundai). The case describes the background conditions of the acquisition, the integration processes after the acquisition, and the requisites for Kia Motors to normalize management within a short time. Hyundai, in acquiring Kia, enhanced its competitive power in both domestic and global markets, achieving economies of scale and scope and strengthening its global market basis. That said, Hyundai/Kia faced several pressing challenges, among them the cooperation of Renault and Samsung Motors, the unclear domestic treatment of Daewoo Motors, and M&As taking place among top motor companies worldwide. This case study asks students to analyze the process of post-acquisition restructuring and the resulting synergy effects, inviting them to think through the strategies by which Hyundai/Kia may thrive in the global automobile market. Further, it illustrates both the current state of the domestic Korean automobile industry and recent trends in the global automobile market.

Teaching Note: 8B09M15 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Restructuring; Mergers & Acquisitions; Organizational Change; Integration; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TATA MOTORS' ACQUISITION OF DAEWOO COMMERCIAL VEHICLE COMPANY
Meera Harish, Sanjay Singh, Kulwant Singh

Product Number: 9B08M094
Publication Date: 2/2/2009
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 15 pages

In January 2004, the chairman of the India-based Tata Group, announced that the Tata Group would focus its efforts on international expansion to become globally competitive. This largely domestic vehicle manufacturing firm subsequently acquired a leading established South Korean firm, Daewoo Commercial Vehicle Company (DCVC). This case focuses on the background of the firms and the acquisition, and the bidding and acquisition process. It provides information on the interests of the acquirer and target, and how both came to see the value in the acquisition. The Tata Group acquisition presents an uncommon situation of how an Indian firm acquired a firm in South Korea while overcoming a series of cultural and other barriers. An analysis of this case provides the basis for determining what criteria should be considered to guide a successful acquisition. A companion case is also available, Tata Motors' Integration of Daewoo Commercial Vehicle Company.

Teaching Note: 8B08M94 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Strategy; International Expansion; Management Decisions; Market Entry; Mergers & Acquisitions; Corporate Strategy; Business Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TATA MOTORS' INTEGRATION OF DAEWOO COMMERCIAL VEHICLE COMPANY
Meera Harish, Sanjay Singh, Kulwant Singh

Product Number: 9B08M095
Publication Date: 2/2/2009
Length: 8 pages

In January 2004, the chairman of the India-based Tata Group, announced that the Tata Group would focus its efforts on international expansion to become globally competitive. This largely domestic vehicle manufacturing firm subsequently acquired a leading established South Korean firm, Daewoo Commercial Vehicle Company (DCVC). This case complements the case Tata Motors' Acquisition of Daewoo Commercial Vehicles Company, #9B08M094. Commencing from the successful completion of the acquisition of DCVC, this case details the strategic, organizational and operational changes implemented to integrate the two firms. The value of this case is twofold: 1) it demonstrates how firms can effectively integrate an acquired firm, particularly in terms of the wide range of strategic and tactical actions; and 2) it provides an example of a firm that takes an unorthodox approach to integration. Students have an opportunity to evaluate the factors that determine the success of a post-acquisition integration.

Teaching Note: 8B08M95 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Market Entry; Mergers & Acquisitions; Business Policy; International Expansion; International Strategy; Management Decisions
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



YUNNAN BAIYAO: TRADITIONAL MEDICINE MEETS PRODUCT/MARKET DIVERSIFICATION
Paul W. Beamish, George Peng

Product Number: 9B06M088
Publication Date: 1/23/2007
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 17 pages

In 2003, 3M initiated contact with Yunnan Baiyao Group Co., Ltd. to discuss potential cooperation opportunities in the area of transdermal pharmaceutical products. Yunnan Baiyao (YB), was a household brand in China for its unique traditional herbal medicines. In recent years, the company had been engaged in a series of corporate reforms and product/market diversification strategies to respond to the change in the Chinese pharmaceutical industry and competition at a global level. By 2003, YB was already a vertically integrated, product-diversified group company with an ambition to become an international player. The proposed cooperation with 3M was attractive to YB, not only as an opportunity for domestic product diversification, but also for international diversification. YB had been attempting to internationalize its products and an overseas department had been established in 2002 specifically for this purpose. On the other hand, YB had also been considering another option namely, whether to extend its brand to toothpaste and other healthcare products. YB had to make decisions about which of the two options to pursue and whether it was feasible to pursue both.

Teaching Note: 8B06M88 (12 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Product Diversification; Internationalization; Brand Extension; Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CIBC-BARCLAYS: SHOULD THEIR CARIBBEAN OPERATIONS BE MERGED?
Don Wood, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M067
Publication Date: 1/10/2005
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 17 pages

At the end of 2001, the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) and Barclays Bank PLC were in advanced negotiations regarding the potential merger of their respective retail, corporate and offshore banking operations in the Caribbean. Some members of each board wondered whether this was the best direction to take. Would the combined company be able to deliver superior returns? Would it be possible to integrate, within budget, companies that had competed with each other in the region for decades? Would either firm be better off divesting regional operations instead? Should the two firms just continue to go-it-alone with emphasis on continual improvement? A decision needed to be made within the coming week. This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the six additional Cross-Enterprise cases that deal with the various functional issues associated with the actual merger: Accounting and Finance - CIBC-Barclays: Accounting for Their Merger, product 9B04B022, Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032, Marketing and Branding - FirstCaribbean International Bank: The Marketing and Branding Challenges of a Start-up, product 9B05A012, Human Resources - Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean International Bank, product 9B04C053, Finance - FirstCaribbean Merger: The Proposed Merger, product 9B06N004, and technical note - Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B04M67 (8 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Emerging Markets; Mergers & Acquisitions; Integration; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Strategizing, Structuring, and Learning around the World

COLOPLAST A/S - ORGANIZATIONAL CHALLENGES IN OFFSHORING
Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt, Bo Bernhard Nielsen

Product Number: 9B08M031
Publication Date: 7/25/2008
Length: 16 pages

Coloplast's future global manufacturing strategy was based on relocation of volume production of mature product lines to low cost countries like Hungary and China, whereas most creative and innovative activities (pilot production, ramp-up and range care) were retained in Denmark. The large scale project of offshoring, first volume production and later perhaps other activities, to Tatabanya, Hungary constituted a major shift in the operational strategy for Coloplast, which resulted in a series of organizational and managerial challenges. An important feature of the case is the surprise to the management team of how challenging it was to globalize the operations despite Coloplast's international experience operating a network of subsidiaries in more than 26 countries. The management team learned how important it is to have the structure, the organization and the mindset in place when offshoring production. Sourcing internationally is very different from selling internationally as it involves the entire organization. The learning process of the management team and the challenges they faced is unfolded in this case.

Teaching Note: 8B08M31 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Operations Management; Human Resources Management; Centralization; Management Science and Info. Systems; Management Information Systems; Organizational Behaviour; International Management; Change Management; Value Chain
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ORGANIZING FROM SCRATCH: THE LEARNING LAB DENMARK EXPERIENCE (A)
Claus Rerup, John Lafkas

Product Number: 9B06C006
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 14 pages

Learning Lab Denmark, a research and development institute, encountered many of the difficulties typically experienced by start-ups, especially obstacles that involve developing a set of routines for getting things done. In other respects LLD faced several distinct challenges that are specific to its charter. This case describes in detail the history behind the formation of Learning Lab Denmark, the goals and the organizing principles underlying LLD and its sub-components, the various personnel roles and issues, including performance problems, criticism and paradoxes that arose in the first couple of years. The supplement, Organizing from Scratch: The Learning Lab Denmark Experience (B) case, product 9B06C007, picks up the story and discusses significant organizational changes.

Teaching Note: 8B06C06 (18 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Visioning; Leadership; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Organizational Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ORGANIZING FROM SCRATCH: THE LEARNING LAB DENMARK EXPERIENCE (B)
Claus Rerup, John Lafkas

Product Number: 9B06C007
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 7 pages

This supplement to Organizing From Scratch: The Learning Lab Denmark Experience (A), product 9B06C006, identifies several of the consortia's achievements, notes some findings from LLD's self-evaluation report and discusses significant organizational changes.

Teaching Note: 8B06C06 (18 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Visioning; Leadership; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Organizational Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Governing the Corporation Around the World

CALLMATE TELIPS (A) - CHOICE OF ACCOUNTING POLICY
Muntazar Bashir Ahmed

Product Number: 9B08N028
Publication Date: 12/15/2008
Revision Date: 4/23/2009
Length: 15 pages

Callmate Telips Telecom Limited (Callmate) was in the telecommunications business, an industry in which the regulatory controls were gradually being undone by the government of Pakistan as part of an economic deregulation program. Callmate was the pioneer in the payphones and prepaid calling card industries in Pakistan. The events in the case demonstrate that the company strategy, as well as aggressive share price management, could be dangerous if there were no checks on the directors. All the directors of Callmate were close family members and the audit committee consisted of three of the directors. The external audit firm that audited Callmate was A.F. Ferguson & Co. (Ferguson), an affiliate of Price Waterhouse Coopers International. As Callmate was listed on the Karachi Stock Exchange, it was required to publish its financials quarterly after these had been reviewed by Ferguson. The company had received permission during early 1995 to enter into the long distance international market. A disagreement arose between the auditors and the company on the accounting policy related to revenue recognition. This dispute, along with the company trying to manage its share price, led to a number of problems that became public knowledge as the company tried to malign the auditors. The case examines corporate governance by examining the role of the external auditor, the conduct of the board of directors and the regulator of publicly listed companies.

Teaching Note: 8B08N28 (9 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management Style; Auditing; Accounting Standards; Corporate Governance
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



REPUTATION RISK IN THE GLOBAL ART MARKET
Kimberley Howard, William Wei, Eric Zengxiang Wang

Product Number: 9B09M062
Publication Date: 10/9/2009
Revision Date: 7/27/2017
Length: 6 pages

When Yves Saint Laurent died in June 2008, his estate passed to his business partner, Pierre Bergé. Bergé decided to auction several items from Laurent's estate at Christie's international auction house, including two antique bronzes from China. The general feeling in China was that these artifacts had been looted and should be repatriated rather than auctioned. The case highlights issues of ethics, corporate governance and corporate responsibility.

Teaching Note: 8B09M62 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: ethical issues; corporate responsibility; customer relationship management; corporate governance; luxury goods
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SYDNEY WATER CUSTOMER INFORMATION AND BILLING SYSTEM (A)
Michael Parent

Product Number: 9B08E012
Publication Date: 12/23/2008
Length: 4 pages

Sydney Water's new customer information and billing system (CIBS), its largest information technology project ever, was over-budget and very late, with no end in sight. In the (A) case, the board of directors must decide what action to take with regards to management's actions, and regarding the project contractor, PricewaterhouseCoopers. The (B) case outlines what happened afterwards. The cases span a 10-year period - from inception to litigation. The case is useful as a tool to explore governance issues at the board and senior management levels as they pertain to enterprise risk management and IT risk.

Teaching Note: 8B08E12 (8 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Project Management; Information Systems; Government and Business; Board of Directors
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SYDNEY WATER CUSTOMER INFORMATION AND BILLING SYSTEM (B)
Michael Parent

Product Number: 9B08E013
Publication Date: 12/23/2008
Length: 3 pages

Sydney Water's new customer information and billing system (CIBS), its largest information technology project ever, was over-budget and very late, with no end in sight. In the (A) case, the board of directors must decide what action to take with regards to management's actions, and regarding the project contractor, PricewaterhouseCoopers. The (B) case outlines what happened afterwards. The cases span a 10-year period - from inception to litigation. The case is useful as a tool to explore governance issues at the board and senior management levels as they pertain to enterprise risk management and IT risk.

Teaching Note: 8B08E12 (8 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Government and Business; Information Systems; Project Management; Board of Directors
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



CRESCENT STANDARD INVESTMENT BANK LIMITED — GOVERNANCE FAILURE
Muntazar Bashir Ahmed

Product Number: 9B08M068
Publication Date: 10/20/2008
Revision Date: 12/12/2008
Length: 25 pages

The Crescent Standard Investment Bank Limited (CSIBL) was the largest investment bank quoted on all the stock exchanges in Pakistan, so when it declared a huge loss of Rs2.1 billion (US$35.5 million) for the year December 31, 2005, the market was taken by surprise. There had been some rumours that all was not well and that the investment banking regulator, Securities and Exchange Commission of Pakistan (SECP), had sent a team to investigate the affairs of the bank. Since the main shareholders were individuals or companies of the well-known business group known as the Crescent Group, there was enormous interest in the CSIBL affairs by financial and political circles.The case describes the various types of entities that were merged to form the CSIBL, principally to protect the stakeholders by creating an entity with a large capitalization. The bank had reported in its annual reports that all the internal control mechanisms for good governance stipulated by the SECP were in place and the auditors (internal and external) had reported that these were satisfactory. Yet, when subjected to an investigation, it was revealed that the internal management was involved in a variety of acts of misrepresentation and concealment. The case focuses on the weaknesses in the structure of the corporate governance regime in Pakistan. The fact remains that no amount of internal or external checks can stop internal management from colluding to perpetrate fraud.

Teaching Note: 8B08M68 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Corporate Responsibility; Corporate Governance; Ethical Issues; Financial Management; Pakistan
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LARSON IN NIGERIA (REVISED)
Paul W. Beamish, Isaiah A. Litvak, Harry Cheung

Product Number: 9B04M012
Publication Date: 2/3/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 7 pages

The vice-president of international operations must decide whether to continue to operate or abandon the company's Nigerian joint venture. Although the expatriate general manager of the Nigerian operation has delivered a very pessimistic report, Larson's own hunch was to stay in that country. Maintaining the operation was complicated by problems in staffing, complying with a promise to increase the share of local ownership, a joint venture partner with divergent views, and increasing costs of doing business in Nigeria. If Larson decides to maintain the existing operation, the issues of increasing local equity participation (i.e. coping with indigenization) and staffing problems (especially in terms of the joint venture general manager) have to be addressed.

Teaching Note: 8B04M12 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Subsidiaries; Third World; Government Regulation; Staffing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Strategizing With Corporate Social Responsibility

SAMSUNG TESCO HOMEPLUS AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Youngchan Kim, Kwangho Ahn

Product Number: 9B09M040
Publication Date: 7/13/2009
Revision Date: 7/29/2009
Length: 17 pages

Samsung Tesco Homeplus (STH), one of Korea's large hypermarkets, increased its investment in social contribution activities and systemized the organization in charge in the aftermath. It especially focused on education and cultural services, saving the environment and sharing with others. As a consequence, by December 2008, STH was considered one of the most innovative companies and one that realized true customer value. It had won a variety of awards, such as the Green Management award, Social Contribution Company award and the Eco-friendly Management award. After creating a corporate social responsibility (CSR) team in 2005, it won the CSR award given by the British Chamber of Commerce in Korea and was selected as one of Korea's Most Admired Companies. While much progress had been made, company executives wondered what factors would be the keys to their continuing CSR activities. This case presents points of contention and issues in the practice of corporate social responsibility by STH. Social contribution activities and STH were aligned with both sustainable management and customer value-oriented management. Various activities in extended education, environment and charity ultimately led customers to view STH as not just a discount store that simply sold products, but a value store. STH conducted systematic programs and activities in the areas of extended education environment and charity after having declared itself a social contribution company. This case illustrates how a company can develop its social contribution activities. In addition, discussion will centre on the long-term impacts that social contribution activities have on enterprises.

Teaching Note: 8B09M40 (10 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Corporate Social Responsibility; Customer Value Management; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIJI WATER AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - GREEN MAKEOVER OR "GREENWASHING"?
James McMaster, Jan Nowak

Product Number: 9B09A008
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

This case analysis traces the establishment and subsequent operation of FIJI Water LLC and its bottling subsidiary, Natural Waters of Viti Limited, the first company in Fiji extracting, bottling and marketing, both domestically and internationally, artesian water coming from a virgin ecosystem found on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. The case reviews the growth and market expansion of this highly successful company with the brand name FIJI Natural Artesian Water (FIJI Water). The company has grown rapidly over the past decade and a half, and now exports bottled water into many countries in the world from its production plant located in the Fiji Islands. In 2008, FIJI Water was the leading imported bottled water brand in the United States. In the context of great marketing success of the FIJI brand, particularly in the U.S. market, the case focuses on how the company has responded to a number of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, including measuring and reducing its carbon footprint, responsibilities to key stakeholders, and concerns of the Fiji government with regard to taxation and transfer pricing issues. The case provides a compelling illustration of how CSR challenges may jeopardize the sustainability of a clever marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B09A08 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environment; Corporate Responsibility; Marketing Communication; Transfer Pricing; International Marketing; Greenwashing; Green Marketing; Brand Positioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (B)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M011
Publication Date: 2/25/2008
Revision Date: 9/15/2014
Length: 9 pages

This case, which outlines the product recall, is a supplement to Mattel and the Toy Recalls (A).

Teaching Note: 8B08M11 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NESTLE'S NESCAFE PARTNERS' BLEND: THE FAIRTRADE DECISION (A)
Niraj Dawar, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06A020
Publication Date: 7/27/2006
Revision Date: 1/9/2008
Length: 24 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Corporate Social Responsibility Award, 2006 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. In early 2005, Nestle is in the midst of a decision: whether or not the Fairtrade mark should be applied on Partners' Blend, a new instant coffee product to be marketed in the growing UK 'ethical' coffee segment. Application of the Fairtrade mark on the Partners Blend product means that Nestle must go against its historical position of not offering minimum guaranteed prices to coffee farmers. As part of their deliberations, Nestle executives must consider their coffee sourcing program at large, their corporate social responsibility framework, Nescafe and corporate Nestle branding, the UK market and the potential consumer benefits or backlash that could result from releasing such a product.

Teaching Note: 8B06A20 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Corporate Responsibility; Brand Management; Product Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NESTLE'S NESCAFE PARTNERS' BLEND: THE FAIRTRADE DECISION (B)
Niraj Dawar, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06A021
Publication Date: 7/27/2006
Revision Date: 9/14/2009
Length: 2 pages

This supplement to product # 9B06A020, Nestle's Nescafe Partners' Blend: The Fairtrade Decision (A) outlines the company's decision.

Teaching Note: 8B06A20 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Product Strategy; New Products; Corporate Responsibility; Brand Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BP AND CORPORATE GREENWASH
Michael Sider

Product Number: 9B05C010
Publication Date: 2/21/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 7 pages

Bp's green re-branding efforts began officially with the unveiling of its new bp Helios mark, named after the Greek sun god. The new logo did away with 70 years of corporate branding, replacing the bp shield, long associated in consumers' minds with the strength of British imperialism. The Helios mark cost US$7 million to develop and was forecast to cost the company another US$100 million a year to integrate into marketing and operations over the next two years. At the logo's unveiling, the company's chief executive officer directed attention to the company's recent purchase of the solar energy company Solarex, an acquisition that made bp the world's largest solar energy company. The unveiling of the Helios logo was a formalization of a re-branding strategy that had begun to emerge the year before with the CEO's announcement that 200 new bp sites around the world would be powered in part by solar energy, through solar panels placed on the roofs of gas pumps, and his commitment to reducing bp's own carbon dioxide emissions by 10 per cent by the year 2010. From the start, however, environmental groups heaped scorn on bp's green re-branding. Greenpeace gave the company its Greenhouse Greenwash Award, given to the largest corporate climate culprit on earth.

Teaching Note: 8B05C10 (4 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Ethical Issues; Communications; Public Relations; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA