Ivey Publishing

Marketing: An Introduction

Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Trifts, V., Buchwitz, L.A.,5/e (Canada, Pearson, 2015)
Prepared By Eunika Sot,
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Marketing: Creating and Capturing Customer Value

VISA INC. AND THE GLOBAL PAYMENTS INDUSTRY
Neil Bendle, Dan Horne

Product Number: 9B14A018
Publication Date: 5/29/2014
Revision Date: 5/29/2014
Length: 8 pages

A manager, preparing for an interview with Visa Inc., seeks to understand the nature of the global payments industry and Visa Inc.'s position within it. The case outlines the industry's history and current practice through extensive use of publicly reported information. The public information allows answers to some important questions. What does Visa Inc. do? How competitive is the industry? And what is the source of Visa Inc.'s competitive advantage? Student spreadsheet is available, see 7B14A018.

Teaching Note: 8B14A018 (11 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Industry analysis; strategy; credit card; market share; North America
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CARDSWAP: CONVERTING UNWANTED GIFT CARDS INTO CASH
Neil Bendle, Michael Taylor

Product Number: 9B11A034
Publication Date: 9/22/2011
Length: 12 pages

CardSwap was an online service that provided consumers with the opportunity to convert unwanted gift cards into hard cash. The co-founder felt convinced that his small Canadian company created great value for its customers. After all, there were around a billion dollars of unwanted gift cards entering circulation every year. People who owned these unwanted gift cards would surely want to use the CardSwap service. CardSwap could offer a strong value proposition to consumers while ensuring a healthy return through commissions on every transaction. Problems remained, however, as CardSwap was a relatively small company and had no access to the multi-million-dollar advertising budgets that might be needed to get a message out to consumers through an extensive multi-media strategy. How much should the company be willing to spend to acquire a customer? How best could this new company use its limited resources to communicate to customers the benefits of CardSwap?

Teaching Note: 8B11A034 (12 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Customer Value; Creating Value; Gift Cards; Marketing Communications
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



SAMSUNG TESCO HOMEPLUS AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Youngchan Kim, Kwangho Ahn

Product Number: 9B09M040
Publication Date: 7/13/2009
Revision Date: 7/29/2009
Length: 17 pages

Samsung Tesco Homeplus (STH), one of Korea's large hypermarkets, increased its investment in social contribution activities and systemized the organization in charge in the aftermath. It especially focused on education and cultural services, saving the environment and sharing with others. As a consequence, by December 2008, STH was considered one of the most innovative companies and one that realized true customer value. It had won a variety of awards, such as the Green Management award, Social Contribution Company award and the Eco-friendly Management award. After creating a corporate social responsibility (CSR) team in 2005, it won the CSR award given by the British Chamber of Commerce in Korea and was selected as one of Korea's Most Admired Companies. While much progress had been made, company executives wondered what factors would be the keys to their continuing CSR activities. This case presents points of contention and issues in the practice of corporate social responsibility by STH. Social contribution activities and STH were aligned with both sustainable management and customer value-oriented management. Various activities in extended education, environment and charity ultimately led customers to view STH as not just a discount store that simply sold products, but a value store. STH conducted systematic programs and activities in the areas of extended education environment and charity after having declared itself a social contribution company. This case illustrates how a company can develop its social contribution activities. In addition, discussion will centre on the long-term impacts that social contribution activities have on enterprises.

Teaching Note: 8B09M40 (10 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Corporate Social Responsibility; Customer Value Management; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Company and Marketing Strategy: Partnering to Build Customer Relationships

MARKS AND SPENCER ENTERS CHINA
Jane Menzies, Ilan Alon, Jennifer Dugosh

Product Number: 9B12A036
Publication Date: 2/26/2013
Revision Date: 2/20/2013
Length: 18 pages

Marks and Spencer (M&S) had first ventured into international markets 70 years ago. By 2012, M&S had 337 stores in 41 countries. Although M&S saw itself as a U.K. retailer that exported its products, the company had been attempting to reduce its dependency on the U.K. economic cycle. Its goal was to increase international sales from £800 million to £1.0 billion by 2013/14. By 2020, M&S wanted to be an international, multi-channel retailer. When the company entered the Chinese market in 2008, it faced many difficulties. It had failed to conduct proper market research to understand the Chinese consumer, which had led to many issues. The company had neglected to address the cultural gaps between the United Kingdom and China. It had also taken an approach of standardizing its products, instead of adapting products to the new market. Students must consider the marketing mix policies of product, price, placement and promotion to recommend changes to M&S’s entry into China.

Teaching Note: 8B12A036 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China market entry; culture; emerging markets; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NORTHERN DRILLING INC.: THE MOND NICKEL CONTRACT DECISION - A TACTICAL DILEMMA IN A GROWTH STRATEGY
Michael Taylor, Robert Bremner

Product Number: 9B12A038
Publication Date: 8/13/2012
Revision Date: 11/8/2012
Length: 9 pages

Northern Drilling Inc., an exploration diamond-drilling contractor, has been asked to tender a bid for a lucrative, highly complex contract with Mond Nickel. Northern has no drills or crew currently available to work on the contract, which requires experienced drillers. Compounding the issue is a shortage of skilled labour in the industry. At the same time, Northern's biggest client, Noranda Nickel, is seeing poor geological results on a job in the same area. Northern's management needs to decide whether to incur additional costs and leave a capacity cushion in an effort to maintain its excellent relationship with its current client, or whether it should instead utilize the drills on the new job. The primary issue facing Northern's management is whether Northern can handle the new contract, both financially and technically, without compromising the current job.

Teaching Note: 8B12A038 (13 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Limits to Strategic Growth; Strategic Tools; Growth Plans; Projections of Resources Required; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TEN THOUSAND VILLAGES OF CINCINNATI: THE FIRST YEAR AND BEYOND
Mary Conway Dato-on

Product Number: 9B10A008
Publication Date: 6/10/2010
Length: 15 pages

Ten Thousand Villages (TTV) is a nonprofit fair trade retail organization with a store located in Cincinnati, Ohio. During the store's opening and first two years of operations (2002-2004), Karen, the chair of the board of directors, and Cheryl, the store manager, struggle to develop a customer-focused plan to ensure sales increases for their unique operation. Marketing issues ranging from store location selection to inventory selection and promotion are presented. In addition to covering an alternative method of doing business - nonprofit enterprise - the case provides a platform for customer relationship management (CRM) implementation in a small, nonprofit environment.

Teaching Note: 8B10A08 (8 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Not-For-Profit Marketing; Fair Trade; Retailing; Customer Value Segmentation
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



CINEPLEX ENTERTAINMENT: THE LOYALTY PROGRAM
Kenneth G. Hardy, Renee Zatzman

Product Number: 9B08A008
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Revision Date: 5/15/2009
Length: 17 pages

In 2007, the marketing director for Cineplex Entertainment is trying to decide whether or not to proceed with a loyalty program that would provide incentives for customers to see more movies and events, and spend more on concessions. An important by-product would be the collection of detailed customer buying data. She has crafted four possible combinations of rewards and received proposals from three suppliers with experience in managing customer data banks. She must decide the structure and richness of the program, the supplier, the likely response rate to determine financial feasibility, and whether to launch regionally or nationally.

Teaching Note: 8B08A08 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: New Product Launch; Customer Relationship Management; Loyalty Programs
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Sustainable Marketing: Social Responsibility and Ethics

SAFE WATER NETWORK IN INDIA
Neena Sondhi, Sajjan Raj Singhvi

Product Number: 9B13A047
Publication Date: 2/3/2014
Revision Date: 1/31/2014
Length: 17 pages

Safe Water Network, a charity initiative focused on providing underserved populations with clean drinking water, established its first site in the village of Nizampally, India. This initiative was unique in a number of ways in its conception as well as its execution. Firstly, after vigorous assessment of the identified region, demand-driven solutions were customized to deal with the specific water-related issues of the region. Secondly, it was supported by prominent Indian and international companies who not only provided monetary support but also extended assistance in terms of technology, assessment and further research. Thirdly, the project was economically sustainable and required active participation and ownership by the community it served. Safe Water Network’s directors hoped to scale up and sustain the adoption of the Safe Water project. The commitment and participation of the villagers was truly heartening but would this enthusiasm continue? Would the villagers see value in this expenditure? Were there any barriers to the project’s adoption?

Teaching Note: 8B13A047 (17 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Social marketing; consumer attitude; change; sustainable marketing; rural consumers; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



"OUR BEER PRINT": BREWING CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY AT MOLSON COORS
Mary Weil, Chitra P. Reddin

Product Number: 9B13A026
Publication Date: 11/19/2013
Revision Date: 11/19/2013
Length: 14 pages

Molson Coors’ chief corporate responsibility officer has been tasked to use the company’s efforts toward global corporate responsibility to drive its global competitiveness. He must roll out new corporate responsibility initiatives to engage employees across the company’s range of geographic locations.

Teaching Note: 8B13A026 (9 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Corporate responsibility; sustainability; communications; responsible sourcing; United States
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



BIO-VERT: GREEN TO WHAT LIMIT?
Raymond L. Paquin, Catherine Bedard, Genevieve Grainger

Product Number: 9B12A035
Publication Date: 12/18/2012
Revision Date: 12/18/2012
Length: 18 pages

Bio-Vert is a leading Canadian brand of eco-cleaning products manufactured by Quebec-based Savons Prolav. Run by a brother and sister team, Savons Prolav bases its products on their vision, which includes eco-friendliness, affordability and effectiveness. Demand for Bio-Vert’s phosphate-free detergents has increased dramatically since the 2007 blue-green algae bloom outbreaks in Quebec’s waterways and subsequent legislation restricting phosphate use in cleaning products. However, now that “green” cleaning products have become more mainstream, Savons Prolav faces the issue of how to adapt and grow in an increasingly crowded marketplace. This discussion considers how Savons Prolav can remain competitive in this difficult industry segment while maintaining its environmental focus.

This case highlights the pressures that an SME with strong environmental values faces in a competitive market. It includes a portrait of the cleaning products industry, consumer patterns with regards to eco-friendly products, and a background of the provincial socio-environmental event that triggered increased demand for green cleaning products in Quebec. Savons Prolav’s history, business model and core values are discussed along with potential growth options. Details on related industry, societal and marketing perspectives are provided to guide the reader through the advantages and disadvantages inherent to each opportunity.


Teaching Note: 8B12A035 (9 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Sustainability; SME; product strategy; Canada
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



FIJI WATER AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - GREEN MAKEOVER OR "GREENWASHING"?
James McMaster, Jan Nowak

Product Number: 9B09A008
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

This case analysis traces the establishment and subsequent operation of FIJI Water LLC and its bottling subsidiary, Natural Waters of Viti Limited, the first company in Fiji extracting, bottling and marketing, both domestically and internationally, artesian water coming from a virgin ecosystem found on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. The case reviews the growth and market expansion of this highly successful company with the brand name FIJI Natural Artesian Water (FIJI Water). The company has grown rapidly over the past decade and a half, and now exports bottled water into many countries in the world from its production plant located in the Fiji Islands. In 2008, FIJI Water was the leading imported bottled water brand in the United States. In the context of great marketing success of the FIJI brand, particularly in the U.S. market, the case focuses on how the company has responded to a number of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, including measuring and reducing its carbon footprint, responsibilities to key stakeholders, and concerns of the Fiji government with regard to taxation and transfer pricing issues. The case provides a compelling illustration of how CSR challenges may jeopardize the sustainability of a clever marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B09A08 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environment; Corporate Responsibility; Marketing Communication; Transfer Pricing; International Marketing; Greenwashing; Green Marketing; Brand Positioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Analyzing the Marketing Environment

THE BEER CASES (A): A-B INBEV
Andrew Karl Delios, Donna Jimenez

Product Number: 9B11M124
Publication Date: 1/24/2012
Length: 18 pages

The beer industry comprises elements of sub-national, national and global competition. To expand, the industry players use various strategic approaches as illustrated by five major beer companies: Anheuser-Busch InBev, Groupo Modelo (9B11M125), Tsingtao Brewery (9B11M126), San Miguel (9B09M074) and Thai Bev (9B13M065). Observations about the beer industry — a fairly easy product and industry to understand — can be extrapolated to other industries. Lessons can be drawn regarding the influence of industry pressures on the four key components of an international expansion strategy: product choice for expansion, market choice for geographic expansion, timing of entry and mode of entry.

Teaching Note: 8B11M124 (16 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Industry Analysis; Strategic Acquisitions; Global Strategy; Industry Globalization; Strategic Alliances; Beer Industry; Ivey/NUS
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOUVEAU EVENT PLANNING: THE WEDDING EXTRAVAGANZA
Neil Bendle, Rocky Campana

Product Number: 9B11A042
Publication Date: 10/17/2011
Length: 16 pages

Since 1988, Nouveau Event Planning has been operating the largest wedding expo in Windsor, Canada, an event called the Wedding Extravaganza. In 2001, the Wedding Odyssey became the second wedding expo in Windsor, and started to pose a significant threat to the Wedding Extravaganza. Now in 2011, the owner of Nouveau Event Planning must make strategic decisions involving pricing, customer retention, and selection of an appropriate target market. She must also determine the best course of action for the exhibition through analysis of the competitive landscape and future potential of the wedding industry.

Teaching Note: 8B11A042 (7 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Competition; Differentiation; Market Analysis; New Entrants, Event Planning; Wedding Industry; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HYUNDAICARD'S MARKETING STRATEGY
Chansoo Park, Ronald D. Camp

Product Number: 9B09A028
Publication Date: 12/23/2009
Length: 20 pages

In the competitive South Korean credit card market, a review of the past decade of HyundaiCard's marketing strategies and evaluation of anticipated possible difficulties of being a market follower revealed several challenges for senior management. Despite a tremendously successful creative business model based on customer needs, innovative products and integration of online and offline customers, the company's performance had not progressed in the past seven years. HyundaiCard had difficulty relating its creative business model to the strong personas of the leading players in the credit card industry. How could HyundaiCard, a market follower, successfully position itself as a market leader? Could HyundaiCard's marketing strategy keep enhancing its competitive edge in the market? What future strategy would be best for HyundaiCard?

Teaching Note: 8B09A28 (9 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Market Analysis; Market Segmentation; Consumer Marketing; Credit Card Business; Marketing Management; Promotion Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LAUNCH OF THE SONY PLAYSTATION 3
Gloria Barczak, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B07A014
Publication Date: 8/3/2007
Revision Date: 6/28/2012
Length: 18 pages

The PlayStation 3 (PS3) was the successor of the acclaimed PlayStation 2 (PS2), recognized as the world's best-selling video game console with more than 100 million units sold. The unprecedented display of enthusiasm for the PS3 suggested that Sony had another winner on its hands. The company projected sales of six million PS3 consoles worldwide between November 2006 and March 2007, a level that the PS2 took almost a year to reach. Sony's initial euphoria was short-lived. By February 2007, more than a third of PS3 consoles remained unsold, while some retailers reported a higher number of returns than sales. Consumers said they felt let down by Sony. The PS3 looked no better than Microsoft's Xbox 360, they complained, even though the Xbox 360 had already been on the market for more than a year, and sold for $200 less than the PS3. Customers also lamented the PS3's lack of interesting games, spotty support for PlayStation 2 games, and uninspiring online capabilities. Meanwhile, Nintendo's inexpensive and quirky Wii console had become all the rage, despite its underpowered processor and comparatively basic graphics. The case examines the characteristics of a successful new product launch, particularly product features, brand loyalty, content availability, third-party support, and adherence to industry standards. The case also considers how radical innovations can be used to win market share from technically superior products focused on incremental innovations. Finally, we use a 4P marketing analysis to compare video game systems offered by Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo.

Teaching Note: 8B07A14 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Product Design/Development; New Products; Generating Profit from New Technology; Market Strategy; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Managing Marketing Information to Gain Customer Insights

SALESBRAIN LLC - B2B COMMUNICATIONS
Dante Pirouz, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B12A005
Publication Date: 2/21/2012
Revision Date: 2/17/2012
Length: 12 pages

In May 2010, the “chief pain officer” of SalesBrain, a neuroscience-based marketing research and coaching company located in California, has been approached for advice by the marketing head of Digital Technology International (DTI), a Utah-based provider of technology solutions for the global publishing industry. DTI has been struggling with communicating the core value proposition of its offerings to customers, including leading newspaper publishers. Its frontline people are delivering messages that are technical, jargon-filled, and complex. Publisher-customers are unable to understand quickly how the technology solutions being offered by DTI can help them become competitive. The sales messages are also not consistent.

SalesBrain is suggesting a three-step process wherein it will identify the “pain points” being experienced by the publisher-customers of DTI; create a compelling set of claims that DTI could offer about its technology products; and guide its frontline salespersons towards developing appropriate sales scripts that they could use with prospective clients. SalesBrain is deploying the cutting-edge tools of neuroscience marketing in each of the three processes. The chief pain officer must choose between Layered Voice Analysis and Facial Action Coding System as a medium to serve the needs of DTI.


Teaching Note: 8B12A005 (4 pages)
Industry: Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services
Issues: Business to Business Marketing; Marketing Research; Sales Management; Newspapers; Consumer Neuroscience; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMPBELL SOUP: GAINING CUSTOMER INSIGHTS THROUGH MARKETING RESEARCH
Dante Pirouz, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B11A029
Publication Date: 10/11/2011
Revision Date: 8/15/2016
Length: 14 pages

In early 2008, Campbell Soup Company, a global food and beverage enterprise, is experimenting with a new way of understanding the mindset of its consumers. This has been prompted by the stagnation in sales of its soup products in the United States, its home market, where the soups category has matured. For decades, the company’s focus in marketing research has been on tracking how the end users, having bought its soup products at stores, consume them at home. But now, it is keen on tracking the shoppers while they are searching the retail aisles. The company is planning to deploy the techniques of consumer neuroscience, a relatively new discipline, for this purpose.

Teaching Note: 8B11A029 (9 pages)
Issues: Consumer Neuroscience; Packaged Goods Marketing; Consumer Insights; Merchandising and Retailing; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PILLSBURY COOKIE CHALLENGE
Allison Johnson, Natalie Mauro

Product Number: 9B11A001
Publication Date: 2/3/2011
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 14 pages

The Canadian Pillsbury ready-baked goods cookie line is experiencing disappointing performance, and the marketing manager at General Mills Canada Corporation is under pressure to make strategic decisions that will help turn around the segment. The marketing manager has engaged the help of the consumer insight team to conduct market research studies that will shed light on consumers and their attitudes, behaviours, and preferences towards the product. The results from the market research studies have arrived, and the students, assuming the role of the marketing manager, must filter through them to determine how this information can be used to improve the performance of the cookie segment. More specifically, students will need to determine where the greatest opportunities lie, who the team should target, what brand messaging is the most relevant, and what type of communication plan would be most effective.

Teaching Note: 8B11A001 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cross-cultural Differences; Customer Segmentation; Brand Positioning; Value Proposition; Market Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Understanding Consumer and Business Buyer Behaviour

THE POPCORN PREDICAMENT: COMPETITION, CONFLICT AND BUYING BEHAVIOUR
Michael Taylor

Product Number: 9B12A021
Publication Date: 6/22/2012
Revision Date: 6/18/2012
Length: 2 pages

This B2B role-play case, with its six supplements, is a six part interaction between competing Original Equipment Manufacturers, Distributors and End Users, each with their own business priorities. It is an excellent case to explore organizational buying behaviour, the discipline of the selling process, and the management of sales resources (time) as an asset. It can be included in an introductory marketing course at the MBA or undergraduate level. It is equally effective for executive development. It also fits in a B2B marketing course to explore organizational buying behaviour, or in the introduction module of a sales management course.

Teaching Note: 8B12A021 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales Force Resource Management; Selling Process; Channel Management; North America
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FRET AND REGRET: A CONSUMER DECISION-MAKING DILEMMA
June Cotte, Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

Product Number: 9B12A018
Publication Date: 5/10/2012
Revision Date: 5/10/2012
Length: 3 pages

As a birthday present, Mike has just been given a new smartphone by his girlfriend, Molly. However, it is not the phone he wants. Over the course of a few days, Mike struggles with the decision of whether to return the phone and get the one he wants, or keep the one he received as a gift. The case is written from the perspective of the consumer, and deals with consumer behaviour issues such as anticipatory regret. It would be useful in an introductory marketing or undergraduate consumer behaviour course.

Teaching Note: 8B12A018 (3 pages)
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Mobile Telephones; United States
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



BOISE AUTOMATION CANADA LTD.: THE LOST ORDER AT NORTHERN PAPER (A) (REVISED)
Michael Taylor

Product Number: 9B12A008
Publication Date: 3/9/2012
Revision Date: 6/11/2015
Length: 13 pages

A senior account manager at Boise Automation Canada Ltd. was disappointed with the news that he had just lost the $1.2 million order with Northern Paper Inc. (Northern), a paper mill. The opportunity was to design, supply, and install an automated control system for Northern’s wood-chip handling system. He had over 20 years’ experience selling automation systems in heavy industry, and had he won the order it would have easily put him over his target quota for 2011 and significantly boosted his incentive payout. Now, with less than three months before the end of the year, he was unlikely to meet his target for the year. The senior account manager wanted to understand what had gone wrong, and to learn from the experience in order to avoid repeating it. What should he have done differently? See supplement 9B15A029.

Teaching Note: 8B12A008 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Selling process; sales force resource management; organizational buying behaviour; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning

SODASTREAM TAKES ON COKE AND PEPSI
Ram Subramanian

Product Number: 9B14M038
Publication Date: 4/24/2014
Revision Date: 4/24/2014
Length: 11 pages

SodaStream International Limited is an Israel-based company that pioneered the home carbonation market. It sells soda makers that enable the consumer to prepare at home sparkling water or a variety of flavoured carbonated beverages. After its initial public offering in 2010, its chief executive officer sought to aggressively grow the company and set a $1 billion revenue target (from 2012 revenues of $436.32 million) by principally focusing on the U.S. market, the largest in the world for non-carbonated beverages. In addition to going up against global beverage behemoths, Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo — whose advertising budgets alone are five to eight times SodaStream’s revenues — SodaStream faces new competitors in Green Mountain Coffee Roasters and Primo Water Corporation, who pose a direct challenge to its ambitious goal.

Teaching Note: 8B14M038 (7 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: business model; disruptive innovation; beverages; Israel; United States
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ABERCROMBIE & FITCH: IS IT UNETHICAL TO BE EXCLUSIVE?
Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, June Cotte, Danae Blanchard

Product Number: 9B14A009
Publication Date: 4/9/2014
Revision Date: 4/9/2014
Length: 5 pages

The CEO of clothing manufacturer and retailer Abercrombie and Fitch defends his decision that the company will not offer plus sizes for women, although extra large sizes are available for men, because average- to large-sized female consumers do not fit the company’s target market. This insistence on a standard of female beauty as young, svelte and tall has enraged consumers who have criticized the company, and the CEO in particular, in both the traditional and social media for exacerbating problems of body image and gender stereotypes, especially among teens. Increasing sizes, however, presents not only logistical and manufacturing challenges but may lead to charges that the company is encouraging obesity and unhealthy lifestyles as happened when a competitor, H&M, introduced large-size models and mannequins in its stores. Abercrombie and Fitch’s popularity with its target teen market depends on its promulgation of exclusivity, which in turn depends on its vision of what is “cool.” Yet, in the face of mounting criticism and declining sales, does sticking to the segmentation strategy make sense?

Teaching Note: 8B14A009 (3 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing ethics; social media; targeting/segmentation; United States
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



EVOE SPRING SPA: A POSITIONING DILEMMA
Ashita Aggarwal, Renuka Kamath, Sunil Rao

Product Number: 9B13A051
Publication Date: 1/13/2014
Revision Date: 2/27/2014
Length: 16 pages

The co-founders of Evoe Spring Spa need to decide on the positioning of their business in the nascent Indian spa market. Indian consumers perceive spas as an expensive indulgence for the rich, and some spa services are seen as socially and culturally unacceptable. As a result, the co-founders need to build this category by changing consumer attitudes toward spa services. To identify the target segment and the best positioning for Evoe, the co-founders study the market and their competitors and conduct qualitative consumer research. In the end, they must choose from three viable positioning concepts.

Teaching Note: 8B13A051 (13 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Positioning; segmentation; targeting; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



HCL BEANSTALK: ALL-IN-ONE DESKTOP RE-LAUNCH
Jaydeep Mukherjee, Rahul Seth

Product Number: 9B13A012
Publication Date: 7/11/2013
Revision Date: 9/20/2016
Length: 15 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Best case in the Marketing category, 2012 ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition. HCL Infosystems Ltd. is a reputable computer hardware firm and a major player in the Indian desktop market. Due to changes in consumer behaviour, the desktop market is shrinking and demand is shifting towards laptops, where HCL has a miniscule presence. At the same time, the desktop market is witnessing the emergence of a new form of devices called all-in-ones (AIOs). HCL needs a significant presence in AIOs to retain its position in the Indian PC market. The company was an early entrant in the Indian AIO market in 2007 and sought to capture a niche market for its premium range, but did not succeed and withdrew its product line. The category has, in the last four years, grown in the mass market segment and HCL needs a successful relaunch of the HCL Beanstalk AIO in the face of intense competition from multinational competitors who have a head start. The problem is compounded by the fact that the HCL brand is losing market share and that the company lacks the financial resources to invest heavily in brand building. HCL’s management believes that the Beanstalk needs to capture eight per cent of the retail segment of the Indian AIO market in order to be able to gain the same share in the business-to-business market, which is slower to adopt new technologies.

Teaching Note: 8B13A012 (14 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: New product launch; product relaunch; marketing plan; computer market; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



THE BEAUTY OF SORBET
Margaret Sutherland, Verity Hawarden

Product Number: 9B12A039
Publication Date: 8/3/2012
Revision Date: 8/16/2012
Length: 10 pages

HIGHLY COMMENDED CASE - African Business Cases Runner-up, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. This case chronicles the origins and growth of Sorbet, a chain of beauty salons targeting upper income women in South African metropolitan areas. Owner Ian Fuhr identified an opportunity to redefine the beauty salon experience in South Africa by offering customers a service unlike anything in the industry. He carefully managed human resources to motivate employees and grow the client base. To complement this, the company started an external beauty therapy school to improve staff and train potential employees. In addition, Fuhr stressed the importance of growing brand awareness and carefully adjusted the company’s sales mix to maximize all potential profit margins, all while developing a customer-centric culture. By 2011, two new businesses had been launched under the Sorbet brand (wellness services; event management). Such expansion plus regional diversification options all had to be considered while keeping service quality levels high.

Teaching Note: 8B12A039 (12 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Brand Positioning; Brand Personality; Brand Awareness; Brand Management; Human Resources Management; Marketing Strategy; Employee Branding; Employee Participation; South Africa
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 8:
Developing and Managing Products and Services

AJANTA PACKAGING
Sandeep Puri

Product Number: 9B13A049
Publication Date: 1/31/2014
Revision Date: 1/29/2014
Length: 7 pages

The Indian packaging industry — represented by a mix of paperboard, plastics, metals and glass — had seen great change leading up to 2013. In 2012, Ajanta Packaging ranked among the top suppliers of glass bottles in India with an employee base of more than 50 and net revenues of US$100 million. The glass-bottle industry had a derived demand and depended on major industries using glass bottles in India, such as the liquor and beer, soft-drinks and pharmaceutical industries.

The case discusses the stiff competition faced by the glass-bottle industry from different packaging options and materials that had entered the industry in the last four to five years. It assesses the changing market dynamics that could have a big impact on the future of Ajanta Packaging, with many companies shifting to PET bottles, Tetra Pak, flexible packaging and other innovative packaging solutions, to reduce costs and improve the durability of products. Ajanta Packaging was highly dependent on glass-bottle sales, as 95 per cent of its revenue came from them. Should it carry on with the same product range, exploit the declining glass-bottle industry with more customers of glass bottles or enhance its product range with more varieties of PET bottles?


Teaching Note: 8B13A049 (8 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Business environment; CRM; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PEARSON'S SUCCESSMAKER: PUTTING THE CUSTOMER FIRST IN TRANSFORMING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES
T.S. Raghu, Collin Sellman

Product Number: 9B11E040
Publication Date: 2/23/2012
Length: 13 pages

Pearson Plc is an education company that operates worldwide, with headquarters in London, England. Its six primary business units are North American Education, International Education, Professional, The Financial Times, Interactive Data, and Penguin Publishing. The vice president of product management within the Digital Learning division of the North American Education unit based in Chandler, Arizona, begins to transform the product development processes to better meet the needs of his customers in the education market, specifically in transitioning from using an off-shored Waterfall software development model to an on-shore Agile model.

When the vice president first joined Pearson a year earlier, the Digital Learning unit had spent significant resources developing a major upgrade for one of its educational software products. The first version of this new product was challenged by the disconnect between what the software development group was delivering and what the vice president’s customers desired. He is now faced with a decision to continue focusing on the specific methodology the group had implemented (Scrum) or move to a new one (Kanban). Additionally, he has to consider expanding his focus to help drive Agile methodologies both with other groups in his business unit and outside his business unit. These decisions must be made at a potentially critical time for his products as his organization deals with the growing pains associated with the shift to Agile.


Teaching Note: 8B11E040 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Product Development; Process Design; Agile Methodology; Systems Development; Educational Software; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DO IT SHOW: A NEW MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE IN KOREA
Youngchan Kim, Changjo Yoo

Product Number: 9B08A012
Publication Date: 8/28/2008
Revision Date: 5/12/2010
Length: 18 pages

This case presents points of contention and issues in the brand launch of a new telecommunication service of KTF, one of Korea's mobile telecommunication companies. As the second-place player in the 2G service market, which offered voice and text-messaging services, KTF decided to be the number one player in the new 3G service market, which offered stable video communication and high-speed data transmission as well as voice and text-messaging services. To do so, KTF developed a new brand, called SHOW, and implemented various integrated marketing communication (IMC) strategies to attract customers. After only four months since its launch, KTF had successfully attracted more than one million members. Several critical points for successfully launching a new brand in the mobile telecommunication service can be determined from this case. The introduction highlights the success of KTF's new brand launch strategy. Then the mobile telecommunication service market situation in South Korea is summarized. The next section provides a brief explanation of KTF and its new brand launch strategy in the 3G service market, covering topics from the market survey for 3G service to the brand-building processes. This is followed by an examination of how KTF used marketing-integrated communication for its new SHOW 3G service brand. Finally, the competitor's reaction to KTF's successful brand launch is summarized.

Teaching Note: 8B08A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Mobile Communication Industry; Brands; New Brand Launching Strategy; Integrated Marketing Strategy; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Brand Strategy and Management

WONDER LA: A BRAND IN THE SERVICE OF FUN
Sanal Kumar Velayudhan, Kochouseph Chittilappilly

Product Number: 9B14A004
Publication Date: 5/23/2014
Revision Date: 4/23/2014
Length: 16 pages

The performance of Wonderla, the leader in the amusement park industry in South India, for the year 2011/12 could not be better. It grew at 30 per cent with more than one million customers visiting each of its two parks in Kochi and Bangalore. It also completed the development of a three-star hotel in its Bangalore park. Its growth is creating challenges that it has not faced before. The chief executive officer is concerned with the issue of prioritizing investment among its different businesses as the existing amusement parks are growing and new parks are being planned in two new locations. At the same time, effort is required to create demand for the hotel business. The concern extends beyond investment to examining the option of leveraging the brand Wonderla, which stands for “Fun,” to its hotel, with attendant implications for that business and for the brand and its image.

Teaching Note: 8B14A004 (13 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Brand; service; entertainment; hospitality; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



LOUIS VUITTON IN JAPAN
Justin Paul, Charlotte Feroul

Product Number: 9B10M067
Publication Date: 10/19/2010
Revision Date: 2/22/2017
Length: 20 pages

This case deals with the opportunities and challenges of Louis Vuitton, the leading European luxury-sector multinational firm, in Japan, taking into account the unique features of brand management and integrating culture and consumer behaviour in Japan. In the last decade, Japan has been Louis Vuitton’s most profitable market, but the global economic crisis has presented challenges.

Facing a weak economy and a shift in consumer preferences, Louis Vuitton has been adapting its unique strategy in the Japanese market. The days of relying on a logo and a high price seem to be gone, as there is more interest in craftsmanship and value for money. To promote sales, the company has had to launch less expensive collections made with cheaper materials. The brand has also been opening stores in smaller cities, where the lure of the logo still works.

Over the years, Japanese consumers have demonstrated fascination with and passion for the iconic brand. What have been the keys to Louis Vuitton’s successful business model in the Japanese market?


Teaching Note: 8B10M67 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Marketing; Strategic Management; Brand Management; Luxury Goods; Financial Crisis; Japan; France
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COLA WARS IN CHINA: THE FUTURE IS HERE
Niraj Dawar, Nancy Dai

Product Number: 9B03A006
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 18 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case won the Emerging Chinese Global Competitors, 2003 EFMD Case Writing Competition. The Wahaha Hangzhou Group Co. Ltd. is one of China's largest soft-drink producers. One of the company's products, Future Cola, was launched a few years ago to compete with Coca Cola and PepsiCo and has made significant progress in the soft-drink markets that were developed by these cola giants. The issue now is to maintain the momentum of growth in the face of major competition from the giant multinationals, and to achieve its goal of dominant market share.

Teaching Note: 8B03A06 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Market Strategy; Competition; Brand Management; Emerging Markets
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Pricing: Understanding and Capturing Customer Value

CUSTOMER SEGMENTATION AND BUSINESS MODEL EVOLUTION AT UNBOUNCE
Raymond Pirouz, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B14A029
Publication Date: 7/8/2014
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 7 pages

In December 2011, the co-founder of Unbounce, a Vancouver-based software services start-up, is considering expanding into the enterprise user space. Unbounce got its start providing turnkey landing pages — web pages specific to current advertising campaigns — to the small and medium-sized enterprise market. Within 18 months, the company has achieved thought leadership in this space, has a list of paying customers and has built its support team from six to 25 people. The challenge is that since the entire company is focused on its core market segment, entering the enterprise user space means that different capabilities will have to be developed. Will developing the enterprise user market prevent the competition from invading this space or will it mean alienating and perhaps losing its current customers? What is the best plan for going forward?

Teaching Note: 8B14A029 (4 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Social media; landing pages; monetization; growth; pricing strategy; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LUDHIANA CITY BUS SERVICES LIMITED: PRICING FOR PROFITS
Neeraj Pandey, Gaganpreet Singh

Product Number: 9B14A019
Publication Date: 5/26/2014
Revision Date: 5/26/2014
Length: 12 pages

Ludhiana City Bus Service Limited (LCBSL) was created to improve the urban transportation system in the city of Ludhiana, India. As per the existing pricing strategy, bus fares (one of key revenue source for LCBSL) were set by the state government. LCBSL management was convinced that there was ample scope for raising the bus fares. The partial project implementation had been generating a return on capital of 1.9 per cent. To reduce this breakeven period and achieve targeted returns on capital of 4 per cent, management was considering the option to increase fares across different distance categories. Would this price restructuring be a game changer for LCBSL and a benchmark pricing strategy for other city bus service projects to follow?

Teaching Note: 8B14A019 (8 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Pricing over product life; profit; target returns; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



A COUPLE OF SQUARES: PRICING FOR THE FUTURE (A)
Dante Pirouz, Raymond Pirouz, Dina Ribbink, Emily Chen-Bendle

Product Number: 9B13A004
Publication Date: 3/14/2013
Revision Date: 3/21/2013
Length: 14 pages

A small upscale bakery produces artisan-quality, hand-decorated cookies, generating $1 million in annual revenue. In the (A) case, the two co-owners investigate the role of pricing in driving growth for their business and allowing them to achieve several fundamental financial goals. In the (B) case 9B13A005, the partners explore the possibility of a website to drive direct-to-consumer sales on an e-commerce platform.

The multimedia elements of the case 7B13A004 will add to the richness of the conversation. (A higher price applies to this case due to color exhibits.)


Teaching Note: 8B13A004 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Pricing; Operations; Small Business; Social Media; B2C; B2B; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHRISTIE DIGITAL: MAXIMIZING THE DIGITAL CINEMA OPPORTUNITY (A)
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B12A044
Publication Date: 8/24/2012
Revision Date: 8/24/2012
Length: 18 pages

The co-president and co-CEO of Christie Digital, a digital projector firm based in Cypress, California, and Kitchener, Waterloo, is speaking with his counterpart and trying to decide how Christie should tackle the rest of the 65,000-screen theatre market that has not yet converted to digital. The co-president has to consider that Christie is one of three viable competitors in the market and that there is a real risk of rapidly declining margins if a price war breaks out.

Teaching Note: 8B12A044 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategy Implementation; Game Theory; Competitive Reaction; Pricing Strategy; Product Extension; Canada
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 11:
Marketing Channels: Retailing, and Wholesaling

THE ESPRESSO LANE TO GLOBAL MARKETS
Ilan Alon, Meredith Lohwasser

Product Number: 9B12M058
Publication Date: 5/23/2012
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 16 pages

Founded in Trieste, Italy, Illy marketed a unique blend of coffee drinks in over 140 countries and in more than 50,000 of the world’s best restaurants and coffeehouses. The company wanted to expand the reach of its own franchised coffee bar, Espressamente, through international expansion. Potential markets included Brazil, China, Germany, Japan, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The managing director of Espressamente knew that global expansion meant prioritizing markets, but where did the greatest potential lie? In addition to market selection, mode of entry was vital and included options such as exporting, franchising, and joint ventures. This case provides a practical example of the challenges faced in international business.

Teaching Note: 8B12M058 (7 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: International Market Selection; Modes of Entry; Franchising; Retailing; International Business; Coffee; Italy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANADA GOOSE INC.: AT A RETAIL CROSSROADS
June Cotte, Jesse Silvertown

Product Number: 9B09A012
Publication Date: 5/14/2009
Length: 12 pages

In June 2008, the president and owner of Canada Goose Inc. (Canada Goose), a producer of luxury sport jackets, was contemplating the future of his company. Despite recent years' steady growth in both his company and the industry in general, the president believed that a significant opportunity existed for Canada Goose to further cement itself as a market leader for this industry. The president was intrigued by two separate offers from national retailers in Canada. Both were in the form of long-term contracts; in the past Canada Goose had used such contracts to maintain successful relationships with its many distributors. The offers were lucrative; however, the president needed to consider whether the offers aligned with the company's current marketing strategy. Agreeing to stock its product through a national chain would be a departure from its current method of distribution through independently-owned regional retailers. Accepting either of the offers would not only potentially price these retailers out of the market but could also lead to the devaluation of the brand.

Teaching Note: 8B09A12 (3 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Brand Positioning; Brand Management; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEN & JERRY'S - JAPAN
James M. Hagen

Product Number: 9A99A037
Publication Date: 4/13/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 17 pages

The CEO of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc. needed to give sales and profits a serious boost; despite the company's excellent brand equity, it was losing market share and struggling to make a profit. The company's product was on store shelves in all U.S. states, but efforts to enter foreign markets had only been haphazard with non-U.S. sales accounting for just three per cent of total sales. The CEO needed to focus serious attention on entering the world's second largest ice cream market, Japan. An objective of Ben & Jerry's was to use the excess manufacturing capacity it had in the U.S., and it found that exporting ice cream from Vermont to Japan was feasible from a logistics and cost perspective. The company identified two leading partnering options. One was to give a Japanese convenience store chain exclusive rights to the product for a limited time. The other was to give long-term rights for all sales of the product in Japan to a Japanese-American who would build the brand. For the company to enter Japan in time for the upcoming summer season, it would have to be through one of these two partnering arrangements.

Teaching Note: 8A99A37 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Market Entry; International Marketing; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Communicating Customer Value: Advertising and Public Relations

TESLA MOTORS: BURNING UP THE ROAD TO MARKET DOMINATION OR DOOM
Dante Pirouz, Karam Putros

Product Number: 9B13A050
Publication Date: 2/4/2014
Revision Date: 4/16/2014
Length: 10 pages

Ten years after its founding, California-based Tesla Motors is close to becoming one of the world’s premier luxury car manufacturers. Its innovative design — using carbon fibre and aluminum rather than steel to construct body and parts — and technology — lithium ion battery packs rather than gasoline for power and a simple powertrain to provide maximum acceleration — make its models treasured options for eco-friendly and tech-savvy consumers as well as wealthy professionals. Relying almost entirely on word-of-mouth promotion through social media, the company sells its cars through factory stores in upscale malls rather than through dealerships and has built service centres to provide free battery charging. However, just as it is expanding into Europe and Asia and is contemplating buying its own factory to secure its battery supply, three of its cars have burst into flames following collisions, although no one has been injured. In addition, analysts claim that the company has been covering up its lack of cash flow by using non-generally accepted accounting principles for reporting its revenue. The CEO knows that the company has tremendous potential but is struggling with public relations problems arising from the crashes and questions about its financial stability and return on investment to investors.

Teaching Note: 8B13A050 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Electric cars; premium; sales; public relations; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NETFLIX: THE PUBLIC RELATIONS BOX OFFICE FLOP
Jana Seijts, Paul Bigus

Product Number: 9B12M049
Publication Date: 4/24/2012
Revision Date: 4/24/2012
Length: 12 pages

On the morning of September 19, 2011, the chief executive officer (CEO) of the online movie provider Netflix Incorporated became witness to growing public discontent and media criticism directed at the company. The previous evening, the CEO had announced on the company blog that Netflix would be splitting into two separate entities. With the proposed change, the Netflix DVD-by-mail service would be spun out and renamed Qwikster. The move would leave the Netflix brand to focus on offering online streamed entertainment. This was not the first time Netflix had caused large-scale consumer frustration, as a few months earlier in July 2011 the company had announced it would be increasing rates by as much as 60 per cent. The result was a loss of over one million Netflix subscribers by September 2011, representing the first time the company had ever lost subscribers from one quarter to the next. Although the split into two separate entities could be seen as a good business strategy, Netflix did not follow through with a well-developed communication plan. Moving forward, both Netflix and Qwikster had come to represent an unfortunate dichotomy, and Netflix’s management was in desperate need to develop better communications with disgruntled consumers or risk losing additional subscribers and lucrative profits to a number of growing competitors.

Teaching Note: 8B12M049 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Communications; Brands; Consumer Satisfaction; Pricing; Movie Rentals; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GREGORY SHINE DAYCARE
Matthew Thomson, Anthea Rowe

Product Number: 9B12A004
Publication Date: 2/24/2012
Revision Date: 2/24/2012
Length: 9 pages

The executive director of a daycare is trying to figure out how to address legal, financial, and safety issues stemming from an incident that occurred two months before, when a two-year-old boy broke his leg. Despite having no formal training in public relations or crisis management, the executive director felt she had handled the incident reasonably well: it seemed as though everything at the daycare had returned to normal. Still, the executive director couldn’t stop worrying that the daycare might experience further fallout from the incident.

Teaching Note: 8B12A004 (10 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Public Relations; Crisis Communication; Canada
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



CCM HOCKEY: THE RE-LAUNCH OF THE U+ PRO SKATE
Christopher A. Ross

Product Number: 9B11A038
Publication Date: 11/18/2011
Length: 18 pages

CCM Hockey had been losing market share to competitors in the hockey skate business. In order to counter this trend, in March 2008 the most innovative pair of hockey skates ever developed by CCM was made available to customers. Soon after the launch, however, some quality issues developed. In 2009, new and improved skates were put on the market but they looked identical to the previous model. Buyers were skeptical and, as a result, sales were poor. Both the trade and individual consumers had lost confidence in the brand. CCM returned to the drawing board and redesigned the skates but also decided to launch them in fall 2010, instead of the normal industry cycle time of spring 2010. The decision was complicated by a stagnant market and indistinct consumer segments. The brand manager and his assistant were faced with developing a strong launch strategy because the future of the CCM skate brand depended on it.

Teaching Note: 8B11A038 (12 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Brand Management; Integrated Marketing Communications; Product Positioning; Competitor Analysis; Product Management; Customer Analysis; Ice Hockey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Personal Selling and Sales Promotion

ADVANTAGE FOOD & BEVERAGE SALES REPRESENTATIVE
Michael A. Levin, Bruce C. Bailey

Product Number: 9B13A023
Publication Date: 11/7/2013
Revision Date: 11/1/2013
Length: 5 pages

Advantage Food & Beverage (AF&B), a sales and service vending machine company, has added an Avanti kiosk division and hired a sales representative to devote all their time to selling the kiosk service to businesses within a specific geographic market. In the first year of the kiosk operation, AF&B hired and fired three sales representatives while acquiring seven Avanti customers. A management review uncovered issues with the selling process and the lack of presentations to prospective customers. AF&B’s owner pondered the relationship between the personal selling process and AF&B’s current compensation approach for sales representatives. How could AF&B’s compensation approach be changed to meet senior management’s new emphasis on presentations, and how would the various options impact AF&B’s profit and loss statement?

Teaching Note: 8B13A023 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Sales; selling process; United States
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



PARKIN LABORATORIES: SALES TARGET DILEMMA
Sandeep Puri

Product Number: 9B13A017
Publication Date: 7/3/2013
Revision Date: 12/10/2013
Length: 7 pages

At the end of the year’s third quarter, the sales team at a generic-pharmaceutical company has achieved just 91 per cent of its sales target, and growth is less than what was anticipated. The general manager of sales needs to decide whether he can revise the sales targets for the last quarter of the year without compromising growth. He also needs to address the impact of launching a new product when the sales team is striving to achieve its budgets and devise strategies the sales team can use to achieve their sales targets during a selling downturn.

Teaching Note: 8B13A017 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales management; sales strategy; conflict management; pharmaceuticals; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PHARMA TALENT: PAYING SALES FORCE BONUSES WITHIN A FIXED BUDGET
Michael Taylor, Rocky Campana

Product Number: 9B12A041
Publication Date: 10/17/2012
Revision Date: 10/17/2012
Length: 9 pages

This case concerns the bonus structure for a representative sales team. Pharma Talent, a contract sales company for pharmaceutical companies across Canada, promised its clients that its representatives would drive sales at a lower cost than what the client would incur if it had its own sales force. Historically, it had contracts with products that targeted physicians (e.g., prescription drugs or medical devices); however, a new contract in Ontario involved an over-the-counter (OTC) product. Pharma Talent currently had a pay-for-performance bonus structure that had already been revised three times. Nevertheless, due to the structure of the different territories in Ontario, many sales team members thought the bonus was unfair and very discouraging, while its pay-for-performance structure did not meet the clients' needs.

Teaching Note: 8B12A041 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Sales Force Compensation; Resource Management; Sales Process; Retail Merchandising; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BOOTS: HAIR-CARE SALES PROMOTION
Robert J. Fisher, Murray J. Bryant, Pankaj Shandilya

Product Number: 9B05A022
Publication Date: 9/1/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 11 pages

Boots Group PLC, one of the best known and respected retail names in the United Kingdom, provided health and beauty products and advice that enhanced personal well being. The marketing manager at Boots was planning his sales promotion strategy for a line of professional hair-care products. The professional hair-care line consisted primarily of shampoos, conditioners and styling products (gels, wax, mousse, etc.) developed in collaboration with United Kingdom's top celebrity hairdressers. The marketing manager's challenge was to select one of three promotional alternatives - get three for the price of two, receive a gift with purchase or an on-pack coupon - for the Christmas season. He realized that the alternative he selected would have both immediate effects on costs and sales, but also long-term implications for the brands involved. His primary objective was to drive sales volumes and trade-up consumers from lower-value brands, while retaining or building brand equity.

Teaching Note: 8B05A22 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Sales Promotion; Advertising Management; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Direct and Online Marketing

MEDIAMATH: POSITIONING A REAL-TIME INTERFACE FOR ONLINE MEDIA PLANNING & BUYING
Raymond Pirouz, Emily Chen-Bendle

Product Number: 9B13A014
Publication Date: 7/5/2013
Revision Date: 7/5/2013
Length: 8 pages

MediaMath is a demand-side platform that provides a single interface from which online media buyers can buy display media advertising from multiple advertising exchanges. The company’s chief executive officer is contemplating the strategic direction of his new business after its first full year of operation. Specifically, he needs to determine which clients he should most actively pursue and how that decision will affect the strategic direction of the business.

Teaching Note: 8B13A014 (5 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Online Media; Online Marketing; Media Buying and Planning; Digital Marketing; United States
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BETTER HOMES & GARDENS REAL ESTATE: B2B AND B2C SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
Raymond Pirouz, Emily Chen-Bendle

Product Number: 9B12A057
Publication Date: 12/3/2012
Revision Date: 12/3/2012
Length: 12 pages

This case explores social media marketing as both business to business (B2B) and business to consumer (B2C) strategies. In spite of a challenging real estate environment, Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate (BHGRE) was launched in 2008 by Realogy Corporation, the largest franchisor of real estate brands in the world, to maintain and grow market share with a new type of real estate company centered around lifestyle. BHGRE has grown rapidly and has experienced tremendous success with its B2B social media efforts. Now, several years after the formation of the company, the president and chief executive officer must decide how to leverage what she has learned from the B2B effort to create a B2C social media program. Additional factors include a concurrent Canadian market entry.

Teaching Note: 8B12A057 (8 pages)
Industry: Real Estate and Rental and Leasing
Issues: New Media; Social Media; Online Marketing; Internet; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PETS.COM INC.: THE RISE AND DECLINE OF A PET SUPPLY RETAILER
Omar Merlo

Product Number: 9B09A021
Publication Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 16 pages

The case follows the rise and decline of Pets.com from its inception in 1994 until 2000. It starts with a look at the birth of Pets.com, followed by a discussion of the market, consumer behaviour and key competitors. It then focuses on Pets.com's business strategy and marketing mix. The case study provides the basis for class discussion of a number of key issues, including but not limited to a) the decision whether to enter a strategic partnership, b) the pursuit of an aggressive growth strategy, c) the design and management of the marketing mix, d) the use of aggressive communication and pricing strategies, and e) brand-building decisions. Pets.com is often cited alongside the Edsel, New Coke, Betamax and others as one of the biggest marketing blunders of all times. As such, students find it a fascinating story. The case study also asks students to reflect on some common challenges faced by organizations, such as entry and survival in a highly competitive market, how to deal with a dominant player, venture capital and entrepreneurial issues, business model design, brand management, marketing mix decisions, and the benefits and perils of a growth strategy. The case has been used successfully in the following courses: a) an MBA elective course dealing with popular marketing mistakes and failures, b) a postgraduate strategic marketing course dealing with growth strategies, c) a marketing management course at the undergraduate level focused on the design and management of the marketing mix, and d) a services marketing module at the undergraduate level on the topic of online marketing.

Teaching Note: 8B09A21 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing Mix; Business Growth; Online Retail; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LONDON JETS
Michael R. Pearce, Joel Bycraft, Chad Hensler

Product Number: 9B02A022
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 11 pages

The marketing manager for a hockey team has been told by senior management that revenues for the next season must increase or the franchise will be sold. The previous year's high-budget advertising campaign did not bring in the single-ticket sales results he expected. A database of past ticket holders is available and the question arises how to use this database. Using pivot tables, and recency, frequency and monetary value analyses, he must determine how to increase the return on the marketing investment. An Excel spreadsheet, product 7B02A022, is also available.

Teaching Note: 8B02A22 (26 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Database Marketing; Sports Marketing; Analysis; Direct Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA