Ivey Publishing

Consumer Behavior

Blackwell, R.D., Miniard, P.W., Engel, J.F.,10/e (United States, Cengage Learning, 2006)
Prepared By Jianping Liang, Ph.D. Student (Marketing)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Consumer Behavior and Consumer Research

NOTE ON RETAIL MARKETING RESEARCH
Michael R. Pearce

Product Number: 9B05A032
Publication Date: 12/14/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 19 pages

This note describes many aspects of secondary and primary market research from the retailer's perspective. The value of information in making marketing decisions does not distinguish the retailer from other marketers; however, the retailer is in an enviable position to gather information directly from customers. Increasingly, retailers are considering their stores as laboratories for understanding the consumer marketplace.

Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STELLA ARTOIS IN THE U.K.
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B01A017
Publication Date: 12/6/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 15 pages

Stella Artois, Interbrew company's flagship brand of beer, has experienced phenomenal success on the international market. The United Kingdom market has played a critical role in that success, and Interbrew needs to assess the reasons for this. Interbrew's managing director and its chief marketing officer are meeting to have a discussion about how to proceed in developing the Stella Artois brand. First, they need to understand what part of the company's success was due to expert marketing practices and what part might possibly be due to being in the right place at the right time. As well, they want to assess what possible steps might be taken to spread these practices across the corporation for use in the company's global marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B01A17 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Management; European Market; Product Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FUTURE SHOP: RETAIL CUSTOMER RESEARCH
Michael R. Pearce, Alykhan Alidina, Morley Ivers, Rachel Kay

Product Number: 9B01A018
Publication Date: 12/10/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 7 pages

Future Shop is a large retail store chain that specializes in audio, video, computer equipment and software, and appliances. A student group has conducted a research study of Future Shop customers' perception of the strengths and weaknesses of the chain and submitted their findings.

Teaching Note: 8B01A18 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing Research; Consumer Satisfaction; Retail Marketing; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Creating Marketing Strategies for Customer-Centric Organizations

PENNZOIL-QUAKER STATE CANADA: THE ONE-TO-ONE DECISION (A)
Terry H. Deutscher, Christopher Spalding

Product Number: 9B04A010
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 22 pages

The director of Lubricants business for Pennzoil-Quaker State Canada is faced with a significant challenge - overcoming the apathy that many consumers had about changing their motor oil. Increasing the frequency of oil changes and improving retention of its customers was critical for the financial success of the company. In response to this challenge, the director had to make a recommendation on adoption and implementation of a major new promotional program. The program, called One-to-One, was designed to create closer relationships among consumers, retailers and Pennzoil-Quaker State. Making the program work required active cooperation from the retail installers who actually performed the oil changes. The supplement Pennzoil-Quaker State Canada: The One-To-One Decision (B), product 9B04A011, focuses on the 240-day field trial of the program.

Teaching Note: 8B04A10 (16 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Marketing Communication; Sales Promotion; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PENNZOIL-QUAKER STATE CANADA: THE ONE-TO-ONE DECISION (B)
Terry H. Deutscher, Christopher Spalding

Product Number: 9B04A011
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 4 pages

This supplement to Pennzoil-Quaker State Canada: The One-To-One Decision (A), product 9B04A010 looks at the 240-day field trail of a program designed to build loyalty among consumers, and to increase frequency of oil changes.

Teaching Note: 8B04A10 (16 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Marketing Communication; Sales Promotion; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD OF ONTARIO (A): MARKET SEGMENTATION
Michael R. Pearce, Brad Hause

Product Number: 9B00A020
Publication Date: 8/28/2002
Revision Date: 1/7/2009
Length: 29 pages

The project manager for the Liquor Control Board of Ontario faces store network decisions in southeast Toronto. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario has developed a new five-year strategy in which all of their stores will be revamped into one of the four new formats, which has led to a review of every one of their nearly 600 retail locations. With a store within five minutes of 86% of the population of Ontario, the project manager's task is not about expanding coverage but rather improving the performance of the retail network. The (A) case focuses on what to do about a particular store in the area. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario (B): Market Segmentation, product 9B00A021 is a short follow-up about further decisions on store layout and merchandising. (A higher price applies to this case due to color exhibits.)

Teaching Note: 8B00A20 (14 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Analysis; Retailing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD OF ONTARIO (B): MARKET SEGMENTATION
Michael R. Pearce, Brad Hause

Product Number: 9B00A021
Publication Date: 8/28/2002
Revision Date: 1/7/2010
Length: 3 pages

This supplement to Liquor Control Board of Ontario (A): Market Segmentation, product 9B00A020 looks at the decisions the project manager must make on store layout and merchandising.

Teaching Note: 8B00A20 (14 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Analysis; Retailing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT
Michael R. Pearce, Yvette Mahieu

Product Number: 9B02A001
Publication Date: 2/12/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 23 pages

The concept of customer relationship management (CRM) and why it is important is examined in this note. It also examines the implementation process: corporate culture and strategy, software providers, technology and ways to measure the success of a CRM program. Many traditional bricks-and-mortar businesses are creating electronic commerce operations, therefore traditional CRM has expanded to include doing business on the Internet and this note looks at electronic customer relationship management (eCRM) as well. Also included are some examples of companies that have successfully implemented a CRM program, a list of CRM software vendors and examples of CRM software solutions.

Issues: Corporate Strategy; Relationship Management; Information Technology; Internet Software; Customer Relationship Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
The Consumer Decision Process

KRAFT FOODS: THE COFFEE POD LAUNCH (A)
Robin Ritchie, Aleem Visram

Product Number: 9B06A019
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Revision Date: 5/27/2014
Length: 19 pages

The product manager for coffee development at Kraft Canada must decide whether to introduce the company's new line of single-serve coffee pods or await results from the United States. Key strategic decisions include which target market to focus on and what value proposition to signal. Important questions are also raised as to how the new product should be branded, which flavors to offer, whether Kraft should use traditional distribution channels or direct-to-store delivery, and what forms of advertising and promotion to use. The case provides a basis for discussing consumer decision making, and stresses the importance of providing a clear incremental benefit when introducing a new product in an established category. It may be used independently or with the supplement, Kraft Foods: The Coffee Pod Launch (B).

Teaching Note: 8B06A19 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Consumer Behaviour; Consumer Marketing; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KRAFT FOODS: THE COFFEE POD LAUNCH (B)
Robin Ritchie, Aleem Visram

Product Number: 9B06A026
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/14/2009
Length: 2 pages

This is the second of two cases on Kraft Canada's entry into the single-serve coffee and hot beverage market. Kraft Foods: The Coffee Pod Launch (A) describes the initial situation facing the category manager, who must decide whether to launch a new line of coffee pods that Kraft plans to introduce shortly in the United States. The (B) case summarizes key elements of the marketing strategy, and the preliminary results. Students are then faced with the challenge of what to do next.

Teaching Note: 8B06A19 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Management; New Products; Consumer Behaviour; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PRAEDA MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS INC.
Kenneth G. Hardy

Product Number: 9B06A003
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 5/1/2014
Length: 8 pages

A venture fund has approached an entrepreneur to sell one of its poorly performing holdings, or if there is no reasonable sale opportunity, turn the company around. He finds no acceptable offers for the company. He searches to find more information on how buyers purchase and use the product, which is a software system for police and courts to lay charges and manage them across the court process. The case illustrates the leverage available from understanding customer budgeting and buying processes, and fitting the service to meet the mind of the customer.

Teaching Note: 8B06A03 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Marketing Planning; Consumer Behaviour; Market Strategy; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Pre-Purchase Processes: Need Recognition, Search, and Evaluation

CAPITAL ONE: LAUNCHING A MASS MEDIA CAMPAIGN
Robert J. Fisher, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06A005
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/9/2009
Length: 18 pages

The senior Brand Manager for Capital One Canada is developing the firm's strategy for its first mass media advertising campaign in Canada. He had been provided with a menu of U.S. and U.K. advertisements - with test results for each - which he can adapt for a Canadian audience. The key decisions the Senior Brand Manager faces includes which customer segment to focus on, what value proposition to signal to this segment, what advertisements should be used to deliver these messages, and what customization efforts are necessary. He has a presentation to Capital One's senior management team and needs to back up his recommendations with numbers and logic.

Teaching Note: 8B06A05 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brand Management; Advertising Media; Advertising Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES
Jeff Saperstein, Camilla Burg, Anamika Ghosh, Maria del Carmen Arenas

Product Number: 9B04A004
Publication Date: 1/15/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 26 pages

Agilent Technologies was spun-off from Hewlett Packard in an effort to establish a new brand in the high-tech industry. The senior director of global brand management was reflecting on the company's challenges in focusing its worldwide marketing effort in the multiple business sectors. Agilent was intended to establish itself as a separate company from Hewlett Packard while still continuing in the Hewlett Packard tradition of excellent customer service and reliability. Now, with smaller advertising and marketing budgets, downsizing of the company, fierce competitive pricing and service, and an evolution from within Agilent Technologies to provide more service and knowledge through its Web site, the marketing and communications challenges have changed since the company's introduction.

Teaching Note: 8B04A04 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Marketing Management; Consumer Research; Marketing Communication; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LAUNCH OF MBANX
Donald W. Barclay

Product Number: 9A98A025
Publication Date: 9/23/1998
Revision Date: 1/22/2010
Length: 19 pages

From a strategic perspective, the Bank of Montreal, a major Canadian bank, has committed to entering the 'virtual banking' marketplace in Canada. There is also the potential to launch later in the USA and Mexico. They plan to do this in a preemptive fashion to gain first mover advantage. This means no extensive pilots and a short time to launch. The decision makers are charged with developing a complete launch strategy. They have two years of tentative ideas to work with, but a number of major decisions on product line, pricing, communications, salesforce, etc. are still to be made. The purpose of the case is to introduce students to the entire scope of marketing decisions to be made in such a situation, including fundamental decisions around targeting and positioning. It also drives students to make decisions in the face of incomplete information and short time horizons. To date, the case has been successfully used to set the stage for marketing management courses, and to kick off marketing management modules in executive development programs. (A nine-minute video can be purchased with this case, video 7A98A025.)

Teaching Note: 8A98A25 (11 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Consumer Marketing; Market Entry; Market Strategy; New Products
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 5:
Purchase

JILL'S TABLE: SET TO SERVE
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06A001
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/8/2009
Length: 11 pages

The founder and owner of Jill's Table, a specialty food and housewares store is thinking about the challenges ahead of her. As a small business operating in the same arena as the mass merchandising chains, she has to decide how to position her service offerings so as to survive and even thrive in a highly competitive environment. As a Retailer of the Year award winner (2004 Canadian Gift and Tableware Association, Housewares and Gourmet Division), she knows that her challenges go beyond competition and touch on areas such as customer service, associate training, buying and finance.

Teaching Note: 8B06A01 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing Management; Leadership; Small Business; Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON RETAIL FORMATS
Michael R. Pearce, Kyle Murray, Krista Morrison

Product Number: 9B05A034
Publication Date: 12/14/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 14 pages

Every retailer faces competition, either directly or indirectly. This note examines how a retailer can systematically conceptualize and analyze his or her competition in order to make better retail marketing decisions. The two key topic areas are retail formats (a way to classify retail competitors) and competitive analysis. Every retailer needs to find some reason why customers should buy from him or her rather than from a competitor - in short, a competitive advantage. Gaining competitive advantage requires not only customer understanding, but also competitive understanding.

Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Discounters; Competitor Analysis; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON RETAIL CONVENIENCE
Michael R. Pearce

Product Number: 9B05A031
Publication Date: 12/14/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 12 pages

Convenience is a key competitive benefit retailers can offer: ways to save customers time and effort. Retailers employ various strategies, including location, layout, merchandise arrangement, transaction processing, hours and delivery, to differentiate themselves from competitors. This note explains each of these strategies, and explore the growing importance of shopping convenience.

Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Store Layout; Retailing; Services; Merchandising
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BOOTS: HAIR-CARE SALES PROMOTION
Robert J. Fisher, Murray J. Bryant, Pankaj Shandilya

Product Number: 9B05A022
Publication Date: 9/1/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 11 pages

Boots Group PLC, one of the best known and respected retail names in the United Kingdom, provided health and beauty products and advice that enhanced personal well being. The marketing manager at Boots was planning his sales promotion strategy for a line of professional hair-care products. The professional hair-care line consisted primarily of shampoos, conditioners and styling products (gels, wax, mousse, etc.) developed in collaboration with United Kingdom's top celebrity hairdressers. The marketing manager's challenge was to select one of three promotional alternatives - get three for the price of two, receive a gift with purchase or an on-pack coupon - for the Christmas season. He realized that the alternative he selected would have both immediate effects on costs and sales, but also long-term implications for the brands involved. His primary objective was to drive sales volumes and trade-up consumers from lower-value brands, while retaining or building brand equity.

Teaching Note: 8B05A22 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Sales Promotion; Advertising Management; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Post-Purchase Processes: Consumption and Post-Consumption Evaluations

SUMMERWOOD OUTDOORS INC.
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Erich Isopp, Naomi Midanik

Product Number: 9B06D012
Publication Date: 8/30/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 16 pages

The head of logistics has received a number of customer complaints regarding various aspects of the company's product delivery policy. She must decide what can be done to increase customer satisfaction with its pricing, delivery service and customer relations. The head of logistics is not sure if it's a problem with communications or internal problems with the delivery process. She will have to assess customer feedback and examine the sales process.

Teaching Note: 8B06D12 (10 pages)
Industry: Construction
Issues: Logistics; Quality; Service Operations; Customer Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TINPLATE COMPANY OF INDIA: NEED FOR A CONCEPTUAL FOCUS
S. Ramesh Kumar, Mohan Kuruvilla

Product Number: 9B01A011
Publication Date: 3/11/2002
Revision Date: 4/26/2011
Length: 11 pages

Tinplate Company of India is a leading manufacturer of tin packaging for food and beverage products and batteries. Changes in government policy on importing materials, new types of packaging products and customer dissatisfaction present challenges for the company. The company must decide whether to continue with its current market strategy, determine how it can compete with foreign companies or determine if they are missing other strategic opportunities based on organizational buying behaviours.

Teaching Note: 8B01A11 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Segmentation; Competitiveness; Market Strategy; Product Management
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



WAVERIDER COMMUNICATIONS INC.: SELLING WIRELESS INTERNET ACCESS EQUIPMENT
Donald W. Barclay, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01A003
Publication Date: 5/18/2001
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 16 pages

WaveRider Communications, a wireless Internet access equipment provider, had just completed the first installation of its latest system. The vice-president of marketing had to deal with two key sales issues that had recently surfaced. First, as compared to initial expectations, it had been taking at least twice as long for the company's salesforce to sell its new portfolio of products. Second, he noticed a sharp increase in the number of customers relying on WaveRider's post-sales support. He must examine the impact of the longer sales cycle on a number of company issues, such as type of salesforce and support needed, costs to serve, revenue generation, and share price. He also wanted to determine if more could be done to educate the customer during the selling period in order to facilitate smoother implementation.

Teaching Note: 8B01A03 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Action Planning and Implementation; Sales Management; Sales Strategy; Product Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EURO-AIR (A)
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9A99M015
Publication Date: 6/24/1999
Revision Date: 1/18/2010
Length: 7 pages

A North America-based representative of a major European airline has just received a letter from an unhappy customer detailing a very large number of service problems. A quick check had revealed that this premium-paying customer's complaints were all valid. A meeting is planned with the customer. Before this, the airline representative must decide (A) what to say in response, and (B) what, if any, compensation should be offered. Internally, there was a need (C) to resolve what their organization should learn from this experience, both from a subsidiary and parent company perspective, and the implications on their participation in the Crown Alliance. This case raises many important questions regarding service recovery, communications, and non-equity alliances.

Teaching Note: 8A99M15 (11 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Alliances; Service Quality; Compensation; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Demographics, Psychographics, and Personality

JEWELLWORLD.COM - ONLINE JEWELRY SHOPPING IN CHINA
Shige Makino, Anthony Fong

Product Number: 9B05A009
Publication Date: 9/23/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 19 pages

The marketing manager of Jewellworld.com was faced with the problem of a saturated Hong Kong market, and has to consider ways in which to expand the business. In a meeting with the marketing director, who was responsible for the development of the Hong Kong and Chinese Jewelry markets, one of the main topics was the expansion of the online shopping strategy into the B2C area in China; however, the staff of the marketing department held different views. The immediate question was whether Jewellworld.com should move into the B2C area at full speed or wait and see how other competitors fared in the China online market. The other issue was the segmentation that Jewellworld should employ if they decide to enter the B2C market in China. A competitor had established retail stores across China. The question was whether Jewellworld should aim to cover all market segments and product lines, or target young people who tend to use the Internet more frequently.

Teaching Note: 8B05A09 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Internet; Retail Marketing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KIDS MARKET CONSULTING
Paul W. Beamish, Stephanie Taylor, Oleksiy Vynogradov

Product Number: 9B04M065
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 8 pages

The founder of Kids Market Consulting, a market research firm dedicated to the kids, tweens and teens segment, was faced with increasing competition and slowing revenue, and was exploring a variety of possibilities for the future strategic direction of the business. In particular, she had to formulate the best plan for protecting the niche market and decide how aggressively to pursue expansion. In addition, there was the existing relationship with her business partner, and Kids Market Consulting was part of his group of marketing firms. Any changes the founder chose had to respect this relationship and she was therefore restricted to a limited number of options. The over-arching corporate objective for the company was to defend the market from larger businesses who were trying to increase their share of the market research industry.

Teaching Note: 8B04M65 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Strategy Development; Strategic Planning; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ESTIMATING DEMAND FOR KODAK FILM
David M. Currie, Ilan Alon

Product Number: 9B04D015
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 7 pages

An executive must estimate the demand for rolls of film in various countries based on demographic data about the counties. She must determine the process and develop a spreadsheet model that will provide the results based on data (GNP per capita, population, income distribution) from the various countries. The purposes of the case are to show the relation between national statistics and company decisions and to provide training in advanced spreadsheet skills, conceptualizing a problem and modelling.

Teaching Note: 8B04D15 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Research; International Business; Spread Sheet Application; Operations Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Consumer Motivation

THE HOME DEPOT CANADA: RENOVATING STRATEGY
Kyle Murray, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B06A031
Publication Date: 11/23/2006
Length: 16 pages

The president of The Home Depot Canada (THDC), a subsidiary of U.S.-based The Home Depot Inc., had recently articulated her own vision for THDC: to become Canada's top retailer. To achieve this goal, THDC would have to continue to evolve to meet the changing needs of its customer base. The do-it-yourself segment, which THDC had nurtured, was giving way to the do-it-for-me segment. Attracting the female customer, towards whom The Home Depot Inc. had only recently turned its attention, was critical to future growth. The big-box format was approaching saturation in Canada's urban centers. The company would have to look for growth from secondary, inner city markets, requiring stores with less square footage. Did THDC need a new retailing strategy? The president wondered whether the strategy, which had been tried and tested, should be continued, tweaked or overhauled.

Teaching Note: 8B06A31 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; Retail Marketing; Segmentation; Competitive Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK: THE MARKETING AND BRANDING CHALLENGES OF A START-UP
Gavin Chen, Derrick Deslandes

Product Number: 9B05A012
Publication Date: 6/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 17 pages

FirstCaribbean International Bank was the new banking entity created from the combination of the Caribbean operations of two foreign banks, Barclays Bank plc of the United Kingdom and headquarters in London, England and CIBC - formally the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce - of Canada and headquartered in Toronto, Ontario. A marketing team was formed with the specific responsibility of developing the marketing function and the brand strategy, as well as guiding the branding process of the new entity. The head of the marketing team has a number of concerns: Would geography, history and commercial practices support or mitigate against a single, centralized marketing strategy for the entire region, what should the new brand be and how should it be articulated, should the new brand reflect one or both of the heritage banks or should the new brand break with the past and reflect a totally new identity, and how quickly could the new brand be rolled out? This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the five additional Cross-Enterprise cases that deal with various functional issues associated with the eventual merger: Human Resources - Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean, product 9B04C053; Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032; General Management - CIBC-Barclays: Should Their Caribbean Operations Be Merged?, product 9B04M067; Accounting and Finance - CIBC-Barclays: Accounting For Their Merger, product 9B04B022; FirstCaribbean International Bank: The Marketing and Branding Challenges for a Start-up, product 9B05A012; and technical note - Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B05A12 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Brand Management; Brand Positioning; Market Strategy; Marketing Planning; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Consumer Knowledge

THE HOME DEPOT CANADA: ECOOPTIONS
Kyle Murray, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B06A032
Publication Date: 11/23/2006
Length: 11 pages

In December 2005, The Home Depot Canada (THDC) rolls out its EcoOptions product line. The market for environment-friendly products has been changing in terms of vendor interest, consumer demand and competitive dynamics. THDC has been pushing that change with EcoOptions, which started off as a pilot project in March 2004. The project was driven by a larger vision of making EcoOptions the leading environmental brand in the global home-improvement market. Translated into measurable goals, it meant that 10 per cent of THDC's assortment of about 50,000 SKUs would be designated as EcoOptions by 2010. This case introduces many of the critical issues in strategic merchandising and assortment decisions, with a focus on the management of a major shift in the retailer's product assortment.

Teaching Note: 8B06A32 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Pricing Strategy; Retailing; Retail Marketing; Assortment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OQOQO: SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS FASHIONS
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark, Megan Sherritt

Product Number: 9B06A023
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Length: 8 pages

Chip Wilson, founder of lululemon athletica, a Vancouver-based manufacturer, distributor and retailer of high quality yoga apparel, started a new streetwear line of apparel that would combine fashion with social consciousness. The apparel sold at OQOQO was made from natural and organic materials, under safe and fair working conditions, and it was produced in a way to reduce environmental impact. There were some problems regarding the sourcing of materials and the customer's perception of certain materials such as soy and hemp. Chip must decide whether to expand the number of OQOQO stores.

Teaching Note: 8B06A23 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Decision Theory; Decision Analysis; Corporate Responsibility; Retailing; Product Strategy; Growth Strategy; Market Strategy; Decision Trees; Decision Support Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LIVING ARTS CENTRE OF MISSISSAUGA: CONDENSED VERSION
Michael R. Pearce

Product Number: 9B02A027
Publication Date: 2/6/2003
Revision Date: 10/29/2009
Length: 21 pages

The marketing director of a major multicultural arts and entertainment complex is reviewing many different market studies. His challenge lies in how to distinguish the centre's services from other discretionary purchases. He must resolve positioning, programming, communications, and fundraising issues prior to the upcoming launch. (A higher price applies to this case due to colour exhibits.)

Teaching Note: 8A96A01 (4 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Consumer Beliefs, Feelings, Attitudes, and Intentions

STARBUCKS
Mary M. Crossan, Ariff Kachra

Product Number: 9A98M006
Publication Date: 5/14/1998
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 23 pages

Starbucks is faced with the issue of how it should leverage its core competencies against various opportunities for growth, including introducing its coffee in McDonald’s, pursuing further expansion of its retail operations, and leveraging the brand into other product areas. The case is written so that students need to first identify where Starbucks competencies lie along the value chain, and assess how well those competencies can be leveraged across the various alternatives. It also provides an opportunity for students to assess what is driving growth in this company. Starbucks has a tremendous appetite for cash since all its stores are corporate, and investors are betting that it will be able to continue its phenomenal growth, so it needs to walk a fine line between leveraging its brand to achieve growth while not eroding it in the process. This is an exciting case that quickly captures the attention of students.

Teaching Note: 8A98M06 (13 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: competitiveness; industry analysis; growth strategy; core competence; coffee
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOYOTA: DRIVING THE MAINSTREAM MARKET TO PURCHASE HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES
Jeff Saperstein, Jennifer Nelson

Product Number: 9B04A003
Publication Date: 1/16/2004
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 23 pages

Toyota is a large, international automobile manufacturer headquartered in Japan, with plans to become the largest worldwide automaker, striving for 15 per cent of global sales. Toyota is committing itself to be the leader of the hybrid-electric automotive industry, and is relying on changes in the industry and customer perceptions to bring its plan to fruition. Toyota's challenge is to develop consumer attitude and purchase intent, from an early adopter, niche market model into universal mainstream acceptance.

Teaching Note: 8B04A03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Product Design/Development; Multinational; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ALARMFORCE: THE LAUNCH OF ALARMFOG
June Cotte, David Singer

Product Number: 9B03A010
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 9 pages

AlarmForce Industries Inc. is a developer and sales provider of home security systems with offices throughout Canada. Since the company's inception, it had become one of the leaders in the Canadian home security market and had established a reputation for being a technological innovator in the industry. The president and chief executive officer of the company must decide whether or not to launch their new product, AlarmFog, which the president believed represented the future of the home security market. The case focuses on past strategic decisions made by the company in differentiating itself in a mature market. The potential folly of making tactical product launch decisions without a solid analysis of underlying strategic issues can be discussed.

Teaching Note: 8B03A10 (6 pages)8B03A10B (16 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Marketing Management; New Products; Market Analysis; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Culture, Ethnicity, and Social Class

CARVEL ICE CREAM - DEVELOPING THE BEIJING MARKET
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A017
Publication Date: 8/5/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 12 pages

The manager of business development for Carvel Asia Limited is trying to determine how best to increase ice cream cake sales in Beijing. In doing so, he needs to develop a complete marketing program which includes decisions about product offerings, pricing, placement (distribution) and promotion - the 4 Ps. Carvel Asia was a 50-50 joint venture between Carvel (USA) and China's Ministry of Agriculture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A17 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Pricing Strategy; Product Concept; Marketing Communication; Distribution
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SAMSUNG CHINA: THE INTRODUCTION OF COLOR TV
Paul W. Beamish, David J. Sharp, Chang-Bum Choi

Product Number: 9A98G003
Publication Date: 3/2/1998
Length: 16 pages

Mr. Chung Yong, president of Samsung China Headquarters was considering a recent meeting with the marketing director who was responsible for developing a marketing strategy for the entire China market. The topic at the meeting was the marketing strategy for color TVs, which had been chosen as the flagship product for the China market. Samsung had to decide whether it should focus on the low or high-end market segment (or both), and whether to import or produce locally.

Teaching Note: 8A98G03 (7 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: China;
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BENJAMIN'S BAGELS
Michael R. Pearce

Product Number: 9A97A004
Publication Date: 9/10/1997
Revision Date: 2/2/2010
Length: 3 pages

After a successful roll-out throughout the Northeastern United States, Benjamin's Bagels is set to enter the Canadian market. The vice-president is reviewing information about potential sites in the Greater Toronto area, using micromarketing and geographic information systems. A supplemental file containing maps, product 7A97A004, accompanies this case.

Teaching Note: 8A97A04 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Research; Retail Marketing; Shopping Centres; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Family and Household Influences

FORD WINDSTAR
Robert J. Fisher, David J. Sharp, Satish Jha

Product Number: 9B03A005
Publication Date: 5/1/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 22 pages

Ford of Canada is a division of the Ford Motor Company - one of the Big Three automobile manufacturers in North America. The brand manager of the Windstar was concerned that its only brand in the minivan category would not meet its annual sales target. Since the Windstar's launch in the early 1990s, it had become one of the largest selling auto brands in Canada and was synonymous with safety and family travel. During the past few years, the popularity of purchasing a Windstar had declined with the minivan market becoming very competitive, the recession, quality problems and several product recalls. The brand manager must create a promotional strategy that will maintain Windstar sales and profitability and attempt to maintain the brand image. (Also available is the video, Ford Windstar product # 7B03A005.)

Teaching Note: 8B03A05 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Product Management; Product Strategy; Costs; Advertising
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEIJING TORONTO INTERNATIONAL HOSPITAL
Kenneth G. Hardy, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01A006
Publication Date: 3/5/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 16 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case was one of the winning cases in the 2001 Regional Asia-Pacific Case Writing Competition. Beijing Toronto International Hospital was a new private facility being built in Beijing that would offer a full range of general and specialized Western-quality medical services to a very specific market segment: expatriates and wealthy Chinese families. Membership cards were sold that entitled each member to a distinct level of hospital service. The chief executive officer found that as the building neared completion, only a few memberships had been sold which resulted in a cash shortage. He did not know why sales failed to materialize as expected, but felt that he must redirect and revitalize the marketing campaign. He considered several options and had to determine what would work best in the Chinese market.

Teaching Note: 8B01A06 (9 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; International Marketing; Market Entry; Health Administration; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE MORES BUY A CAR: OR DO THEY?
Roger A. More

Product Number: 9A98A017
Publication Date: 11/9/1998
Revision Date: 4/8/2003
Length: 27 pages

This case enables a clinical analysis of the complex choice/rejection process that a family goes through in buying a car. It is an online, real time track of the actual events that took place. Many situational factors are explored, including pricing versus leasing, individual and family situation and biases, information sources and uses, dealer and sales representative relationships, and conflicting choice criteria. Students are asked to explore implications for marketing strategy.

Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Market Analysis; Marketing Channels; Market Segmentation; Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Group and Personal Influence

LOGITECH: LAUNCHING A DIGITAL PEN
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B03A002
Publication Date: 5/28/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 10 pages

Logitech is an international company that designs and manufactures computer peripheral products. The retail pointing devices unit director is thinking about the development of the next generation of his device, the Logitech io Digital Pen. The digital pen is about to be launched in less than two months, and he is still unsure which features were valuable to potential users, who these potential users were and for which applications the digital pen could be used.

Teaching Note: 8B03A02 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Consumer Analysis; New Products
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NINTENDO - THE LAUNCH OF GAME BOY COLOR
Robert J. Fisher, Adrian B. Ryans

Product Number: 9B01A013
Publication Date: 10/18/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 14 pages

Nintendo Co. Ltd. is a worldwide leader in the retail video game industry. In 1998 the color version of Nintendo Game Boy would be launched simultaneously in North America and Europe and would be one of Nintendo's most important launches. The president of Nintendo, Canada must develop a marketing plan that would generate the most profit.

Teaching Note: 8B01A13 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Marketing Management; Market Strategy; Marketing Mix
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MICROSOFT ASIA: LAUNCHING SIMPLIFIED CHINESE WINDOWS 95 IN THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA
John S. Hulland, Mark B. Vandenbosch, David Ager

Product Number: 9A99A025
Publication Date: 11/30/1999
Revision Date: 1/13/2010
Length: 21 pages

Microsoft's vice president of the Far East had recently announced that China was a strategic market for Microsoft. The objective of the recently appointed director of the End User Customer Unit for China and Hong Kong was to establish Chinese Windows 95, slated for release in March 1996, as the new standard for operating systems in China. With the launch date only four months away, she realized that she needed to initiate a sales and marketing campaign immediately. Her first step would be to develop a marketing plan which would ensure the rapid adoption of Chinese Windows 95, and which would create a permanent distribution channel for future Microsoft applications software products.

Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: China; Marketing Planning; Market Entry; Global Product; International Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Making Contact

SMART CO-OPERATIVE MARKETING
Kyle Murray, Jianping Liang

Product Number: 9B06A030
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Length: 11 pages

The owner of Cherished Scrapbooks (CS) had just decided to go ahead with the development of an industry-level marketing program. In January 2006, the chief executive officer of SMART Group (SMART), a scrapbook trade group based in California, advised the owner of CS that the next step in the evolution of her business was to co-operate with her direct competitors. Initially the CS owner had rejected the idea out-right: The retailers in my area don't like me and besides it seems it would be contrary to my competitive position. However, just one month later, she asked SMART's CEO if he would come to Toronto to lead the formation of a cooperative marketing plan team for 68 scrapbook retailers within 100 miles of Toronto. She now wondered how she could help grow this grass roots initiative? SMART planned to launch 20 cooperatives in North America for 2006. How could CS's owner help support and grow this initiative? She also wondered what her exit strategy would be; she hoped to grow her business and either sell or franchise it.

Teaching Note: 8B06A30 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; Exit Strategy; Retail Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANADIAN TIRE MULTIPLE CHANNEL RETAILING
Michael R. Pearce, Neal Costello, Michael Hall, Lindsay Nicholl

Product Number: 9B02A014
Publication Date: 7/22/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 11 pages

Three years after launching a content-based Web site, a nationwide hard goods retailer invested in software to support Internet shopping. The online component was one element in a multiple channel retailing approach, which also included retail stores, a phone-order service and an annual catalog. Although the company is the country's most shopped retailer, the online retail segment has not turned a profit. The director of marketing must consider the effect of multiple channel retailing on the company's profitability.

Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Distribution Channels; E-Business; Retailing; Internet Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CONSUMERS' ADVERTISING RESPONSE PROCESSES
John S. Hulland

Product Number: 9A91A002
Publication Date: 7/30/1992
Revision Date: 3/6/2002
Length: 9 pages

This note provides a review of three different models of consumers' advertising response processes, and discusses the implications of these models for advertisers. It also describes the advertising agency's model or grid and its role in marketing communication planning. The model is known as AIDA, standing for getting Attention, developing Interest, building Desire, and finally getting Action.

Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Advertising; Advertising Effectiveness
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



E-LOAN: A BETTER WAY TO GET A LOAN
Dickson Louie, Jeffrey F. Rayport

Product Number: 9B01A028
Publication Date: 2/14/2002
Revision Date: 12/7/2009
Length: 25 pages

E-Loan is a leading online mortgage provider. Its success is built on its key strategies of building a nationally recognized brand and providing superior customer service. Despite its strong market standing, the company was anxious to reposition itself as a provider of all consumer loans, not solely a mortgage lender. In order to meet this goal, E-Loan's president identified four strategic challenges: leveraging technology to provide further efficiencies, expanding its selection of products to meet consumer needs, continuing to build a strong brand presence and expanding internationally. The company's co-founder recognized that one of the greatest challenges would be to maintain the company's successful culture that they had worked so carefully to establish, while at the same time, achieving the broader goals.

Teaching Note: 8B01A28 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Market Strategy; E-Commerce; Brand Positioning; Monitor
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Shaping Consumers’ Opinions

MOLSON CANADIAN - THE RANT
Robert J. Fisher, Scott Walker

Product Number: 9B01A025
Publication Date: 3/28/2002
Revision Date: 12/7/2009
Length: 17 pages

Molson Canada produced Molson Canadian, Canada's best selling beer. Canadian's previous advertising campaign The Rant had been incredibly popular making it one of the most successful ads for Molson in a long time, and winning numerous international and domestic advertising awards. The marketing team for Molson Canadian had to find the theme for the next advertising campaign, and must decide whether to move towards more traditional beer advertising or maintain the non-traditional them of The Rant. (A 9-minute VHS video is available, product 7B01A025 containing Molson's and Labatt's advertisements.)

Teaching Note: 8B01A25 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Advertising Strategy; Advertising Effectiveness; Marketing Planning; Advertising Media
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PROCTER & GAMBLE CANADA: DEVELOPING SCOPE ADVERTISING COPY
John S. Hulland, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9A98A030
Publication Date: 2/17/1999
Revision Date: 1/22/2010
Length: 14 pages

The assistant brand manager for Procter & Gamble's Scope brand in Canada has been working since May with the brand manager to refine the brand's market position. They are concerned about whether they have chosen the correct target for the brand, and what their fall advertising for Scope should communicate. A focus group session has been planned for the next two weeks. They are eagerly awaiting the opportunity to uncover key consumer insights but want to ensure that they are asking the right questions. They have to make specific decisions regarding the fall advertising campaign no later than the beginning of August and want to ensure that the new advertisements are as successful as possible. This case can be used in a second year advertising or research methods elective, or as part of the advertising module in a first year course.

Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Advertising; Product Strategy; Marketing Research; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INCREDIBLE UNIVERSE
Michael R. Pearce, Michelle Kromer

Product Number: 9A99A023
Publication Date: 10/27/1999
Revision Date: 1/13/2010
Length: 7 pages

This case provides a detailed description of Tandy Corporation's Incredible Universe stores from 1992 to 1995: layout, major departments, advertising and promotion, location, staff and customers. These very large consumer electronics stores were launched in the belief that incredible selection, entertainment and service would be a formula that customers would love; however, the unprofitable performance of the chain to date raises questions about the future of this venture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A23 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Competition; Consumer Behaviour; Retail Marketing; Profitability Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Helping Consumers to Remember

SANTA FE RELOCATION SERVICES: REGIONAL BRAND MANAGEMENT
Niraj Dawar, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B05A029
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 15 pages

Sante Fe Relocation Services was a premium provider of relocation services based in Hong Kong. Founded in 1980, the company had built a reputation as a reliable, high-quality packer and mover of household goods. By 2000, the company also offered a full range of relocation support services including visa and immigration applications, home searching and cultural and language training. Santa Fe relocated expatriates and their families between Asian countries and between Asia and other regions. The company had its own staff and assets in Asia and managed its international operations through a network of partners. In 2005, the chief operating officer faced three key challenges: differentiating and positioning the brand in a crowded and often price-driven market; incorporating an expanded service line under the original brand and gaining market recognition for those additional services; and managing the brand across the Asian region with an effective balance of standardization versus local adaptation.

Teaching Note: 8B05A29 (6 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: International Marketing; Competitor Analysis; Brand Positioning; Brand Extension; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NEW CENTURY BREWING: MOONSHOT CAFFEINATED BEER
Christopher J. Robertson, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A014
Publication Date: 8/12/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 9 pages

New Century Brewing: Moonshot Caffeinated Beer discusses the introduction of a completely new beverage to the U.S. market. New Century Brewing, which is owned by one of the founders of Boston Beer Company, is a small brewer that outsources production to third party brewers. It has two products, a light craft beer sold in upscale shops and restaurants, and a caffeinated beer, which is oriented towards younger drinkers mainly between 21 and 25 years of age. Moonshot, created by the legendary masterbrewer, known as the father of light beer, became the first caffeinated beer in the world. The company follows a differentiation strategy that attempts to appeal to a small niche of customers traditionally ignored by large brewers. Shortly after the introduction of each of its products, large competitors introduced similar products. Nevertheless, Moonshot has a first-to-market advantage that could potentially be leveraged.

Teaching Note: 8B05A14 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Women in Management; Entrepreneurial Marketing; Competitive Advantage; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IVILLAGE.COM
Madeline Choquette, Dickson Louie, Jeffrey F. Rayport

Product Number: 9B01A023
Publication Date: 2/15/2002
Revision Date: 12/7/2009
Length: 25 pages

iVillage.com was a successful Web site that served as a point of entry to numerous sites (or channels) targeted to a female audience. With a solid strategic vision and a network structure that provided consistency and control of the customer experience, the founders were rewarded by the site's favorable online presence. The company's business strategy relied on creating revenue through sponsorship and advertising. As the marketing industry had identified women as their single largest target category, iVillage.com had little difficulty in successfully pursuing innovative sponsorships and creative advertising. The pursuit for women's buying power also meant, however, that iVillage.com faced competition -- for both audience numbers and advertising dollars -- from numerous online and offline businesses. More women were accessing information online, driving the demand for more sophisticated Web sites. At the same time, iVillage.com needed to capture the audience that was currently offline and those who were about to move online. The founders must determine how to proceed in the face of increased competition, and how to achieve profitability.

Teaching Note: 8B01A23 (9 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: E-Commerce; Market Strategy; Monitor
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA