Ivey Publishing

Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm

Laudon, K.C., Laudon, J.P., Brabston, M.E.,2/e (Canada, Pearson Education, 2005)
Prepared By Israr Qureshi, Ph.D. Student (Information Systems)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Managing the Digital Firm: Canada and the World

TALKING ABOUT...RFID
Darren Meister, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05E011
Publication Date: 5/30/2005
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 7 pages

Two managers discuss issues related to radio frequency identification (RFID) trends and adoption, including how the technology works and how it might be used. The purpose of the case is to engage a class in a discussion regarding the way in which managers look at new technologies, RFID being one example.

Teaching Note: 8B05E11 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Information Technology; Technological Change; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INFORMATION SYSTEMS STRATEGY AT THE TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE
Michael Parent, Derrick Neufeld, Nicole R.D. Haggerty

Product Number: 9B00E005
Publication Date: 5/1/2000
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 10 pages

The president and CEO of the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSE) is faced with the task of reconstructing the TSE to succeed in the face of significant industry and technological change. The exchange industry is undergoing a transformation brought about by globalization of financial markets, consolidation of exchanges, and the introduction of new competitive players due to technological advancements. The TSE is Canada's largest equity market and has created and started to implement a plan to deal with these threats. Concurrently, the TSE has been recreating its technological platform, moving from its computer assisted trading system to the Torex system purchased from the Paris Bourse. Implementation problems have delayed the project from its original release date to three years later. During the time frame of this implementation, the TSE suffered several computer glitches causing closure of the exchange for temporary periods of time. The president and CEO needs to review the priorities of the TSE and consider what actions she should take to ensure the successful implementation of this new technology, and the long term alignment of information technology with TSE business strategies.

Teaching Note: 8B00E05 (8 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Implementation; Information Technology; Information System Design; Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MANAGING THE GROWING WEB PRESENCE OF MEDISYS HEALTH GROUP INC.
Michael Parent, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B00E017
Publication Date: 12/7/2000
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 7 pages

Medisys Health Group, a leading occupational health company, was founded in 1981. It began to look at the North American market for expansion, seeking ways to leverage the Internet to become a leading medical information management company. With a couple of Internet projects on the go, it is up to the director of Internet strategy to explain how each piece fits into the overall business strategy. He contemplates shifting the business from the provision of medical services to the provision of information using an application service provider model. This case may be used in conjunction with Ivey case 9A98E011, Creating a Web Site for Medisys Health Group.

Teaching Note: 8B00E17 (10 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Internet; Organizational Change; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Information Systems in the Organization

RBC ROYAL BANK: SERVICE PLATFORM IMPLEMENTATION
Deborah Compeau, Phoebe Tsai

Product Number: 9B05E001
Publication Date: 1/31/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 16 pages

The vice-president - RBC Banking business & information solutions must develop an implementation plan for the bank's new paperless transaction system. The new system will reduce costs in proof processing and will facilitate the role of the customer service representatives, allowing the CSRs to shift from transactional to sales oriented roles. The system must be implemented across the company within 12 months. Challenges concerning the timing of installation, sequence of rollout, scope management and prioritization must be addressed.

Teaching Note: 8B05E01 (8 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Management Information Systems; Computer System Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TANDESIC CORPORATION - FROM CRM TO PRM
Derrick Neufeld, Peter Tingling

Product Number: 9B02E005
Publication Date: 3/11/2002
Revision Date: 11/30/2009
Length: 10 pages

Tandesic Corporation was founded by three entrepreneurs to develop customer relationship management solutions. Funded at the height of the Internet bubble with plans for an initial public offering, the company has discovered that its core software product is undifferentiated and constrained by changes in technology. Faced with a financing gap and with less than 12 months venture capital funding remaining, a new chief executive officer is installed. The new chief executive officer must analyse four options: re-write the software product, sell the company, close it down or refocus. He wonders if he has identified all of the challenges facing the company as he decides on the direction the company must go.

Teaching Note: 8B02E05 (12 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Computer Applications; Strategy Development; Management of Professionals; Ethical Issues; Customer Relationship Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COMPUTER SCHOOL'S.NET PROJECT (A)
Nicole R.D. Haggerty, Noah Ivers

Product Number: 9B04E005
Publication Date: 3/4/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 13 pages

Computer School is a large post-secondary, career-focused education firm. The chief executive officer of the school has determined that the IT department is in a state of disarray. The IT department was not identified as part of the core business strategy but is deemed as fundamental to the operation of the organization. Before proceeding with growth strategy, the CEO knew that gaining control of this department and establishing procedures for managing these resources more effectively would be an important aspect of laying the foundation for growth.

Teaching Note: 8B04E05 (6 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Management Information Systems; Management of Technology; Management of Professionals; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Information Systems, Organizations, Management and Strategy

PLANET INTRA
Elizabeth M.A. Grasby, Aaron Anticic

Product Number: 9B02M042
Publication Date: 1/9/2003
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 10 pages

Planet Intra sold information management systems used to share information and data through a Web-based interface, giving the employees of an organization and its respective suppliers and customers access to the services. The chief executive had to determine what changes, if any, would be required to Planet Intra's overall strategy so that the venture capitalists funding the firm could achieve their desired return on investment. He must complete a valuation of the firm and formulate a detailed strategy by which the company can increase its sales and profits, becoming even more attractive to a potential purchaser.

Teaching Note: 8B02M42 (17 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategy Development; Business Valuation; Change Management; Venture Capital
Difficulty: 1 - Introductory



BIRCH POINT LODGE
Deborah Compeau, V. Joseph Compeau

Product Number: 9B01E024
Publication Date: 11/9/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 7 pages

Birch Point Lodge is a small family run resort. The managers of the lodge are trying to incorporate technology into the daily operations of the resort. With little experience, staff that are not very computer savvy and limited resources, using technology effectively have become a real challenge. They have twice tried to purchase a computerized system for handling reservations, billing and other processes. Most recently they spent $9,000 to purchase a system that was never used. They are faced with another option and must decide whether to purchase the new software or not.

Teaching Note: 8B01E24 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Management Information Systems; Computer System Implementation; Small Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



R.J. THOMPSON DATA SYSTEMS, INC.
Laurie Schatzberg

Product Number: 9B05E019
Publication Date: 10/28/2005
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 6 pages

R.J. Thompson Data Systems sells, implements and maintains management information systems. The president of the company receives a call from a potential client to demonstrate a system that they had rejected earlier. The company would benefit from a large sale, however, the president reflects on the experience from the last presentation to this company; R.J. Thompson Data Systems spent considerable time preparing the presentation, only to be treated poorly and to have the offer rejected. He must decide if he should rally the team again.

Teaching Note: 8B05E19 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Enterprise Resource Planning; Management Information Systems; Computer System Implementation; Customer Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
The Digital Firm: Electronic Business and Electronic Commerce

NRG INVESTMENTS: CHOOSING AN INTERNET STARTUP FOR VENTURE CAPITAL FINANCING
Derrick Neufeld, Ken Thomson

Product Number: 9B01E018
Publication Date: 7/11/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 13 pages

NRG Investments is a venture capital group whose current area of investment interest lies in Internet startups that specialize in information personalization software and infrastructure software. The director of NRG Investments is in the process of researching two very similar business plans in an effort to determine which idea, if either, merits NRG's $500,000 venture capital financing package. Management representatives from each of the two companies, ConciergeConnectInc. and Hotel Services Online, have already met with NRG Investments to provide the details of their Internet business plans. Both companies provide software packages that would interconnect concierges in high-traffic hotels, condominiums and offices with a wide variety of service providers (e.g., travel services, restaurants, ticket purchases, etc.). Both sets of entrepreneurs have been identified by NRG as being capable managers. The director's decision will therefore be based on her assessment of the products, market attractiveness, technology, revenue models, potential partnerships, possible exit strategies and company values.

Teaching Note: 8B01E18 (5 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: E-Business Models; Internet; Investment Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EDRUGSTORE.CA
James A. Erskine, Mathew Collins

Product Number: 9B03M023
Publication Date: 6/26/2003
Revision Date: 10/22/2009
Length: 10 pages

eDrugstore.ca is a Canadian Internet startup that provides a full-service, licensed pharmacy for prescription medicine. The company provides a convenient and private shopping experience that offers many brands names at competitive prices. The company is looking at expanding and knew that the U.S. prescription market was huge, however, the regulations were unclear in this area and the company's pharmacist partners could have their licenses suspended. The co-founders of eDrugstore.ca must decide whether or not they should sell prescription medication over the Internet to U.S. consumers.

Teaching Note: 8B03M23 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: E-Business; Doing Business in the U.S.; Startups
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL HEALTHCARE EXCHANGE CANADA: TRADE EXCHANGE ADOPTION
Terry H. Deutscher, Dana Gruber

Product Number: 9B02A023
Publication Date: 12/9/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 14 pages

Global Healthcare Exchange Canada is a business-to-business exchange that connects hospitals and their major suppliers through an electronic procurement process. Founded as a subsidiary of its global parent, the exchange has become the leading health-care exchange in the country, but it is still far short of break-even. It must develop a compelling value proposition if it is going to drive adoption among hospitals and suppliers to the target levels. To do so, it must overcome considerable inertia among hospitals that are often very reluctant to change from frequently inefficient purchasing processes. Although there are major benefits to be realized from automating supply chain operations in the industry, the adoption decision process among hospitals is highly complex, but very idiosyncratic. In confronting these challenges, the exchange must also re-examine its own business model, in particular its pricing strategy for both suppliers and hospitals.

Teaching Note: 8B02A23 (15 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: E-Business; Market Strategy; Purchasing; Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EMERGING ISSUES IN THE ELECTRONIC WORKPLACE
Mary Beth Currie, Daniel Black

Product Number: 9B01TA09
Publication Date: 1/1/2001
Length: 7 pages

The Internet has changed not only the way companies do business but also the way employers treat employees. The authors, labour and employment lawyers, identify the important issues that have emerged and must be dealt with by both dot-coms and bricks and mortar companies. Amongst those issues are the use and misuse of the Internet, and employee privacy, which has come into question with employers' use of electronic monitoring. Other issues the authors discuss include the exercise of stock option on termination and the wording of non-compete provisions.

Issues: Organizational Behaviour; E-Business; Privacy Issues



Chapter 5:
Social, Legal and Ethical Issues in the Information Age

ORANGEWERKS: A QUESTION OF ETHICS
Christina A. Cavanagh, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01C007
Publication Date: 4/23/2001
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 4 pages

OrangeWerks, an entrepreneurial company that creates software applications, is preparing to present to venture capital firms for its first major round of funding. However, during routine network maintenance, the network administrator becomes aware that the company may not have purchased the original software used to create the company's product, and that government workplace safety insurance was not in place. He must decide how to proceed with the knowledge by assessing available options and judging the stakeholder impact, as well as his career implications.

Teaching Note: 8B01C07 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Action Planning and Implementation; E-Commerce; Organizational Behaviour; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ASPEN GROVE
Daniel McCarthy, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B03E008
Publication Date: 4/2/2003
Revision Date: 10/19/2009
Length: 20 pages

Aspen Grove was one of the first companies to provide applications over the Internet in 1996. It was also the first application service provider to implement a functional system for the legal market. Despite an apparent first mover advantage, the company has had limited growth and it has not expanded its customer base much beyond its original legal clients. With one of the three founders tied to the development of software and support for the company's partner and another managing the company's European division, they did not have the time they need to fully develop the company the way they originally envisioned. Because Aspen Grove did not use a proprietary database or other proprietary technology, the company soon found many new entrants competing against it. Services were charged on a per process basis, meaning that clients only paid for services that they used. While this appeared to be low risk solution for reducing information technology expenses, many potential clients were reluctant to trust sensitive legal information to a small Internet company. With many Internet companies failing or being acquired by larger companies, trust became even more critical.

Teaching Note: 8B03E08 (5 pages)
Industry: Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services
Issues: Legal System; Internet Software; Women in Management; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE: DIGITAL EMPLOYEE PRIVACY
Mike Wade, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B00E018
Publication Date: 1/26/2001
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 6 pages

The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) had implemented word recognition software, Assentor, in its U.S. brokerage arm to ensure its employees were not acting inappropriately in their dealings with customers and to protect company systems from viruses. This software scanned e-mails for flagged business words and archived the e-mails in a central database. The manager of compliance at CIBC's head office in Toronto, found that the decision to implement the Assentor software was much easier than deciding what to do in the event the software found something improper. Issues related to company ethics and employee privacy were raised. Acknowledging that occasional personal e-mails would be sent and received, he wondered what the legal ramifications would be if a manager found out about a private situation because Assentor had found a flagged word in a personal e-mail. He felt that clear communication with and upfront understanding from employees would help prevent negative impressions of this process so he had to determine the best way to inform employees about the e-mail scanning while enforcing CIBC's e-mail policy.

Teaching Note: 8B00E18 (4 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Risk Analysis; Privacy Issues; Management Information Systems; Management of Technology
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Hardware and Software

TOYBOX: MANAGING DYNAMIC DIGITAL PROJECTS
Darren Meister, David Singer

Product Number: 9B02E014
Publication Date: 2/6/2003
Revision Date: 12/1/2009
Length: 12 pages

Toybox is the visual effects division of Command Post, Canada's largest full service postproduction company and industry leader in technical and creative services for film, television, video and digital audio productions. Toybox's visual special effects manager believes that an improved information system for managing digital projects is required to cope with future growth. For example, during recent production work on a feature film, difficulties in workload, signoffs and rework reached an unsustainable level. The visual special effects manager must choose between an off-the-shelf product and a custom in-house solution. However, his decision is complicated by the creative work environment and the number of systems to which the new system must be integrated.

Teaching Note: 8B02E14 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Make or Buy Decision; Information Technology; Animation Studio; Computer Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MEYERS NORRIS PENNY: PRACTICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Deborah Compeau, Helen Kelley

Product Number: 9B02E006
Publication Date: 5/23/2002
Revision Date: 12/1/2009
Length: 14 pages

Meyers Norris Penny is one of the leading chartered accountancy and business advisory firms in Canada. The vice-president of technology must decide whether to replace the company's practice management system or continue to upgrade the system as needs arise. The system has performed well, has stable hardware and software and staff are familiar and satisfied with using the system, however, he must consider the company's need to be innovative and proactive to maintain the firm's competitive advantage.

Teaching Note: 8B02E06 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management Information Systems; Information System Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DELTA BANK: SOFTWARE CHANGES WITH A RIGID DEADLINE
Scott L. Schneberger, Ying Wang

Product Number: 9A99E019
Publication Date: 7/20/1999
Revision Date: 1/15/2010
Length: 12 pages

Delta Bank, a full service bank with 28,000 employees worldwide and $189 billion in asset value, faced the Y2K problem with only months to spare. The consequences of failure were enormous, the project was very complex, and the deadline was unmovable.

Teaching Note: 8A99E19 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Computer Applications; Operations Management; Information Systems; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Managing Data Resources

EDUCATION STORE
Barbara L. Marcolin, Frank Thirkettle, Chris Nelson

Product Number: 9B03E022
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 10/21/2009
Length: 11 pages

The Education Store reviewed and provided sales of educational software for children in kindergarten to grade 12. The store took its direction from the local board of education and functioned with the administrative system of the school board but operated independently and was relatively free to make day-to-day decisions. The manager of the Education Store felt the existing database no longer kept up with the store's needs. A database designer had two weeks to analyze the store's requirements and develop a prototype. From the information he had, he wondered whether this task was an upgrade or a complete redesign. He must also look at a number of design issues, and who would ultimately maintain the database.

Teaching Note: 8B03E22 (13 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Management Information Systems; Information System Design; System Design; Models
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TISSAGE ET BRODERIE
Deborah Compeau

Product Number: 9B01E025
Publication Date: 12/10/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 7 pages

Tissage et Broderie is a consignment store selling handicrafts. The founders of the store have contacted a consulting firm for the development of a product and customer information system. After a preliminary interview, the consultant leading the project is ready to begin the requirements structuring process. She must create data, process and logic models.

Teaching Note: 8B01E25 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Management Information Systems; Computer System Implementation; Small Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS: THE DOCTORAL TRACKING DATABASE
Sid L. Huff, David Koltermann

Product Number: 9A98E015
Publication Date: 8/19/1998
Revision Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 7 pages

Richard Ivey School of Business has a need for the creation of a database, to be used for managing information about students and their courses of study, in its Business PhD program. Information on students to date has been maintained in a mix of paper and computer-file systems. The program director would like to develop a database, using a facility such as Microsoft Access, to be used for this purpose. The case provides examples of the actual forms and data maintained currently, and challenges the students to first create an entity-relationship data model, then a design for a relational database.

Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Information System Design; System Design; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DATA WAREHOUSING AT CANADIAN TIRE
Michael Parent, Shawn Finkbeiner

Product Number: 9A98E016
Publication Date: 10/17/1998
Revision Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 8 pages

Canadian Tire's information warehouse has become the victim of its own success. Both the end-user and IT communities have become increasingly frustrated with interruptions in service. The data architect for the warehouse needs to decide what needs to be met, in what priority, and with what programs.

Teaching Note: 8A98E16 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Decision Analysis; Consumer Marketing; Information Systems; Data Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Telecommunications and Networks

CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE WIRELESS STRATEGY
Mike Wade, David Hamilton

Product Number: 9B01E001
Publication Date: 3/7/2001
Revision Date: 12/17/2009
Length: 23 pages

The director of business development of the electronic banking division of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) had just won a long-fought battle to implement a wireless banking initiative for customers with mobile devices such as cell phones and personal digital assistants. Now he had to make a number of key decisions relating to the strategy. These decisions included which services to offer (banking as well as non-related services), which devices and standards to support and whether to partner with a third-party content supplier. An extensive glossary of wireless technology terminology is included with this case.

Teaching Note: 8B01E01 (3 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Strategy Implementation; Technological Change; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THOSE !*@! WIRELESS NETWORK CARDS
Deborah Compeau, Derrick Neufeld, E.F. Peter Newson, Michael Parent, Scott L. Schneberger

Product Number: 9B00E020
Publication Date: 1/31/2001
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 4 pages

The Richard Ivey School of Business had recently introduced a wireless network and required all students to purchase laptops and network cards. After a year of use, the faculty decided to restrict laptop usage in class by disallowing the use of network cards. They felt the students were using the network cards for unrelated activities in class and that this was compromising the learning process. Reaction from the students was mixed, with some students quite vocal about the (un)fairness of this new policy. The section head for one of the MBA sections knew that finding a long-term solution would be a difficult process. There were valid points in the arguments to both restrict and not restrict the use of the cards. She had to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages in order to make a recommendation to the faculty at a section meeting the following day.

Teaching Note: 8B00E20 (11 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Management Information Systems; Information Technology; Networks
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
The Internet and its Infrastructure

WAVERIDER COMMUNICATIONS INC.: THE WIRELESS LAST MILE
Scott L. Schneberger, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01E008
Publication Date: 3/6/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 12 pages

WaveRider Communications, Inc. was a Toronto-based company with a mission to become the leader in global wireless technology by developing, selling and supporting products that enabled wireless Internet service providers. It recently launched market its Last Mile Solution, offering Internet service providers the opportunity to provide wireless Internet access at broadband speeds in the unlicensed 2.4 gigahertz spectrum. The wireless Internet access industry was relatively untapped and WaveRider's vice-president of marketing wondered whether the company, as it started its growth phase, should seek an alliance with a competing technology company. To determine the feasibility of this idea, he needed to classify the competition, review the customer barriers and evaluate which technology was the best fit.

Teaching Note: 8B01E08 (12 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Information Systems; Action Planning and Implementation; Innovation; Technological Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OPEN TEXT PREFERRED LISTINGS
Sid L. Huff, Mike Wade

Product Number: 9A98E021
Publication Date: 2/15/1999
Revision Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 8 pages

Open Text is a small, startup electronic commerce company based in Waterloo, Ontario. Initially, their main product was an Internet/worldwide web search engine. Theirs was one of the first such search engines available to users of the web. There are two basic issues in the case: revenue generation on the Internet, and Internet culture. Open Text has come up with a revenue model which involves advertisers paying to have their web sites appear at the top of search engine results when 'bought' words are included in the search criterion. It is an innovative approach to revenue generation, and a departure from the traditional 'banner ad' model. One of the central issues of the case is whether Internet culture will allow search engine results, which are generally considered to be a free and 'honest' resource, to be influenced by advertisers. The case also provides a useful way to examine the issue of searching for material on the web.

Teaching Note: 8A98E21 (11 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: E-Commerce; Internet Culture; Worldwide Web; Search Engines
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OP4.COM: CHOOSING A WEB SITE DESIGN AGENCY
Scott L. Schneberger, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B00E011
Publication Date: 1/26/2001
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 13 pages

OP4.com's objective was to build a portal, an Internet site to attract and retain a large number of its visitors by providing multiple features and site products wanted by its audience; OP4.com's target audience was teenagers. The Vancouver-based company had just secured one-half million dollars in private placement financing from a prominent West Coast venture capitalist. The business CEO of OP4.com was anxious to get the Web site developed. There were many factors to consider in designing and developing a Web site. The Web agency would be key to the success of the company because the Web site was the first customer interface. He was not confident that their current Web agency understood what would appeal to their audience so he asked another agency to submit a proposal. This second agency, known for its innovative Web design, was considerably more expensive. He needed to decide quickly which agency to use.

Teaching Note: 8B00E11 (9 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Site Selection; Action Planning and Implementation; E-Commerce; Agency
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Systems Development

NORTEL - RE-INVENTING I/S
E.F. Peter Newson, Olga Volkoff

Product Number: 9A97E001
Publication Date: 9/8/1997
Revision Date: 2/3/2010
Length: 15 pages

With changes in both technology and the environment, Nortel has had to evolve from a company that sells a collection of telecommunication products to a company that sells integrated packages of products that satisfy specific customer needs. In the past, I/S has been spread across the various product divisions, supporting a highly decentralized corporate structure. Now it has been charged with transforming itself to facilitate the company's need for greater integration, including a move to standardized systems. I/S must re-define its role and restructure itself to fulfill its new mandate. After an extensive analysis and design exercise, the I/S function has been re-visualized as centering on three key processes: client management, solution delivery, and business support. This represents a significant change from a traditional I/S shop that focuses on building applications and infrastructure. While there is broad support for the changes in principle, actually getting the new processes fully articulated and implemented presents a significant challenge.

Teaching Note: 8A97E01 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Information Systems; Business Process Re-Engineering; Restructuring; Management of Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RIVERBANK FINANCIAL: BALANCING THE PENDULUM
Duncan G. Copeland, Sid L. Huff, Kathryn Brohman

Product Number: 9A98E005
Publication Date: 3/25/1998
Revision Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 17 pages

The information technology (IT) group at a large Canadian financial institution has recently undergone a dramatic change from a controlled, technology centric environment, to a much more participative, customer-focused environment. A new operating framework has been implemented that introduced a competency (resource) centre into the group's structure and altered operations related to process and project execution. Consistent with their vision, the IT group have effectively partnered with their customers and are delivering cost-competitive and innovative solutions. IT executives are satisfied with the change and the internal customers of the IT group have recognized short-term advantages. However, looking long-term, one key customer can't help but wonder if the new structure and operations may jeopardize Riverbank Financial's traditional reputation of extraordinary technical expertise. Recognizing the customer's concern, the executive vice-president of IT must consider whether the new operating framework has taken too much focus away from the proprietary technology and identify possible adjustments to the IT group's structure and operations.

Teaching Note: 8A98E05 (9 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Integration; Management Information Systems; Project Management; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TYNER-SHORTEN CLOTHIERS (CONDENSED): ACQUIRING PC HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE
Michael Parent, Sean Van Doorselaer

Product Number: 9A97E014
Publication Date: 10/17/1997
Revision Date: 2/3/2010
Length: 9 pages

Tyner-Shorten is a small, high-end men's clothing retail store looking to automate its client database in order to market itself more effectively to a growing clientele in a highly competitive market. The owner-managers of the store are looking to acquire a PC-based system. The case considers both the hardware and software decisions. In the case of hardware, the men must decide whether to purchase an integrated, turnkey system or a stand-alone PC. If the latter, two choices are presented: a technologically obsolete, but currently adequate PC, or a state-of-the-art PC. For software, the owner-managers must decide whether to build their own application using MS-Access, or to buy a standard, off-the-shelf package - the traditional make-buy decision.

Teaching Note: 8A97E14 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Computer Applications; Computer Selection; Small Business; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FINE COATING INC.
Sachi Sakthivel

Product Number: 9B04E010
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 8 pages

Fine Coating Inc. provides coating services such as phosphate, powder and electrostatic coating to automobile parts manufacturers. Major customers of Fine Coating Inc. are urging the president of the company to implement Electronic Data Interchange to reduce their costs while Fine Coating Inc.'s cost of operations have been increasing. The president needs to identify strategic and operational information systems in response to various organizational, market and environmental pressures. In addition to justifying the investment he needs to determine the source for systems development and an approach to managing the development project.

Teaching Note: 8B04E10 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategy Development; Competitive Advantage; Feasibility Analysis; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Information Systems Security, Quality and Control

EGGHEAD.COM: MANAGING A SECURITY BREACH
Alexandra Hurst, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01C021
Publication Date: 4/25/2002
Revision Date: 12/16/2009
Length: 6 pages

Egghead.com is a chain of retail stores for computer software. A hacker has breached the company's Web site, putting up to four million customer credit card numbers at risk. The media relations officer must prepare a news release, wonders what media questions she should expect.

Teaching Note: 8B01C21 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Communications; Crisis Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A HACKER ATTACK: AN E-COMMERCE NIGHTMARE (A)
Darren Meister, Carlie Bell

Product Number: 9B05E002
Publication Date: 3/7/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 6 pages

The general manager of BookMart, a major online book, movie and CD store was struggling to manage a serious breach of the company's information systems, which jeopardized both the company's reputation and its ability to provide service to its customers. He must develop an immediate plan to address the security breach internally; how to communicate the situation to customers and the media and develop a long term plan that will minimize the risk against possible future attacks. The supplement A Hacker Attack: An e-Commerce Nightmare, product 9B05E003 looks at the general manager's short and long term plans.

Teaching Note: 8B05E02 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Crisis Management; E-Commerce; Information Systems; Security Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A HACKER ATTACK: AN E-COMMERCE NIGHTMARE (B)
Darren Meister, Carlie Bell

Product Number: 9B05E003
Publication Date: 3/7/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 4 pages

BookMart has a breach in the company's information systems. In this supplement to A Hacker Attack: An e-Commerce Nightmare, product 9B05E002, the general manager has to develop immediate and long term plans to deal with the situation.

Teaching Note: 8B05E02 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Information Systems; Security Systems; E-Commerce; Crisis Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Information as a Critical Resource: Information Resource Management

RBC INVESTMENTS: PORTFOLIO PLANNING INITIATIVE
Derrick Neufeld

Product Number: 9B05E005
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 10/20/2010
Length: 11 pages

The newly hired head of Strategic Resources Planning and Management at Royal Bank of Canada Investments (RBCI) must develop a dashboard mechanism for strategically assessing and managing RBCI's non-interest expenses, excluding brokerage fees associated with providing value-added service to clients. After a week of analysis, two things became apparent; first, the four major business units within RBCI were operating independently, neither collaborating on projects nor sharing information. Second, most of the non-interest expenses spent was related to information technology projects. Consider that RBCI was spending nearly $700,000 per day on service delivery, the senior management team was extremely eager to see what the head of Strategic Resources Planning and Management would propose. This case presents information technology portfolio management challenges facing large organizations, and challenges students to develop performance metrics that will be useful at the most senior levels of the organization.

Teaching Note: 8B05E05 (18 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Portfolio Management; Planning; Information Systems; Cost Control
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PROVINCIAL POWER CORPORATION (A)
E.F. Peter Newson, Johnathan Minsky

Product Number: 9B00E006
Publication Date: 5/2/2000
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 22 pages

The objective of this case is to illustrate the complexity of a large information technology project. The case begins when the Provincial Power Corporation and PricewaterhouseCoopers agree to do a SAP implementation project. The benefits of the system to the Provincial Power Corporation are discussed, as well as the strengths, weaknesses and history of SAP IS-U/CCS (SAP Industry Specific-Utilities/Customer Care & Service). The key success factors and major project risks are reviewed. The project team composition and management are explained and the PricewaterhouseCoopers Omniim methodology is also described. The case explains how the project progresses and discusses some of the complexities and issues that the project team members faced. The case concludes a couple of months before planned implementation, with the question of go or no go and how to resolve some of the issues on the project that could jeopardize its future. Some of these issues include: time pressures, management issues, budget constraints, technical problems and staff motivation concerns. A follow-up to this case is available entitled Provincial Power Corporation (B), case 9B00E007.

Teaching Note: 8B00E06 (8 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Information Systems; Management Information Systems; Managing Implementation; Computer System Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PROVINCIAL POWER CORPORATION (B)
E.F. Peter Newson, Johnathan Minsky

Product Number: 9B00E007
Publication Date: 5/2/2000
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 9 pages

The project manager of an SAP Industry Specific Utilities/Customer Care and Service (IS-U/CSS) project must help his client, a utilities company, decide on the future of the project. The major project issues included time pressures, budget constraints, management issues, technical problems and staff motivation concerns. The project was at a point of no return, and he had to recommend whether the project continue on schedule, be delayed or be cancelled.

Teaching Note: 8B00E06 (8 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Managing Implementation; Computer System Implementation; Management Information Systems; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Decision Making in a Digital Age

BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE STRATEGY AT CANADIAN TIRE
Nicole R.D. Haggerty, Darren Meister

Product Number: 9B03E019
Publication Date: 11/5/2003
Revision Date: 10/19/2009
Length: 13 pages

Canadian Tire Corporation consists of five main business groups: a large retail chain providing automotive parts, sports and leisure and home products; a financial division; a petroleum division; a specialty automotive parts division; and a retailer of casual and work wear clothing. The information technology group is faced with developing an implementation plan for the development of a business intelligence infrastructure and business capability at Canadian Tire Retail. Concurrent to this initiative is the development and implementation of an information technology strategy for Canadian Tire Corporation, which places a number of programs on the priority list, with business intelligence seen as a high priority item for which the organization can score some quick win business success.

Teaching Note: 8B03E19 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Information Systems; Business Intelligence; Knowledge Based Systems; Information System Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DIGITAL CANADA'S NEW WORK ENVIRONMENT
Chris A. Higgins, Derrick Neufeld

Product Number: 9A95E007
Publication Date: 8/31/1995
Revision Date: 12/13/2002
Length: 20 pages

A project manager at Digital Canada has designed a work-at-home program to encourage field personnel to spend less time working in the office and more time working at client sites, on the road and at home. He believes his plan will save Digital Canada millions of dollars annually and result in increased productivity. Unfortunately, the response from U.S. headquarters has been lukewarm, and the affected employees are reacting quite negatively. The manager is uncertain how to generate support for his plan in order to move forward.

Teaching Note: 8A95E07 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Program Design/Implementation; Personnel Management; Organizational Change; Facilities Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CLEARWATER FINE FOODS INC.: USING A GROUP SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR STRATEGIC PLANNING
Michael Parent

Product Number: 9A97E015
Publication Date: 10/24/1997
Revision Date: 2/3/2010
Length: 12 pages

Clearwater Fine Foods Inc. is a Canadian-based multinational seafood harvester and producer with a fleet of over 35 ships and 4 offices. The finance and accounting group, headquartered in Bedford, Nova Scotia, used a Group Support System (GSS) to complete the initial stage of its strategic plan. This case deals with the results of a facilitated-GSS session, and participants' reactions to the technology. The MIS manager must decide whether to continue using this technology, and if so, for which tasks and organizational groups.

Teaching Note: 8A97E15 (10 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Information Systems; Computer Applications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Knowledge-Based Information Systems

IBM'S KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PROPOSAL FOR THE ONTARIO MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
Darren Meister, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05E007
Publication Date: 3/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 12 pages

Kathryn Everest, the knowledge management consultant for IBM Canada Ltd.’s business consulting service, was preparing for a meeting with the province of Ontario’s Deputy Minister of Education. The purpose of the meeting was to secure top-level support for an early-stage knowledge management program at the ministry. For the past few weeks she had conducted an initial study of ministry needs and believed that the organization could benefit from one or more knowledge management solutions, including document management, communities of practice, and an expert directory. Everest wondered how she should approach the meeting, given that there seemed to be internal ministry concerns about knowledge-sharing. As she reviewed her notes, she wanted to know which solution(s) she should recommend and what implementation challenges she could expect to face.

Teaching Note: 8B05E07 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Project Management; Knowledge Management; Action Planning and Implementation; Stakeholder Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA: THE KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING GROUP
Peter C. Bell, Betty Vandenbosch

Product Number: 9A90E002
Publication Date: 1/1/1990
Revision Date: 3/7/2002
Length: 12 pages

The Knowledge Engineering Group must decide on a strategy for expert systems development at Mutual Life. Should the Group concentrate on new applications or should the Group expand the use of expert systems within existing data processing activities?

Teaching Note: 8A90E02 (4 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HILL & KNOWLTON: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
Darren Meister, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B04E003
Publication Date: 3/4/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 15 pages

Hill & Knowlton is a division of one of the world's largest communication services group. Tagging e-mail communications to support knowledge management codification and connection strategies is an important issue for managers. Issues related to privacy and performance need to be considered. The worldwide director of knowledge management at Hill & Knowlton needs to assess the degree to which tagging should be enforced in a communication services organization that supports numerous clients around the world.

Teaching Note: 8B04E03 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Knowledge Based Systems; Communications; Knowledge Management; Leveraging Information Technology
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Managing International Information Systems

KASHIWA TUBING LTD.
David T.A. Wesley, Henry W. Lane

Product Number: 9B02M014
Publication Date: 7/22/2002
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 8 pages

A student at a large Boston-area university would soon be completing a dual degree in Management Information Systems and Business Administration. She is the oldest child and only member of a Japanese family that spoke English and was learning to represent the family business, Kashiwa Tubing, with its international accounts. It was planned that she would eventually assume leadership of the company. During her studies she became a believer in the potential and reach of the Internet. She immediately set up a Web site for the company. Within six months, the Web site generated its first major sale, a $2.5 million order from Saudi Arabia. Recently, she had begun to negotiate a multi-million dollar deal with a Taiwanese firm. The company's Japanese headquarters recently forwarded an inquiry from Nigeria. The inquiry was from a member of the Federal Ministry of Works and Housing, proposed a business transaction that would, if successful, represent the largest single Internet order in the history of Kashiwa Tubing. Believing in personally meeting with customers and building long lasting ties, her father suggests that she should meet with this customer, even if that meant traveling to Nigeria.

Teaching Note: 8B02M14 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Law; Third World; Internet; E-Commerce; Northeastern
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



YAHOO V. SURVIVORS OF THE HOLOCAUST
Henry W. Lane, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B02C051
Publication Date: 10/29/2002
Revision Date: 11/9/2009
Length: 15 pages

Yahoo Inc. was the second largest Internet portal worldwide and the leading Internet portal in France. After Nazi-era memorabilia was posted on one of its English-language auction sites, the company was ordered under a French law to block access to neo-Nazi content. Yahoo filed a countersuit, alleging that compliance would violate free speech, as guaranteed under U.S. and international laws. Angered by the company's response, survivors of the Holocaust charged the chief executive officer with war crimes, for supporting the atrocities of the Nazi regime through its Web site. The borderless nature of the Internet raises many issues for the company: conflicting laws and cultures of other countries, differing views on freedom of speech and suppression of objectionable material, ethical considerations and the impact of extraterritoriality.

Teaching Note: 8B02C51 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Competitiveness; International Law; Ethical Issues; International Business; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PATAGON.COM: EXPANDINNG GLOBALLY AND PENETRATING LOCALLY WHILE CONSTANTLY REINVENTING ITSELF
Ramiro Montealegre, Alberto Ballvé

Product Number: 9B01E012
Publication Date: 5/17/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 26 pages

Founded in 1998, Patagon.com is a pioneer in Latin American Internet-based financial services. The substantial changes in and growth of its business and operations had placed significant demands on the company's administrative, operational, technological and staffing resources. The rapid growth has strained its ability to adequately integrate the companies it is acquiring. The challenge for the management team is to integrate the confederation of country-specific organizations while maintaining the agility and responsiveness of a small firm - and at the same time, develop management systems and enterprise design that would handle the growing complexity.

Teaching Note: 8B01E12 (17 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: E-Commerce; Strategy Development; Organizational Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DATACOM: THE INTERNET IN MONGOLIA
Sid L. Huff, Harvey G. Enns

Product Number: 9A97E011
Publication Date: 9/12/1997
Revision Date: 11/18/2002
Length: 29 pages

Datacom is one of the first Internet Service Provider companies to be started in Mongolia. The company was sponsored in part by the Pan Asia Networking (PAN) initiative, a project under the auspices of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), a Canadian Crown Corporation. IDRC believed that an effective way of promoting third-world economic development was through the development of Information Technology infrastructure. Datacom was PAN's first major project, so the PAN initiative and the IDRC had a lot riding on its success. Development of data communications and the Internet in Mongolia was especially challenging given the rudimentary nature of telecommunications in the country. The decision maker in the case is faced with questions of how to expand Datacom's service offerings following its initial venture into Internet services. Wireless communications and satellites provide a way around some of the obstacles, but pose other challenges in terms of cost and know-how. A technical note (9A99E010) on Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSATs) is available as a supplement to this case.

Teaching Note: 8A97E11 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Computer Applications; Information Systems; Technological Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA