Ivey Publishing

Operations Management – Processes and Supply Chains

Krajewski, L.J., Ritzman, L.P. , Malhotra, M.K.,10/e (United States, Pearson Education, 2012)
Prepared By Eunika Sot,
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Using Operations to Compete

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AT BANK OF MAHARASHTRA
Asmita Chitnis, Omkarprasad S. Vaidya, Darroch A. Robertson

Product Number: 9B14D004
Publication Date: 6/6/2014
Revision Date: 6/6/2014
Length: 7 pages

In January 2013, the general manager of the Planning Division of the Bank of Maharashtra in Pune, India, is considering how best to analyze the performance of the bank’s 1,728 branches in 28 states and two union territories and its staff of nearly 14,000 people. Such a process would help develop a comprehensive yearly plan by setting realistic targets for each of the bank branches, which have a wide variety of operating conditions. With its market share falling and increasing competition from major players in both the private and public sectors, the bank must take proactive steps to develop a strategy for expansion. The general manager meets a business school graduate who suggests using performance evaluation and benchmarking tools that will not only help evaluate performance in terms of an efficiency score but also indicate possible potential improvements. Should the general manager trust that the young analyst can pinpoint why some branches are not meeting their targets and suggest how their performance can be improved, or should he hire a more experienced consultant?

Teaching Note: 8B14D004 (15 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Performance evaluation; banks; data envelopment analysis; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



AMERICAN EXPRESS CANADA
Larry Menor, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B12D022
Publication Date: 10/17/2012
Revision Date: 7/5/2018
Length: 23 pages

This case examines how a premium credit card company, American Express Canada (Amex Canada), is attempting to differentiate itself from its competition and to realize value for—and from—its cardholder members through a focus on providing apt quality services and servicing. In April 2011, the president and chief executive officer of Amex Canada is considering his options in sustaining the company's stance in the ultra-rich end of the premium payment cards segment in the face of competition from credit card companies that previously targeted the Canadian mass market. The situation is compounded by the after-effects of the economic downturn that began in the United States in 2008. Amex Canada has to develop a viable strategic and operational plan to realize its vision of becoming the most respected service brand, an ambition that is founded upon what it calls the Total Service Experience it provides to its card members. The case looks at the history of the company, provides an overview of the Canadian payment card industry, and explores core service and servicing issues salient to the design and provision of the Total Service Experience that Amex Canada hopes will not only satisfy existing cardholders but will attract new card members across its array of payment card options.

Teaching Note: 8B12D022 (23 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Service Design and Delivery; Quality; Customer Experience; Canada
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT AT WAL-MART
P. Fraser Johnson, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B07D001
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/30/2017
Length: 15 pages

In 2006 Wal-Mart, the second largest firm in the world by sales, was looking to improve its already efficient supply chain. The company's supply chain was closely integrated with its retail and information systems strategies and has been developed incrementally over the past 40 years. However, rivals are copying every aspect, from the way Wal-Mart cross-docks product in warehouses, to Wal-Mart's use of a sophisticated database to capture, store and disseminate store-level information to suppliers. Wal-Mart's new executive vice-president, logistics was overseeing a handful of initiatives designed to improve the firm's supply chain. However, it was not certain that these initiatives were going to have a significant impact on Wal-Mart costs, and he needed to consider what the company should do to stay ahead of the competition.

Teaching Note: 8B07D01 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Purchasing; Retailing; Supply Chain Management; Logistics
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Project Management

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS IN THE INTERNET FORECASTING INDUSTRY
Owen Hall, Jr., Kenneth Ko

Product Number: 9B12E006
Publication Date: 5/25/2012
Revision Date: 5/17/2012
Length: 3 pages

B&W Systems designs and distributes a variety of management software products through the Internet and retail outlets such as Best Buy. The company is considering the development of an Internet-based forecasting system designed specifically for new start-up and small business owners. The company’s primary concern with the product is timing and the possibility of new market entrants. The director of operations has been tasked with reviewing the timely implementation of the new product, including estimated completion times and costs, and presenting his findings to the board.

Teaching Note: 8B12E006 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Information Systems; Project Management; Critical Path; Linear Programming; Forecasting
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



AMERICAN CONSTRUCTORS INC.: WORLD OUTREACH EXPANSION PROJECT
Kenneth J. Klassen, Leanne Miele

Product Number: 9B10D016
Publication Date: 1/21/2011
Revision Date: 9/27/2019
Length: 11 pages

The project manager for American Constructors Inc. (ACI) sat down with his team on September 24, 2009, to evaluate the progress of its building expansion project in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The team had been working on the World Outreach Church expansion project for over a year already and it was nearing completion. Originally scheduled for completion by March 2010, the project deadline was pushed ahead to December 14, 2009, at the request of the client, who desired to use the property for the Christmas season. In an effort to maintain the reputation of ACI, which had grown to be known as a premier contractor in Tennessee, the project manager and his team needed to determine if the December 14 deadline was feasible.

Teaching Note: 8B10D016 (14 pages)
Industry: Construction
Issues: Scheduling; Project Design/Development; Project Management; Critical Path
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TORONTO SUN AND CARIBANA
Kenneth J. Klassen, Leanne Miele

Product Number: 9B10D002
Publication Date: 6/10/2010
Length: 7 pages

It was June 5, 2008 and the senior promotions coordinator was beginning to feel the pressure of managing a major sponsorship event for the Toronto Sun, a daily newspaper publication in Ontario, Canada. She had recently been hired and had received the responsibility of organizing the Toronto Sun's presence in the city's annual Caribana Parade after her colleague failed to make any progress following months of handling the assignment. With only eight weeks until parade day (August 2), she felt challenged to make the company's float a success. The Toronto Sun earned its place in the parade as the primary print media sponsor for the event. Pulling the company's float from the biggest parade event in the city would mean forfeiting valuable marketing exposure. This case was designed for use in an undergraduate or MBA operations management or introductory project management course. Developed to aid instructors in facilitating discussions of key project management concepts, the case content allows for an analytical approach to covering the basic skills in planning a project, including precedence relationships, critical path, due dates, uncertainty (PERT tasks), crashing, etc. It can be used to teach students MS Project or other project management software. It can also be used for a less analytic, more managerial discussion of project management.

Teaching Note: 8B10D02 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Media; Scheduling; Project Design/Development; Project Management; Critical Path
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Process Strategy

ASTERAND: LEARNING FROM FAILURE
Anne Snowdon, Hannah Standing Rasmussen, David Maslach

Product Number: 9B12D018
Publication Date: 10/29/2012
Revision Date: 10/26/2012
Length: 11 pages

This case chronicles the challenges of establishing an innovative tissue bank service to accelerate the research and development processes of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies worldwide. Asterand’s two major challenges involved achieving a standardized approach to collecting tissue samples in hospitals all over the world and achieving the highest possible quality of tissue samples shipped to their primary customer, Amgen. Despite the identified need for high-quality tissue samples, Asterand was experiencing multiple quality control problems in their processes and procedures. Tissue samples were being packaged poorly, labeled incorrectly or delivered at the wrong time or to the wrong place. Additionally, there were quality issues with the RNA analysis of the samples, which was a critical factor in the usability of the tissue sample for research and development of new therapies and drugs.



The head of pathology at Amgen’s California facility was threatening to terminate their existing order and communicate the failure of Asterand to all company employees, which would have a devastating ripple effect across the industry and likely destroy opportunities for any future orders with Asterand. If this happened, Asterand would not be able to secure contracts with customers and was at risk of losing investors and going bankrupt.


Teaching Note: 8B12D018 (11 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health sector; medical products; product quality; customer relationship; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CREATING A PROCESS-ORIENTED ENTERPRISE AT PINNACLE WEST
T.S. Raghu

Product Number: 9B10E002
Publication Date: 3/2/2010
Revision Date: 2/4/2015
Length: 18 pages

Pinnacle West is in the energy-related services business and headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona. Its largest subsidiary, APS, is a power utility that serves over a million customers across Arizona. The case was written when one of the biggest recessions in recent history hit global and U.S. markets. Written from the perspective of the vice-president and chief information officer, the case chronicles the various recent successful process change initiatives at Pinnacle West. The vice-president has achieved initial success in instituting a process-oriented culture inside his own information technology (IT) services organization, and in some specific business units within Pinnacle West. He now faces a significant crossroads in his process orientation strategy for Pinnacle West. He has to devise a strategy for a wider rollout of a process-oriented strategy throughout Pinnacle West and determine if the larger enterprise is ready for this strategy. He has to consider various issues in making this decision - resource availability, change management competency and buy-in from other top-level managers. He has to carefully weigh the various options in rolling out this strategy, as he fears that any misstep may derail his carefully executed plans for bringing a process-oriented approach to managing at Pinnacle West. This case can be used in an introductory systems course. It can also be used in a course on business process management or operations management.

Teaching Note: 8B10E02 (8 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Organizational Change; Information Technology Strategy; Change Management; Business Process Re-Engineering
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PROCESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR XYZ LIMITED - KLTD DIVISION
Srinivasan Maheswaran

Product Number: 9B09D007
Publication Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 4 pages

The case describes the situation faced by the vice-president of operations at Konkan Leaf Tobacco Development, the tobacco processing unit of XYZ Limited. This unit is in charge of procurement and processing of different varieties and grades of tobacco grown in southern India. The tobacco leaves are categorized into different varieties on the basis of quality and location of the crop. The company has two processing plants with varying processing capacities. Due to the seasonal and agricultural nature of the commodity, the company is finding it difficult to maintain efficiencies between the inflow of the tobacco and the requirement of the processing line capacity, resulting in frequent start-stop situations for the processing lines. This case enables students to develop strategies for the process management to achieve the optimum process schedule, which will result in the fewest stoppages of the process lines and optimization of both the utilization of the processing lines and the inflow patterns among the processing units.

Teaching Note: 8B09D07 (8 pages)
Issues: Mapping Inflow and Processing Line Capacity; Process Management; Capacity Utilization; Forecasting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Process Analysis

MEAGAL STELPLAST: STEERING A NEW PATH
Rajiv Misra, Achin Kishore

Product Number: 9B13D013
Publication Date: 7/12/2013
Revision Date: 7/5/2013
Length: 12 pages

A family-owned business that manufactures automobile horns for the replacement market in Delhi, India is considering options to improve current operations and expand the business. The company is faced with numerous challenges: erratic demand, lack of brand, high warranty returns, lack of information, availability of skilled manpower and implementing modern methods of manufacturing. The company is also considering expanding beyond Delhi and manufacturing products for automobile manufacturers, which requires adherence to regulatory certification.

Teaching Note: 8B13D013 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Process analysis; line balancing; plant expansion; production planning; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



METROPOLITAN WATER SUPPLY AUTHORITY: EVALUATING SECURITY RISKS
Jeanne McNett, Ronald M. Whitfield

Product Number: 9B12D025
Publication Date: 1/31/2013
Revision Date: 1/25/2013
Length: 4 pages

The director of a rural metropolitan water supply facility faces a complex risk management challenge. The facility uses chlorine gas in its water treatment, largely because it has determined that chlorine is the most effective treatment available, in terms of safety, cost and environmental impact. However, a security report from the Department of Homeland Security suggests that chlorine, a hazardous chemical, can be used by terrorists, both during its transport to the treatment facility and at the facility itself. The director of the water supply facility wonders whether the Department of Homeland Security made its recommendation based on an isolated risk without considering the big picture. The case provides students with an opportunity to analyse a complex sustainability-related management issue.

Teaching Note: 8B12D025 (3 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Security Systems; Risk Analysis; Safety; Process Analysis; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



METROPOLITAN COLLEGE
P. Fraser Johnson, Robert Klassen

Product Number: 9B09D012
Publication Date: 10/22/2009
Revision Date: 12/14/2009
Length: 2 pages

A manager of Student Services at a small college was very concerned about the delays and costs of processing student registrations during the annual orientation week. She glanced at recently collected data on processing times for the six major steps that the registration process required. She wondered how the process might be improved while balancing budgetary pressures to reduce costs.

Teaching Note: 8B09D12 (7 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Service Operations; Process Analysis; Process Design/Change; Educational Administration
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate


Chapter 5:
Quality and Performance

AGILE ELECTRIC: QUALITY ISSUES IN A GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN
Dhruv Dar, Sanjay Kumar, Vijay Aggarwal

Product Number: 9B12D011
Publication Date: 7/18/2012
Revision Date: 8/16/2012
Length: 16 pages

The case describes the evolution of a global multi-tiered supply chain involving one of the world’s largest automotive original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), its tier 1 supplier — Automek, a U.S.-based global corporation — and the tier 2, tier 3, and tier 4 suppliers based in India.

With Automek’s engineering support, India-based Agile Electric had successfully developed many parts for the OEM in the past. Based on this experience, Automek buyers placed an order with Agile for a new product — an actuator assembly. In developing this product with little support from Automek, Agile was concerned due to its lack of knowledge concerning the suppliers for the actuator assembly components and the critical requirements. To allay its concerns, Automek promised to locate suppliers and assess and validate the suppliers based in India. Agile then invested in the assembly line and developed the actuator assembly. When supplies started, the OEM reported many quality problems, traceable to the tiered suppliers.

Along with quality and parts supply issues, the issues of subsequent liability in the case of a recall by the OEM were faced by members of the supply chain. Agile felt that since Automek had selected or approved the suppliers, and since Agile had had no original product expertise, that Automek should take responsibility for resolving the quality problems.


Teaching Note: 8B12D011 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Sourcing; Supply Chain Management; Quality Management; Cross-cultural Differences; Developing Countries; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STRATEGIC SOURCING AT WHIRLPOOL CHINA: FINDING THE IDEAL SUPPLIER
Martin Lockstrom, Thomas E. Callarman, Shengrong (Linda) Zhang

Product Number: 9B12D012
Publication Date: 6/21/2012
Revision Date: 6/19/2012
Length: 8 pages

It was April 10, 2011, when the head of Whirlpool’s Asia International Procurement Office in Shanghai was informed by his colleagues that the company was about to launch a new energy-efficient refrigerator model in just six months. For the new refrigerator model, the basic difference was in the motor; the current AC motor would need to be replaced with a DC motor, which was more efficient but also more expensive. He would have to find a suitable supplier of DC motors in a very short time. Delayed sourcing of components would cause delays in the production of a new refrigerator and result in a later launch of new products. Within the home-appliance industry, the fierce level of competition meant that any delays in launching new products would result in a loss of sales. How should Whirlpool go about the process of finding a suitable supplier for the required DC motor parts? Should the company explore the possibility of developing its current supplier, or should it quickly engage an existing supplier of DC motors?

Teaching Note: 8B12D012 (7 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Suitable Supplier; IPO; Global Sourcing; Supplier Quality; Strategic Sourcing; Supplier Selection Criteria; China
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SIX SIGMA IMPLEMENTATION AT MAPLE LEAF FOODS
P. Fraser Johnson

Product Number: 9B05D016
Publication Date: 1/5/2007
Length: 12 pages

Six Sigma has become a popular management philosophy adopted by several large companies including Maple Leaf Foods as a means of reducing waste systematically. The plant manager at the Rivermede plant is preparing for a meeting with the senior manager to discuss the new initiative Six Sigma @ the Edge. Based on the success of Six Sigma at this plant, it was chosen as a pilot for this new initiative. Students will develop a deeper understanding of Six Sigma and the challenges associated with embedding it in the organization.

Teaching Note: 8B05D16 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Continuous Improvement; Job Enrichment; Work-Force Management; Quality
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Capacity Planning

BELLA SPRINGS
Nicole R.D. Haggerty, Francis Ayensu, Jesse Brame, Chris Lau, Gerry Li

Product Number: 9B13D009
Publication Date: 4/16/2013
Revision Date: 8/3/2018
Length: 6 pages

The founder of a water purification, packaging and distribution company in Ghana, Africa, faced some operational issues. Demand has increased for the company’s water sachets, but the founder needed to develop strategies to increase the firm’s current operational capacities to meet this demand. He and the operations manager needed to determine how the company can position itself as a successful high-growth company in a developing and sometimes uncertain Ghanaian economy.

Teaching Note: 8B13D009 (5 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: capacity planning; distribution; emerging markets
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



AVALANCHE CORPORATION: INTEGRATING BAYESIAN ANALYSIS INTO THE PRODUCTION DECISION-MAKING PROCESS
Owen Hall, Jr., Kenneth Ko

Product Number: 9B11D006
Publication Date: 5/20/2011
Length: 3 pages

The director of operations at Avalanche Corporation was faced with some major decisions. The firm was experiencing considerable difficulties in matching supply with demand. As a result, the company was overproducing and had to sell the excess at a loss. At a recent board meeting, the vice president of marketing reported on a new snowboard product, the Avalanche Racer. She presented her rationale for introducing a new ski product at this time by highlighting the growth of the ski equipment sales over the past five years. The board meeting concluded with the general manager tasking the director of operations with developing an analysis and reporting back his findings to the board the following week.

Teaching Note: 8B11D006 (6 pages)
Issues: Risk Analysis; Manufacturing; Break-even Analysis; Decision Making; Skiing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TSC STORES: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT FOR PROFITABLE GROWTH
P. Fraser Johnson

Product Number: 9B09D005
Publication Date: 3/9/2009
Length: 10 pages

In May 2007, the chief operating officer at TSC Stores in London, Ontario, asked the director of distribution to evaluate the company's supply chain strategy and make recommendations to the board of directors. The chief operating officer was concerned about the ability of the company's supply chain to support the corporate business plan, which called for 20 per cent annual growth over the next three years. Preliminary analysis indicated that TSC would need more distribution capacity by first quarter 2008, which gave the director of distribution only six to eight months to evaluate options and implement a plan. The chief operating officer and the board would want to know the process and schedule that the director of distribution intended to follow to deal with the evolving capacity demands in distribution.

Teaching Note: 8B09D05 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Supply Chain Strategy; Capacity Planning; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DESIGNING OPTIMAL CAPACITY PLANNING STRATEGIES
Owen Hall, Jr., Charles McPeak

Product Number: 9B08D003
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Length: 4 pages

Mapleleaf Corporation is a mid-size player in the paper products industry. The firm has recently become aware that growing demand will soon outstrip its present production capacity. The primary objective of this case is to introduce students to the world of capacity planning and optimization.

Teaching Note: 8B08D03 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Capacity Planning; Multi-source, Multi-demand Optimization Analysis; Net Present Value Method; Forecasting
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 7:
Constraint Management

HELIO POLYMER ENTERPRISES
Nicole R.D. Haggerty, Juma Wagoki, Clarke Eaton, Wesley Hunt, Matthew Smart

Product Number: 9B14D002
Publication Date: 4/2/2014
Revision Date: 7/27/2018
Length: 7 pages

Helio Polymer Enterprises, located in Nakuru, Kenya, is a company that manufactures synthetic polymer gunny bags used in the transportation and handling of animal feed. The owner wants to expand her business operations so she can serve more clients. She has three options: to add a night shift, buy a new printing machine or start producing laminate gunny bags for other markets. Before she makes the decision, she must understand her current operational capacity and determine what aspects of customer service she believes are important for the long-term success of her company.

Teaching Note: 8B14D002 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: capacity; bottleneck; expansion; emerging markets; Kenya
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



PRAMANIK CONTAINERS AND THE BOTTLENECK CHALLENGE (A)
Rajiv Agarwal

Product Number: 9B12E014
Publication Date: 1/16/2013
Revision Date: 1/4/2013
Length: 6 pages

In 2010, a recent business graduate tries to resolve a constant bottleneck in the printing department of the family business. The two-part case discusses the issues of identifying the need for relevant information and then discusses the staff’s resistance to change and how these objections were handled and overcome.

This pair of cases seeks to identify the pressures faced by small businesses, along with the task of managing the various stakeholders, including the father-owner and the personnel on the factory shop floor.


Teaching Note: 8B12E014 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Change management; identifying bottlenecks; organizational behaviour; India
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



CRP PRODUCTS
David Wood, Robert Klassen

Product Number: 9B11D015
Publication Date: 11/10/2011
Revision Date: 6/29/2012
Length: 7 pages

Bruce Ballantyne had recently joined C.R.P. Products (CRP), a furniture manufacturer in Stratford, Ontario, to help review the company’s operations and assess what changes were necessary to keep up with demand. Although it was early 2011 and the peak season was still four months away, Ballantyne knew that he would have to determine what equipment was needed over the next three weeks to ensure it was delivered and installed before the peak season. Jamie Bailey, the owner of CRP, had also concluded that CRP did not have the financing available for both the new equipment needed to make its unique design of outdoor furniture and the seasonal working capital required to support inventory and accounts receivable. He had turned to Ballantyne to develop a solution that would keep up with demand, keep inventory low, and work within the available financing.

Teaching Note: 8B11D015 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Capacity Management; Inventory, Batch Size and Free Capacity; Economic Order Quantity; Process Design; Plant Layout; Furniture; Ontario, Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOTALLINE TRANSPORT
Larry Menor, Ken Mark, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B05D001
Publication Date: 6/14/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 18 pages

The vice-president and general manager of Totalline Transport wants to eliminate late appointment fees in delivering to one of Canada's premier electronic shops - Electronics International. Totalline Transport is hired by suppliers of electronics goods to deliver to retailers. The vice-president sees an opportunity to solve the problem of congestion in the parking lot of Electronics International's warehouse and eliminating unnecessary soft costs such as missed appointment fees and detention charges. The bottleneck in the process is the waiting time for all of the trucks to unload. If the carrier arrives late, the retailer will charge the carrier $1,000. If the carrier is waiting in line due to a backlog at the warehouse, the carrier will levy a charge of $50 to $60 per hour. Beyond these costs, the vice-president realizes that suppliers and retailers are spending one day per week investigating problems with shipments. He is eager to make his customers (suppliers) successful. He sees three central options in cutting down traffic: to request two dedicated doors at the warehouse; cut down on time for Electronics International by applying stickers at Totalline's consolidation point on all the deliveries so that Electronics International could immediately accept shipments into inventory without handling; or deliver direct to Electronics International stores.

Teaching Note: 8B05D001 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Services; Operations Management; Service Operations; Supplier Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Lean Systems

SHANGHAI BAOLONG AUTOMOTIVE CORPORATION
H. Brian Hwarng, Xuchuan Yuan

Product Number: 9B12D021
Publication Date: 10/25/2012
Revision Date: 10/23/2012
Length: 18 pages

The president of a Chinese auto parts manufacturer is facing a crisis. For nearly 10 years the company's production lines have not been able to keep up with the orders. Deliveries are due, but the in-house stock is in short supply despite the production lines operating under extended hours. Quality issues have resulted in recent recalls in the United States, making the company's prospects worrisome. Faced with worsening international trade conditions and mounting problems, the chair and president decide to expedite the initiative of transforming their company into a lean manufacturer based on the Toyota Production System. However, the company has no in-house expertise or experience in lean production. The case presents a challenging situation faced by many companies as they move up the ladder of production competence and operational excellence. The major learning focuses on the adoption of Japanese production practices in an emerging Chinese company as it implements lean production.

Teaching Note: 8B12D021 (17 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Lean production; Toyota production system; lean implementation; corporate/social culture; China
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



LEAN IMPLEMENTATION AT SIEMENS' KALWA PLANT
Jamie Anderson, Subramanian Chidambaran, Vaibhav Khandekar

Product Number: 9B12M026
Publication Date: 5/9/2012
Revision Date: 6/25/2012
Length: 20 pages

The Siemens Kalwa factory in Mumbai, also referred to as Kalwa Works (KW), started in 1973 with the production of motors and later diversified to produce switchgears and switchboards. By 2009, 40 per cent of all Siemens India employees were working in Kalwa and contributing 45 per cent of the total Siemens India production. Kalwa had become the most important business centre for Siemens India.

In October 2006, Siemens AG decided to implement lean manufacturing in the Kalwa factory as part of a worldwide rollout of the Siemens Production System in all its medium-voltage facilities. The implementations were expected to bring drastic improvements in labour productivity, lower inventory levels, and higher throughput to improve the factories’ financial performance. The lean program promised that the factory’s current realized capacity of 4,000 panels per year could be increased by approximately 50 per cent to 6,000 panels per year in the medium term within two years, and to about 12,000 panels within the next four to five years.

While the benefits of successful implementation were attractive, the company faced several challenges, including restructuring the organization, getting staff on board to accept and facilitate the change, and handling resistance from internal and external stakeholders. This case provides an opportunity to analyze and discuss lean implementation issues for a global multinational firm in the Indian context.


Teaching Note: 8B12M026 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Lean Manufacturing Implementation; Organizational Change; Change Management; Factory; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EAGLE SERVICES ASIA
Edward D. Arnheiter

Product Number: 9B07D019
Publication Date: 10/10/2007
Length: 13 pages

This case chronicles the creation and transformation of a Singaporean joint venture, Eagle Services Asia (ESA). It describes some early start-up problems, including a forced shutdown by the Civilian Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). The resulting shakeup of the ESA management team provides a fresh start and an opportunity to reinvigorate the company using lean management principles. Managerial decisions play a key role in ESA's success, together with the discipline and training of the workforce. Students will gain an understanding of cultural difficulties associated with international joint ventures, and learn fundamental aspects of lean management including how to create and sustain a lean culture. The case also provides insight into the worldwide aircraft engine business, the engine overhaul process and cultural barriers that may arise when managing operations in foreign countries.

Teaching Note: 8B07D19 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Expatriate Management; Cultural Customs; Organizational Behaviour; Joint Ventures; Management of Change; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 9:
Supply Chain Inventory Management

ELIZABETH ARDEN: EXECUTING GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN RE-ENGINEERING
David Wood, Norman Gao

Product Number: 9B13D017
Publication Date: 11/8/2013
Revision Date: 1/14/2019
Length: 11 pages

In mid-2008, the senior vice-president of Global Supply Chain at Elizabeth Arden in New York City was troubled with the challenges that lay before him. He had been hired to make sweeping changes to the company’s management of its supply chain, and he had already made a significant impact in forecasting, inventory control and service performance. His next move would require a radical consolidation of suppliers, make dramatic changes to inventory management, have a far-reaching impact on product development and require major lead time reductions. Given such a disruptive move, would current suppliers be able to meet expectations? Could the company’s current employees keep up with the pace of change expected? How many would have to be let go, and what would this do the morale of the workforce? Were significant results to shareholders really achievable? How much money would be saved, where would the savings come from and when would they be realized? The senior vice-president was determined to execute the re-engineering in a manner that would best address all these concerns.

Teaching Note: 8B13D017 (15 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Strategy; design; restructuring; impact of supply chain innovation; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



UPGRADING THE SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT STRATEGY AT SICHUAN TELECOM
Xu Chen, Zhang Du, Li Zheng, Ding Yichao, Liu Ying

Product Number: 9B12D013
Publication Date: 8/21/2012
Revision Date: 8/20/2012
Length: 7 pages

In the process of business development, many enterprises have to deal with issues from all dimensions of operations management including inventory management, distribution management, and network design. Sichuan Telecom, a branch of China Telecom Co. Ltd, which was a Fortune Global 500 company, had achieved its highest market share in its broadband business and maintained strong growth momentum in this segment. However, there was a serious inventory management problem concerning ADSL modems, a component that most broadband users required. The problem was that Sichuan Telecom's ADSL modem inventory was either too high or insufficient. To reduce inventory costs and improve the service level, the procurement manager conducted a comprehensive analysis of the company's sales and demand forecasting, procurement and suppliers, distribution management, warehouse management, and inventory management. This case follows the procurement manager in analyzing the company's existing operational management system for ADSL modems in order to discover the cause of the inventory problem and develop an effective plan to improve operations management.

Teaching Note: 8B12D013 (7 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Inventory Planning Control; Distribution Design; Telecommunications; Service Industry; China; Ivey/CMCC
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS PLANNING AT A-CAT CORP.
Jitendra R. Sharma, Tinu Agrawal

Product Number: 9B12D003
Publication Date: 4/12/2012
Revision Date: 4/11/2012
Length: 5 pages

Material requirements planning (MRP) systems have been widely used by manufacturing firms to maintain an optimum flow of inputs for the best production results. By using an MRP system, a firm can prepare a production plan that specifies the number of sub-assemblies that go into a final product along with the exact timeline of an order, from placement to completion.

In the case, an A-CAT employee is assigned the task of preparing an operating plan for the next eight weeks for a product. She has to decide how much to produce to be able to meet the requirements economically, taking into account the forecasted demand. The case examines the intricacies of procurement, warehousing, and processing costs of various material components by critically evaluating different techniques in practice. Using situational scenarios, the case presents lot-sizing techniques — including lot for lot, economic order quantity, least total cost and least unit cost — for balancing costs such as set-up costs, ordering costs, and inventory-holding costs.


Teaching Note: 8B12D003 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Material Requirements Planning; Inventory Management; Lot-sizing Techniques; Bill of Materials; Electrical Appliances; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Supply Chain Design

QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE OIL INDUSTRY: HOW BP GREASES ITS MACHINERY FOR FRICTIONLESS SOURCING
Martin Lockstrom, Shen Li, Shengrong (Linda) Zhang

Product Number: 9B12D006
Publication Date: 3/28/2012
Revision Date: 3/28/2012
Length: 9 pages

In the winter of 2010 in Shanghai, Dr. Zeb Feng, procurement director for Asia at British Petroleum (BP), was acutely aware of the growing burden that quality control imposed over his company’s global operations. Chinese suppliers were masters of cost-cutting, but quality often suffered as a result, which led in turn to an increased need for inspection and development efforts. Almost five years ago, Feng’s company had established an international procurement office (IPO) in Shanghai, which served as a shared service centre for internal customers throughout BP worldwide. Since that time, the IPO had been mainly sourcing non-hydrocarbon goods and services.



After a corporate board meeting with Christina De Luca, the vice president of procurement and supply chain management for BP’s downstream operations, it had been decided that the company would start to enhance its global competitive sourcing. As the number-one supplier market in the world, China was a high priority for further oil exploration. The pressing point that concerned Feng was whether Chinese suppliers were sufficiently ready to supply mission-critical supplies for oil drilling, extraction, and refining. During a recent conference call, De Luca had reiterated, “Zeb, our competitors are way ahead of us in their sourcing operations, and they have achieved much lower costs. We’ve got to do something!” Feng had to gather his team for a planning meeting. He knew that supply quality was the key issue, but how could it be resolved?


Teaching Note: 8B12D006 (6 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: International Procurement Office (IPO); Quality Management; China; CEIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



HIGH-TECH METAL COMPONENTS: FINDING LOCAL SUPPLIERS
Martin Lockstrom, Shen Li

Product Number: 9B12D004
Publication Date: 3/22/2012
Revision Date: 10/26/2015
Length: 10 pages

In May 2009, High-Tech Metal Components (HTMC) inaugurated its brand new production plant of forgings and castings for automotive supplies in Suzhou, a city of 13 million close to Shanghai, China. After the successful installation of machinery and placement of workers, the company was prepared to begin production. A month later, the general manager of the Chinese division of HTMC received a phone call from the chief operating officer of its German headquarters; it was decided that it was necessary to cut costs for 2009 by more than five per cent. The cost structure was way too high, with many components imported from Europe. How could cost-cutting be done with the existing supply chain design in China? What long-term measures could be taken to realize the goal?

Teaching Note: 8B12D004 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supplier Management; Low-cost Country Sourcing; Technology; Germany; China; CEIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 11:
Supply Chain Location Decisions

WAREHOUSING STRATEGY AT VOLKSWAGEN GROUP CANADA INC. (VGCA)
P. Fraser Johnson, Adam Bortolussi

Product Number: 9B12D002
Publication Date: 3/5/2012
Revision Date: 11/15/2012
Length: 8 pages

The director of warehousing and logistics at Volkswagen Group Canada (VGCA) had been tasked with analyzing the capacity of the Toronto parts distribution centre to support an aggressive growth plan that involved a series of new product launches and product facelifts. Expecting that expansion of the facility would be necessary, the director needed to determine the additional warehouse capacity required, when it would be needed by, and which expansion option made the most sense.

Teaching Note: 8B12D002 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Warehousing; Distribution; Capacity Analysis; Logistics; Automotive Industry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SHER-WOOD HOCKEY STICKS: GLOBAL SOURCING
Paul W. Beamish, Megan (Min) Zhang

Product Number: 9B12M003
Publication Date: 2/13/2012
Revision Date: 11/17/2014
Length: 11 pages

In early 2011, the senior executives of the venerable Canadian hockey stick manufacturer Sher-Wood Hockey were considering whether to move the remainder of the company’s high-end composite hockey and goalie stick production to its suppliers in China. Sher-Wood had been losing market share as retail prices continued to fall. Would outsourcing the production of the iconic, Canadian-made hockey sticks to China help Sher-Wood to boost demand significantly? Was there any other choice?

Teaching Note: 8B12M003 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Offshoring; Outsourcing; Insourcing; Nearshoring; R&D Interface; Labour Costs; Canada; SME
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ARE WE READY FOR AN AUTOMOTIVE PLANT?
Yi-Chia Wu, Joo Y. Jung

Product Number: 9B09D014
Publication Date: 2/5/2010
Length: 15 pages

The city of McAllen, Texas and its partners have worked on attracting an automotive assembly plant to the region for over fifteen years. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provision, this region enjoys the advantages offered by both sides of the Mexican-U.S. border. Even during the economic downturn of 2007 to 2008, McAllen experienced a lower unemployment rate compared to other cities in the United States. One of the primary reasons was its close proximity and economic ties to Mexico. Lower labour cost, a right-to-work state and proximity to Mexico were some of this region's strengths, while a high illiteracy rate, limited numbers of automotive suppliers and small workforce were among its weaknesses. Based on publicly available data and aggregate score evaluation methods, McAllen is compared to other potential sites. The case addresses a wide range of issue regarding site selection factors within the automotive industry.

Teaching Note: 8B09D14 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Automotive; Site Selection; Global Strategy; Decision Making
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Supply Chain Integration

ADANI AGRI LOGISTICS LIMITED: BLOCKING THE GRAIN DRAIN
Mohita Gangwar Sharma, K.N. Singh, Sachinder Mohan Sharma, Puneet Mehndiratta

Product Number: 9B14D001
Publication Date: 4/2/2014
Revision Date: 4/1/2014
Length: 11 pages

Adani Agri Logistics Limited (AALL) was established to execute a national project for the bulk handling of food grains through a public-private partnership with the Food Corporation of India. This project involved financing, planning, designing, constructing, operating and maintaining modern infrastructure for the bulk handling, storage and transportation of grains required for the public distribution system. Although a technology-driven supply chain solution was implemented, the benefits of this innovative supply system did not come into full fruition even after four years of operation. AALL soon realized that farmers were reluctant to accept the new storage system because it was a departure from the relationship-based transactions they were used to undertaking with traditional intermediaries. In this way, the company learned that there are cultural subtleties and traditions that must be appreciated and given consideration, along with the economic justifications. How could these traditions be respected and upheld while making way for improvement and progress?

Teaching Note: 8B14D001 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Supply chain strategy; collaboration; national culture; trust; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GLOBAL SOURCING AT ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV: TAPPING (BEER) INTO THE CHINESE SUPPLIER MARKET
Martin Lockstrom, Thomas E. Callarman, Shengrong (Linda) Zhang

Product Number: 9B12D015
Publication Date: 7/25/2012
Revision Date: 7/25/2012
Length: 5 pages

This case concerns the difficulties of global sourcing for InBev, an international brewery with branches in six geographical zones. In 2006, Pascal Baltussen came to China to set up the company's international procurement office and had it up and running by the end of the year. Not only were risks such as delivery delays and rising costs constantly lurking, but in 2010 his company, Brazilian-Belgian brewer InBev, acquired the almost equally large U.S. brewer Anheuser-Busch to form the world's largest brewer, AB InBev. This posed further complications. How could Baltussen now successfully roll out his sourcing vision for China and manage internal and external challenges?

Teaching Note: 8B12D015 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Global Sourcing; Supplier Selection; Procurement Organization; Sourcing Strategy; China
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 13:
Supply Chain Sustainability and Humanitarian Logistics

BUILDING SUSTAINABLE DISTRIBUTION AT WALMART CANADA
Robert Klassen, P. Fraser Johnson, Asad Shafiq

Product Number: 9B13D010
Publication Date: 4/5/2013
Revision Date: 11/12/2013
Length: 9 pages

The director of logistics at Walmart Canada, was developing plans for a new distribution centre in Alberta. Senior management had presented her with a challenge: why not build the most sustainable distribution centre in the world? Yet, much remained unclear about how to translate this challenge into specific actions, while keeping in mind corporate goals for sustainability. Her team now was exploring three options that promised to be significantly greener: hydrogen fuel cells for forklift trucks, LED lighting and renewable energy generation from on-site wind turbines. Any investment in these sustainable technologies had to make business sense, and any decision could dramatically affect the distribution centre’s operating performance.

Teaching Note: 8B13D010 (12 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Environmental Management; Supply Chain; Renewable Energy; Distribution; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DHL SUPPLY CHAIN
Singfat Chu, David Ringrose

Product Number: 9B12E003
Publication Date: 4/19/2012
Revision Date: 4/24/2015
Length: 3 pages

The degradation of the environment has led many governments and customers to pressure businesses to make their operations more environmentally friendly. The case illustrates an effective example of corporate social responsibility. Specifically, it demonstrates how a small increase in a supply chain budget can drastically reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation of LCD TVs from their manufacturing bases to a distribution centre.

Teaching Note: 8B12E003 (7 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Environmental Sustainability; Linear Programming; Logistics; Optimization Analysis; Spreadsheet Modeling; Corporate Social Responsibility; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION: REVERSING LOGISTICS
David Wood, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B11D001
Publication Date: 8/8/2011
Length: 12 pages

New legislation in Ontario, Canada, might require all appliance manufacturers and brand owners to take responsibility for end-of-life collection and recycling of products. The senior manager of government relations for Whirlpool Corporation was updating his colleagues on Ontario’s proposed extended producer responsibility (EPR) legislation. Whirlpool was the Canadian market share leader in household appliances such as washing machines, dryers, and cooking ranges. With EPR, Whirlpool and other firms would now have to manage — or pay to manage — a more complex model involving reverse logistics. Each appliance manufacturer had at least three options from which to choose: it could argue the legislation was unnecessary, it could join an industry-funded organization (IFO) to meet EPR’s requirement, or it could set up its own IFO.

Teaching Note: 8B11D001 (9 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Reverse Logistics; Recycling; Supply Chain Management; Corporate Social Responsibility; Household Appliances
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



NOKIA INDIA: BATTERY RECALL LOGISTICS
Charles Dhanaraj, Narendar Sumukadas, P. Fraser Johnson, Monali Malvankar

Product Number: 9B11D003
Publication Date: 6/22/2011
Length: 13 pages

This case presents the challenge faced by Nokia India in 2007. Nokia had built a strong brand reputation over a ten-year period and was a market leader in Indian mobile devices. India, incidentally, was also Nokia’s second-largest market, next only to China. Suddenly, what corporate headquarters considered a routine product advisory for a defective battery resulted in panic in customers after the Indian media widely publicized the potential dangers that defective batteries could pose. Over a three-month period, Nokia India had to recall a few million batteries and replace them with new ones.



The case provides an opportunity for students to develop practical knowledge of the role of operations management in a product recall situation, particularly in an emerging market context. Product recalls are an integral part of supply chain management (SCM). Companies inevitably face a question of when, not if, a recall will be necessary. These recall situations combine the complexity of operations with the time-urgency of a mission-critical task. The case also provides a rich context to learn about the interaction of SCM, information systems and reverse logistics, and to understand the marketing, logistics, and communication challenges faced by a multinational company operating in an emerging market such as India.


Teaching Note: 8B11D003 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Logistics; Communications; Crisis Leadership; Product Recall; India; Ivey/ISB
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 14:
Forecasting

HARMONIZING DEMAND FORECASTING AND SUPPLY AT MAHINDRA & MAHINDRA LTD.
Alok Yadav, Sunil Ashra

Product Number: 9B13D019
Publication Date: 1/13/2014
Revision Date: 1/10/2014
Length: 6 pages

Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd., a US$15.4 billion company in 2012, has been the number one tractor manufacturer in India for the last 30 years. The agriculture tractor sale market in India is seasonal in nature and growing. To meet demand, the company has four manufacturing plants and 26 sales offices across the country; their main job is to coordinate supplies between its 800 dealers and the company. The sales offices provide a rolling tractor demand forecast for the current month plus two months in the future; it is used to determine the number and models of tractors to manufacture and to enable placing parts supply orders in advance. The deputy general manager of sales in the company’s Farm Division has been receiving an increasing number of complaints from irate dealers about the irregular and short supply of tractors from the company’s stockyards. This has created stress and low dealer satisfaction. The deputy general manager has decided to improve the demand forecasting of agriculture tractor sales and hence supply management.

Student spreadsheet 7B13D019 with data is available.


Teaching Note: 8B13D019 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales forecasting; tractor sales; excel spreadsheet; time series; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A-CAT CORP.: FORECASTING
Jitendra R. Sharma

Product Number: 9B13D016
Publication Date: 9/13/2013
Revision Date: 9/6/2013
Length: 4 pages

A-CAT Corp., a company that produces domestic electrical appliances in a poor region of India, largely caters to the price-sensitive rural market. During the past several months, there has been an alarming dip in sales of its major product, a voltage regulator that is used for varied purposes but most commonly as a protective device for refrigerators and television sets, to protect the latter from the vagaries of load fluctuations and/or frequent power failures, which are a very common phenomenon in the region. At the same time, the production department has been complaining about shortages of spares and components. Placing orders beyond a certain limit for the vital transformers used in most of its products has also stretched the system — whereas the company previously had access to four suppliers of transformers, now there is only one. The vice president has asked the chief operations manager to look into the problem. The operations manager traces the production planning process and its reliance on accurate forecasts. The manager’s job is to collect the data, analyze the data patterns, use forecasting methods, carry out back-testing and submit recommendations to management to solve the problem.

Teaching Note: 8B13D016 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Forecasting; back testing; errors; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NISSAN CANADA INC.
P. Fraser Johnson, Kyle Hunter

Product Number: 9B07D018
Publication Date: 8/30/2007
Length: 12 pages

The corporate manager of vehicle planning at Nissan Canada Inc. had been asked by the director of vehicle ordering for Nissan North America (NNA), to review the proposed vehicle ordering process as part of the new Integrated Customer Order Network (ICON). The ICON project would change Nissan's North American vehicle ordering process from a 'make-to-stock' into a 'make-to-order' environment which called for a significant process transformation for Nissan's operations in North America and Japan. The corporate manager of vehicle planning was hoping that the new process would be exactly what the dealers were seeking in an effort to closer align production with customer demand. However, he needed to evaluate the new process from the perspective of all stakeholders to ensure that Nissan's business objectives could be met.

Teaching Note: 8B07D18 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Forecasting
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 15:
Operations Planning and Scheduling

HALF A CENTURY OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT AT WAL-MART
P. Fraser Johnson, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B12D010
Publication Date: 4/19/2012
Revision Date: 11/12/2013
Length: 23 pages

In 2012, a stock analyst was preparing a recommendation on what his firm, a large U.S. investment house, should do with its stake in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer, was trying to recover from a series of missteps that had seen competitors such as dollar stores and Amazon.com close the performance gap. Competitors had copied many aspects of Wal-Mart’s distribution system, including cross-docking products, eliminating storage time in warehouses, positioning stores around distribution centres, and widespread adoption of electronic data interchange (EDI), as well as ordering and shipping from suppliers.

Teaching Note: 8B12D010 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Operations Analysis; Supply Chain Management; Supplier Relations; Competitive Advantage; Scheduling; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NECANKO, INC.
Carol Prahinski

Product Number: 9B04D020
Publication Date: 9/12/2004
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 2 pages

Necanko Inc. is a large international food manufacturer. A buyer-scheduler for the company must forecast sales demand to determine production planning, inventory management and distribution for the year. Sales were normally predictable and stable, but the company has just come back from a three month layoff due to slow sales and they are now experiencing a sales increase three times greater than usual. The buyer-scheduler is uncertain why the sales are spiking and must decide what action to take.

Teaching Note: 8B04D20 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Production Scheduling; Bullwhip Effect; Uncertainty; Marketing Channels
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



QUINTE MRI
Carol Prahinski, John S. Haywood-Farmer, David Wright, Kevin Saskiw

Product Number: 9B02D024
Publication Date: 1/10/2003
Revision Date: 11/30/2009
Length: 15 pages

Quinte MRI is a small service provider of medical diagnostic technologies. After just six weeks in operation at a medical centre, the company developed an extensive waiting list, and physicians began referring patients to competing facilities. Quinte MRI's business development coordinators must provide recommendations and an action plan to deal with this process and productivity problem in a setting with extreme variability.

Teaching Note: 8B02D24 (22 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Bottlenecks; Scheduling; Process Analysis; Capacity Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Resource Planning

ATHLETIC KNIT
David Wood, Dina Ribbink

Product Number: 9B12D020
Publication Date: 8/31/2012
Revision Date: 7/17/2017
Length: 7 pages

This case investigates issues of obsolescence and inventory control in a local sportswear company that is competing on the global stage with both multinational corporations and foreign, low-cost distributors. Athletic Knit, a family-owned company in Toronto, faces the need to balance peak-season demand during the third quarter of the year with the available knitting production capacity. Inventory, if it serves a purpose, can be an asset to a company, but too much inventory can be a liability. Trade-offs between capacity, inventory, and flexibility to meet custom orders must be met to support corporate strategy. Given the competitive nature of the industry, tighter inventory controls are essential, but the company must weigh endangering its reputation for fast responses to custom orders with managing inventory to prevent stock-outs and/or overruns of stock that cannot be sold.

Teaching Note: 8B12D020 (9 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Inventory Analysis; Economic Order Quantity; Aggregate Planning; Cost; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RIVERSIDE HOSPITAL'S PHARMACY SERVICES
Anne Snowdon, Hannah Standing Rasmussen

Product Number: 9B11D014
Publication Date: 1/31/2012
Revision Date: 2/6/2014
Length: 16 pages

Riverside District Memorial Hospital is a small rural hospital that must work within an operational budget that is determined by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. This case identifies the emergence of concerns for patient safety related to medication administration, and the challenges of ensuring that professional services are maintained by the pharmacy department to serve patients admitted to hospital. The chief nursing executive must decide what steps should be taken to reduce medication errors, in the context of the complex relationships at Riverside.

Teaching Note: 8B11D014 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health Care; Technological Change; Operations Analysis; Pharmacy; Drug Administration; Hospitals; Canada
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



SCOTTS MIRACLE-GRO: THE SPREADER SOURCING DECISION
John Gray, Michael Leiblein, Shyam Karunakaran

Product Number: 9B08M078
Publication Date: 11/14/2008
Revision Date: 6/22/2009
Length: 11 pages

The Scotts Miracle-Gro company is the world's largest marketer of branded consumer lawn and garden products, with a full range of products for professional horticulture as well. Headquartered in Marysville, Ohio, the company is a market leader in a number of consumer lawn and garden and professional horticultural products. The case describes a series of decisions regarding the ownership and organization of the assets used to manufacture fertilizer spreaders. This case is intended to illustrate the application of and tradeoffs between financial, strategic and operations perspectives in a relatively straightforward manufacturing make-buy decision. The case involves a well-known, easily-described product that most students would assume is made overseas. Sufficient information is provided to roughly estimate the direct financial cost associated with internal (domestic) production, offshore (non-domestic) production and outsourced production. In addition, information is included that may be used to estimate potential transaction costs as well as costs associated with foreign exchange risk.

Teaching Note: 8B08M78 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Human Resources Management; Outsourcing; Globalization; Operations Management; Supply Chain Management; Operations Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate