Ivey Publishing

Modern Management: Concepts and Skills

Certo, S.C., Certo, T.,11/e (United States, Pearson, 2009)
Prepared By Sunil Godse, Ph.D. Student (General Management)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Modern Management: Skills for Success

DELL INC. IN 2009
Stewart Thornhill, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B08M093
Publication Date: 1/20/2009
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 18 pages

The Dell story is well-known in the business world: a young Michael Dell, while attending the University of Texas in Austin, founds a computer sales company that eventually revolutionizes the industry. The case puts students in the position of a senior executive at Dell who is preparing for an investor relations meeting. As the senior executive reviews information on his company, he wonders how best to convey to skeptical investors that Dell's strategy will return the company to growth. In examining the Dell story, students learn about how Dell built up a set of competitive advantages that seemed unassailable until the early 2000s. The second part of the case illustrates the impermanence of competitive advantages - it describes how Dell is attempting to remake itself after falling behind its competitors.

Teaching Note: 8B08M93 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategy Development; Strategic Change; Globalization; Strategic Balance
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE CAREER CHOICE OF MS. LINLIN CHEN
Fernando Olivera, Natalie Bin Zhao

Product Number: 9B07C015
Publication Date: 3/16/2007
Length: 6 pages

Linlin Chen, a sales manager at Allnation Import and Export Co. Ltd. is in her office looking at the revenue reports for her sales in the past three months. Her numbers are very good, and she knows she is about to be rewarded with a promotion and the opportunity to become a shareholder in the company. Chen has been thinking about becoming an entrepreneur for some time. As she weighs in the risks and the opportunities, she realizes that she needs to make a decision within nine days when she will be asked to become a shareholder in the company.

Teaching Note: 8B07C15 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Entrepreneurship Opportunity; Career Anchor; Career Choice
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



AURORA CULTURAL CENTRE
Charlene Zietsma, Geoffrey Kistruck

Product Number: 9B05M050
Publication Date: 9/22/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 16 pages

The Aurora Cultural Centre's mission is to foster a more just community, globally and locally, by providing community education on diversity and cross-cultural awareness, global development issues, and immigration/refugee issues. The centre also provide housing and settlement services to new immigrants and refugees. The organization has been facing budget deficits, administrative overload, board member turnover and staff problems. A recently appointed member of the board is preparing to lead a board strategy retreat and must make recommendations on improvements to the agency's financial performance and must determine how she can convince the board members that the situation is serious and requires immediate action.

Teaching Note: 8B05M50 (10 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Strategy Development; Mission Statements; Non-Profit Organization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MARIE BOHM AND THE ASPECT GROUP
Alison Konrad

Product Number: 9B05C017
Publication Date: 6/14/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 10 pages

The Aspect Group is a small entrepreneurial marketing company that focuses on brand management. Having worked in the industry for a number of years both as permanent employee and freelancer, Marie Bohm founded the Aspect Group with a goal of developing a humane work environment with work-life flexibility. To grow the business, she is faced with two choices: she could partner with a small local firm or link with a high-profile firm in Toronto. The latter would provide greater visibility and credibility but she is concerned that the demands could alter the work-life flexibility qualities she valued. A video is available, product # 7B05C017.

Teaching Note: 8B05C17 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Family-Work Interaction; Women in Management; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Managing: History and Current Thinking

SWATCH AND THE GLOBAL WATCH INDUSTRY
Allen Morrison, Cyril Bouquet

Product Number: 9A99M023
Publication Date: 5/9/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The efforts of Swatch to reposition itself in the increasingly competitive global watch industry are reviewed in this case. Extensive information on the history and structure of the global watch industry is provided and the shrinking time horizons decision makers face in formulating strategy and in responding to changes in the industry are highlighted. In particular, the case discusses how technology and globalization have changed industry dynamics and have caused companies to reassess their sources of competitive advantage. Like other companies, Swatch faces the difficult task of deciding whether to emphasize product breadth, or focus on a few key global brands. It also must decide whether to shift manufacturing away from Switzerland to lower cost countries like India.

Teaching Note: 8A99M23 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Industry Analysis; Competing with Multinationals; Globalization
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 3:
Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics

ONLINE PIRACY: JAYWALKING OR THEFT?
Alex Beamish, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B09C018
Publication Date: 9/18/2009
Revision Date: 3/24/2010
Length: 8 pages

In September 2009, Brian Lee purchased a computer game developed by a major company and, like other customers, he was experiencing difficulty running it. The source of the problems was a highly restrictive system of digital rights management (DRM), which, while more or less universally disliked, was causing serious technical problems for a minority of users. Lee began to share his experience on the company's message board and was engaging in a debate about online piracy with a company representative. He was curious about piracy in the file-sharing age and wondered why it would be wrong to download a pirated version of the game with the DRM circumvented. The case deals with an issue which resonates with students. Although the context is simple, the problem is complex, thus giving instructors wide latitude on how to teach the case. It is suitable for modules or courses focused on ethics, service operations, intellectual property rights and information technology.

Teaching Note: 8B09C18 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Service Recovery; Intellectual Property; Internet; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KILLER COKE: THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST COCA-COLA
Henry W. Lane, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B07C003
Publication Date: 1/31/2007
Revision Date: 2/24/2010
Length: 23 pages

The CEO of Coca-Cola is faced with increasing criticism over the company's handling of alleged human rights abuses in Colombia. A grass roots protest movement known as The Campaign to Stop Killer Coke has built international support for a boycott of Coca-Cola products on college campuses. The campaign centers specifically on the intimidation and murder of union leaders at a specific Coca-Cola bottling plant in Colombia. Coca-Cola asserted that it was not responsible for such abuses. Rather, the violence at the Coca-Cola plant was the product of a political situation that was beyond the company's control. The company further argued that it was in compliance with local labor laws, and had been dismissed as the defendant in lawsuits filed in Colombia and U.S. courts. At the time of the case, Coca-Cola is faced with anti-Coke campaigns at more than 100 college campuses worldwide and official boycotts of its products at a number of large well-known campuses in the United States. In response, the company has undertaken an audit of its bottling plants in Colombia. It also launched a public relations campaign aimed at refuting accusations of human rights violations. The case can be used to discuss corporate ethics, extraterritoriality, marketing and public relations.

Teaching Note: 8B07C03 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Trade Unions; Ethical Issues; Emerging Markets; Supplier Selection; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WHAT ARE WE POURING IN OUR MORNING CEREAL? (A)
Gerard Seijts, Dan Crim

Product Number: 9B05C028
Publication Date: 10/13/2005
Length: 10 pages

A husband and wife investigative reporting team had created a four-part TV series on a genetically modified bovine growth hormone produced by a large biotech company. The hormone was injected into dairy cows to increase milk yields. The TV series raised concerns about the health effects of the hormone on humans who consumed the milk. Shortly before the series was to air, an attorney for the biotech company contacted the TV network and demanded that the script for the series be altered. The investigative reporters has to decide options they have. The supplement, What Are We Pouring In Our Morning Cereal? (B), product 9B05C029, discusses the aftermath of their decision.

Teaching Note: 8B05C28 (6 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Product Safety; Whistleblower; Leadership; Ethical Issues; Accountability
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BROAD AIR CONDITIONING AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Zhi Yi He, Meng Sun, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M034
Publication Date: 6/24/2004
Revision Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 12 pages

Broad Air Conditioning is a Chinese company with a proactive environmental attitude, but suffering from deteriorating financial results. The company founder and chief executive officer must decide whether to start producing electricity powered air conditioners to improve its financial results easily or stick to its ideal and only manufacture machines powered by heat. The major theme of this case is to understand corporate social responsibility, by discussing how an enterprise can find a way to harmonize the relationship between benefitting the company and protecting the environment, especially in developing countries.

Teaching Note: 8B04M34 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Corporate Responsibility; Sustainable Development; Environment; Energy; Peking University
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NIKE INC.: DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE PUBLIC RELATIONS STRATEGY
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9A99C034
Publication Date: 5/29/2000
Revision Date: 1/14/2010
Length: 20 pages

It had been almost a decade since the first article surfaced in the media alleging that factories sub-contracted by Nike in China and Indonesia were forcing workers to work long hours for low pay, and for physically and verbally abusive managers. The article was the seed of a media campaign that created a public relations nightmare for the company. A financial crisis in Asia and intense competition in the domestic market contributed to a decline in Nike's revenue and market share after three years of record performance. Though no direct correlation could be proven between the consumer's negative perceptions of Nike and the company's decline in market share and stock, it certainly did not help in their efforts to establish themselves as the global leader in a hotly competitive industry. A linear overview of the adverse publicity that Nike received, and the perspectives of Nike senior management, demonstrates to students the importance and elements of the timely development of an effective media and consumer relations campaign.

Teaching Note: 8A99C34 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Public Relations; Consumer Relations; Management Philosophy; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Management and Diversity

AN INDISCREET CONVERSATION ON HIRING
Alison Konrad, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05C032
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 3 pages

A group of four friends, all married men and in their late 20s, meet for coffee in a major city. One of the men has received a job application from a young woman he considers to be a stellar candidate for his job opening. The discussion turns into a debate about the feasibility of hiring young women for professional and managerial positions, given that they become pregnant and go on maternity leave.

Teaching Note: 8B05C32 (9 pages)
Issues: Discrimination; Human Resources Management; Women in Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JULIE DEMPSTER (A)
Christine Pearson, Rachel M. Knight

Product Number: 9B03C011
Publication Date: 5/1/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 5 pages

A black Canadian woman is hired as vice-president of marketing and brand positioning for an Amsterdam-based computer software company. Shortly after joining the firm she encounters a number of cross-cultural and equality issues. She must decide whether or not to renew her contract with the company. The supplement case, Julie Dempster (B), product 9B03C012 outlines her decision.

Teaching Note: 8B03C11 (6 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Cultural Customs; Management in a Global Environment; Personal Development; Corporate Culture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELLEN MOORE (A): LIVING AND WORKING IN KOREA
Henry W. Lane, Chantell Nicholls, Gail Ellement

Product Number: 9A97G029
Publication Date: 6/3/1998
Revision Date: 2/23/2017
Length: 16 pages

Ellen Moore, a systems consultant, was sent to Korea to manage a project involving a team of North American and Korean consultants representing a joint venture between a major Korean conglomerate and a significant North American information technology company. The Americans were to be involved for the first seven months in order to transfer expertise and knowledge to the South Koreans, who had little experience in this area. Ellen's superior had played an integral part in securing the contract in Korea due to his depth of knowledge on the subject. He chose Ellen to be the key North American project manager because she had significant project management skills and impressive international experience. Upon Ellen's arrival, she discovered that the Korean consultants were far less skilled than she had expected. In addition, Ellen had understood that she and the Korean manager were to be co-managers, but immediately tensions arose regarding who was giving direction to the team, and the scope of the project. Tensions escalated until it was clear that the project was behind schedule and the Koreans were not taking direction from Ellen. The Koreans insisted that Ellen was the problem. Ellen’s superior disagreed; he and Ellen needed to decide how to proceed. The challenge was to balance strategic goals with individual action.

Teaching Note: 8A97G29 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Group Behaviour; Cross-cultural Relations; Women in Management; Team Building; United States; Korea
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Managing in the Global Arena

BEST BUY INC. - DUAL BRANDING IN CHINA
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A016
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Revision Date: 5/11/2010
Length: 17 pages

A month after Best Buy Inc. (Best Buy), the largest retailer of consumer electronics in the United States, acquired Five Star, the third largest retailer of appliances and consumer electronics in China in May 2006, the management of Best Buy is weighing in on a branding option. Should Five Star lose its identity and be marketed as Best Buy? Or should Best Buy retain the Five Star brand and let the two brands compete with each other in the Chinese market? The option has a sense of déjà vu because, when it first stepped out of its home turf in January of 2002 by acquiring Future Shop, the largest consumer electronics retailer in Canada, Best Buy was facing a similar dilemma. The company had decided, at the time, in favour of dual brand strategy. It had worked. There was no evidence of cannibalization, the single largest risk in dual branding. Best Buy and Future Shop had both grown together as independent brands in Canada. But, does dual brand strategy work in the vastly different retail environment of China?

Teaching Note: 8B09A16 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Brand Management; Retailing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMERON AUTO PARTS (A) - REVISED
Harold Crookell, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M015
Publication Date: 1/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

This case is about a small American auto parts producer trying to diversify his way out of dependence on the major automakers. A promising new product is developed and the company gets a chance to license it to a Scottish manufacturer. The issue of whether to license or go it alone in international markets is central to the case. (A sequel to this case is available titled Cameron Auto Parts (B) - Revised, case 9B06M016.)

Teaching Note: 8B06M15 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Exports; Licensing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMERON AUTO PARTS (B) - REVISED
Harold Crookell, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M016
Publication Date: 1/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

Two years after signing a license agreement in the U.K., the company now faces an opportunity to establish with another firm a joint venture in France for the European market. However, the prospect upsets the U.K. licensee who is clearly doing very well, and who even wants Cameron to consider joint venturing with him in Australia. The case ends with Cameron, run off its feet in North America, trying to decide whether to enter Europe via licensing, joint venture or direct investment. (This case is a sequel to Cameron Auto Parts (A) - Revised, case 9B06M015.)

Teaching Note: 8B06M16 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Licensing; Joint Ventures; International Business; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON INTERNATIONAL LICENSING
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M005
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 18 pages

Licensing is a strategy for technology transfer; and an approach to internationalization that requires less time or depth of involvement in foreign markets, compared to exports, joint ventures, and foreign direct investment. This note examines when licensing is employed, risks associated with it, intellectual property rights, costs of licensing, unattractive markets for licensing, and the major elements of the license agreement.

Issues: Technology Transfer; Licensing; Corporate Strategy; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NORA-SAKARI: A PROPOSED JV IN MALAYSIA (REVISED)
Paul W. Beamish, R. Azimah Ainuddin

Product Number: 9B06M006
Publication Date: 11/30/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2012
Length: 16 pages

This case presents the perspective of a Malaysian company, Nora Bhd, which was in the process of trying to establish a telecommunications joint venture with a Finnish firm, Sakari Oy. Negotiations have broken down between the firms, and students are asked to try to restructure a win-win deal. The case examines some of the most common issues involved in partner selection and design in international joint ventures.

Teaching Note: 8B06M06 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Third World; Negotiation; Joint Ventures; Finland; Malaysia
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CIBC-BARCLAYS: SHOULD THEIR CARIBBEAN OPERATIONS BE MERGED?
Don Wood, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M067
Publication Date: 1/10/2005
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 17 pages

At the end of 2001, the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) and Barclays Bank PLC were in advanced negotiations regarding the potential merger of their respective retail, corporate and offshore banking operations in the Caribbean. Some members of each board wondered whether this was the best direction to take. Would the combined company be able to deliver superior returns? Would it be possible to integrate, within budget, companies that had competed with each other in the region for decades? Would either firm be better off divesting regional operations instead? Should the two firms just continue to go-it-alone with emphasis on continual improvement? A decision needed to be made within the coming week. This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the six additional Cross-Enterprise cases that deal with the various functional issues associated with the actual merger: Accounting and Finance - CIBC-Barclays: Accounting for Their Merger, product 9B04B022, Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032, Marketing and Branding - FirstCaribbean International Bank: The Marketing and Branding Challenges of a Start-up, product 9B05A012, Human Resources - Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean International Bank, product 9B04C053, Finance - FirstCaribbean Merger: The Proposed Merger, product 9B06N004, and technical note - Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B04M67 (8 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Emerging Markets; Mergers & Acquisitions; Integration; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



VINCOR AND THE NEW WORLD OF WINE
Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M001
Publication Date: 1/14/2004
Revision Date: 11/18/2014
Length: 17 pages

Vincor International Inc. was Canada's largest wine company and North America's fourth largest in 2002. The company had decided to internationalize and as the first step had entered the United States through two acquisitions.The company's chief executive officer felt that to be among the top 10 wineries in the world, Vincor needed to look beyond the region. To the end, he was considering the acquisition of an Australian company, Goundrey Wines. He must analyze thestrategic rationale for the acquisition of Goundrey as well as to probe questions of strategic fit and value.

Teaching Note: 8B04M01 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Internationalization; Market Entry; Acquisitions; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Principles of Planning

CHICKEN AND EGG: A STUDY OF THE POULTRY GENETICS INDUSTRY
Patrick F. O'Leary

Product Number: 9B06A022
Publication Date: 10/12/2006
Revision Date: 9/30/2008
Length: 13 pages

At the beginning of 2006, the president of Ullman International (Ullman), a leading producer of hybrid chicks for both the American and world egg industry was facing many challenges: his imminent retirement, the threat of the Asian bird flu, zero or negative growth in primary markets, increasing pressure from the animal rights movement and a strained relationship with Ullman's European parent company. 2006 marked the end of an era for this $200 million company as it enters a period of revolutionary organizational and environmental change, the resolution of which will determine its fate for the next decades.

Teaching Note: 8B06A22 (10 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Ethical Issues; Succession Planning; International Business; Industry Analysis; Biotechnology; Cross Cultural Management; Industry Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NEWFOUNDLAND CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
Charlene Zietsma, Gillian Rowe

Product Number: 9B05M038
Publication Date: 5/30/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 17 pages

The Newfoundland Centre for the Arts (NCA) was a theatre, dance and visual arts organization with a long history of promoting indigenous Newfoundland and Labrador arts. The centre was a democratic, member-driven organization, and stakeholders disagreed over aspects of the centre's mandate and operations. NCA had also experienced financial difficulties, including a crisis in 2002 that almost resulted in closure. Funding came through, and the general manager undertook a strategic review of the organization. She must now present her recommendations to ensure the long term viability and success of NCA to the board of directors.

Teaching Note: 8B05M38 (13 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Arts Administration; Strategy Implementation; Strategic Planning; Non-Profit Organization, Indigenous Peoples
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAPQUEST
Paul W. Beamish, Kevin K. Boeh

Product Number: 9B04M044
Publication Date: 9/20/2004
Revision Date: 9/18/2008
Length: 22 pages

MapQuest is a leading provider of mapping services and destination information as well as a publisher of maps, atlases and other guides. On the Internet, they provide these products and services both to consumers directly and to other businesses enabling these businesses to provide location, mapping and destination information to their own customers. The company completed a successful initial public offering five years ago and were in a strong competitive position. However, the markets were allowing competitors to quickly get funding in both private and public deals. As well, there were perceptions that a general stock market bubble existed for technology companies. The chief executive officer had several options available, and wanted to consider those options and present a recommendation to the board. Possible options included splitting the firm's old and new-line business units, raising capital to fund an acquisition strategy, forging a set of alliances, focusing on organic growth, and pursuing the sale of the firm.

Teaching Note: 8B04M44 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Strategic Alliances; Competitive Advantage; Mergers & Acquisitions
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KIDS MARKET CONSULTING
Paul W. Beamish, Stephanie Taylor, Oleksiy Vynogradov

Product Number: 9B04M065
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 8 pages

The founder of Kids Market Consulting, a market research firm dedicated to the kids, tweens and teens segment, was faced with increasing competition and slowing revenue, and was exploring a variety of possibilities for the future strategic direction of the business. In particular, she had to formulate the best plan for protecting the niche market and decide how aggressively to pursue expansion. In addition, there was the existing relationship with her business partner, and Kids Market Consulting was part of his group of marketing firms. Any changes the founder chose had to respect this relationship and she was therefore restricted to a limited number of options. The over-arching corporate objective for the company was to defend the market from larger businesses who were trying to increase their share of the market research industry.

Teaching Note: 8B04M65 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Strategy Development; Strategic Planning; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STARBUCKS
Mary M. Crossan, Ariff Kachra

Product Number: 9A98M006
Publication Date: 5/14/1998
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 23 pages

Starbucks is faced with the issue of how it should leverage its core competencies against various opportunities for growth, including introducing its coffee in McDonald’s, pursuing further expansion of its retail operations, and leveraging the brand into other product areas. The case is written so that students need to first identify where Starbucks competencies lie along the value chain, and assess how well those competencies can be leveraged across the various alternatives. It also provides an opportunity for students to assess what is driving growth in this company. Starbucks has a tremendous appetite for cash since all its stores are corporate, and investors are betting that it will be able to continue its phenomenal growth, so it needs to walk a fine line between leveraging its brand to achieve growth while not eroding it in the process. This is an exciting case that quickly captures the attention of students.

Teaching Note: 8A98M06 (13 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: competitiveness; industry analysis; growth strategy; core competence; coffee
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Making Decisions

MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (B)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M011
Publication Date: 2/25/2008
Revision Date: 9/15/2014
Length: 9 pages

This case, which outlines the product recall, is a supplement to Mattel and the Toy Recalls (A).

Teaching Note: 8B08M11 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GVM EXPLORATION LIMITED
Michael J. Rouse, Guoliang Frank Jiang

Product Number: 9B07M007
Publication Date: 12/15/2006
Length: 10 pages

GVM Exploration Limited's (GVM) $2 million environmental assessment project at Grizzly Valley was disrupted by a road blockade set up by a small group of local First Nation people. How GVM handled this situation would not only affect the progress of the Grizzly Valley project but also other ongoing projects. The case challenges students to address an emergent situation. Students will need to think through the short-term and long-term implications of the potential project delay or legal actions. They must assess the issues, alternatives, and decision criteria before selecting the actions to be recommended. The case introduces stakeholder management and corporate social responsibility (CSR). However, the case provides a fairly inclusive scenario where a stakeholder or CSR perspective alone does not dictate strategic directions. Students will need to take into account both stakeholder and business imperatives.

Teaching Note: 8B07M07 (7 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Resource Allocation; Stakeholder Analysis; Growth; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A DIFFICULT HIRING DECISION AT CENTRAL BANK
Mark S. Schwartz, Hazel Copp

Product Number: 9B06C004
Publication Date: 3/1/2006
Revision Date: 9/15/2009
Length: 21 pages

The case is designed to encourage readers to select among three highly qualified candidates for an important managerial position. In doing so, readers are required to establish the set of criteria that they believe should be taken into account when making an important hiring decision for the bank. Through the process of considering and prioritizing potential criteria with respect to the three potential candidates, readers are led to evaluate and reflect upon the vision, mission and core ethical values of the bank.

Teaching Note: 8B06C04 (13 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Ethical Issues; Corporate Culture; Human Resources Management; Employee Selection
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PHARMAXIS: A STAR PERFORMER AT COMMERCIALIZATION CROSSROADS
Deepak Sardana, Don Scott-Kemmis

Product Number: 9B06M093
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Length: 13 pages

Pharmaxis is a new biotechnology venture based in Sydney, Australia. The case brings to light the important stages in the growth of the company and the commercialization decisions the company faced. It also highlights both the uniqueness of some of the managing team's decisions and their understanding of the industry. The case underscores the point that good decision-making can overcome apparent barriers to growth. The company is now at a key decision point. It needs to determine the best approach to commercialize its first diagnostic product. The wrong decision could waste scarce financial resources, divert the time of managers and researchers, and jeopardize the reputation of the firm with potential investors.

Teaching Note: 8B06M93 (8 pages)
Issues: Managing Growth; Business Development; Biotechnology Management; Planning
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GUEST-TEK INTERACTIVE ENTERTAINMENT: INTERNATIONAL SALES
Laurie Milton, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B06M067
Publication Date: 7/27/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 17 pages

The chief executive officer of Calgary-based Guest-Tek Interactive Entertainment Ltd., a leading provider of high-speed Internet access to the hotel industry, must consider whether and how his company should grow its business overseas. Ninety-seven per cent of Guest-Tek's fiscal year 2003 revenue was derived from North American hotels - a market he knew would eventually become saturated. Guest-Tek had listed publicly in January 2004. Both internal and external investors now demanded results. Other geographic markets held the promise of new growth and competitors were already pursuing those opportunities.

Teaching Note: 8B06M67 (9 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: International Marketing; Industry Globalization; Telecommunication Technology; Decision Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Strategic Planning

GOME - KING OF CHINA'S ELECTRICAL APPLIANCE RETAIL CHAIN
Shige Makino, Anthony Fong

Product Number: 9B06M098
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Revision Date: 1/10/2007
Length: 20 pages

The chairman of Gome Ltd, a well known appliance retail chain, congratulated his management team for their excellent performance over the past year. For three consecutive years, Gome had been ranked the largest electrical appliance retail chain in China, and the second largest overall retail chain. Claiming to be the only true national player, Gome achieved total sales of RMB23.9 billion in 2004 and in 2005 doubled its number of stores to 426. The company's four-year plan is to capture 10 to 15 per cent of the market share nationally. Gome would need to double the number of stores in the coming three years, and more importantly, it needed to work out a strategy to fend off its local and global competitors.

Teaching Note: 8B06M98 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Electronics; Retailing; Expansion
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SELECTPOWER - GREEN ENERGY IN ONTARIO
Robert Klassen, Arif Merchant

Product Number: 9B06M097
Publication Date: 12/15/2006
Revision Date: 9/5/2007
Length: 8 pages

As a small retailer of green energy, Selectpower was at a critical point in its growth. The chief executive officer (CEO) was developing a cohesive strategy for the firm's multiple business units. Revenues were expected to increase significantly in the coming year; however; limited resources also were forcing the CEO to make some tough decisions about two important investment opportunities: its growing wind-derived electricity business; or the nascent geothermal business. Both options offered clear environmental benefits to customers, although the strategic value and immediate financial return to Selectpower were less clear. The CEO was also not certain to what extent Selectpower's strategy should emphasize environmental objectives relative to traditional financial metrics. Finally, evolving customer expectations, fluctuating energy prices, and changing government regulations further complicated planning.

Teaching Note: 8B06M97 (13 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Energy; Business and Society; Business Development; Sustainable Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ALBERTA THEATRE PROJECTS: GOVERNANCE IN TIMES OF CRISIS
Pratima Bansal, Tom Ewart

Product Number: 9B06M047
Publication Date: 3/17/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 17 pages

Alberta Theatre Projects (ATP) was a performing arts non-profit organization. It enjoyed a strong brand recognition as a socially liberal organization in a community with strong conservative values. With funding from the Alberta Performing Arts Stabilization Fund, ATP had paid down its accumulated deficit and expected to emerge from debt in 1999. However, in the 1998/99 season it lost over $400,000. By later 1999, ATP's accumulated deficit reached $600,000, including $300,000 owed to Canada's tax collection authority, Revenue Canada. Cash flow statements showed that ATP would be bankrupt by the spring of 2000 unless it could raise $1 million. There were concerns that ATP may not even meet its payroll obligations in the meantime.

Teaching Note: 8B06M47 (26 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Arts Administration; Crisis Management; Corporate Governance; Action Planning and Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GANONG BROS. LIMITED
Eric Morse, Vanessa M. Strike

Product Number: 9B05M011
Publication Date: 3/7/2005
Revision Date: 11/18/2014
Length: 14 pages

Ganong Bros. Limited is a fifth generation family chocolate company in New Brunswick that is facing financial difficulties. The firm has been spreading its resources too thinly and needs to develop a plan to not only return to profitability but also to grow the business while upholding its responsibility to the local community. This case helps students to develop an understanding of cutting costs in a turnaround situation and seeking out alternative lines of business for strategic growth.

Teaching Note: 8B05M11 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Change; Strategic Planning; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELI LILLY IN INDIA: RETHINKING THE JOINT VENTURE STRATEGY
Charles Dhanaraj, Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M016
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 3/13/2017
Length: 18 pages

Eli Lilly and Company is a leading U.S. pharmaceutical company. The new president of intercontinental operations is re-evaluating all of the company's divisions, including the joint venture with Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, one of India's largest pharmaceutical companies. This joint venture has run smoothly for a number of years despite their differences in focus, but recently Ranbaxy was experiencing cash flow difficulties due to its network of international sales. In addition, the Indian government was changing regulations for businesses in India, and joining the World Trade Organization would have an effect on India's chemical and drug regulations. The president must determine if this international joint venture still fits Eli Lilly's strategic objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B04M16 (18 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Joint Ventures; Emerging Markets; International Management; Strategic Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Plans and Planning Tools

HONEY CARE AFRICA (A): A DIFFERENT BUSINESS MODEL
Oana Branzei, Mike Valente

Product Number: 9B07M022
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Revision Date: 4/24/2007
Length: 16 pages

The founding entrepreneur of Honey Care Africa revitalized Kenya’s national honey industry by focusing on small-holder farmers across the country. Central to success was an innovative business model: a synergistic partnership between the development sector, the private sector, and rural communities that drew on the core competencies of each party as well as their complementary roles. This tripartite model was combined with local manufacturing of beehives, effective beekeeping training, a guaranteed market for small-holder farmers through forward contracts, and prompt payments. Four years later, Honey Care had achieved a 68 per cent market share in Kenya and distributed several brands of organic, fair-trade honey internationally, and was a lead distributor of beeswax. The business model had been successfully replicated in neighbouring Tanzania, and there were plans to expand to Uganda and Sudan.

Teaching Note: 8B07M22 (15 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Competitive Advantage; Sustainable Development; Alliances; Africa
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RBC FINANCIAL GROUP - THE EQUATOR PRINCIPLES IN QATARGAS II LNG PROJECT
Robert Klassen, Matias Gancberg

Product Number: 9B06M055
Publication Date: 10/12/2006
Revision Date: 3/31/2011
Length: 17 pages

The environmental manager at the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) has finally received the detailed environmental and social risk assessment of Qatargas II LNG Project. RBC was a potential participant in a syndicated loan for a project financing venture in Qatar. The project would extract and process liquid natural gas there and transport it to the United Kingdom market. RBC was among the first banks to use an environmental and social risk assessment process based on the Equator Principles that supported the principles underlying sustainable development. However, environmental non-government organizations further complicated any financing decision; they were only too quick to point out publicly any shortcomings. Moreover, it was not clear if problems might occur in monitoring and enforcing any loan covenants. Two basic questions remained: first, does the Qatargas II Project make sense to RBC as it attempts to balance economic, environmental and social performance (i.e. the triple-bottom line); and second, do the Equator Principles provide a competitive advantage?

Teaching Note: 8B06M55 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Sustainable Development; Environment; Financing; International Finance
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MOTE AQUACULTURE PARK - STURGEON PROJECT
William J. Ritchie, Jim Michaels

Product Number: 9B05M057
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 11 pages

Mote Aquaculture Park is raising sturgeon for the production of caviar. With eggs imported from Eastern Europe, the park is engaging in a unique venture, bringing Russian caviar harvesting to the United States. The project manager is faced with evaluating a number of issues such as political-legal forces, local and international economics, production technologies and socio-cultural forces. Further, industry factors also played a key role. As he considers Mote Aquacultural Park's current situation, he knows that a thorough review of these environmental factors are necessary. The case offers students the opportunity to determine what forces pose critical threats as well as potential opportunities for future growth. However, since sturgeon farming and caviar production in the United States is a new industry, the application of traditional models of evaluation may not universally apply.

Teaching Note: 8B05M57 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Non-Profit Organization; Corporate Strategy; Business Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MACPHERSON REFRIGERATION LIMITED
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Bill Rankin

Product Number: 9A93D021
Publication Date: 10/2/1993
Revision Date: 9/9/2009
Length: 7 pages

Linda Metzler, newly-appointed production planning manager, is drafting an aggregate production plan for the company's refrigerators, freezers and air conditioners for the next year. She has considered three plans. Students are asked to devise better plans and to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative factors favouring them. Ultimately, the use of linear programming to construct aggregate plans will be introduced.

Teaching Note: 8A93D21 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Aggregate Planning; Linear Programming; Tradeoff Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Fundamentals of Organizing

RESEARCH IN MOTION: MANAGING EXPLOSIVE GROWTH
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Daina Mazutis

Product Number: 9B08M046
Publication Date: 5/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 19 pages

Research in Motion (RIM) is a high technology firm that is experiencing explosive sales growth. David Yach, chief technology officer for software at RIM, has received notice of an impending meeting with the co-chief executive officer regarding his research and development (R&D) expenditures. Although RIM, makers of the very popular BlackBerry, spent almost $360 million in R&D in 2007, this number was low compared to its largest competitors, both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of sales (e.g. Nokia spent $8.2 billion on R&D). This is problematic as it foreshadows the question of whether or not RIM is well positioned to continue to meet expectations, deliver award-winning products and services and maintain its lead in the smartphone market. Furthermore, in the very dynamic mobile telecommunications industry, investment analysts often look to a firm's commitment to R&D as a signal that product sales growth will be sustainable. Just to maintain the status quo, Yach will have to hire 1,400 software engineers in 2008 and is considering a number of alternative paths to managing the expansion. The options include: (1) doing what they are doing now, only more of it, (2) building on their existing and satellite R&D locations, (3) growing through acquisition or (4) going global.

Teaching Note: 8B08M46 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Change Management; Globalization; Staffing; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SELKIRK GROUP IN ASIA (CONDENSED)
Paul W. Beamish, Lambros Karavis

Product Number: 9B02M041
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 10 pages

Selkirk Group is a family-owned brick manufacturer which has built an export business to Japan and other Asian markets from zero to 10% of its volume in seven years. The managing director of the company raises the question of whether it is time to change their regional export strategy and organizational structure in light of the Asian economic crisis and the reasons for their competitive success in both Australia and Asia.

Teaching Note: 8A99M03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Exports; Organizational Structure; International Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



VICTORIA HEAVY EQUIPMENT LIMITED - 2001
Tom A. Poynter, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B01M004
Publication Date: 1/25/2001
Revision Date: 12/21/2009
Length: 12 pages

Victoria Heavy Equipment (Victoria) was a family owned and managed firm which had been led by an ambitious, entrepreneurial chief executive officer who now wanted to take a less active role in the business. Victoria had been through two reorganizations in recent years, which contributed to organizational and strategic issues which would need to be addressed by a new president.

Teaching Note: 8B01M04 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Growth Strategy; Decentralization; Organizational Structure; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Responsibility, Authority, and Delegation

THERE IS NOTHING PERMANENT EXCEPT CHANGE... EVEN AT THE ICELANDIC POLICE DEPARTMENT
Gerard Seijts

Product Number: 9B08C009
Publication Date: 8/14/2008
Revision Date: 2/25/2010
Length: 21 pages

The Minister of Justice for the Republic of Iceland is contemplating how to work with the various stakeholders to implement the recommendations for the structure of policing. The main issue to address is how to consolidate the number of region-based police forces. The minister's views on restructuring the police force are shared by the police association; however, a number of municipalities and police commissioners are not as enthusiastic about the proposed changes to the structure of the police organization. He understands that change is never a pain-free process. Formal reports have been submitted and now is the time to make some decisions.

Teaching Note: 8B08C09 (6 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Implementation; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HUADUN ANTI-COUNTERFEIT TECHNOLOGY INC.
June Cotte, Alan (Wenchu) Yang

Product Number: 9B04M089
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 14 pages

The sudden resignation of the company's national sales manager has left the vice-president of sales and marketing stressed and concerned. He must decide on the successor from a pool of five candidates and is finding the decision difficult, not only because of the strengths and weaknesses of each candidate but this sudden resignation has him wondering about his authority and credibility within the organization.

Teaching Note: 8B04M89 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: China; Sales Promotion; Sales Management; Sales Organization; Sales Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Managing Human Resources

SCOTTS MIRACLE-GRO: THE SPREADER SOURCING DECISION
John Gray, Michael Leiblein, Shyam Karunakaran

Product Number: 9B08M078
Publication Date: 11/14/2008
Revision Date: 6/22/2009
Length: 11 pages

The Scotts Miracle-Gro company is the world's largest marketer of branded consumer lawn and garden products, with a full range of products for professional horticulture as well. Headquartered in Marysville, Ohio, the company is a market leader in a number of consumer lawn and garden and professional horticultural products. The case describes a series of decisions regarding the ownership and organization of the assets used to manufacture fertilizer spreaders. This case is intended to illustrate the application of and tradeoffs between financial, strategic and operations perspectives in a relatively straightforward manufacturing make-buy decision. The case involves a well-known, easily-described product that most students would assume is made overseas. Sufficient information is provided to roughly estimate the direct financial cost associated with internal (domestic) production, offshore (non-domestic) production and outsourced production. In addition, information is included that may be used to estimate potential transaction costs as well as costs associated with foreign exchange risk.

Teaching Note: 8B08M78 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Human Resources Management; Outsourcing; Globalization; Operations Management; Supply Chain Management; Operations Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MARIMEKKO
Alison Konrad, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06C014
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 19 pages

Kirsti Paakkanen has achieved a celebrity status in Finland for her enigmatic leadership of the Finnish design company Marimekko. Purchasing the company in a state of near bankruptcy in 1991, Paakkanen took several actions to restore profitability and realize growth. As of 2006, the company has sales of $64 million (of which 80 per cent are from Finland) and net profits of $8.4 million. Over the last few years, Paakkanen and her team have focused on growing international sales. Recently, the company has opened concept shops in Japan, United Arab Emirates, Iceland, Sweden and the United States owned by foreign partners. In light of the international expansion, Paakkanen is wondering if any changes to Marimekko's personnel policies and/or organization structure are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B06C14 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Succession Planning; Women in Management; Organizational Structure; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BAX GLOBAL LIMITED: STAFF TURNOVER IN MAINLAND CHINA
Jean-Louis Schaan, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B05C035
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 13 pages

The human resources manager for logistics and supply chain management at BAX China must consider her company's high rate of staff turnover. In her monthly report to the managing director, the turnover had reached 12 per cent in the first eight months of the year. The human resources manager must evaluate the company's current methods of dealing with turnover and consider what additional action should be taken. Logistics was a complex and rapidly growing industry, particularly in mainland China. Many multinational and domestic service providers were entering the marketing and expanding their operations; however, these companies had to respond to complex operational challenges and escalating customer demands. The resulting demand for skilled workers led to high turnover rates across the industry and at all organizational levels, and created margin pressure and other management challenges. The case offers a uniquely Chinese perspective on workforce recruitment, management and retention. The industry and the broader economy were growing rapidly. Skilled workers were in short supply because logistics was a new and developing discipline in the former command economy. Also, in the human resources manager's opinion, cultural attitudes resulted in low loyalty among the workers.

Teaching Note: 8B05C35 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: China; Employee Retention; Recruiting; Compensation; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LARSON IN NIGERIA (REVISED)
Paul W. Beamish, Isaiah A. Litvak, Harry Cheung

Product Number: 9B04M012
Publication Date: 2/3/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 7 pages

The vice-president of international operations must decide whether to continue to operate or abandon the company's Nigerian joint venture. Although the expatriate general manager of the Nigerian operation has delivered a very pessimistic report, Larson's own hunch was to stay in that country. Maintaining the operation was complicated by problems in staffing, complying with a promise to increase the share of local ownership, a joint venture partner with divergent views, and increasing costs of doing business in Nigeria. If Larson decides to maintain the existing operation, the issues of increasing local equity participation (i.e. coping with indigenization) and staffing problems (especially in terms of the joint venture general manager) have to be addressed.

Teaching Note: 8B04M12 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Subsidiaries; Third World; Government Regulation; Staffing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HARMONIZATION OF COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS FOR FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK
Edward Akhentoolove Corbin, Betty Jane Punnett

Product Number: 9B04C053
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 9 pages

The merger of the Caribbean holdings of Barclays Bank Plc. and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) is going ahead, and the reality of integration of very diverse systems and procedures has to be faced. The case deals with understanding the current situation in terms of existing policies and designing policies that would be acceptable to employees from both banks in the organization - FirstCaribbean International Bank - which would be created by the merger. A critical aspect of the merger is the harmonization of compensation and benefits that must be resolved as a matter of priority. This case may be taught on a stand alone basis, or in combination with any of four additional cases that deal with various functional issues: 1) General Management - CIBC and Barclays: Should Their Operations be Merged, product 9B04M067. 2) Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032. 3) Accounting and Finance: CIBC Barclays: Accounting for Their Merger, product 9B04B022 4) Technical note: Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B04C53 (6 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Consolidations and Mergers; Benefits Policy; Compensation; Change Management; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Organizational Change and Stress

CORAL DIVERS RESORT
Paul W. Beamish, Kent E. Neupert, Andreas Schotter

Product Number: 9B08M041
Publication Date: 4/18/2008
Revision Date: 11/19/2014
Length: 19 pages

The owner of a small scuba diving operation in the Bahamas is reassessing his strategic direction in the light of declining revenues. Among the changes being considered are shark diving, family diving, exit, and shifting operations to another Caribbean location. These options are not easily combined, nor are they subtle. The case is intended to provide a work-out on the relationship between strategy, organization and performance, and how changes in strategy will dramatically affect the organization. The case also highlights the importance of understanding demographic changes as part of an environmental analysis. (A nine-minute video can be purchased with this case, video 7B08M041.)

Teaching Note: 8B08M41 (14 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Strategic Change; Services; Small Business; Industry Analysis; Tourism
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PATAGON.COM: EXPANDINNG GLOBALLY AND PENETRATING LOCALLY WHILE CONSTANTLY REINVENTING ITSELF
Ramiro Montealegre, Alberto Ballvé

Product Number: 9B01E012
Publication Date: 5/17/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 26 pages

Founded in 1998, Patagon.com is a pioneer in Latin American Internet-based financial services. The substantial changes in and growth of its business and operations had placed significant demands on the company's administrative, operational, technological and staffing resources. The rapid growth has strained its ability to adequately integrate the companies it is acquiring. The challenge for the management team is to integrate the confederation of country-specific organizations while maintaining the agility and responsiveness of a small firm - and at the same time, develop management systems and enterprise design that would handle the growing complexity.

Teaching Note: 8B01E12 (17 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: E-Commerce; Strategy Development; Organizational Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ART AND PRACTICE OF LEARNING AT OAK VALLEY INC.
Allen Morrison, Cyril Bouquet

Product Number: 9A99M047
Publication Date: 5/9/2000
Revision Date: 1/21/2010
Length: 9 pages

Oak Valley Inc. is a $2.1 billion Toronto-based company operating in various consumer markets. In early 1993, the company launched a management development program with the objective of promoting a culture that thrived on best practices. Five years later, the chief executive officer is attempting to evaluate the impact of the program on participants. Hoping to generate new insights that could be applied to similar events in the future, he has asked a team of five past participants to meet to discuss what they learned. This short case deals with the attitudes and behaviors most conducive to individual and group-based learning. The case provides an excellent vehicle for discussing how people learn, how teams can accelerate the learning process, and how companies can create positive learning environments.

Teaching Note: 8A99M47 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Employee Training; Management Training; Personal Development; Group Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FRANS RYCKEBOSCH: AN INTERNATIONAL MANAGER (A)
Aimin Yan, Leslie Steinberg

Product Number: 9A99C030
Publication Date: 2/9/2000
Revision Date: 1/14/2010
Length: 12 pages

In a 30-year career, a recently retired international manager of Xerox Corporation played a major role in the company's international expansion to emerging economies, assumed key responsibilities for the negotiation and founding of several international joint ventures, and served as an expatriate manager of these ventures in several countries (e.g., Mexico, Brazil, and China). The case provides a learning opportunity at both the individual and the organizational levels. As a manager or future manager, the student can learn about critical career decisions, development through international assignments, and the joys and frustrations of the portable life of an expatriate family. At the organizational level, the case provides useful examples of international growth/expansion strategies, challenges for managing joint venture operations, and international human resource policies and practices. Importantly, the case presents these examples/issues in the context of doing business in emerging economies. Frans Ryckebosch: An International Manager (B) case, (9A99C031) may be used as a supplement to this case.

Teaching Note: 8A99C30 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Career Development; Organizational Behaviour; International Business; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Influencing and Communication

KENEXA
Joerg Dietz, Chetan Joshi

Product Number: 9B07C004
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Revision Date: 3/25/2008
Length: 15 pages

This case describes the measurement and evaluation of high performance principles of people management in a retail bank by a consulting company. This case serves as a platform for students to deliberate on what is involved in an organization's quest to achieve competitive success through its workforce. A unique strength of the case is that students are asked to quantitatively test their arguments with data provided in an Excel spreadsheet that accompanies the case (Ivey product #7B07C004). The case is intended as an integrated case across organizational behavior, management science and communication. The organizational behavior teaching approach is included to demonstrate that effective people management is associated with competitive advantages. For management science, the case serves to practice correlation and regression analyses. For communication, the case allows students to prepare a presentation that effectively communicates the complex and comprehensive results of their analyses.

Teaching Note: 8B07C04 (18 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Communications; Regression Analysis; Human Resources Management; Consulting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PETA'S KENTUCKY FRIED CRUELTY, INC. CAMPAIGN
Gerard Seijts, Michael Sider

Product Number: 9B03C045
Publication Date: 11/5/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 20 pages

A year and a half after calling off their campaign against fast-food giant McDonald's, the vegan campaign coordinator of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), contacted Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) to warn them that they would be the next target. He pointed out in his letter that while many of KFC's competitors had convened advisory panels to help them investigate the welfare of animals raised and slaughtered for their businesses, KFC appeared completely uninterested in the issue. PETA would rather not engage KFC in a campaign, but if the company refused to put together an animal welfare panel and to begin to look into the issue of how to raise and slaughter their chickens more humanely, all the leaflets, action alerts, posters, billboards, T-shirts and press releases PETA was now preparing would be dedicated to KFC and its cruel treatment of chickens. In January 2003, PETA, fed up with what it saw as KFC's lack of open communication, public misinformation, and outright stonewalling on change, announced a campaign against the company to the media in a news event replete with bloody descriptions of the cruelties of KFC's animal factories. Now it was time for Kentucky Fried Chicken to respond.

Teaching Note: 8B03C45 (12 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Business and Society; Ethical Issues; Crisis and Change; Management Communication
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INTEL IN CHINA
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Donna Everatt, Xiaojun Qian

Product Number: 9A99C007
Publication Date: 6/23/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 8 pages

The newly appointed division head must examine organizational or communication problems within a division of a billion dollar semiconductor manufacturer. The manager made a decision, which an employee emotionally responded to, creating the potential for conflict within the department. Cross-cultural issues come into play given that the manager, although originally from China, was educated and gathered extensive experience in the West and was thus considered an expatriate by his employees. The manager must also examine the effect of organizational culture on an employee's behavior.

Teaching Note: 8A99C07 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Interpersonal Relations; Intercultural Relations; Conflict Resolution; Management Communication
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EURO-AIR (A)
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9A99M015
Publication Date: 6/24/1999
Revision Date: 1/18/2010
Length: 7 pages

A North America-based representative of a major European airline has just received a letter from an unhappy customer detailing a very large number of service problems. A quick check had revealed that this premium-paying customer's complaints were all valid. A meeting is planned with the customer. Before this, the airline representative must decide (A) what to say in response, and (B) what, if any, compensation should be offered. Internally, there was a need (C) to resolve what their organization should learn from this experience, both from a subsidiary and parent company perspective, and the implications on their participation in the Crown Alliance. This case raises many important questions regarding service recovery, communications, and non-equity alliances.

Teaching Note: 8A99M15 (11 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Alliances; Service Quality; Compensation; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Leadership

ING INSURANCE ASIA/PACIFIC
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Andreas Schotter

Product Number: 9B06M083
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Length: 15 pages

The new chief executive officer (CEO) of ING Insurance Asia/Pacific wants to improve the regional operation of the company. ING Group was a global financial services company of Dutch origin with more than 150 years of experience. As part of ING International, ING Insurance Asia/Pacific was responsible for life insurance and asset/wealth management activities throughout the region. The company was doing well, but the new CEO believed that there were still important strategic and operational improvements possible. This case can be used to discuss the local versus regional or global management issue and will yield best results if the class has already been introduced to different strategic and organizational alternatives in the international business context.

Teaching Note: 8B06M83 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Subsidiaries; Organization; Leadership; International Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ANITA JAIRAM AT METROPOLE SERVICES
Alison Konrad, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06C003
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/15/2009
Length: 5 pages

The senior project manager at Metropole Services is getting the sense that her business relationship with her software development group is taking a turn for the worse. According to her, she was their project manager and it seemed strange that her team members - all subordinates, were excluding her from an important client meeting. She must figure out what the issue is, and if something truly is wrong, take the appropriate steps to correct it immediately.

Teaching Note: 8B06C03 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Personnel Management; Leadership; Human Behaviour; Communications
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MILLENNIUM WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS (A)
David T.A. Wesley, Paul Croke, Henry W. Lane

Product Number: 9B02M018
Publication Date: 8/28/2002
Revision Date: 1/30/2006
Length: 15 pages

A successful executive at a U.S. wholesaler has resigned his position to pursue an MBA. Shortly after beginning the program, he is contacted by a former business associate, the owner of a family-owned wholesale distribution company who asks for help in turning around the company where sales have fallen dramatically and which is close to insolvency. Although the former executive is interested in the challenge, he needs to consider the feasibility of salvaging the company. If it is possible and he accepts the assignment, he must decide how to define his role in the company, his relationship to the family. On a personal level, he needs to decide whether to interrupt his studies to advise at a family-owned business. The supplement, Millennium Wholesale Distributors (B), product number 9B02M019, explores strategies, actions and successes in leading change at the failing company.

Teaching Note: 8B02M18 (8 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Bankruptcy; Wholesaling; Leadership; Career Development; Northeastern
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SABENA BELGIAN WORLD AIRLINES: WEYTJENS' FIRST ASSIGNMENT
Mary M. Crossan, Barbara Pierce

Product Number: 9A94M004
Publication Date: 11/15/1994
Revision Date: 9/9/2009
Length: 8 pages

This case is the first supplement to Sabena Belgian World Airlines (A). It outlines the strategic changes implemented by Pierre Godfroid, Sabena’s CEO, and introduces Erik Weytjens, a recent graduate of an MBA program. This case outlines Weytjens’s first assignment to solve a major logistics problem in the dishwashing department. The case, along with the follow-on series of cases, provides the opportunity to: 1) make decisions and take action under realistic constraints of limited information, time, and credibility; and 2) reflect on how the pattern of actions supports or undermines strategy.

Teaching Note: 8A94M03 (19 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Strategy Formulation; Strategy Implementation; Change Management; Airline Industry; Belgium
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Motivation

TRANSKIN INCOME FUND: LEADING ENTREPRENEURIAL TEAMS
Gerard Seijts, Jana Seijts, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B09C016
Publication Date: 9/1/2009
Length: 10 pages

Transkin Income Fund provided freight transportation services in Canada and the United States. In mid February 2009, in response to a sharp fall in demand for transportation services due to the economic crisis, the chief operation officer had suggested that each of his six freight divisions and six support divisions and the corporate division should all implement a salary rollback. The chief operating officer (COO) believed that a strong message needed to be sent to customers, shareholders, banks, owner-operators, drivers and suppliers that Transkin was being proactive by taking action internally to ride out the crisis. Two of the 13 general managers resented the COO's plan. The two dissenters were from Transkin's two most profitable divisions; they were also the most senior executives. Both had their own reasons to resist the COO's idea. The COO wondered how he should respond to both dissenters - he wanted the support of every general manager for the salary rollback.

Teaching Note: 8B09C16 (7 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Leading Change; Motivation; Recession
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAPITAL COAST HEALTH LIMITED: BEING A GOOD EMPLOYER IN THE MIDST OF CHANGE (B)
Anne Marie Francesco, Alvin Hwang

Product Number: 9B05M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2005
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 7 pages

The new chief executive officer of Capital Coast Health Limited, a government funded healthcare provider, has made many changes and succeeded in substantially reducing the financial deficit in his first year and a half. However, there were still a number of pressing concerns that needed to be addressed. The governing board of Capital Coast Health Limited has requested information about the Equal Employment Opportunity policies and practices in the organization. The request serves as a reminder to the CEO that internal issues should be a priority in the future. This is a supplement to Capital Coast Health Limited: Being a Good Employer in the Midst of Change (A), product 9B05M009.

Teaching Note: 8B05M10 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Strategy Development; Employment Equity; Environmental Change; Change Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JINJIAN GARMENT FACTORY: MOTIVATING GO-SLOW WORKERS
Tieying Huang, Junping Liang, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M033
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 6 pages

Jinjian Garment Factory is a large clothing manufacturer based in Shenzhen with distribution to Hong Kong and overseas. Although Shenzhen had become one of the most advanced garment manufacturing centres in the world, managers in this industry still had few effective ways of dealing with the collective and deliberate slow pace of work by the employees, of motivating workers, and of resolving the problem between seasonal production requirements and retention of skilled workers. However, the owner and managing director of the company must determine the reasons behind the deliberately slow pace of the workers, the pros and cons of the piecework system and the methods he could adopt to motivate the workers effectively.

Teaching Note: 8B04M33 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Productivity; Employee Attitude; Piece Work; Performance Measurement; Work-Force Management; Peking University
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELISE SMART
Jeffrey Gandz, Elizabeth Spracklin

Product Number: 9B03C010
Publication Date: 5/31/2003
Revision Date: 9/4/2013
Length: 7 pages

Elise Smart must decide what performance assessment to give one of her employees who has, uncharacteristically, failed to meet one of her key objectives for the year. The situation is difficult for several reasons; the causes of the unacceptable performance are not clear; the employee has previously received excellent appraisals, including a recent one by the vice-president; and the employee was absent for a good part of the year on maternity leave. The various factors that influence sustained performance (ability, motivation, resources, role clarity, reinforcement) are examined, as well as steps leaders can take in improving performance of those for whom they are responsible.

Teaching Note: 8B03C10 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Motivation; Performance Evaluation; Management Performance; Management Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 17:
Groups, Teams and Corporate Culture

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?: AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B09M086
Publication Date: 10/19/2009
Length: 11 pages

This team-building and familiarization activity can be used in the initial class or session of an international management program. It assesses one's exposure to the rest of the world's peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a classes' collective exposure to the world's people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one's business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

Teaching Note: 8B09M86 (6 pages)
Issues: Career Development; Intercultural Relations; Team Building; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IVEY BUILDS: THE SECOND ACT
Murray J. Bryant

Product Number: 9B06M017
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 14 pages

Ivey Builds: The Second Act examines the process and outcome of a student lead initiative to build a Habitat for Humanity house and organize an international conference on corporate social responsibility. Students will learn how to identify the importance of contributing to their communities as both students and alumni.

Teaching Note: 8B06M17 (11 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Communications; Change Management; Team Building; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



YMCA OF LONDON, ONTARIO
W. Glenn Rowe, Pat MacDonald

Product Number: 9B06M056
Publication Date: 4/28/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 16 pages

The chief executive officer (CEO) of a multi-site and multi-business YMCA must determine how to more than double participation levels in the next five years. The case describes how the London YMCA has grown in both participation and size. However, the corporate level strategy has become complicated and the board of directors, CEO and senior management team need to consider a new M-form structure. This has many implications for the CEO, the senior managers and the future growth of the YMCA London.

Teaching Note: 8B06M56 (12 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Benefits Policy; Growth; Non-Profit Organization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEO BURNETT COMPANY LTD.: VIRTUAL TEAM MANAGEMENT
Joerg Dietz, Fernando Olivera, Elizabeth O'Neil

Product Number: 9B03M052
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 1/8/2019
Length: 16 pages

Leo Burnett Company Ltd. is a global advertising agency. The company is working with one of its largest clients to launch a new line of hair care products into the Canadian and Taiwanese test markets in preparation for a global rollout. Normally, once a brand has been launched, it is customary for the global brand centre to turn over the responsibility for the brand and future campaigns to the local market offices. In this case, however, the brand launch was not successful. Team communications and the team dynamics have broken down in recent months and the relationships are strained. Further complicating matters are a number of client and agency staffing changes that could jeopardize the stability of the team and the agency/client relationship. The global account director must decide whether she should proceed with the expected decision to modify the global team structure to give one of the teams more autonomy, or whether she should maintain greater centralized control over the team. She must recommend how to move forward with the brand and determine what changes in team structure or management are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B03M52 (14 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JUAN PEDRO'S SHRIMP FARM: OR THE 48-HOUR EXAM NIGHTMARE (A)
Gerard Seijts, Paul Szabunio

Product Number: 9B02C057
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 11/9/2009
Length: 6 pages

A learning team of five students must work together to complete a 48-hour team exam. One of the students has a reputation for being unreliable, disruptive and confrontational. When the team members convene to write their report, this student calls to say he will be late. He shows up eight hours later. The level of team tension and animosity reached a point of near-violence and the team member was expelled. The team wonders how to deal with this team member whose behaviour is dysfunctional to effective team performance, and what to do next given that there are several more team projects to come. Supplemental case Juan Pedro's Shrimp Farm: Or the 48-hour Exam Nightmare (B), product 9B02C058, discusses the first hour after the student arrives to work on the report. Supplement Juan Pedro's Shrimp Farm: Or the 48-hour Exam Nightmare (C), product 9B02C059, describes the student's attempt to contribute to the report and the subsequent confrontation. Supplement Juan Pedro's Shrimp Farm: Or the 48-hour Exam Nightmare (D), product 9B02C060, an interview, conducted several months later, provides the student's perspective on the events.

Teaching Note: 8B02C57 (5 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Group Behaviour; Case Method; Private Placement; Organizational Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 18:
Understanding People: Attitudes, Perception and Learning

NORA-SAKARI: A PROPOSED JV IN MALAYSIA (REVISED)
Paul W. Beamish, R. Azimah Ainuddin

Product Number: 9B06M006
Publication Date: 11/30/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2012
Length: 16 pages

This case presents the perspective of a Malaysian company, Nora Bhd, which was in the process of trying to establish a telecommunications joint venture with a Finnish firm, Sakari Oy. Negotiations have broken down between the firms, and students are asked to try to restructure a win-win deal. The case examines some of the most common issues involved in partner selection and design in international joint ventures.

Teaching Note: 8B06M06 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Third World; Negotiation; Joint Ventures; Finland; Malaysia
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KTM: QUEST FOR GROWTH
Charlene Zietsma, Iris Fischlmayr, Rob Wong

Product Number: 9B06M060
Publication Date: 5/12/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 18 pages

KTM was a leading sport motorcycle company based in Austria with sales internationally. In 2005, the company was considering expanding into all terrain vehicles (ATVs), a market which was experiencing mid to high double-digit sales growth with healthy operating margins. There were several options open to KTM to expand into the ATV market, including internal development, acquisition of another firm with capabilities in the area of allying with an ATV manufacturer. The chief executive officer had to consider the fit of the ATV business with KTM's core business as well as the implications of the various options for ATV market entry on maintaining control of KTM, achieving KTM's growth objectives, and effectively exploiting the ATV opportunity in an international context. This case allow students to determine how best to pursue a related market to maximize revenue and cost synergies, learning, and control of the firm. This case can be used with KTM: Ready to Race, product 9B05M036.

Teaching Note: 8B06M60 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Growth Strategy; Acquisitions; Alliances; Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ETRAFFIC SOLUTIONS: THE FUTURE OF ELEARNING
Rebecca A. Grant, Michelle Jeske

Product Number: 9B03M043
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 10/22/2009
Length: 22 pages

Etraffic Solutions is an award-winning developer of e-learning platforms and customized content solutions, primarily in the kindergarten to grade 12 market. The future direction of the e-learning industry is uncertain - will custom solutions continue to dominate, or will the fastest growing markets turn to off-the-shelf software with options for user-tailoring? Etraffic is wrestling with a decision to move into the off-the-shelf segment of the market, but must determine whether that is a desirable strategy and, if so, how this company will make the transition from a consulting firm to one that is product-based. In addition, there is a question as to whether the company is missing opportunities in other markets.

Teaching Note: 8B03M43 (6 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: E-Commerce; Change Management; Generating Profit from New Technology; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KASHIWA TUBING LTD.
David T.A. Wesley, Henry W. Lane

Product Number: 9B02M014
Publication Date: 7/22/2002
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 8 pages

A student at a large Boston-area university would soon be completing a dual degree in Management Information Systems and Business Administration. She is the oldest child and only member of a Japanese family that spoke English and was learning to represent the family business, Kashiwa Tubing, with its international accounts. It was planned that she would eventually assume leadership of the company. During her studies she became a believer in the potential and reach of the Internet. She immediately set up a Web site for the company. Within six months, the Web site generated its first major sale, a $2.5 million order from Saudi Arabia. Recently, she had begun to negotiate a multi-million dollar deal with a Taiwanese firm. The company's Japanese headquarters recently forwarded an inquiry from Nigeria. The inquiry was from a member of the Federal Ministry of Works and Housing, proposed a business transaction that would, if successful, represent the largest single Internet order in the history of Kashiwa Tubing. Believing in personally meeting with customers and building long lasting ties, her father suggests that she should meet with this customer, even if that meant traveling to Nigeria.

Teaching Note: 8B02M14 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Law; Third World; Internet; E-Commerce; Northeastern
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate


Chapter 19:
Encouraging Creativity and Innovation

HYDRO: FROM UTSIRA TO FUTURE ENERGY SOLUTIONS
Robert Klassen, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06M044
Publication Date: 3/29/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 22 pages

Managers at Norway's Hydro are wondering whether or not an economically viable business case can be made to commercialize a wind-hydrogen solution. The company has successfully installed a wind-hydrogen renewable energy system as a research and development project on the 200 person remote island of Utsira. Now, they are considering two early markets to which to sell the idea: remote island communities or grid power balancing for grid operators with high reliance on wind power. Students will be introduced to current trends in renewable energy and will look at the threats and opportunities and business drivers in launching a new project. Students will analyse the priorities of the company by looking at economic, social and environmental objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B06M44 (13 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Innovation; Environmental Business Management; Feasibility Analysis; New Products
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STAMYPOR
Wim Vanhaverbeke, Rein Nieland, Inge Leuverink, Femke van Hoven, Marijke van Wely

Product Number: 9B05M072
Publication Date: 10/28/2005
Revision Date: 8/29/2018
Length: 23 pages

The New Business Development unit is part of DSM, a Dutch globally operated chemical company. The unit looks for promising new ideas to develop into start-up businesses. Stamypor is a new project that the New Business Development unit is working on and the team leader of the project must decide if it should be developed into a start-up company. Students will apply their knowledge about new product development, new product evaluation, the stage-gate process, customer value, business models, and corporate venturing.

Teaching Note: 8B05M72 (22 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Innovation; New Products; Business Valuation; Business Models; the Netherlands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



APPLE INC.: IPODS AND ITUNES
Mary M. Crossan, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05M046
Publication Date: 8/2/2005
Revision Date: 4/15/2010
Length: 13 pages

Apple Computer, Inc. has enjoyed tremendous market success with its digital music initiative consisting of software (iTunes), hardware (iPods and Shuffles), and content (iTunes Music Store). Highlighted is the development of the online music industry within the context of the overall music industry, the major record labels, Napster, and the Recording Industry Association of America. Students will be able to conduct an industry analysis of the music industry and determine why Apple Computer has succeeded in profiting from digital music while others have failed.

Teaching Note: 8B05M46 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: New Economy; Strategy Implementation; Industry Analysis; Business and Society
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 20:
Principles of Controlling

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT AT WAL-MART
P. Fraser Johnson, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B07D001
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/30/2017
Length: 15 pages

In 2006 Wal-Mart, the second largest firm in the world by sales, was looking to improve its already efficient supply chain. The company's supply chain was closely integrated with its retail and information systems strategies and has been developed incrementally over the past 40 years. However, rivals are copying every aspect, from the way Wal-Mart cross-docks product in warehouses, to Wal-Mart's use of a sophisticated database to capture, store and disseminate store-level information to suppliers. Wal-Mart's new executive vice-president, logistics was overseeing a handful of initiatives designed to improve the firm's supply chain. However, it was not certain that these initiatives were going to have a significant impact on Wal-Mart costs, and he needed to consider what the company should do to stay ahead of the competition.

Teaching Note: 8B07D01 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Purchasing; Retailing; Supply Chain Management; Logistics
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NON-TERRITORIAL OFFICES AT SEMCO
Cecilia Gurgel do Amaral, Marlei Pozzebon

Product Number: 9B06M003
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 13 pages

This case describes the history of a non-traditional business group, Semco, starting from the 1980s, when Ricardo Semler assumed responsibility for the company and triggered a genuine revolution in terms of management practices. Since then, Semco's workforce has grown from 90 to 2,500 employees and its annual turnover climbed from US$4 million to US$160 million in 2001. The secret for transforming a conventional workplace into an unconventional hive was given: giving up control.

Teaching Note: 8B06M03 (7 pages)
Issues: Construction; Arts Administration; Bonuses; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHRISTINA GOLD LEADING CHANGE AT WESTERN UNION
Alison Konrad, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06M007
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 11 pages

The chief executive officer of Western Union had just begun implementing a new organization structure. Changing the structure set out a clear message of Gold's desire to change the company's mindset to a new more global culture. Already the CEO was finding that leaders in the United States were reluctant to give up control of product lines. At the regional level, she had keen leaders in place who wanted to push out the responsibility within their own regions and move towards a decentralized plan. While the CEO supported this notion in principle, she wanted to ensure that the right leaders could be placed in decentralized offices in order to execute on the six strategic pillars that she had laid out for the organization. One thing was certain - the CEO had made it clear that no revenue decreases would be forgiven amidst the change. Many considerations had arisen: What pace of change should she take? How would she deal with resistance to change? How could she ensure that the new structure would support Western Union's global expansion?

Teaching Note: 8B06M07 (13 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Organizational Change; Globalization; Organizational Design; Corporate Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAJESTICA HOTEL IN SHANGHAI?
Paul W. Beamish, Jane W. Lu

Product Number: 9B05M035
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 14 pages

Majestica Hotels Inc., a leading European operator of luxury hotels, was trying to reach an agreement with Commercial Properties of Shanghai regarding the management contract for a new hotel in Shanghai. A series of issues require resolution for the deal to proceed, including length of contract term, name, staffing and many other control issues. Majestica was reluctant to make further concessions for fear that doing so might jeopardize its service culture, arguably the key success factor in this industry. At issue was whether Majestica should adopt a contingency approach and relax its operating philosophy, or stick to its principles, even if it meant not entering a lucrative market.

Teaching Note: 8B05M35 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Market Entry; Negotiation; Control Systems; Corporate Culture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 21:
Production and Control

HALTON RECYCLING, LTD.
Carol Prahinski, Ying Fan

Product Number: 9B07D009
Publication Date: 6/4/2007
Revision Date: 5/23/2007
Length: 17 pages

The operations manager at Halton Recycling was becoming increasingly dissatisfied with the inefficiency caused by its three-streamed recycling system. City Hall aimed to increase the current 35 per cent waste diversion rate to the provincial goal of 60 per cent within three years. The operations manager wondered if the single-stream operation would contribute to a cost reduction and an efficiency improvement, providing the company with significant competitive advantages by the time of the contract renewal later that year.

Teaching Note: 8B07D09 (18 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Cost/Benefit Analysis; Capacity Analysis; Stakeholder Analysis; Sustainable Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SIX SIGMA IMPLEMENTATION AT MAPLE LEAF FOODS
P. Fraser Johnson

Product Number: 9B05D016
Publication Date: 1/5/2007
Length: 12 pages

Six Sigma has become a popular management philosophy adopted by several large companies including Maple Leaf Foods as a means of reducing waste systematically. The plant manager at the Rivermede plant is preparing for a meeting with the senior manager to discuss the new initiative Six Sigma @ the Edge. Based on the success of Six Sigma at this plant, it was chosen as a pilot for this new initiative. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Six Sigma and the challenges associated with embedding it in the organization.

Teaching Note: 8B05D16 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Continuous Improvement; Job Enrichment; Work-Force Management; Quality
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MCLEOD MOTORS LTD
John S. Haywood-Farmer

Product Number: 9A95D008
Publication Date: 5/4/1995
Revision Date: 6/5/2012
Length: 5 pages

In the mid-1990s McLeod Motors rationalized a number of motor end shields to reduce manufacturing costs, improve service, and reduce inventories. However, inventories have apparently risen. Students must identify why McLeod has inventory, how large the inventory might have been before the rationalization, how large they might be now, why they are so large, and what could be done to reduce inventory levels. The case can be used in conjunction with a discussion on inventory function.

Teaching Note: 8A95D08 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Inventory; Scheduling; Materials Management; Inventory Planning/Control
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 22:
Information and Technology

UPS AND HP: VALUE CREATION THROUGH SUPPLY CHAIN PARTNERSHIPS
Mark O. Lewis, Arun Rai, David Forquer, Dan Quinter

Product Number: 9B07D002
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 14 pages

This case is about managing large supply change outsourcing relationships over time. The focus is on the challenges service providers and their customers face as they seek to continually find new sources of value as the relationships change. Emphasis is placed on issues related to coordinated capabilities across functional boundaries, information sharing and developing information technology readiness.

Teaching Note: 8B07D02 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Relationship Management; Outsourcing; Innovation
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BELL CANADA: THE VOIP CHALLENGE
Rod E. White, Daniel Day

Product Number: 9B06M009
Publication Date: 2/16/2006
Revision Date: 3/19/2010
Length: 12 pages

Voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) is beginning to disrupt plain old telephone service (POTS). Ron Close has been offered the job of heading Bell Canada's nascent VoIP business. Bell is Canada's largest telco and supplier of POTS. The case provides a platform for discussing a disruptive innovation (VoIP) and its implications for an incumbent player. Ron Close explains how Bell addressed the technology challenge, and its managerial and organizational consequences in an available video, product 7B06M009.

Teaching Note: 8B06M09 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Technological Change; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MERIDCO MAGNESIUM: INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER
Pratima Bansal, Ken Cole

Product Number: 9B01M006
Publication Date: 9/5/2001
Revision Date: 7/21/2008
Length: 14 pages

Meridco Magnesium is an international automotive parts supplier of magnesium die-cast components with manufacturing plants in Canada, the United States and France. The company has a strong market position in North America; however, two out of the three plants are not performing well. The vice-president of the company's Global Technologies Organization division believes the weaker performance in the two plants is due to resistance to technological innovations. He must determine the reasons for this resistance and develop a plan to resolve the weak performance in the plants before the upcoming annual board meeting. Three supplements further discuss the issues each of the plants have with new technology. Meridco Magnesium: The French Perspective, product 9B01M007; Meridco Magnesium: The Canadian Perspective, product 9B01M008, and Meridco Magnesium: The American Perspective, product 9B01M009. AWARD WINNING CASE - This case was a winner at the AIB Case Competition, Academy of International Business, 2001 and first place winner of the 2001 Indiana University Center for International Business Education and Research (IUCIBER) International Case Competition.

Teaching Note: 8B01M06 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Technology Transfer; International Business; Knowledge Management; Strategy Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TIME WARNER INC. AND THE ORC PATENTS
Paul W. Beamish, John Adamson

Product Number: 9B01M059
Publication Date: 1/29/2002
Revision Date: 8/28/2009
Length: 16 pages

Optical Recording Corporation (ORC) secured the rights to a technology known as digital optical audio recording. During the time it took to negotiate the final transfer of the technology ownership, it was rumored that some major electronics manufacturers were developing compact disc (CD) players that recorded digital optical audio signals. A patent lawyer advised ORC that the compact disc players and compact discs recently released by these companies might be infringing the claims of ORC's newly acquired patents. Based on this information, the company proceeded to successfully negotiate licensing agreements with the two largest CD manufacturers, Sony of Japan, and Philips of the Netherlands The third largest manufacturer, WEA Manufacturing, a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc., maintained a position of non-infringement and invalid patents. With the U.S. patent expiry date looming, ORC decided to sue Time Warner for patent infringement. When the defense counsel presented testimony that questioned the integrity of the licensing agreement, ORC's president realized that the entire licensing program was in jeopardy and must decide whether he should accept a settlement or proceed with the lawsuit.

Teaching Note: 8B01M59 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Business Law; Intellectual Capital; Licensing; Patents
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



QUEST FOODS ASIA PACIFIC AND THE CRM INITIATIVE
Allen Morrison, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B01M011
Publication Date: 4/30/2001
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 15 pages

Quest Foods International is one of the world's largest manufacturers of fragrances, flavors and textures for the food, beverage and consumer products industries. Quest Foods' regional vice-president is in the process of implementing a business process re-engineering project for the company. His current efforts focus on developing an information technology-based customer relationship management (CRM) system that he believes could give the company a sustainable competitive advantage with customers in the region and throughout the world. His ultimate goal is to bring Quest to the next phase of e-business. Despite high ambitions, his initiatives are making little headway. Internal opposition to change is significant and some key customers are growing concerned that Quest's CRM plans might miss the mark. Faced with considerable time and resource pressures, he is wondering how to set priorities and where to focus his energies.

Teaching Note: 8B01M11 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Leveraging Information Technology; Business Process Re-Engineering; Customer Relations
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate