Ivey Publishing

Strategic Management: Creating Competitive Advantages

Dess, G.G., Lumpkin, G.T., Eisner, A.B.,3/e (United States, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2007)
Prepared By Chen Rongdong, Ph.D. Student (General Management)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Strategic Management: Creating Advantages

HYDRO: FROM UTSIRA TO FUTURE ENERGY SOLUTIONS
Robert Klassen, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06M044
Publication Date: 3/29/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 22 pages

Managers at Norway's Hydro are wondering whether or not an economically viable business case can be made to commercialize a wind-hydrogen solution. The company has successfully installed a wind-hydrogen renewable energy system as a research and development project on the 200 person remote island of Utsira. Now, they are considering two early markets to which to sell the idea: remote island communities or grid power balancing for grid operators with high reliance on wind power. Students will be introduced to current trends in renewable energy and will look at the threats and opportunities and business drivers in launching a new project. Students will analyse the priorities of the company by looking at economic, social and environmental objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B06M44 (13 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Innovation; Environmental Business Management; Feasibility Analysis; New Products
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON THE CUBAN CIGAR INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish, Akash Kapoor

Product Number: 9B03M001
Publication Date: 2/27/2003
Revision Date: 10/21/2009
Length: 20 pages

The cigar industry in Cuba has a mythical aura and renown that give it unparalleled recognition worldwide. The relationship between Cuba and the United States makes the situation in this industry particularly intriguing. Cuban cigars cannot currently be sold in the United States, even though it is the largest premium cigar market in the world. This note provides an opportunity for a structured analysis using Porter's five forces model and to consider several scenarios including the possible lifting of the U.S. embargo and the relaxation of Cuba's land ownership laws.

Teaching Note: 8B03M01 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Government and Business; Internationalization; International Business; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LULULEMON ATHLETICA: PRIMED FOR GROWTH
Eric Morse, Ken Mark, Patrick A. Walsh

Product Number: 9B06M092
Publication Date: 10/25/2006
Revision Date: 9/23/2009
Length: 15 pages

The chairman and chief product designer of lululemon athletica is preparing to address an audience at an investor's conference. He describes lululemon's great success from 1998 to 2006 and analyses the growth opportunities it faces. This case helps students understand the concept of competitive advantage in relation to the functional and emotion marketing drivers. In addition, it underlines the importance of preserving brand equity and prioritizing strategic growth options.

Teaching Note: 8B06M92 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Decision Theory; Decision Trees; Decision Support Systems; Decision Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Analyzing the External Environment of the Firm

LOBLAW COMPANIES LIMITED
Charlene Zietsma, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B04M082
Publication Date: 1/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 20 pages

The president of Loblaw Companies Limited must decide what to do in response to the rumoured introduction of Wal-Mart's SuperCenters (combining grocery and non-food items) in Canada. The potential launch of SuperCenters in Canada was seen by observers as a threat to Loblaw, the market leader in Canadian grocery. Wal-Mart is a vigorous competitor, and the Every Day Low Prices strategy of Wal-Mart's SuperCenters could wean away traffic from Loblaw's various banners.

Teaching Note: 8B04M82 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Food and Drug; Industry Analysis; Competition
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



APPLE INC.: IPODS AND ITUNES
Mary M. Crossan, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05M046
Publication Date: 8/2/2005
Revision Date: 4/15/2010
Length: 13 pages

Apple Computer, Inc. has enjoyed tremendous market success with its digital music initiative consisting of software (iTunes), hardware (iPods and Shuffles), and content (iTunes Music Store). Highlighted is the development of the online music industry within the context of the overall music industry, the major record labels, Napster, and the Recording Industry Association of America. Students will be able to conduct an industry analysis of the music industry and determine why Apple Computer has succeeded in profiting from digital music while others have failed.

Teaching Note: 8B05M46 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: New Economy; Strategy Implementation; Industry Analysis; Business and Society
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GENERAL MOTORS DEFENSE
Paul W. Beamish, Changwha Chung

Product Number: 9B03M002
Publication Date: 2/6/2003
Revision Date: 10/21/2009
Length: 10 pages

General Motors Defense, a division of General Motors, one of the world's largest automobile manufacturers, designs and manufactures light armored vehicles. The company is approached by General Dynamics to jointly pursue the U.S. Army's Brigade Combat Team program. However, General Dynamic made it clear that they would also submit a bid on their own. Contrary to past practices, the chief of staff of the U.S. Army planned to award the multi-billion dollar contract within only 11 months. The executive director of General Motors Defense has to decide whether the company should bid-it-alone or submit a joint venture bid with General Dynamics.

Teaching Note: 8B03M02 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Joint Ventures; Doing Business in the U.S.; Political Environment; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



APPLE INC.: IPODS AND ITUNES
Mary M. Crossan, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05M046
Publication Date: 8/2/2005
Revision Date: 4/15/2010
Length: 13 pages

Apple Computer, Inc. has enjoyed tremendous market success with its digital music initiative consisting of software (iTunes), hardware (iPods and Shuffles), and content (iTunes Music Store). Highlighted is the development of the online music industry within the context of the overall music industry, the major record labels, Napster, and the Recording Industry Association of America. Students will be able to conduct an industry analysis of the music industry and determine why Apple Computer has succeeded in profiting from digital music while others have failed.

Teaching Note: 8B05M46 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: New Economy; Strategy Implementation; Industry Analysis; Business and Society
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STRATEGIC CROSSROADS AT MATAV: HUNGARY'S TELECOMMUNICATIONS POWERHOUSE
Michael J. Rouse, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B05M033
Publication Date: 5/11/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 27 pages

In September 2004, four months after Hungary joined the European Union, the strategy group of Matav - Hungary's largest communications company - is working on its mid-term strategic plan. Since being privatized from state ownership in 1993, the company has seen several changes in its strategy, structure and culture. Nearly 15 years later, the company is a fully integrated telecommunications company involved in a broad range of services including fixed line telephony, mobile communications, Internet services, data transmission and outsourcing. The company's latest acquisition of a formerly state run telecommunications company is considered a success, and management believes that international expansion is necessary to realize dynamic growth as its domestic fixed line business is declining. As well, Hungary's mobile market is highly competitive and saturated with 80 per cent of the country having a mobile phone. The management team feels that Matav is at a crossroads with three main options: expansion in Hungary, regional expansion or focusing on organic growth in existing product lines. The team has to consider all of the lines of business in forming a strategy and whether Matav's resources and organization are suitable for a healthy future.

Teaching Note: 8B05M33 (16 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Growth Strategy; Strategy Development; International Business; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Assessing the Internal Environment of the Firm

GRAND & TOY: STAPLES' COMPETITIVE THREAT
Mary M. Crossan, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01M017
Publication Date: 5/17/2001
Revision Date: 12/21/2009
Length: 14 pages

Grand & Toy is one of Canada's largest commercial suppliers of office stationery. The president of Grand & Toy is wary of the competitive threat posed by Staples, a well-known U.S. office supply company, and is reviewing his company's budget forecast to plan for a meeting with senior managers. He wants to use this opportunity to rethink the company's strategy and ensure all competitive threats and opportunities have been considered.

Teaching Note: 8B01M17 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Planning; Core Competence; E-Commerce; Competitiveness
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STARBUCKS
Mary M. Crossan, Ariff Kachra

Product Number: 9A98M006
Publication Date: 5/14/1998
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 23 pages

Starbucks is faced with the issue of how it should leverage its core competencies against various opportunities for growth, including introducing its coffee in McDonald’s, pursuing further expansion of its retail operations, and leveraging the brand into other product areas. The case is written so that students need to first identify where Starbucks competencies lie along the value chain, and assess how well those competencies can be leveraged across the various alternatives. It also provides an opportunity for students to assess what is driving growth in this company. Starbucks has a tremendous appetite for cash since all its stores are corporate, and investors are betting that it will be able to continue its phenomenal growth, so it needs to walk a fine line between leveraging its brand to achieve growth while not eroding it in the process. This is an exciting case that quickly captures the attention of students.

Teaching Note: 8A98M06 (13 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: competitiveness; industry analysis; growth strategy; core competence; coffee
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IKEA (CANADA) LTD.- 1986 (CONDENSED)
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9A88M010
Publication Date: 1/1/1988
Revision Date: 2/23/2000
Length: 14 pages

The mid-1986 Sears new catalogue contained a 20-page section called Elements. This section bore a striking resemblance to the format of an IKEA catalogue, and the furniture being offered was similar to IKEA'S knocked-down self-assembly line. The head of IKEA'S North American operations wondered how serious Sears was about its new initiative and what, if anything, IKEA should do in response.

Teaching Note: 8A88M10 (12 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Supplier Relations; Competition; Value Analysis; Subsidiaries
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Recognizing a Firm’s Intellectual Assets: Moving beyond a Firm’s Tangible Resources

GEOTECH TELECOM
Mary Han

Product Number: 9B07M036
Publication Date: 3/1/2007
Length: 11 pages

Geotech Telecom (Geotech) is a small but successful 14-year old company that provides telecom consulting to two main clients, Rogers Telecom and Bell Canada. The company is facing the upcoming transfer of a large multimillion-dollar telecom contract from one of its largest clients, Bell Canada, to another provider. Geotech's president doubts whether Geotech will be able to compete for the project and, hence, a potentially disastrous future lies ahead for the company. At the same time, the widow of the company's founder wants to sell the company, and Geotech has received acquisition offers from larger telecom consulting companies. The president needs to decide what steps to take next.

Teaching Note: 8B07M36 (10 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Social Capital; Sustainability; Entrepreneurial Mindset; Network Ties
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELISE SMART
Jeffrey Gandz, Elizabeth Spracklin

Product Number: 9B03C010
Publication Date: 5/31/2003
Revision Date: 9/4/2013
Length: 7 pages

Elise Smart must decide what performance assessment to give one of her employees who has, uncharacteristically, failed to meet one of her key objectives for the year. The situation is difficult for several reasons; the causes of the unacceptable performance are not clear; the employee has previously received excellent appraisals, including a recent one by the vice-president; and the employee was absent for a good part of the year on maternity leave. The various factors that influence sustained performance (ability, motivation, resources, role clarity, reinforcement) are examined, as well as steps leaders can take in improving performance of those for whom they are responsible.

Teaching Note: 8B03C10 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Motivation; Performance Evaluation; Management Performance; Management Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TIME WARNER INC. AND THE ORC PATENTS
Paul W. Beamish, John Adamson

Product Number: 9B01M059
Publication Date: 1/29/2002
Revision Date: 8/28/2009
Length: 16 pages

Optical Recording Corporation (ORC) secured the rights to a technology known as digital optical audio recording. During the time it took to negotiate the final transfer of the technology ownership, it was rumored that some major electronics manufacturers were developing compact disc (CD) players that recorded digital optical audio signals. A patent lawyer advised ORC that the compact disc players and compact discs recently released by these companies might be infringing the claims of ORC's newly acquired patents. Based on this information, the company proceeded to successfully negotiate licensing agreements with the two largest CD manufacturers, Sony of Japan, and Philips of the Netherlands The third largest manufacturer, WEA Manufacturing, a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc., maintained a position of non-infringement and invalid patents. With the U.S. patent expiry date looming, ORC decided to sue Time Warner for patent infringement. When the defense counsel presented testimony that questioned the integrity of the licensing agreement, ORC's president realized that the entire licensing program was in jeopardy and must decide whether he should accept a settlement or proceed with the lawsuit.

Teaching Note: 8B01M59 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Business Law; Intellectual Capital; Licensing; Patents
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Business-level Strategy: Creating and Sustaining Competitive Advantage

WESTJET: THE PEARSON DECISION
Rod E. White, Derek Lehmberg

Product Number: 9B05M054
Publication Date: 10/28/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 22 pages

In early 2003, WestJet's management was reviewing its plans for growth, and specifically considering whether WestJet should move its eastern Canada base of operations from Hamilton's Munro airport to Toronto Pearson airport. WestJet had grown rapidly since its launch in 1996, and was now the second largest airline in Canada. WestJet had originally focused on Western Canada, but had entered eastern Canada in March of 2000, with an eastern base of operations in Hamilton, a secondary airport in the greater Toronto area. Pearson was Canada's largest domestic and international airport, the primary commercial airport for the greater Toronto area, and a hub of WestJet's largest competitor, Air Canada. Compared with Pearson, Hamilton was less congested and charged much lower fees. WestJet's operations had been closely modeled upon Southwest Airlines. The use of a secondary airport such as Hamilton as a base of operations was consistent with Southwest's low cost, high utilization features. With higher costs and longer turnaround times due to congestion, a base at Pearson was arguably not consistent with the Southwest business model, however, it was hard for WestJet to ignore the growth potential.

Teaching Note: 8B05M54 (25 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Growth Strategy; Competitor Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GOME - KING OF CHINA'S ELECTRICAL APPLIANCE RETAIL CHAIN
Shige Makino, Anthony Fong

Product Number: 9B06M098
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Revision Date: 1/10/2007
Length: 20 pages

The chairman of Gome Ltd, a well known appliance retail chain, congratulated his management team for their excellent performance over the past year. For three consecutive years, Gome had been ranked the largest electrical appliance retail chain in China, and the second largest overall retail chain. Claiming to be the only true national player, Gome achieved total sales of RMB23.9 billion in 2004 and in 2005 doubled its number of stores to 426. The company's four-year plan is to capture 10 to 15 per cent of the market share nationally. Gome would need to double the number of stores in the coming three years, and more importantly, it needed to work out a strategy to fend off its local and global competitors.

Teaching Note: 8B06M98 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Electronics; Retailing; Expansion
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HONG KONG'S OCEAN PARK: TAKING ON DISNEY (REVISED)
Michael N. Young, Dong Liu, Derek Au, Karen Hung, Crystal Wong, Marty Yam, Olivia Yau

Product Number: 9B06M075
Publication Date: 8/30/2006
Revision Date: 2/5/2014
Length: 16 pages

Ocean Park was the only amusement park in Hong Kong until 2005 when Hong Kong Disney exploded onto the entertainment scene. This case outlines Ocean Park's history and its response to Disney's encroachment into its market. Ocean Park acted swiftly and decisively to capitalize on the excitement generated by Disney, thus turning what could have been a threat into an opportunity. In terms of business-level strategy, the park moved to accentuate the differences with Disney rather than compete with Disney head-on. As the CEO stated We have no intention of trying to out-Disney Disney. The park focused on its aquarium, animals and thrill-rides as opposed to the fantasy and animated characters that make up Disney's core competence. By following such a strategy, the park was able to capture a large portion of Disney visitors that came from Mainland China. The case also discusses a recent restructuring, as well as, human resources management issues and other challenges that the park faced in 2006.

Teaching Note: 8B06M75 (6 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Product Positioning; Competitive Strategy; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Corporate-Level Strategy: Creating Value through Diversification

YUNNAN BAIYAO: TRADITIONAL MEDICINE MEETS PRODUCT/MARKET DIVERSIFICATION
Paul W. Beamish, George Peng

Product Number: 9B06M088
Publication Date: 1/23/2007
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 17 pages

In 2003, 3M initiated contact with Yunnan Baiyao Group Co., Ltd. to discuss potential cooperation opportunities in the area of transdermal pharmaceutical products. Yunnan Baiyao (YB), was a household brand in China for its unique traditional herbal medicines. In recent years, the company had been engaged in a series of corporate reforms and product/market diversification strategies to respond to the change in the Chinese pharmaceutical industry and competition at a global level. By 2003, YB was already a vertically integrated, product-diversified group company with an ambition to become an international player. The proposed cooperation with 3M was attractive to YB, not only as an opportunity for domestic product diversification, but also for international diversification. YB had been attempting to internationalize its products and an overseas department had been established in 2002 specifically for this purpose. On the other hand, YB had also been considering another option namely, whether to extend its brand to toothpaste and other healthcare products. YB had to make decisions about which of the two options to pursue and whether it was feasible to pursue both.

Teaching Note: 8B06M88 (12 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Product Diversification; Internationalization; Brand Extension; Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TPV TECHNOLOGY LIMITED: THE COMPUTER MONITOR BUSINESS
Stewart Thornhill, Terry Wang

Product Number: 9B05M062
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 10/3/2009
Length: 20 pages

TPV Technology Limited is a worldwide computer monitor manufacturer. In this case, the general manager is reviewing the annual performance result. During the past year, sales of original equipment manufacturer monitors and self-branded monitors dominated the market but the profit margin had decreased sharply, and flat-panel TVs were becoming more popular. The general manager must determine if TPV Technology should enter the flat-panel TV market.

Teaching Note: 8B05M62 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Industry Analysis; Diversification; Competitive Advantage; Environmental Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RAYOVAC CORPORATION: INTERNATIONAL GROWTH AND DIVERSIFICATION THROUGH ACQUISITIONS
Ravi Sarathy, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B06M025
Publication Date: 2/16/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 18 pages

The Rayovac case discusses the company's bold and risky acquisitions strategy as it diversifies into personal care and grooming, lawn and garden care, insecticides and pet foods. The company assumes it can successfully manage diverse product categories across diverse geographic markets in which it has limited experience. Success will depend on how well the acquired companies are integrated and managed under Rayovac's supervision. Increasingly, it will also depend on external conditions beyond Rayovac's control, such as macroeconomic conditions and foreign exchange fluctuations. Students should be able to analyze the case from the point of view of international business and strategy and perform a financial analysis of potential future returns using different assumptions for sales growth and margins of the various businesses acquired.

Teaching Note: 8B06M25 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Risk Analysis; Diversification; Acquisition Strategy; Globalization; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MCDONALD'S AND THE MCCAFE COFFEE INITIATIVE
Pratima Bansal, Lindsay Sgro

Product Number: 9B04M008
Publication Date: 1/15/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 9 pages

While McDonald's breakfast and snack sales have been increasing, they have not kept pace with industry growth. The primary barrier to this sales growth in the Canadian market, according to a franchise owner, is the quality of the coffee. McDonald's in Canada has been attempting to build its coffee brand equity for many years. They had switched to the Higgins and Burke coffee but had little success changing customers' negative perceptions. To truly change customer perceptions, McDonald's needed to revolutionize their coffee program. McCafe was introduced in response to this coffee issue. McCafe was full service coffee bar, located in a McDonald's restaurant as an extension to the front counter or located as a stand-alone restaurant. Over 300 McCafes existed worldwide. While McDonald's would like to get a piece of the lucrative coffee market, McCafe's main objective was to eliminate coffee as a barrier to breakfast and snack sales. The question for one franchise owner is whether McCafe's strong initial sales can be sustained.

Teaching Note: 8B04M08 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Diversification; Corporate Strategy; Strategy Development; Strategy and Resources
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



VINCOR AND THE NEW WORLD OF WINE
Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M001
Publication Date: 1/14/2004
Revision Date: 11/18/2014
Length: 17 pages

Vincor International Inc. was Canada's largest wine company and North America's fourth largest in 2002. The company had decided to internationalize and as the first step had entered the United States through two acquisitions.The company's chief executive officer felt that to be among the top 10 wineries in the world, Vincor needed to look beyond the region. To the end, he was considering the acquisition of an Australian company, Goundrey Wines. He must analyze thestrategic rationale for the acquisition of Goundrey as well as to probe questions of strategic fit and value.

Teaching Note: 8B04M01 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Internationalization; Market Entry; Acquisitions; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
International Strategy: Creating Value in Global Markets

ELI LILLY IN INDIA: RETHINKING THE JOINT VENTURE STRATEGY
Charles Dhanaraj, Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M016
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 3/13/2017
Length: 18 pages

Eli Lilly and Company is a leading U.S. pharmaceutical company. The new president of intercontinental operations is re-evaluating all of the company's divisions, including the joint venture with Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, one of India's largest pharmaceutical companies. This joint venture has run smoothly for a number of years despite their differences in focus, but recently Ranbaxy was experiencing cash flow difficulties due to its network of international sales. In addition, the Indian government was changing regulations for businesses in India, and joining the World Trade Organization would have an effect on India's chemical and drug regulations. The president must determine if this international joint venture still fits Eli Lilly's strategic objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B04M16 (18 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Joint Ventures; Emerging Markets; International Management; Strategic Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PALLISER FURNITURE LTD.: THE CHINA QUESTION
Paul W. Beamish, Jing'an Tang

Product Number: 9B04M005
Publication Date: 3/4/2004
Revision Date: 11/18/2014
Length: 12 pages

Palliser is Canada's second-largest furniture company. The company has production facilities in Canada, Mexico and Indonesia, and has experimented with cutting and sewing leather in China. The company is looking at further expanding the relationship with China. Ever since Palliser set up a plant in Mexico, the company has faced increasing competitive pressure from Asia, especially from China. The president of Palliser must decide what form this relationship should follow. Should it be an investment, either wholly or partly owned, or should it be through subcontracting?

Teaching Note: 8B04M05 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Expansion; Imports; Outsourcing; Plant Location
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ASIAN PAINTS LTD. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS DIVISION
Jean-Louis Schaan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B06M058
Publication Date: 6/21/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 24 pages

Asian Paints, recognized as one of the best managed companies in India, has recently embarked on a significant push to internationalize its activities. The president of the international division is faced with the challenge of simultaneously meeting sales volumes expected, and to contribute to the company's goal of becoming one of the top five decorative paint companies in the world.

Teaching Note: 8B06M58 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Mergers & Acquisitions; Emerging Markets; International Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SWATCH AND THE GLOBAL WATCH INDUSTRY
Allen Morrison, Cyril Bouquet

Product Number: 9A99M023
Publication Date: 5/9/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The efforts of Swatch to reposition itself in the increasingly competitive global watch industry are reviewed in this case. Extensive information on the history and structure of the global watch industry is provided and the shrinking time horizons decision makers face in formulating strategy and in responding to changes in the industry are highlighted. In particular, the case discusses how technology and globalization have changed industry dynamics and have caused companies to reassess their sources of competitive advantage. Like other companies, Swatch faces the difficult task of deciding whether to emphasize product breadth, or focus on a few key global brands. It also must decide whether to shift manufacturing away from Switzerland to lower cost countries like India.

Teaching Note: 8A99M23 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Industry Analysis; Competing with Multinationals; Globalization
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 8:
Digital Business Strategy: Leveraging Capabilities in a Disruptive Environment

ESTORE AT SHELL CANADA LIMITED
Deborah Compeau, Barbara L. Marcolin, Roger Milley, Chad Saunders

Product Number: 9B06E020
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 14 pages

The commercial eProducts Manager at Shell Canada has to determine how to improve the adoption and utilization of their eCommerce channel. eStore had been developed for the fuel and lubricants market as a pilot test of how Shell might communicate with its customers electronically, thus reducing costs. While eStore had been in place for a year, and many customers had signed up, utilization was low. A consulting firm has made recommendations about the technical issues that might be driving low utilization; the commercial eProducts Manager has to consider whether the problems are purely technical, and make a recommendation on how to proceed.

Teaching Note: 8B06E20 (10 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Management Information Systems; E-Business; Strategy; System Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TONLIST (A): CHANGING ICELAND'S MUSIC LANDSCAPE
Pratima Bansal, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06M018
Publication Date: 7/4/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 17 pages

Iceland's music industry is in a time of tremendous flux - sales of recorded music are dropping, while the portion of homegrown music is growing. Live music at festivals, concert halls and smaller venues is on the rise. Iceland like several other nations around the world, is enjoying access to greater selection and less cost by downloading music for free. Amidst the change is a musician-entrepreneur who has started Iceland's first pay-for-download website. In getting the website operational he encounters many challenges, such as selling Icelandic music internationally, which makes him reconsider his business model. The supplemental case, Tonlist (B): Should Stefan Sell, product 9B06M019, looks at his decision of whether or not to sell his two-year old business to the country's largest music company.

Teaching Note: 8B06M18 (12 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Strategy Development; Internet; Industry Analysis; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WALL STREET JOURNAL: PRINT VS. INTERACTIVE
Amy J. Hillman

Product Number: 9A99M030
Publication Date: 10/28/1999
Revision Date: 1/18/2010
Length: 13 pages

One of Dow Jones & Company's most respected brands, The Wall Street Journal, is threatened by Internet news providers, including their own Interactive Edition. The company is unsure whether the Interactive Edition will be a substitute or a complement to the Print Edition. The case focuses on changing industry boundaries, new technology, potential cannibalization, and a threat to the company's traditional business model. Industry analysis of both print and interactive publishing is discussed, as is resource leveraging across the two formats.

Teaching Note: 8A99M30 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Product Strategy; Industry Analysis; Business Policy; Internet
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BELL CANADA: THE VOIP CHALLENGE
Rod E. White, Daniel Day

Product Number: 9B06M009
Publication Date: 2/16/2006
Revision Date: 3/19/2010
Length: 12 pages

Voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) is beginning to disrupt plain old telephone service (POTS). Ron Close has been offered the job of heading Bell Canada's nascent VoIP business. Bell is Canada's largest telco and supplier of POTS. The case provides a platform for discussing a disruptive innovation (VoIP) and its implications for an incumbent player. Ron Close explains how Bell addressed the technology challenge, and its managerial and organizational consequences in an available video, product 7B06M009.

Teaching Note: 8B06M09 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Technological Change; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Corporate Governance

BAX GLOBAL LIMITED: STAFF TURNOVER IN MAINLAND CHINA
Jean-Louis Schaan, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B05C035
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 13 pages

The human resources manager for logistics and supply chain management at BAX China must consider her company's high rate of staff turnover. In her monthly report to the managing director, the turnover had reached 12 per cent in the first eight months of the year. The human resources manager must evaluate the company's current methods of dealing with turnover and consider what additional action should be taken. Logistics was a complex and rapidly growing industry, particularly in mainland China. Many multinational and domestic service providers were entering the marketing and expanding their operations; however, these companies had to respond to complex operational challenges and escalating customer demands. The resulting demand for skilled workers led to high turnover rates across the industry and at all organizational levels, and created margin pressure and other management challenges. The case offers a uniquely Chinese perspective on workforce recruitment, management and retention. The industry and the broader economy were growing rapidly. Skilled workers were in short supply because logistics was a new and developing discipline in the former command economy. Also, in the human resources manager's opinion, cultural attitudes resulted in low loyalty among the workers.

Teaching Note: 8B05C35 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: China; Employee Retention; Recruiting; Compensation; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LONDON YOUTH SYMPHONY
Craig Dunbar, Colette Southam

Product Number: 9B05N009
Publication Date: 8/12/2005
Revision Date: 10/4/2009
Length: 13 pages

The president of the board of directors of the London Youth Symphony is contemplating how to ensure the survival of the orchestra. On the verge of bankruptcy in 2001, the symphony now has more than $40,000 in the bank, but must address the reality that the orchestra might not survive due to a lack of musicians. Students must develop projected financial statements subject to given minimum balance and breakeven constraints. There is much room for judgment in developing the strategic plan; while many of the numbers are alluded to, many assumptions must also be made. Additionally, students will be exposed to some of the issues that may arise with volunteer boards of directors and not-for-profit organizations.

Teaching Note: 8B05N09 (6 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Strategic Change; Non-Profit Organization; Budgeting; Board of Directors
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CCL INDUSTRIES INC.: DIVESTING THE CUSTOM DIVISION
Lawrence G. Tapp, Trevor Hunter

Product Number: 9B06M096
Publication Date: 11/23/2006
Length: 9 pages

In 2004 CCL Industries Inc. was a leading producer of value-added outsourcing custom products and packages for numerous large consumer packaged goods companies. CCL's chief executive officer and vice-chair faced an important strategic decision. The CEO was contemplating selling the custom manufacturing division of CCL that was the basis for its founding, and still contributed approximately 34 per cent of overall earnings. Although the firm had acquired and divested many business units throughout its history, this divestment was perhaps the most significant in terms of its historical importance. The divestment of this division represented a major change to the essence and strategy of the firm. CCL was fortunate to have a very active, supportive yet independent board of directors. The CEO had to ensure that if he recommended divesting the custom manufacturing division, he would need to be very well prepared for some intense questioning from the board regarding the soundness of his proposal. The board took their role as stewards of the corporation very seriously.

Teaching Note: 8B06M96 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Board/Management Relations; Divestment of Assets; Strategy; Corporate Governance
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GOVERNANCE CHALLENGES AT GOOD HANDS HEALTHCARE (A)
Amy J. Hillman, Marilyn Seymann

Product Number: 9B04M019
Publication Date: 6/24/2004
Revision Date: 10/13/2009
Length: 12 pages

Good Hands Healthcare is a large nursing home provider with more than 400 facilities across the United States. This case series looks at the governance issues facing the board of a firm with declining performance set within the eldercare industry. The (A) case revolves around whether to replace the chief executive officer, who founded and built the firm, due to poor performance. The supplements, Governance Challenges at Good Hands Healthcare (B), (C) and (D), products 9B04M020, 9B04M021 and 9B04M022, discuss the replacement decision, the selection decision and the change in strategy brought on by the new CEO.

Teaching Note: 8B04M19 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Corporate Governance; Succession Planning; Compensation; Strategic Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Creating Effective Organizational Designs

ING INSURANCE ASIA/PACIFIC
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Andreas Schotter

Product Number: 9B06M083
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Length: 15 pages

The new chief executive officer (CEO) of ING Insurance Asia/Pacific wants to improve the regional operation of the company. ING Group was a global financial services company of Dutch origin with more than 150 years of experience. As part of ING International, ING Insurance Asia/Pacific was responsible for life insurance and asset/wealth management activities throughout the region. The company was doing well, but the new CEO believed that there were still important strategic and operational improvements possible. This case can be used to discuss the local versus regional or global management issue and will yield best results if the class has already been introduced to different strategic and organizational alternatives in the international business context.

Teaching Note: 8B06M83 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Subsidiaries; Organization; Leadership; International Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JACQUES KEMP: TOWARDS PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE
Rod E. White, Andreas Schotter

Product Number: 9B06M084
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 19 pages

Over the past two years, ING Insurance Asia/Pacific had successfully implemented a new organizational and operational framework called Towards Performance Excellence (TPE), which was developed with inputs from functional heads, senior management and staff at the business unit level. TPE detailed and organized everything ING Asia/Pacific needed to execute its strategy effectively. TPE divided ING's business processes into six core categories: portfolio, marketing, organizational, operational, reputation and financial. Each category included aspects of execution known as drivers, which required managers to identify specific objectives and key performance indicators (KPIs) for each driver or sub-driver. The case includes many original exhibits and is ideally taught as the follow up case of the ING Insurance Asia/Pacific, Ivey product #9B06M083 or as a standalone case, which illustrates a real example of regional versus local organizational management.

Teaching Note: 8B06M83 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Organizational Design; Organizational Structure; International Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ADVANCED BOOK EXCHANGE: GEOGRAPHIC GROWTH OF AN INTERNET-BASED BUSINESS
Anthony Goerzen, Travis Cramb

Product Number: 9B04M024
Publication Date: 8/10/2004
Revision Date: 10/13/2009
Length: 16 pages

Advanced Book Exchange is an Internet-based used book marketer. It has been very successful, but larger firms such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble were looking into this market. The chief operating officer must decide whether to grow through geographic diversification or consolidate and stay focused on its current markets.

Teaching Note: 8B04M24 (4 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Internet; Global Product; International Business; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PROCTER & GAMBLE CANADA (A): THE FEBREZE DECISION
Rod E. White, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B00M005
Publication Date: 1/25/2001
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 5 pages

Procter & Gamble reorganized its operations and created Global Business Units with Market Development Organizations (MDO) to augment the brand strategy work. This reorganization supported changes in culture that included reasonable risk taking. The marketing director of Procter & Gamble Canada was evaluating the potential success of launching a new product, Febreze, by using volume analysis resources available to her. The results indicated that Febreze would be a relatively small business opportunity, but the model could not take into account the various new MDO marketing tools that were not yet available. To justify the cost of launching the product, revenues would have to be significantly more than the volume model predicted. While trying to adjust to the new culture, she had to evaluate the risks associated with launching the product not knowing if the new tools would generate the additional volumes needed, and the risk of losing the competitive edge if she postponed the launch. A 30-minute video, product 7B00M005, is also available. The second case in this series, Procter & Gamble Canada (B): The Canadian MDO (product 9B00M006) discusses the strategy behind the changes and the implications to the Canadian group.

Teaching Note: 8B00M05 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Planning; Reorganization; Strategy Development; Organizational Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Strategic Leadership: Creating a Learning Organization and an Ethical Organization

ORGANIZING FROM SCRATCH: THE LEARNING LAB DENMARK EXPERIENCE (A)
Claus Rerup, John Lafkas

Product Number: 9B06C006
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 14 pages

Learning Lab Denmark, a research and development institute, encountered many of the difficulties typically experienced by start-ups, especially obstacles that involve developing a set of routines for getting things done. In other respects LLD faced several distinct challenges that are specific to its charter. This case describes in detail the history behind the formation of Learning Lab Denmark, the goals and the organizing principles underlying LLD and its sub-components, the various personnel roles and issues, including performance problems, criticism and paradoxes that arose in the first couple of years. The supplement, Organizing from Scratch: The Learning Lab Denmark Experience (B) case, product 9B06C007, picks up the story and discusses significant organizational changes.

Teaching Note: 8B06C06 (18 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Visioning; Leadership; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Organizational Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STEERING AIR CANADA THROUGH TROUBLED TIMES
Gerard Seijts, Ann C. Frost, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06C005
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 23 pages

Having overseen the oftentimes acrimonious merger of Canadian Airlines, witnessed the depression in the airline passenger market in the wake of September 11, 2001, been negatively affected by the war in Iraq and the SARS threat in the spring of 2003, Robert Milton, CEO of Air Canada, had only recently reached 11th hour settlements with Air Canada's major unions. It was these agreements that had saved Air Canada from liquidation. Public critics pointed fingers directly at Milton and his actions to date as a major reason why employees and union leaders alike were so reluctant to commit to the economic health and viability of the airline. Victor Li, owner of Trinity Time Investments Ltd., was poised to buy a controlling stake in Air Canada. The proposal deal would give him veto power over a list of 23 different matters, including hiring the CEO. Should Li be confident in Milton and his management team to lead Air Canada through its next phase? Or would Air Canada be best served if Milton were let go after having brought the airline to this point?

Teaching Note: 8B06C05 (17 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Leadership; Management Succession; Change Management; Labour Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GONCHAR INVESTMENT BANK
Paul W. Beamish, Jonathan Royce

Product Number: 9B05M029
Publication Date: 3/22/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 9 pages

A recent MBA graduate is working as vice-president equity sales for an investment bank in the Ukraine. The firm's managing director has requested a recommendation regarding whether they should start investing in Ukrainian equities on their own account, or retain their practice of acting purely as an agent - buying and selling shares for clients without taking any ownership position.

Teaching Note: 8B05M29 (13 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Emerging Markets; Investment Dealers; Tradeoff Analysis; Stock Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GM IN CHINA
David W. Conklin, Danielle Cadieux

Product Number: 9B05M007
Publication Date: 12/20/2004
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 19 pages

For General Motors (GM), the year 2004 brought a wide variety of new challenges that added to an already complex business environment. The industry structure was changing quickly. Demand and supply projections for motor vehicles had promised substantial increases in sales and profits, but suddenly the optimism faded. China's new membership in the World Trade Organization created expectations of a level playing field for foreign investors, but - at least in the short run - major barriers remained. Government intervention persisted, particularly the requirement of a joint venture partner, competition from government-owned assembly firms, and arbitrary rules such as sector-specific credit restrictions. Violation of intellectual property, with the copying of foreign automobile designs and false-branding of parts, was an ongoing threat. Also, inflation was increasing and the government was unsure whether and how to use monetary and fiscal policies. The government had purposely kept the renminbi undervalued for many years. Pressure was building for the government to change its foreign exchange rate policy, but a higher renminbi would suddenly decrease GM China's international competitiveness.

Teaching Note: 8B05M07 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Business Policy; Globalization; Manufacturing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LINCOLN DINER (A)
Janice Foley, John Melnyk

Product Number: 9B03C032
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 9 pages

Rachel Turner works as a cook in the largest restaurant of the Lincoln Diner chain. There are a variety of human resources problems in this company and the staff association representing the employees is weak. In this context, Rachel stands up for her co-workers, almost as an unofficial steward. The situation culminates with Rachel's abrupt, unsubstantiated suspension by her difficult boss, leaving her wondering whether or not she should file a grievance. Her decision is complicated by the fact that she is romantically involved with the computer operations manager at Lincoln Diner head office, who also faces a decision as to how to react to this development. The supplement (B), (C) and (D) cases, product numbers 9B03C033, 9B03C034 and 9B03C035 follow the matter through two more decision points to its resolution.

Teaching Note: 8B03C32 (12 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Employee Grievances; Service Operations; Supervisory Practice; Interpersonal Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Managing Innovation and Fostering Corporate Entrepreneurship

UPS AND HP: VALUE CREATION THROUGH SUPPLY CHAIN PARTNERSHIPS
Mark O. Lewis, Arun Rai, David Forquer, Dan Quinter

Product Number: 9B07D002
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 14 pages

This case is about managing large supply change outsourcing relationships over time. The focus is on the challenges service providers and their customers face as they seek to continually find new sources of value as the relationships change. Emphasis is placed on issues related to coordinated capabilities across functional boundaries, information sharing and developing information technology readiness.

Teaching Note: 8B07D02 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Relationship Management; Outsourcing; Innovation
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



STAMYPOR
Wim Vanhaverbeke, Rein Nieland, Inge Leuverink, Femke van Hoven, Marijke van Wely

Product Number: 9B05M072
Publication Date: 10/28/2005
Revision Date: 8/29/2018
Length: 23 pages

The New Business Development unit is part of DSM, a Dutch globally operated chemical company. The unit looks for promising new ideas to develop into start-up businesses. Stamypor is a new project that the New Business Development unit is working on and the team leader of the project must decide if it should be developed into a start-up company. Students will apply their knowledge about new product development, new product evaluation, the stage-gate process, customer value, business models, and corporate venturing.

Teaching Note: 8B05M72 (22 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Innovation; New Products; Business Valuation; Business Models; the Netherlands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAPQUEST
Paul W. Beamish, Kevin K. Boeh

Product Number: 9B04M044
Publication Date: 9/20/2004
Revision Date: 9/18/2008
Length: 22 pages

MapQuest is a leading provider of mapping services and destination information as well as a publisher of maps, atlases and other guides. On the Internet, they provide these products and services both to consumers directly and to other businesses enabling these businesses to provide location, mapping and destination information to their own customers. The company completed a successful initial public offering five years ago and were in a strong competitive position. However, the markets were allowing competitors to quickly get funding in both private and public deals. As well, there were perceptions that a general stock market bubble existed for technology companies. The chief executive officer had several options available, and wanted to consider those options and present a recommendation to the board. Possible options included splitting the firm's old and new-line business units, raising capital to fund an acquisition strategy, forging a set of alliances, focusing on organic growth, and pursuing the sale of the firm.

Teaching Note: 8B04M44 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Strategic Alliances; Competitive Advantage; Mergers & Acquisitions
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GE ENERGY MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE (A)
J. Nick Fry, Julian M. Birkinshaw

Product Number: 9A94G005
Publication Date: 10/12/1994
Revision Date: 2/4/2010
Length: 8 pages

The business development manager for General Electric (GE) Canada, met with executives from GE Supply, a US-based distribution arm of GE. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss new business opportunities in energy management and efficiency. The business development manager had identified some opportunities for business development in Canada, while leveraging GE's strategic capabilities did not fit well with GE's corporate structure. He was keen to work with GE Supply but wanted to retain a high level of operating autonomy. The challenge was to put together an appropriate organizational structure and find a home for the new development idea. (A sequel to this case is available, GE Energy Management Initiative (B). A 12-minute video may also be purchased with this case, GE Energy Management Initiative - Video.)

Teaching Note: 8A94G05 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Organizational Structure; International Business; Multinational
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Recognizing Opportunities and Creating New Opportunities

EAT2EAT.COM
Kenneth G. Hardy, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B06A018
Publication Date: 8/30/2006
Revision Date: 9/11/2009
Length: 13 pages

Eat2Eat.com was an Internet-based restaurant reservation service covering a dozen cities in the Asia Pacific region. It was the principal business of Singapore-based Eat2Eat Pte Ltd. It was launched in 2000 by an entrepreneur and former investment banker with US$1 million of his own capital. He quickly established the capabilities and business model, but after five years, the registered user base remained relatively small at about 12,000. He thought the next step for the company was to expand that user base and hoped that the company could change the way people made plans to eat out. Resources - specifically, time and money - were limited, so any promotional efforts would have to be innovative and efficient. The case focuses on entrepreneurial marketing with sub-themes of financing and small enterprise management. It is a story of an entrepreneur who had an idea and enough money to launch it, but then struggles to achieve adequate scale.

Teaching Note: 8B06A18 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: E-Commerce; Startups; Entrepreneurial Finance; Entrepreneurial Marketing; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPEEDTEST: WIRED FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
Carl F. Fey, Andrew Karl Delios

Product Number: 9B05M028
Publication Date: 8/2/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 14 pages

SpeedTest is a Finland-based entrepreneurial high-tech start-up company that competes in the clinical research segment of the world-wide pharmaceutical industry. More specifically, the company has developed a mobile device to record drug testing information from patients, which has the potential to radically speed up the drug testing process. The newly hired chief executive officer has a mandate to identify the customers for its product, come up with a pricing model and construct a business model to develop a position of advantage for the nascent company.

Teaching Note: 8B05M28 (9 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Competitive Advantage; Growth Strategy; Generating Profit from New Technology
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ACTIVPLANT: THE EUROPEAN OPPORTUNITY
Stewart Thornhill

Product Number: 9B06M046
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 12 pages

Activplant is a software firm specializing in monitoring, measuring and analysing the performance of factory automation systems in London, Ontario, Canada. It is a pioneer of the industry, and has installations in most of the largest automobile manufacturing firms in North America as well as some clients in consumer goods. Activplant is considering the opportunity of expanding their business to include a much more aggressive sales and service approach in Europe. An entrance into Europe involves how both sales and service will be delivered to clients, which could be done through a number of different channels including: consulting partners, value-added resellers, a joint venture or fulltime Activplant staff. The case allows students to evaluate both the dollar costs and benefits of each choice as well as qualitative concerns like product quality and maintaining contact with customers.

Teaching Note: 8B06M46 (9 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: International Expansion; Strategy Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL SOURCE HEALTHCARE: TO START OR NOT TO START
Donald W. Barclay, Eric Morse, Shamail Siddiqi

Product Number: 9B05M055
Publication Date: 9/1/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 17 pages

An entrepreneur was contemplating leaving his job at Goldman Sachs to start Global Source Healthcare, a healthcare outsourcing company focused on international nurse recruitment. He had researched the healthcare staffing market extensively, written a business plan and raised some funding. While this appeared to be an excellent opportunity, there were some very real risks that had to be considered. His greatest concern was the limited amount of funding at his disposal. Since international recruitment required a considerable amount of working capital, the lack of funding brought the long-term feasibility of the business into question. Students will learn about screening the business venture in terms of the entrepreneur, the resources and the opportunity; determining the strategic direction of the company and balancing the long-term vision with short-term cash flow needs; assessing different business models to determine which is the best fit for the company; and the importance of executing the business plan and selected strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B05M55 (12 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Strategy Development; Startups; Health
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CORAL DIVERS RESORT
Paul W. Beamish, Kent E. Neupert

Product Number: 9A96M001
Publication Date: 2/6/1996
Revision Date: 2/10/2010
Length: 18 pages

The owner of a small scuba diving operation in the Bahamas is reassessing his strategic direction in the light of declining revenues. Among the changes being considered are shark diving, family diving, exit, and shifting operations to another Caribbean location. These options are not easily combined, nor are they subtle. The case is intended to provide a work-out on the relationship between strategy, organization and performance, and how changes in strategy will dramatically affect the organization. The case also highlights the importance of understanding demographic changes as part of an environmental analysis. (A nine-minute video can be purchased with this case, video 7A96M001.)

Teaching Note: 8A96M01 (15 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Small Business; Services; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA