Ivey Publishing

Marketing Management: A Strategic Decision-Making Approach

Mullins, J.W.,8/e (United States, McGraw-Hill, 2013)
Prepared By Eunika Sot,
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Marketing Management Process

WONDER LA: A BRAND IN THE SERVICE OF FUN
Sanal Kumar Velayudhan, Kochouseph Chittilappilly

Product Number: 9B14A004
Publication Date: 5/23/2014
Revision Date: 4/23/2014
Length: 16 pages

The performance of Wonderla, the leader in the amusement park industry in South India, for the year 2011/12 could not be better. It grew at 30 per cent with more than one million customers visiting each of its two parks in Kochi and Bangalore. It also completed the development of a three-star hotel in its Bangalore park. Its growth is creating challenges that it has not faced before. The chief executive officer is concerned with the issue of prioritizing investment among its different businesses as the existing amusement parks are growing and new parks are being planned in two new locations. At the same time, effort is required to create demand for the hotel business. The concern extends beyond investment to examining the option of leveraging the brand Wonderla, which stands for “Fun,” to its hotel, with attendant implications for that business and for the brand and its image.

Teaching Note: 8B14A004 (13 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Brand; service; entertainment; hospitality; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



XIAMEN HONDA 4S SHOP
Lin Guo, Zifeng Wang

Product Number: 9B12A051
Publication Date: 12/20/2012
Revision Date: 12/18/2012
Length: 17 pages

Based on the automobile sale model in the mainland of China, this business case describes Xiamen Honda 4S Shop’s current sales situation, marketing strategy and management. It emphasizes the dilemma faced by the company CEO — whether or not he will implement the plan proposed by the sales department to offer lifetime car care for customers who bought car insurance from the company. Deeper marketing management problems are also raised, such as how to distribute marketing resources, how to evaluate the marketing plan and its performance and how to raise company value when it supplies better value to the customers. This case can be used in marketing management for MBA students and senior undergraduates. It provides an opportunity to discuss the subjects of customer lifetime value and marketing budget management.

Teaching Note: 8B12A051 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Customer value; automobiles; service management; China; Ivey/CMCC
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



REDESIGNING SUNNYMEADOWS.CA (A)
June Cotte, Ari Shomair

Product Number: 9B11A017
Publication Date: 7/18/2011
Length: 6 pages

A marketing manager at an RV park developer wants to update the company’s online presence in preparation for a new product launch. Lacking any website design skills himself, he must address various issues, such as where to find potential web design agencies, and how to select an agency. Soon after selecting an agency, the marketing manager begins to doubt his decision. The agency does not seem aligned with the marketing manager’s strategic vision for the website, and has wasted valuable time producing work that must be discarded. The marketing manager, now too close to the new product launch to hire a new agency, must determine how to ensure the agency’s work adheres to the project’s strategy, budget, and timeline.

Teaching Note: 8B11A017 (5 pages)
Issues: Interactive Marketing; Marketing Manager; Website Design; RV Park
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
The Marketing Implications of Corporate and Business Strategies

SELLING READY-TO-DRINK TEA IN SOUTHEAST ASIA: C2 GREEN TEA IN THE PHILIPPINES (A)
Roberto Galang

Product Number: 9B11M118
Publication Date: 2/15/2012
Length: 8 pages

Between 2004 and 2011, the Universal Robina Corporation (URC) launched its first ready-to-drink bottled tea product, C2, in three Southeast Asian markets: the Philippines, Vietnam, and Indonesia. URC’s founder hoped to replicate the success that ready-to-drink tea had achieved in China and Japan. Because of the differences in competitive tactics and consumer preferences in each market, URC needed to modify its strategic plan for each to improve the likelihood of achieving success with C2. These cases encourage students to discern which characteristics are most important for success and thereby determine the profitability of each new international venture.

In addition, the cases explore several issues pertaining to the internationalization of an emerging market firm — particularly one lacking the advantage of being based out of a larger developing country like India, China, or Brazil. Based in the Philippines, URC did not have a sufficiently large domestic market to subsidize its international operations or an internationally known brand or national characteristic to achieve leverage in new markets.

The cases provide a comparative illustration of expansion into three different markets. Case (A) illustrates a local market expansion, while cases (B) and (C) describe international expansions. In each case, students are encouraged to understand the type of localization strategy required to ensure the success of the product launch. Students will also realize that despite being neighbours, the three Southeast Asian countries in these cases have such diverse tastes and consumer preferences that knowledge and experience gained from one market will not necessarily translate to success in the others.


Teaching Note: 8B11M118 (11 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: International Expansion; Emerging Markets; Consumer Goods; Beverages; Philippines; Vietnam; Indonesia
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



VERTU: NOKIA’S LUXURY MOBILE PHONE FOR THE URBAN RICH
Ken Kwong-Kay Wong

Product Number: 9B11A040
Publication Date: 9/28/2011
Revision Date: 12/1/2011
Length: 22 pages

Nokia, headquartered in Finland, was a global telecommunications equipment manufacturer. It operated Vertu, a luxury mobile phone brand that had pioneered the luxury mobile phone market in the late 1990s by using precious materials such as diamonds, sapphires, titanium, and exotic leather for phone production. The company had enjoyed impressive growth in almost 70 countries and had sold hundreds of thousands of phones in the eight years since its launch. On February 11, 2011, Stephen Elop, the new CEO of Nokia, announced a new mobile strategy to adopt Microsoft’s new but unproven Windows Phone as its primary smartphone operating system. The market reacted poorly, and the company’s share price took a 14 per cent dive on the day of announcement. How should Vertu respond to this new Nokia mobile strategy? Was Vertu well positioned to take the brand forward under the new Nokia? Should this U.K.-based wholly owned subsidiary be left alone and continue to be managed at arm’s length from Nokia? Changes to Vertu were inevitable — it was not a matter of if, but when.

Teaching Note: 8B11A040 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Positioning; Market Segmentation; Product Design; Telecommunications; Luxury Goods; United Kingdom; Finland
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEN & JERRY'S - JAPAN
James M. Hagen

Product Number: 9A99A037
Publication Date: 4/13/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 17 pages

The CEO of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc. needed to give sales and profits a serious boost; despite the company's excellent brand equity, it was losing market share and struggling to make a profit. The company's product was on store shelves in all U.S. states, but efforts to enter foreign markets had only been haphazard with non-U.S. sales accounting for just three per cent of total sales. The CEO needed to focus serious attention on entering the world's second largest ice cream market, Japan. An objective of Ben & Jerry's was to use the excess manufacturing capacity it had in the U.S., and it found that exporting ice cream from Vermont to Japan was feasible from a logistics and cost perspective. The company identified two leading partnering options. One was to give a Japanese convenience store chain exclusive rights to the product for a limited time. The other was to give long-term rights for all sales of the product in Japan to a Japanese-American who would build the brand. For the company to enter Japan in time for the upcoming summer season, it would have to be through one of these two partnering arrangements.

Teaching Note: 8A99A37 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Market Entry; International Marketing; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Understanding Market Opportunities

VISA INC. AND THE GLOBAL PAYMENTS INDUSTRY
Neil Bendle, Dan Horne

Product Number: 9B14A018
Publication Date: 5/29/2014
Revision Date: 5/29/2014
Length: 8 pages

A manager, preparing for an interview with Visa Inc., seeks to understand the nature of the global payments industry and Visa Inc.'s position within it. The case outlines the industry's history and current practice through extensive use of publicly reported information. The public information allows answers to some important questions. What does Visa Inc. do? How competitive is the industry? And what is the source of Visa Inc.'s competitive advantage? Student spreadsheet is available, see 7B14A018.

Teaching Note: 8B14A018 (11 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Industry analysis; strategy; credit card; market share; North America
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ISRAELI WINES IN CHINA: REACHING FOR NEW HEIGHTS
Ilan Alon, Jennifer Dugosh, Meredith Lohwasser

Product Number: 9B14M006
Publication Date: 5/5/2014
Revision Date: 2/23/2015
Length: 21 pages

In 2012, Golan Heights Wines wanted to take advantage of the Chinese market. In recent years, China had demonstrated incredible growth in the wine market. Consumers’ growing interest in wine products had made wineries and vineyards like Golan Heights hungry for entry. The CEO of Golan Heights Winery had gone to China with her products in 2009. She had chosen distributorships as the mode of entry because of their expertise and experience in the Chinese market, something she did not possess. Since she had entered the market, however, she had learned of the seemingly disappointing demand for Israeli wines. Sales were rather limited given the size of the market. Most Chinese consumers who sought imported wines wanted them from Europe, particularly France. Additionally, vendors and distributors did a poor job of pushing Israel products. The CEO needed to devise and execute a series of strategies to better take advantage of the impressive Chinese market, establish a brand for Golan Heights Wines and create a platform for future growth.

Teaching Note: 8B14M006 (11 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Export strategy; market entry; market selection; Israel; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE ESPRESSO LANE TO GLOBAL MARKETS
Ilan Alon, Meredith Lohwasser

Product Number: 9B12M058
Publication Date: 5/23/2012
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 16 pages

Founded in Trieste, Italy, Illy marketed a unique blend of coffee drinks in over 140 countries and in more than 50,000 of the world’s best restaurants and coffeehouses. The company wanted to expand the reach of its own franchised coffee bar, Espressamente, through international expansion. Potential markets included Brazil, China, Germany, Japan, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The managing director of Espressamente knew that global expansion meant prioritizing markets, but where did the greatest potential lie? In addition to market selection, mode of entry was vital and included options such as exporting, franchising, and joint ventures. This case provides a practical example of the challenges faced in international business.

Teaching Note: 8B12M058 (7 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: International Market Selection; Modes of Entry; Franchising; Retailing; International Business; Coffee; Italy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Understanding Consumer Buying Behaviour

FRET AND REGRET: A CONSUMER DECISION-MAKING DILEMMA
June Cotte, Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

Product Number: 9B12A018
Publication Date: 5/10/2012
Revision Date: 5/10/2012
Length: 3 pages

As a birthday present, Mike has just been given a new smartphone by his girlfriend, Molly. However, it is not the phone he wants. Over the course of a few days, Mike struggles with the decision of whether to return the phone and get the one he wants, or keep the one he received as a gift. The case is written from the perspective of the consumer, and deals with consumer behaviour issues such as anticipatory regret. It would be useful in an introductory marketing or undergraduate consumer behaviour course.

Teaching Note: 8B12A018 (3 pages)
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Mobile Telephones; United States
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



HIMALAYA HERBAL TOOTHPASTE: CATEGORY AND BRAND INVOLVEMENT IN AN EMERGING MARKET
S. Ramesh Kumar, Nitya Guruvayurappan

Product Number: 9B11A032
Publication Date: 10/25/2011
Revision Date: 1/30/2012
Length: 16 pages

Ramesh Kumar was curious to determine whether consumers were loyal to toothpaste brands. Himalaya Herbal Toothpaste had herbal offerings in the retail and prescription segments, affording him the opportunity to conduct research. Were consumers loyal to a particular brand of toothpaste? Did they remember the functional brand benefits? Were consumers buying brands due to the social benefits reflected in ads? Did consumers continue to buy particular brands without switching? Were consumers interested in herbal toothpastes? How should Himalaya be perceived by consumers? This series of issues presented an opportunity to conceptualize consumer behaviour in the Indian context.

The concept of product involvement differentiates consumer segments based on the degrees of personal interest expressed by consumers with regard to products and services. High-involvement categories require consumers to be involved in extensive buying behaviour that leads to one or more of the following: risk reduction, enhancement of self-image, and gratification in having achieved an optimal choice after examining the alternatives. Low-involvement categories are those that are bought in a routine manner by consumers, with a lower degree of personal interest. Marketers always face competitive challenges in enhancing the degree of involvement even in low-involvement categories through appropriate branding initiatives, including in the toothpaste category.


Teaching Note: 8B11A032 (11 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services, Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Emerging Markets; Consumer Analysis; Consumer Research; Dental; India; IIM-Bangalore/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOYOTA: DRIVING THE MAINSTREAM MARKET TO PURCHASE HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES
Jeff Saperstein, Jennifer Nelson

Product Number: 9B04A003
Publication Date: 1/16/2004
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 23 pages

Toyota is a large, international automobile manufacturer headquartered in Japan, with plans to become the largest worldwide automaker, striving for 15 per cent of global sales. Toyota is committing itself to be the leader of the hybrid-electric automotive industry, and is relying on changes in the industry and customer perceptions to bring its plan to fruition. Toyota's challenge is to develop consumer attitude and purchase intent, from an early adopter, niche market model into universal mainstream acceptance.

Teaching Note: 8B04A03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Product Design/Development; Multinational; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Understanding Organizational Markets and Buying Behaviour

DATAVAST INC.: THE TARGET SEGMENT DECISION
Michael Taylor, Maggie Hao

Product Number: 9B12A020
Publication Date: 6/8/2012
Revision Date: 6/8/2012
Length: 8 pages

Datavast Inc., a product designer and manufacturer based in China, had just launched its new private cloud storage product, the Data Security Box. The general manager of Datavast was faced with the dilemma of who to sell this product to. He determined that segmenting by size was the most effective method, as customers in different industries and regions did not have very different needs or buying characteristics. However, SMEs (companies with 200-500 computers) and large companies (companies with 1,000+ computers) exhibited vastly different needs and purchasing behaviour. The general manager had limited resources, so he faced the decision of focusing on either SMEs or large companies. Although Datavast did not have any direct competitors at the time, its decision was complicated by the company’s current state and capabilities, as well as the data storage industry in China. Also, the general manager was hoping to retire within five years and was unwilling to make additional capital investments in the company. Datavast was operating at a loss and his goal was to bring the company into profitability within the next year. A net loss also meant that the company could not afford to be burdened with large additional expenses. Lastly, private cloud storage was a new technology in China and the market needed to be familiarized with the concept.

Teaching Note: 8B12A020 (10 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Market and Segmentation Analysis; Target Segment Selection; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE POPCORN PREDICAMENT: COMPETITION, CONFLICT AND BUYING BEHAVIOUR
Michael Taylor

Product Number: 9B12A021
Publication Date: 6/22/2012
Revision Date: 6/18/2012
Length: 2 pages

This B2B role-play case, with its six supplements, is a six part interaction between competing Original Equipment Manufacturers, Distributors and End Users, each with their own business priorities. It is an excellent case to explore organizational buying behaviour, the discipline of the selling process, and the management of sales resources (time) as an asset. It can be included in an introductory marketing course at the MBA or undergraduate level. It is equally effective for executive development. It also fits in a B2B marketing course to explore organizational buying behaviour, or in the introduction module of a sales management course.

Teaching Note: 8B12A021 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales Force Resource Management; Selling Process; Channel Management; North America
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BOISE AUTOMATION CANADA LTD.: THE LOST ORDER AT NORTHERN PAPER (A) (REVISED)
Michael Taylor

Product Number: 9B12A008
Publication Date: 3/9/2012
Revision Date: 6/11/2015
Length: 13 pages

A senior account manager at Boise Automation Canada Ltd. was disappointed with the news that he had just lost the $1.2 million order with Northern Paper Inc. (Northern), a paper mill. The opportunity was to design, supply, and install an automated control system for Northern’s wood-chip handling system. He had over 20 years’ experience selling automation systems in heavy industry, and had he won the order it would have easily put him over his target quota for 2011 and significantly boosted his incentive payout. Now, with less than three months before the end of the year, he was unlikely to meet his target for the year. The senior account manager wanted to understand what had gone wrong, and to learn from the experience in order to avoid repeating it. What should he have done differently? See supplement 9B15A029.

Teaching Note: 8B12A008 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Selling process; sales force resource management; organizational buying behaviour; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Measuring Market Opportunities: Forecasting and Market Knowledge

CARGILL INDIA PVT.LTD.
Dante Pirouz, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B13A022
Publication Date: 8/2/2013
Revision Date: 7/7/2016
Length: 14 pages

Cargill Inc., a U.S.-based multinational company, is known for its skills in business-to-business (B2B) marketing. It processes food products and markets them in bulk to large institutional buyers with whom it has a strong customer orientation. However, the head of the refined edible oils business at Cargill India, the company’s fully owned subsidiary, is facing a problem with the parent company's value proposition around B2B. While developing the annual marketing plans for the next financial year, he finds that the volatility of commodity price movements has made the task of revenue forecasts at Cargill India difficult. This volatility is compounded by frequent changes introduced by the federal government to official regulations governing the edible oil business in India. In order to gain control over the two variables, he is examining the prospect of moving into the business-to-consumer (B2C) space in India. This is a new strategic direction not only for the Indian subsidiary but also for Cargill Inc. Can he achieve buy-in not only from the parent company but also from his own managers? Will he be able to attract marketing professionals who can promote his new brands successfully to the Indian consumer?

Teaching Note: 8B13A022 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; Consumer Marketing; Operations; Strategy; Go-To-Market Planning; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM
John G. Wilson, Craig Sorochuk

Product Number: 9B11E034
Publication Date: 10/7/2011
Length: 4 pages

At the University of Wyoming, home games played by the men’s basketball team generated significant revenues for the athletics department through ticket and concession sales. With the 2009-2010 season ending, it was time to forecast revenues for the upcoming season. Even though ticket prices were already set, providing a revenue forecast was difficult, as the schedule of home games for the 2010-2011 season was not yet known, and both ticket and concession sales for each game were uncertain. A director of business operations for the athletics department needed to review data from the four most recent seasons and determine the best way to forecast revenues for the upcoming season.

Teaching Note: 8B11E034 (14 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Revenue Forecasting; Demand Uncertainty; Linear Regression
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PILLSBURY COOKIE CHALLENGE
Allison Johnson, Natalie Mauro

Product Number: 9B11A001
Publication Date: 2/3/2011
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 14 pages

The Canadian Pillsbury ready-baked goods cookie line is experiencing disappointing performance, and the marketing manager at General Mills Canada Corporation is under pressure to make strategic decisions that will help turn around the segment. The marketing manager has engaged the help of the consumer insight team to conduct market research studies that will shed light on consumers and their attitudes, behaviours, and preferences towards the product. The results from the market research studies have arrived, and the students, assuming the role of the marketing manager, must filter through them to determine how this information can be used to improve the performance of the cookie segment. More specifically, students will need to determine where the greatest opportunities lie, who the team should target, what brand messaging is the most relevant, and what type of communication plan would be most effective.

Teaching Note: 8B11A001 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cross-cultural Differences; Customer Segmentation; Brand Positioning; Value Proposition; Market Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Targeting Attractive Market Segments

SODASTREAM TAKES ON COKE AND PEPSI
Ram Subramanian

Product Number: 9B14M038
Publication Date: 4/24/2014
Revision Date: 4/24/2014
Length: 11 pages

SodaStream International Limited is an Israel-based company that pioneered the home carbonation market. It sells soda makers that enable the consumer to prepare at home sparkling water or a variety of flavoured carbonated beverages. After its initial public offering in 2010, its chief executive officer sought to aggressively grow the company and set a $1 billion revenue target (from 2012 revenues of $436.32 million) by principally focusing on the U.S. market, the largest in the world for non-carbonated beverages. In addition to going up against global beverage behemoths, Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo — whose advertising budgets alone are five to eight times SodaStream’s revenues — SodaStream faces new competitors in Green Mountain Coffee Roasters and Primo Water Corporation, who pose a direct challenge to its ambitious goal.

Teaching Note: 8B14M038 (7 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: business model; disruptive innovation; beverages; Israel; United States
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



APPLE IPAD IN INDIA: WAS THERE A WAY OUT?
Sanjeev Prashar, Adeshwar Raja Balaji Prasad, Parasaran VS, Vijay Kumar Venna

Product Number: 9B12A009
Publication Date: 5/2/2012
Revision Date: 10/16/2012
Length: 12 pages

This case considers Apple’s entry into the Indian tablet PC market. In spite of stiff competition, Apple’s iPad had invariably become the market leader in many countries across the world. However, Samsung and RIM had surpassed its market share in India. This case offers students a unique opportunity to understand the reality of entering a new market and losing the coveted market leader position.

Teaching Note: 8B12A009 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Foreign Market Entry; First Movers; Market Evaluation; Apple; Tablet Computers; Technology; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GENICON: A SURGICAL STRIKE INTO EMERGING MARKETS
Allen H. Kupetz, Adam P. Tindall, Gary Haberland

Product Number: 9B10M041
Publication Date: 5/5/2010
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 13 pages

A critical question facing a company's ability to grow its business internationally is where it should go next. One company facing that decision was GENICON, a U.S.-based firm that manufactured and distributed medical instruments for laparoscopic surgeries. Although the minimally invasive surgical market in the United States had long been the largest in the world, international markets were anticipated to grow at a much faster rate than the U.S. market for the foreseeable future. GENICON was already in over 40 international markets and was looking in particular at the rapidly emerging markets - Brazil, Russia, India and China - as potential new opportunities for growth. This case is appropriate for use in an international business course to introduce market selection strategy. It can also be used in sessions on international marketing, entrepreneurship and business strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B10M41 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; International Expansion; Entrepreneurial Marketing; Emerging Markets; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Differentiation and Brand Positioning

HIMALAYA DRUG COMPANY: REPOSITIONING A HERBAL SOAP
S. Ramesh Kumar, Venkata Seshagiri Rao, Narayana Trinadh Kotturu

Product Number: 9B13A048
Publication Date: 4/11/2014
Revision Date: 6/11/2014
Length: 8 pages

In an initiative to develop its herbal soap offering and create a repositioning strategy for its soap products, one of the front-runners in the Indian skincare market explored the perception of the brand image, using survey data to compare its own image with those of two of its strongest competitors. The challenge for this brand was to reposition itself and build its equity after taking into consideration the perceptual results of the study and the existing positioning of soap brands.

Teaching Note: 8B13A048 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Brand positioning; herbal brand; brand repositioning; consumer behaviour; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



THE BEAUTY OF SORBET
Margaret Sutherland, Verity Hawarden

Product Number: 9B12A039
Publication Date: 8/3/2012
Revision Date: 8/16/2012
Length: 10 pages

HIGHLY COMMENDED CASE - African Business Cases Runner-up, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. This case chronicles the origins and growth of Sorbet, a chain of beauty salons targeting upper income women in South African metropolitan areas. Owner Ian Fuhr identified an opportunity to redefine the beauty salon experience in South Africa by offering customers a service unlike anything in the industry. He carefully managed human resources to motivate employees and grow the client base. To complement this, the company started an external beauty therapy school to improve staff and train potential employees. In addition, Fuhr stressed the importance of growing brand awareness and carefully adjusted the company’s sales mix to maximize all potential profit margins, all while developing a customer-centric culture. By 2011, two new businesses had been launched under the Sorbet brand (wellness services; event management). Such expansion plus regional diversification options all had to be considered while keeping service quality levels high.

Teaching Note: 8B12A039 (12 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Brand Positioning; Brand Personality; Brand Awareness; Brand Management; Human Resources Management; Marketing Strategy; Employee Branding; Employee Participation; South Africa
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



FIJI WATER AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - GREEN MAKEOVER OR "GREENWASHING"?
James McMaster, Jan Nowak

Product Number: 9B09A008
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

This case analysis traces the establishment and subsequent operation of FIJI Water LLC and its bottling subsidiary, Natural Waters of Viti Limited, the first company in Fiji extracting, bottling and marketing, both domestically and internationally, artesian water coming from a virgin ecosystem found on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. The case reviews the growth and market expansion of this highly successful company with the brand name FIJI Natural Artesian Water (FIJI Water). The company has grown rapidly over the past decade and a half, and now exports bottled water into many countries in the world from its production plant located in the Fiji Islands. In 2008, FIJI Water was the leading imported bottled water brand in the United States. In the context of great marketing success of the FIJI brand, particularly in the U.S. market, the case focuses on how the company has responded to a number of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, including measuring and reducing its carbon footprint, responsibilities to key stakeholders, and concerns of the Fiji government with regard to taxation and transfer pricing issues. The case provides a compelling illustration of how CSR challenges may jeopardize the sustainability of a clever marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B09A08 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environment; Corporate Responsibility; Marketing Communication; Transfer Pricing; International Marketing; Greenwashing; Green Marketing; Brand Positioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TROUBLE BREWS AT STARBUCKS
Lauranne Buchanan, Carolyn J. Simmons

Product Number: 9B09A002
Publication Date: 2/9/2009
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 14 pages

After going public in 1992, Starbucks' strong balance sheet and double-digit growth made it a hot growth stock. The Starbucks vision was coffee culture as community, the Third Place between work and home, where friends shared the experience and exotic language of gourmet coffee. Its growth was fueled by rapid expansion in the number of stores both in the United States and in foreign markets, the addition of drive-through service, its own music label that promoted and sold CDs in stores and other add-on sales, including pastries and sandwiches. In an amazingly short time, Starbucks became a wildly successful global brand. But in 2007, Starbucks' performance slipped; the company reported its first-ever decline in customer visits to U.S. stores, which led to a 50 per cent drop in its share price. In January 2008, the board ousted CEO Jim Donald and brought back Howard Schultz - Starbucks' visionary leader and CEO from 1987 to 2000 and current chairman and chief global strategist - to re-take the helm. Starbucks' growth strategies have been widely reported and analyzed, but rarely with an eye to their impact on the brand. This case offers a compelling example of how non-brand managerial decisions - such as store locations, licensing arrangements and drive-through service - can make sense on financial criteria at one point in time, yet erode brand positioning and equity in the longer term. Examining the growth decisions made in the United States provides a rich context in which to examine both the promise and drawback of further foreign expansion.

Teaching Note: 8B09A02 (15 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Branding; Retailing; Product Design/Development; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Business Strategies: A Foundation for Marketing Program Decisions

BURBERRY
June Cotte, Marta Jarosinski

Product Number: 9B14A014
Publication Date: 4/28/2014
Revision Date: 4/28/2014
Length: 16 pages

In 2006, Burberry appointed a new chief executive officer (CEO) with many years of experience in senior positions in the fashion and luxury industries. Though Burberry had enjoyed continued year over year growth, the sales growth was not on par with the growth seen within the personal luxury industry. Big changes within Burberry were expected to come as the new CEO took the reins in July 2006. What were the transformations and changes that Burberry would need to make in order to successfully adapt to the dynamic and innovative global business environment of the luxury industry?

Teaching Note: 8B14A014 (11 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Luxury; fashion; strategy; United Kingdom; global
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEGO GROUP: BUILDING STRATEGY
Darren Meister, Paul Bigus

Product Number: 9B11M086
Publication Date: 9/13/2011
Revision Date: 2/1/2013
Length: 12 pages

The world famous toymaker, The LEGO Group, assembled an internal management team to create a strategic report on LEGO’s different product lines and business operations. In recent years, numerous threats to LEGO had emerged in the toy industry. The acquisition of Marvel Entertainment by The Walt Disney Company created major implications for valuable toy license agreements. LEGO had also recently lost a long legal battle with major competitor MEGA Brands, makers of MEGA Bloks, with a European Union court decision that removed the LEGO brick trademark. Furthermore, the second-largest toymaker in the world, Hasbro, was preparing to launch a new rival product line called Kre-O. It was critical for the management team to identify where to expand LEGO’s product lines and business operations, in order to develop a competitive strategy to continue the organization’s recent years of financial success and dominance in the building toy market.

Teaching Note: 8B11M086 (6 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Opportunity Recognition; Licensing; Competitive Strategy; Business Growth; Toy Industry; Denmark
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NETFLIX IN CANADA: ENTERING THE FRAY
Neil Bendle, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B11A020
Publication Date: 8/22/2011
Revision Date: 9/26/2012
Length: 14 pages

Netflix, Inc. was a fast-growing U.S. DVD-rental and video-streaming service that had just entered the Canadian market. This case covers the period immediately following its entry into Canada with a low-price monthly subscription service through which viewers could get video content streamed to their TVs or multimedia devices. Netflix’s entry threatened to change the way video content was viewed in Canada and, as such, it had the potential to heavily impact a number of incumbents in Canada, such as Blockbuster. Netflix’s streaming-only model in Canada created a new service for customers that was not necessarily as strong as the offering in the United States; for instance, the range of titles was relatively limited. The Netflix entry also provided potential benefits for some players, such as Rogers, who could profit from increased Internet usage. This meant that the reaction from players was not immediately obvious.

Teaching Note: 8B11A020 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Competition; Strategy Implementation; Strategic Positioning; Competitor Analysis; Video Rental; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COLA WARS IN CHINA: THE FUTURE IS HERE
Niraj Dawar, Nancy Dai

Product Number: 9B03A006
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 18 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case won the Emerging Chinese Global Competitors, 2003 EFMD Case Writing Competition. The Wahaha Hangzhou Group Co. Ltd. is one of China's largest soft-drink producers. One of the company's products, Future Cola, was launched a few years ago to compete with Coca Cola and PepsiCo and has made significant progress in the soft-drink markets that were developed by these cola giants. The issue now is to maintain the momentum of growth in the face of major competition from the giant multinationals, and to achieve its goal of dominant market share.

Teaching Note: 8B03A06 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Market Strategy; Competition; Brand Management; Emerging Markets
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 10:
Product Decisions

CITIBANK INDIA CREDIT CARDS: STRATEGY FOR PROFITABLE GROWTH
Jaydeep Mukherjee, Sanket Kawde

Product Number: 9B14A016
Publication Date: 5/30/2014
Revision Date: 5/22/2014
Length: 17 pages

The target market of Citibank cards in India was aligned with the profitability objectives of the company. However, if it continued with its current strategy, it faced the risk of being a niche player in a growing market and losing the profit potential from other segments and geographies in the near future. The CEO needed to reconsider the target market and finalize a marketing strategy in the face of the changing composition of the marketplace, the competition and the commercial imperatives of the credit card business. This was a critical decision that would have a long-term impact on resource deployment and budgeting.

Teaching Note: 8B14A016 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Target market selection; strategy; credit card marketing; customer lifetime value; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



APPLE V. SAMSUNG: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND THE SMARTPHONE PATENT WARS
Gloria Barczak, Susan Montgomery, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B13A009
Publication Date: 4/23/2013
Revision Date: 4/30/2013
Length: 20 pages

In 2012, Apple, Inc. won the largest patent infringement case in history against Samsung Electronics for Samsung’s willful copying of Apple’s iPhone and iPad. Samsung, which recently overtook Apple as the leading smartphone maker, must now devise a strategy to address the court verdict and its potential impact on new product development.

Teaching Note: 8B13A009 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intellectual Property; Legal System; Innovation; Patents; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PEARSON'S SUCCESSMAKER: PUTTING THE CUSTOMER FIRST IN TRANSFORMING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES
T.S. Raghu, Collin Sellman

Product Number: 9B11E040
Publication Date: 2/23/2012
Length: 13 pages

Pearson Plc is an education company that operates worldwide, with headquarters in London, England. Its six primary business units are North American Education, International Education, Professional, The Financial Times, Interactive Data, and Penguin Publishing. The vice president of product management within the Digital Learning division of the North American Education unit based in Chandler, Arizona, begins to transform the product development processes to better meet the needs of his customers in the education market, specifically in transitioning from using an off-shored Waterfall software development model to an on-shore Agile model.

When the vice president first joined Pearson a year earlier, the Digital Learning unit had spent significant resources developing a major upgrade for one of its educational software products. The first version of this new product was challenged by the disconnect between what the software development group was delivering and what the vice president’s customers desired. He is now faced with a decision to continue focusing on the specific methodology the group had implemented (Scrum) or move to a new one (Kanban). Additionally, he has to consider expanding his focus to help drive Agile methodologies both with other groups in his business unit and outside his business unit. These decisions must be made at a potentially critical time for his products as his organization deals with the growing pains associated with the shift to Agile.


Teaching Note: 8B11E040 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Product Development; Process Design; Agile Methodology; Systems Development; Educational Software; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Pricing Decisions

CUSTOMER SEGMENTATION AND BUSINESS MODEL EVOLUTION AT UNBOUNCE
Raymond Pirouz, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B14A029
Publication Date: 7/8/2014
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 7 pages

In December 2011, the co-founder of Unbounce, a Vancouver-based software services start-up, is considering expanding into the enterprise user space. Unbounce got its start providing turnkey landing pages — web pages specific to current advertising campaigns — to the small and medium-sized enterprise market. Within 18 months, the company has achieved thought leadership in this space, has a list of paying customers and has built its support team from six to 25 people. The challenge is that since the entire company is focused on its core market segment, entering the enterprise user space means that different capabilities will have to be developed. Will developing the enterprise user market prevent the competition from invading this space or will it mean alienating and perhaps losing its current customers? What is the best plan for going forward?

Teaching Note: 8B14A029 (4 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Social media; landing pages; monetization; growth; pricing strategy; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LUDHIANA CITY BUS SERVICES LIMITED: PRICING FOR PROFITS
Neeraj Pandey, Gaganpreet Singh

Product Number: 9B14A019
Publication Date: 5/26/2014
Revision Date: 5/26/2014
Length: 12 pages

Ludhiana City Bus Service Limited (LCBSL) was created to improve the urban transportation system in the city of Ludhiana, India. As per the existing pricing strategy, bus fares (one of key revenue source for LCBSL) were set by the state government. LCBSL management was convinced that there was ample scope for raising the bus fares. The partial project implementation had been generating a return on capital of 1.9 per cent. To reduce this breakeven period and achieve targeted returns on capital of 4 per cent, management was considering the option to increase fares across different distance categories. Would this price restructuring be a game changer for LCBSL and a benchmark pricing strategy for other city bus service projects to follow?

Teaching Note: 8B14A019 (8 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Pricing over product life; profit; target returns; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



A COUPLE OF SQUARES: PRICING FOR THE FUTURE (A)
Dante Pirouz, Raymond Pirouz, Dina Ribbink, Emily Chen-Bendle

Product Number: 9B13A004
Publication Date: 3/14/2013
Revision Date: 3/21/2013
Length: 14 pages

A small upscale bakery produces artisan-quality, hand-decorated cookies, generating $1 million in annual revenue. In the (A) case, the two co-owners investigate the role of pricing in driving growth for their business and allowing them to achieve several fundamental financial goals. In the (B) case 9B13A005, the partners explore the possibility of a website to drive direct-to-consumer sales on an e-commerce platform.

The multimedia elements of the case 7B13A004 will add to the richness of the conversation. (A higher price applies to this case due to color exhibits.)


Teaching Note: 8B13A004 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Pricing; Operations; Small Business; Social Media; B2C; B2B; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CARVEL ICE CREAM - DEVELOPING THE BEIJING MARKET
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A017
Publication Date: 8/5/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 12 pages

The manager of business development for Carvel Asia Limited is trying to determine how best to increase ice cream cake sales in Beijing. In doing so, he needs to develop a complete marketing program which includes decisions about product offerings, pricing, placement (distribution) and promotion - the 4 Ps. Carvel Asia was a 50-50 joint venture between Carvel (USA) and China's Ministry of Agriculture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A17 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Pricing Strategy; Product Concept; Marketing Communication; Distribution
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 12:
Distribution Channel Decisions

D.LIGHT DESIGN
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B14A023
Publication Date: 6/5/2014
Revision Date: 6/4/2014
Length: 15 pages

Five years earlier, a U.S.-based social enterprise, d.light design, launched its innovative brand of solar lamp in India. Although the company has gained market share, the category as a whole is not growing. The solar lamp market in India is complex, as a result of being both fragmented and disorganized. The company’s new head of Indian operations faces three dilemmas: How can the company scale up? How can the company improve the productivity of its distribution channels? How can the company leverage its first-mover advantage to make its brand synonymous with the category?

Teaching Note: 8B14A023 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Category creation; sustainable development; BOP markets; solar products; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



HCL BEANSTALK: ALL-IN-ONE DESKTOP RE-LAUNCH
Jaydeep Mukherjee, Rahul Seth

Product Number: 9B13A012
Publication Date: 7/11/2013
Revision Date: 9/20/2016
Length: 15 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Best case in the Marketing category, 2012 ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition. HCL Infosystems Ltd. is a reputable computer hardware firm and a major player in the Indian desktop market. Due to changes in consumer behaviour, the desktop market is shrinking and demand is shifting towards laptops, where HCL has a miniscule presence. At the same time, the desktop market is witnessing the emergence of a new form of devices called all-in-ones (AIOs). HCL needs a significant presence in AIOs to retain its position in the Indian PC market. The company was an early entrant in the Indian AIO market in 2007 and sought to capture a niche market for its premium range, but did not succeed and withdrew its product line. The category has, in the last four years, grown in the mass market segment and HCL needs a successful relaunch of the HCL Beanstalk AIO in the face of intense competition from multinational competitors who have a head start. The problem is compounded by the fact that the HCL brand is losing market share and that the company lacks the financial resources to invest heavily in brand building. HCL’s management believes that the Beanstalk needs to capture eight per cent of the retail segment of the Indian AIO market in order to be able to gain the same share in the business-to-business market, which is slower to adopt new technologies.

Teaching Note: 8B13A012 (14 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: New product launch; product relaunch; marketing plan; computer market; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ABERCROMBIE AND FITCH
Cameron Mahi, David Anderson, Gracie Boelsems, John Garrison

Product Number: 9B12A033
Publication Date: 11/28/2012
Revision Date: 11/6/2012
Length: 15 pages

With roots in sporting and excursion goods, Abercrombie and Fitch Co. (A&F Co.) has grown into one of the most well-known men and women’s retail clothing brands by 2012. From the beginning, A&F has "stuck to (its) knitting by not trying to be all things to all people” and adopted the philosophy of creating a unique brand experience throughout each of its subsidiary brands. The company’s CEO was faced with the decision to focus attention on expanding direct-to-consumer operations and international brick and mortar stores, while closing stores domestically. The brand saw growth in sales in recent years but, in 2011, saw a drop in shares after missing Wall Street’s projected estimates. A&F Co. was in an interesting position — the company had to decide where to focus its brand and which market segment it would cater toward.

You might also like: Abercrombie & #Fitchthehomeless, Mountain Dew: The Most Racist Soft-drink Commercial in History?, Domino’s Pizza

Teaching Note: 8B12A033 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail marketing; distribution channel; strategic management; international expansion; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COMPFED: THE DAIRY COOPERATIVE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
Subhash Jha, Atanu Adhikari

Product Number: 9B11A047
Publication Date: 3/16/2012
Length: 19 pages

Bihar State Milk Cooperative Federation (COMPFED) had been marketing its milk and milk-related products under the Sudha brand name in the Bihar and Jharkhand regions of India for three decades. It operated through six unions and two dairies to process the milk collected from nearly 4,000 village-level cooperatives. COMPFED appeared to have a competitive advantage for its supply of milk, since it maintained the largest network for milk procurement, which spanned a large area and was unmatched by its competitors. However, due to various environmental forces, the ability to procure an adequate supply had declined in the last two years, which negatively affected the profitability of the organization.

The marketing manager of COMPFED had been facing difficulty in serving the growing demand and maintaining profitability. Since he operated in an industry with high fixed costs, the declining supply of milk procurement meant lower sales. As a result, there was no opportunity to significantly lower operating costs to match the limited supply.

The marketing manager thought of two reasons in the external environment that contributed to this situation. First, a series of floods had caused damage to grazing land and livestock operations. Additionally, private players were disrupting the supply chain by offering short-term higher payments to some suppliers/farmers. These players did not face the same regulatory and hygiene guidelines that COMPFED did. The marketing manager’s options included two very different alternatives: trying to work with these agents or securing a process to minimize or eradicate their activities.


Teaching Note: 8B11A047 (8 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Agribusiness; Distribution System; Cooperatives; Distribution Channel; Dairy Farming; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 13:
Integrated Promotion Decisions

THE MONTREAL STARS
Christopher A. Ross, Dave A. McKenzie

Product Number: 9B13A043
Publication Date: 4/16/2014
Revision Date: 4/10/2014
Length: 17 pages

In September 2012, the general manager of the Montreal Stars, a women's hockey team, faces several challenges. One of six in the Canadian Women’s Hockey League, a not-for-profit organization that aspires to be the professional league for women's hockey in North America, the team has won the league championship three times and its players have won a number of awards, including Olympic gold medals. Yet, average attendance per game has been sparse. The first issue is how to increase the awareness and the fan base of the team in Montreal. Secondly, the league allows a team to keep only $25,000 of whatever funds it raises; any amount above that limit must be submitted to the league to support it and other teams less successful at fundraising. Given this, it is difficult to raise funds from and maintain support among donors for the local team. Finally, not only the players but the administrative staff, including the general manager, are volunteers. How can the league be persuaded to relax the constraints on fundraising so that the team can develop the organizational capacity to pay its players and staff? In sum, the general manager faces both external and internal marketing problems.

Teaching Note: 8B13A043 (9 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Sports marketing; fund raising; internal marketing; not-for-profit; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CCM HOCKEY: THE RE-LAUNCH OF THE U+ PRO SKATE
Christopher A. Ross

Product Number: 9B11A038
Publication Date: 11/18/2011
Length: 18 pages

CCM Hockey had been losing market share to competitors in the hockey skate business. In order to counter this trend, in March 2008 the most innovative pair of hockey skates ever developed by CCM was made available to customers. Soon after the launch, however, some quality issues developed. In 2009, new and improved skates were put on the market but they looked identical to the previous model. Buyers were skeptical and, as a result, sales were poor. Both the trade and individual consumers had lost confidence in the brand. CCM returned to the drawing board and redesigned the skates but also decided to launch them in fall 2010, instead of the normal industry cycle time of spring 2010. The decision was complicated by a stagnant market and indistinct consumer segments. The brand manager and his assistant were faced with developing a strong launch strategy because the future of the CCM skate brand depended on it.

Teaching Note: 8B11A038 (12 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Brand Management; Integrated Marketing Communications; Product Positioning; Competitor Analysis; Product Management; Customer Analysis; Ice Hockey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Marketing Strategies for a Digitally Networked World

CAN FACEBOOK SAVE OUR FURRY FRIENDS?
Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, June Cotte, Kaitlyn Kenyon

Product Number: 9B13A031
Publication Date: 9/19/2013
Revision Date: 9/19/2013
Length: 5 pages

A local, non-profit, no-kill animal shelter is committed to rescuing homeless cats and helping them find permanent homes. This shelter offers a wide variety of services, including adoption, foster programs, low-cost spay and neuter services, and low-income assistance programs for local pet owners. With a personnel shortage at the shelter and increasing numbers of homeless cats in the area, the executive director must look for ways to effectively allocate the organization’s limited resources. She wonders whether some form of social media marketing might be the answer.

Teaching Note: 8B13A031 (3 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Non-profit; social media; United States
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



BETTER HOMES & GARDENS REAL ESTATE: B2B AND B2C SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
Raymond Pirouz, Emily Chen-Bendle

Product Number: 9B12A057
Publication Date: 12/3/2012
Revision Date: 12/3/2012
Length: 12 pages

This case explores social media marketing as both business to business (B2B) and business to consumer (B2C) strategies. In spite of a challenging real estate environment, Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate (BHGRE) was launched in 2008 by Realogy Corporation, the largest franchisor of real estate brands in the world, to maintain and grow market share with a new type of real estate company centered around lifestyle. BHGRE has grown rapidly and has experienced tremendous success with its B2B social media efforts. Now, several years after the formation of the company, the president and chief executive officer must decide how to leverage what she has learned from the B2B effort to create a B2C social media program. Additional factors include a concurrent Canadian market entry.

Teaching Note: 8B12A057 (8 pages)
Industry: Real Estate and Rental and Leasing
Issues: New Media; Social Media; Online Marketing; Internet; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: MEASURING SOCIAL MEDIA RETURN ON INVESTMENT
Miranda R. Goode, Daniel Samosh

Product Number: 9B12A015
Publication Date: 5/17/2012
Revision Date: 5/18/2012
Length: 10 pages

In August 2011, the digital strategist at Online Advertisers, a small digital media company (web development, affiliate marketing, and social media management), was faced with finalizing a value proposition for a new social media marketing division, Online Advertisers Social. Online Advertisers was a creativity-driven company. Data and analytic capabilities were generally not the reason why clients worked with Online Advertisers. Online Advertisers attracted clients by being young, in touch with trends, energetic, and creative. However, clients (especially larger clients) wanted analytics — metrics that could be used to objectively quantify returns on social media investment. The digital strategist saw an opportunity to position Online Advertisers Social as a social media company that offered smaller businesses insights into their target markets that they would not otherwise have access to due to budget constraints.

The digital strategist needed to create a value proposition that balanced an analytics focus with Online Advertisers’ creative marketing and design. The company was too small to offer a large-scale competitive analytical package, and had relied too heavily on intuition in the past to create a competitive data-based social media package. The digital strategist went through the nuances of social media management, including campaign management and community management, and the issue of offering services related to the measurement of social media ROI in a rapidly growing and maturing industry.


Teaching Note: 8B12A015 (4 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Web Development; Social Media; Metrics; Analytics; Value Proposition Development; Business to Business; Consumer Insights; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ENTREPRENEURS AT TWITTER: BUILDING A BRAND, A SOCIAL TOOL OR A TECH POWERHOUSE?
Simon Parker, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B10M028
Publication Date: 3/22/2010
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 10 pages

Twitter has become an incredibly popular micro-blogging service since its launch in 2006. Its founders have ambitious plans for the service, and are backed by hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital funding, which values the company at $3.7 billion in 2011. Twitter seems to attract a diverse audience of users, such as political organizers looking to disseminate information to their followers; businesses looking to reach out, in real time, to potential customers; and social users. The company charges consumers nothing for its service. By 2011, competitors have emerged, some of whom are financially strong. It remains unclear - at least to some observers - whether the company will ever make money from its service.

Teaching Note: 8B10M28 (10 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Social Networking Media; Strategic Positioning; New Venture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MOLSON CANADA: SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
Deborah Compeau, Israr Qureshi

Product Number: 9B08A014
Publication Date: 10/23/2008
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 13 pages

This case describes Molson’s experiment with social media for creating brand awareness. In November 2007, Molson, part of the Molson Coors Brewing Company, ended a social media promotion after facing criticism that it promoted binge drinking. Molson was faced with the difficulty of how quickly the contents of social media could spread to various audiences. The case encourages readers to ponder whether Molson’s action was the only option available and to consider what its next steps might be.

Teaching Note: 8B08A14 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Privacy Issues; Internet Culture; Management Information Systems; Social Media; Facebook; Breweries
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Strategies for New and Growing Markets

MARKS AND SPENCER ENTERS CHINA
Jane Menzies, Ilan Alon, Jennifer Dugosh

Product Number: 9B12A036
Publication Date: 2/26/2013
Revision Date: 2/20/2013
Length: 18 pages

Marks and Spencer (M&S) had first ventured into international markets 70 years ago. By 2012, M&S had 337 stores in 41 countries. Although M&S saw itself as a U.K. retailer that exported its products, the company had been attempting to reduce its dependency on the U.K. economic cycle. Its goal was to increase international sales from £800 million to £1.0 billion by 2013/14. By 2020, M&S wanted to be an international, multi-channel retailer. When the company entered the Chinese market in 2008, it faced many difficulties. It had failed to conduct proper market research to understand the Chinese consumer, which had led to many issues. The company had neglected to address the cultural gaps between the United Kingdom and China. It had also taken an approach of standardizing its products, instead of adapting products to the new market. Students must consider the marketing mix policies of product, price, placement and promotion to recommend changes to M&S’s entry into China.

Teaching Note: 8B12A036 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China market entry; culture; emerging markets; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SCANDINAVIAN AIRLINES: THE GREEN ENGINE DECISION
Jennifer Lynes

Product Number: 9B09M028
Publication Date: 6/11/2009
Length: 11 pages

Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) is an innovator of strategic environmental management in the airline industry. Being a first-mover can have both its advantages and disadvantages. This case looks at the airline's decision of whether they should invest in the best available environmental technology for a fleet of new aircraft that would serve them for the next 25 years. While the technology for these low-emission engines had been around since the 1970s, it had never really been commercialized. SAS was feeling pressure from the regulatory authorities with regards to potential new charges and taxes that could affect the future operating costs of the fleet. Despite these anticipated future costs, at the time of the decision, the director of aircraft and engine analysis for SAS could not make an economic case for the more expensive engines. The challenge was for the fleet development team to try to convince the SAS management team to spend the extra kr5 million (Swedish Kronor) per aircraft for the dual combustor engine. Given that corporations are faced with increasing pressure with regards to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, this case study presents an opportunity for discussion and analysis of various environmental concepts including strategic environmental management, adoption of best available environmental technologies, the role of internal environmental leadership in a large corporation and the effect of market-based mechanisms to improve a sector's environmental performance. The case illustrates the complexities of environmental decisions in striking a balance between meeting ambitious commitments and dealing with real capabilities of companies and external pressures.

Teaching Note: 8B09M28 (14 pages)
Issues: Corporate Culture; Management Decisions; Competitive Advantage; Environment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LOOKS.COM (A): BUILDING ASIA'S FIRST HEALTH, BEAUTY AND FASHION E-TAILER
John S. Hulland, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B00A007
Publication Date: 6/19/2000
Revision Date: 1/6/2010
Length: 16 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case was one of the winning cases in the 2000 Regional Asia-Pacific Case Writing Competition. Looks.com is an Asian e-commerce site for brand name cosmetics, fragrances, skin care products and fashions. It has been well received among investors; the site had a viable business strategy and a solid first-mover advantage. The founder and managing director is ready to launch looks.com within weeks to capitalize on the upcoming Christmas shopping rush and the intense dot.com fever that caught Hong Kong in late 1999. The biggest challenge the company now faces is persuading brand name cosmetic manufacturers to list their products for sale on the site. Look.com's managing director and buyer are finding that manufacturers' concerns about cannibalizing their existing sales channels and antagonizing their licensed distributors are dampening their enthusiasm for dealing with looks.com. The challenge to the company is to develop strategies to convince manufacturers that using this alternative distribution channel can increase their revenue and the profile of their brands in Asia, with little impact on their current distribution network. This case has universal appeal, given that similar concerns have developed around the world as the Internet becomes an increasingly viable alternative distribution channel.

Teaching Note: 8B00A07 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Supplier Relations; Licensing; Brands; Startups
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Strategies for Mature and Declining Markets

TENNANT COMPANY: CAN “CHEMICAL-FREE” BE A PATHWAY TO COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE?
Chris Laszlo, Eric Ahearn, Indrajeet Ghatge, Garima Sharma

Product Number: 9B12M020
Publication Date: 3/19/2012
Revision Date: 2/7/2014
Length: 15 pages

Companies in every industry are attempting to reduce their use of chemicals, particularly synthetic organic compounds, where there is a perception of harm to human health or the environment. The industrial and commercial floor-cleaning equipment industry is no different, with many equipment manufacturers seeking to reduce their use of harsh cleaning chemicals such as petroleum solvents. But with every competitor pursuing similar greening efforts in a mature market, companies find it difficult to differentiate their offerings to customers.

Tennant Company chose to differentiate itself through a technology-driven business strategy based on chemical-free cleaning. Instead of reducing the use of harsh cleaning chemicals, or reducing the harshness of those chemicals, Tennant offered its customers a cleaning solution that used ionized tap water to clean and disinfect surfaces, thereby eliminating harsh chemicals altogether. The benefits to customers were numerous, including lower total cost of ownership and improved health and safety, while maintaining cleaning performance relative to conventional chemical-based products. This case helps to illustrate the challenge of profitably going beyond incremental “greening” efforts (aimed at doing less harm) — could a significant innovation in environmental performance be the central argument for the company’s value proposition?


Teaching Note: 8B12M020 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environmental Sustainability; Sustainable Value; Environmental and Social Performance; Cleaning Industry; United States
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MACY'S DEPARTMENT STORE REPOSITIONING
Homer H. Johnson

Product Number: 9B11M112
Publication Date: 1/6/2012
Length: 8 pages

From 2005-2006, Federated Department Stores converted some 15 regional department store chains into a single national brand, Macy’s, with 810 stores across the United States. In addition, the company repositioned the consolidated Macy’s in the overall retail landscape in an attempt to differentiate the new company from its competitors. These maneuvers were undertaken to counter decreasing sales and profits in the traditional department store industry. Some retail analysts suggested that the consolidation of Macy’s, while interesting, was destined to fail because the traditional department store was an obsolete entity; however, other analysts suggested that Macy’s strategy might hold the key to success in a declining industry. In 2008, the U.S. economy entered a recession, and by 2011 it remained far from booming. Did Macy’s need to change parts of its strategy to remain competitive? What would need to change?

Teaching Note: 8B11M112 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Strategic Repositioning; Strategy; Strategic Decision-making; Department Stores; United States
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



ALARMFORCE: THE LAUNCH OF ALARMFOG
June Cotte, David Singer

Product Number: 9B03A010
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 9 pages

AlarmForce Industries Inc. is a developer and sales provider of home security systems with offices throughout Canada. Since the company's inception, it had become one of the leaders in the Canadian home security market and had established a reputation for being a technological innovator in the industry. The president and chief executive officer of the company must decide whether or not to launch their new product, AlarmFog, which the president believed represented the future of the home security market. The case focuses on past strategic decisions made by the company in differentiating itself in a mature market. The potential folly of making tactical product launch decisions without a solid analysis of underlying strategic issues can be discussed.

Teaching Note: 8B03A10 (6 pages)8B03A10B (16 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Marketing Management; New Products; Market Analysis; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Strategies for Mature and Declining Markets

TENNANT COMPANY: CAN “CHEMICAL-FREE” BE A PATHWAY TO COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE?
Chris Laszlo, Eric Ahearn, Indrajeet Ghatge, Garima Sharma

Product Number: 9B12M020
Publication Date: 3/19/2012
Revision Date: 2/7/2014
Length: 15 pages

Companies in every industry are attempting to reduce their use of chemicals, particularly synthetic organic compounds, where there is a perception of harm to human health or the environment. The industrial and commercial floor-cleaning equipment industry is no different, with many equipment manufacturers seeking to reduce their use of harsh cleaning chemicals such as petroleum solvents. But with every competitor pursuing similar greening efforts in a mature market, companies find it difficult to differentiate their offerings to customers.

Tennant Company chose to differentiate itself through a technology-driven business strategy based on chemical-free cleaning. Instead of reducing the use of harsh cleaning chemicals, or reducing the harshness of those chemicals, Tennant offered its customers a cleaning solution that used ionized tap water to clean and disinfect surfaces, thereby eliminating harsh chemicals altogether. The benefits to customers were numerous, including lower total cost of ownership and improved health and safety, while maintaining cleaning performance relative to conventional chemical-based products. This case helps to illustrate the challenge of profitably going beyond incremental “greening” efforts (aimed at doing less harm) — could a significant innovation in environmental performance be the central argument for the company’s value proposition?


Teaching Note: 8B12M020 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environmental Sustainability; Sustainable Value; Environmental and Social Performance; Cleaning Industry; United States
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MACY'S DEPARTMENT STORE REPOSITIONING
Homer H. Johnson

Product Number: 9B11M112
Publication Date: 1/6/2012
Length: 8 pages

From 2005-2006, Federated Department Stores converted some 15 regional department store chains into a single national brand, Macy’s, with 810 stores across the United States. In addition, the company repositioned the consolidated Macy’s in the overall retail landscape in an attempt to differentiate the new company from its competitors. These maneuvers were undertaken to counter decreasing sales and profits in the traditional department store industry. Some retail analysts suggested that the consolidation of Macy’s, while interesting, was destined to fail because the traditional department store was an obsolete entity; however, other analysts suggested that Macy’s strategy might hold the key to success in a declining industry. In 2008, the U.S. economy entered a recession, and by 2011 it remained far from booming. Did Macy’s need to change parts of its strategy to remain competitive? What would need to change?

Teaching Note: 8B11M112 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Strategic Repositioning; Strategy; Strategic Decision-making; Department Stores; United States
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



ALARMFORCE: THE LAUNCH OF ALARMFOG
June Cotte, David Singer

Product Number: 9B03A010
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 9 pages

AlarmForce Industries Inc. is a developer and sales provider of home security systems with offices throughout Canada. Since the company's inception, it had become one of the leaders in the Canadian home security market and had established a reputation for being a technological innovator in the industry. The president and chief executive officer of the company must decide whether or not to launch their new product, AlarmFog, which the president believed represented the future of the home security market. The case focuses on past strategic decisions made by the company in differentiating itself in a mature market. The potential folly of making tactical product launch decisions without a solid analysis of underlying strategic issues can be discussed.

Teaching Note: 8B03A10 (6 pages)8B03A10B (16 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Marketing Management; New Products; Market Analysis; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 17:
Organization and Planning for Effective Implementation

CLEARWATER SEAFOODS - B2C IN CHINA
June Cotte, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B13A025
Publication Date: 8/29/2013
Revision Date: 8/29/2013
Length: 12 pages

Clearwater Seafoods, a Canadian shellfish enterprise, has four decades of experience in business-to-business (B2B) marketing. It harvests seafood, processes it and markets it in bulk to large restaurant chains worldwide. The company wants to pursue growth by marketing seafood directly to individual consumers (B2C) in China. The transition from B2B to B2C raises three fundamental questions. How can the company develop and deploy a go-to-market business model with Chinese grocery retailers? How can it balance its focus on margins with the Chinese retailers’ focus on revenues? How can Clearwater establish differentiation as a source of competitive advantage in seafood retailing in China?

Teaching Note: 8B13A025 (4 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; consumer marketing; operations; strategy; go-to-market planning; China
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PARLE-G
Miranda R. Goode, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B10A022
Publication Date: 11/1/2010
Length: 16 pages

In 2009, Parle Products Pvt. Limited (Parle), a leading Indian biscuit manufacturer, had the distinction of producing the largest selling glucose biscuit brand by volume in the world, the Parle-G. Parle-G biscuits sold for approximately US$1 per kilogram and as very few processed and ready-to-eat foods were available at this price point, Parle-G was strongly associated with offering value for money (VFM). A looming problem in this brand category for Parle was that the input prices of two major raw materials for the Parle-G biscuits (which together accounted for 55 per cent of their input costs) had risen enough in the past 18 months to decrease margins from 15 per cent to less than 10 per cent. Pressure to restore margins led Parle to consider a price increase yet a previous attempt had caused dramatic reduction in sales. Parle subsequently addressed rising input costs by reducing the weight of the package, franchising production, reducing supply chain costs and reducing packaging costs. Parle could not ignore the deeply entrenched perception of VFM when devising both short- and long-term marketing plans to retain Parle-G's success in the marketplace. These plans needed to address segmentation, positioning and changing Indian demographics when considering a potential price increase for Parle-G biscuits.

Teaching Note: 8B10A22 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Planning; International Business; Positioning; Market Strategy; Pricing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TEN THOUSAND VILLAGES OF CINCINNATI: THE FIRST YEAR AND BEYOND
Mary Conway Dato-on

Product Number: 9B10A008
Publication Date: 6/10/2010
Length: 15 pages

Ten Thousand Villages (TTV) is a nonprofit fair trade retail organization with a store located in Cincinnati, Ohio. During the store's opening and first two years of operations (2002-2004), Karen, the chair of the board of directors, and Cheryl, the store manager, struggle to develop a customer-focused plan to ensure sales increases for their unique operation. Marketing issues ranging from store location selection to inventory selection and promotion are presented. In addition to covering an alternative method of doing business - nonprofit enterprise - the case provides a platform for customer relationship management (CRM) implementation in a small, nonprofit environment.

Teaching Note: 8B10A08 (8 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Not-For-Profit Marketing; Fair Trade; Retailing; Customer Value Segmentation
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate


Chapter 18:
Measuring and Delivering Marketing Performance

JILL'S TABLE: DIGITIZING A RETAIL LEGACY
Raymond Pirouz, Janice Zolf

Product Number: 9B14A002
Publication Date: 3/20/2014
Revision Date: 3/20/2014
Length: 12 pages

The founder of a bricks-and-mortar kitchen accessories retail store, Jill's Table, is considering the expansion of her existing information-based website to an e-commerce presence, but wonders whether the factors that have led to her current success can be replicated in the virtual world. Students are asked to make decisions related to translating brand values from the real world to the virtual world; overcoming technological hurdles; addressing design issues in terms of the user experience; developing a content marketing and digital promotions strategy, including social media and email marketing; determining a pricing strategy; planning for fulfillment and returns; handling customer service and measuring performance.

Teaching Note: 8B14A002 (3 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Online retailing; etailing; ecommerce; Internet marketing; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIRST CLASS TRADING CORPORATION
Christopher A. Ross

Product Number: 9B11A037
Publication Date: 10/13/2011
Length: 13 pages

First Class Trading Corporation, a Montreal-based company, had two partners: Jeff Morahan, the founder of the company, and David Sciacca. After evaluating the school supplies industry, Morahan had identified an opportunity to market a fully stocked school bag to schools and parents. The bag was filled with various items that a child needed as determined by a given teacher’s requirements. The strategy of the company was to target elementary and secondary private schools in the greater Montreal area, with elementary schools as the initial target. To date, the partners had generated a disappointing level of sales through cold calls and sales visits to schools. They had drawn up a strategic plan with objectives, positioning, and a marketing mix and were now wondering if they were on the right track. Had they missed something? Should they seek additional advice? Should they move ahead? The situation was complicated because of the stakeholders (school directors, teachers, parents, and students) involved in the marketing process.

Teaching Note: 8B11A037 (10 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Breakeven Analysis; Customer Analysis; Market Analysis; Small Business; B2B Marketing; Schools; Education; Quebec, Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LIVING.DUPONT.CA: VIRTUAL BUSINESS, REAL MONEY
Kersi Antia, Ilia Frolov, Bharat Sud

Product Number: 9B03A018
Publication Date: 5/28/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 14 pages

Dupont Canada manufactures and sells the raw materials that are used to produce brand name home renovation and home decorating products, including fabrics, carpets, countertops and paints. In order to develop relationships with consumers and acquire information on their purchasing needs and purchasing patterns, the company launched a Web site that offered decorating idea and product information through a Virtual Home. After 12 months, the company's project team must decide whether the project was a worthwhile investment and whether they should invest in the second phase. In making their decision, they need to identify the performance metrics to use in estimating the return on investments. They also need to determine whether to pursue revenue generation through the sale of advertising space or online sales through the Web site. Finally, the project team needs to assess whether their value chain partners would be willing to invest in the second phase of the project.

Teaching Note: 8B03A18 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Internet; Return on Investment; Marketing Channels
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA