Ivey Publishing

A Preface to Marketing Management

J.P. Peter, J. Donnelly, Jr.,13/e (Canada, McGraw, 2013)
Prepared By Eunika Sot, CaseMate Editor
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Strategic Planning and the Marketing Management Process

HCL BEANSTALK: ALL-IN-ONE DESKTOP RE-LAUNCH
Jaydeep Mukherjee, Rahul Seth

Product Number: 9B13A012
Publication Date: 7/11/2013
Revision Date: 9/20/2016
Length: 15 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Best case in the Marketing category, 2012 ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition. HCL Infosystems Ltd. is a reputable computer hardware firm and a major player in the Indian desktop market. Due to changes in consumer behaviour, the desktop market is shrinking and demand is shifting towards laptops, where HCL has a miniscule presence. At the same time, the desktop market is witnessing the emergence of a new form of devices called all-in-ones (AIOs). HCL needs a significant presence in AIOs to retain its position in the Indian PC market. The company was an early entrant in the Indian AIO market in 2007 and sought to capture a niche market for its premium range, but did not succeed and withdrew its product line. The category has, in the last four years, grown in the mass market segment and HCL needs a successful relaunch of the HCL Beanstalk AIO in the face of intense competition from multinational competitors who have a head start. The problem is compounded by the fact that the HCL brand is losing market share and that the company lacks the financial resources to invest heavily in brand building. HCL’s management believes that the Beanstalk needs to capture eight per cent of the retail segment of the Indian AIO market in order to be able to gain the same share in the business-to-business market, which is slower to adopt new technologies.

Teaching Note: 8B13A012 (14 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: New product launch; product relaunch; marketing plan; computer market; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PILLSBURY COOKIE CHALLENGE
Allison Johnson, Natalie Mauro

Product Number: 9B11A001
Publication Date: 2/3/2011
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 14 pages

The Canadian Pillsbury ready-baked goods cookie line is experiencing disappointing performance, and the marketing manager at General Mills Canada Corporation is under pressure to make strategic decisions that will help turn around the segment. The marketing manager has engaged the help of the consumer insight team to conduct market research studies that will shed light on consumers and their attitudes, behaviours, and preferences towards the product. The results from the market research studies have arrived, and the students, assuming the role of the marketing manager, must filter through them to determine how this information can be used to improve the performance of the cookie segment. More specifically, students will need to determine where the greatest opportunities lie, who the team should target, what brand messaging is the most relevant, and what type of communication plan would be most effective.

Teaching Note: 8B11A001 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cross-cultural Differences; Customer Segmentation; Brand Positioning; Value Proposition; Market Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STRATEGIC PLANNING AT APPLE INC.
Kyle Murray, Miranda R. Goode, Fabrizio Di Muro

Product Number: 9B09A026
Publication Date: 1/11/2010
Length: 12 pages

Apple Inc. is one of the world's most successful and most recognizable companies. Over its 30 year existence, the company had seen a lot of changes in the computer industry. What would the future hold for the computer giant in a rapidly changing world? How should the company allocate resources between its more traditional offerings (computers) and its newer products (iPods, iPhones, Apple TV, etc.) in order to maintain and improve its market position. Also, how should Apple's unique retail strategy be used to support the company's product decisions, and by capitalizing on new and emerging trends thus further maintaining its competitive advantage.

Teaching Note: 8B09A26 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Competitive Advantage; Strategic Planning; Retailing; New Products
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RONA INC.- DEALING WITH RECESSION
Darren Meister, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09M076
Publication Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 19 pages

In September 2009, the president and chief executive officer (CEO) of Rona Inc. was reviewing the company's progress in relation to the ongoing economic recession. Rona was the largest retailer of hardlines in Canada. Rona had noticed definitive signs of slowdown in the third quarter of 2007 and had launched Strategic Plan 2008 - 2011 as a response. The two-phase program was nearing the completion of its first phase of Productivity, Efficiency and Profitability (PEP) and was gearing up for the 24 month-long Recovery Program. The Strategic Plan had been tweaked since its launch, all with a view towards strengthening the core platform. The objective of the Recovery Plan was to restore focus on growth vectors from which the company had become distracted. On the eve of commencement of the Recovery Plan, the CEO began to wonder if Rona was ready to act on increasing sales, recruiting independents, constructing new stores and pursuing acquisitions. Or was it necessary to redesign and relaunch the PEP program, thus deferring the Recovery Plan?

Teaching Note: 8B09M76 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Strategy Development; Retailing; Managing Recession; Strategy Execution
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate


Chapter 2:
Marketing Research: Process and Systems for Decision Making

CENTURYPLY: DEVELOPING A POWER BRAND IN A COMMODITIZED MARKET
Saikat Banerjee, Abhra Banerjee

Product Number: 9B12A042
Publication Date: 9/5/2012
Revision Date: 8/16/2012
Length: 16 pages

Centuryply operates in the building materials space - specifically, in interior decoration with plywood, laminates and decorative veneers - alongside other categories like cement, shipping, and logistics. In India, this market is dominated by unorganized players, and plywood has always been treated as a commodity by marketers. Given the boom in real estate across residences and offices, as well as the current rapid lifestyle changes in India, the company expects sustainable and continuous growth and wants to achieve greater success in the wood furnishings category. Centuryply views investment in brand-building as a way to beat commoditization.The focus of the case is to explain innovative branding strategies that may be adopted by marketers to create a brand in the commodity market. In addition, it touches on the difficulties faced by a company to maintain a sustainable brand proposition amid competition. The key question is how to maintain brand-building momentum and take it to the next level.

Teaching Note: 8B12A042 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Commodity Branding; Brand Positioning; Brand Placement; Plywood Industry; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SALESBRAIN LLC - B2B COMMUNICATIONS
Dante Pirouz, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B12A005
Publication Date: 2/21/2012
Revision Date: 2/17/2012
Length: 12 pages

In May 2010, the “chief pain officer” of SalesBrain, a neuroscience-based marketing research and coaching company located in California, has been approached for advice by the marketing head of Digital Technology International (DTI), a Utah-based provider of technology solutions for the global publishing industry. DTI has been struggling with communicating the core value proposition of its offerings to customers, including leading newspaper publishers. Its frontline people are delivering messages that are technical, jargon-filled, and complex. Publisher-customers are unable to understand quickly how the technology solutions being offered by DTI can help them become competitive. The sales messages are also not consistent.

SalesBrain is suggesting a three-step process wherein it will identify the “pain points” being experienced by the publisher-customers of DTI; create a compelling set of claims that DTI could offer about its technology products; and guide its frontline salespersons towards developing appropriate sales scripts that they could use with prospective clients. SalesBrain is deploying the cutting-edge tools of neuroscience marketing in each of the three processes. The chief pain officer must choose between Layered Voice Analysis and Facial Action Coding System as a medium to serve the needs of DTI.


Teaching Note: 8B12A005 (4 pages)
Industry: Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services
Issues: Business to Business Marketing; Marketing Research; Sales Management; Newspapers; Consumer Neuroscience; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GROWING THE MAMAS & PAPAS BRAND
Michael Goldman, Jennifer Lindsey-Renton

Product Number: 9B11A044
Publication Date: 2/2/2012
Revision Date: 10/16/2012
Length: 17 pages

Nawaal Motlekar is the managing director of Kwenta Media and founding editor of Mamas & Papas, a recently launched parenting magazine in South Africa. From her early entrepreneurial experiences, Motlekar developed a personal and professional interest in parenting magazines. As a Black South African woman married to an Indian man in an increasingly multi-racial and multi-cultural society, Motlekar recognized a gap for a parenting magazine that would appeal to a wider and more racially and culturally inclusive target market. After extensive research and development, she launched the Mamas & Papas magazine in early 2009. The case charts Motlekar’s journey as an entrepreneur, as well as her efforts between 2006 and 2009 to bring the magazine to life. The case explores the quantitative and qualitative research approaches employed by Motlekar, as well as her marketing and branding initiatives towards building a Mamas & Papas brand beyond just the physical magazine. With the magazine having been on shelves for 12 months, Motlekar and her board faced a number of decisions. These included options to increase advertising revenues and circulation, as well as choosing how to extend the Mamas & Papas brand into related categories.

Teaching Note: 8B11A044 (9 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Brand Extension; Brand Management; Brand Positioning; Consumer Research; Marketing Research; Magazines; South Africa; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



CAMPBELL SOUP: GAINING CUSTOMER INSIGHTS THROUGH MARKETING RESEARCH
Dante Pirouz, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B11A029
Publication Date: 10/11/2011
Revision Date: 8/15/2016
Length: 14 pages

In early 2008, Campbell Soup Company, a global food and beverage enterprise, is experimenting with a new way of understanding the mindset of its consumers. This has been prompted by the stagnation in sales of its soup products in the United States, its home market, where the soups category has matured. For decades, the company’s focus in marketing research has been on tracking how the end users, having bought its soup products at stores, consume them at home. But now, it is keen on tracking the shoppers while they are searching the retail aisles. The company is planning to deploy the techniques of consumer neuroscience, a relatively new discipline, for this purpose.

Teaching Note: 8B11A029 (9 pages)
Issues: Consumer Neuroscience; Packaged Goods Marketing; Consumer Insights; Merchandising and Retailing; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Consumer Behavior

HIMALAYA DRUG COMPANY: REPOSITIONING A HERBAL SOAP
S. Ramesh Kumar, Venkata Seshagiri Rao, Narayana Trinadh Kotturu

Product Number: 9B13A048
Publication Date: 4/11/2014
Revision Date: 6/11/2014
Length: 8 pages

In an initiative to develop its herbal soap offering and create a repositioning strategy for its soap products, one of the front-runners in the Indian skincare market explored the perception of the brand image, using survey data to compare its own image with those of two of its strongest competitors. The challenge for this brand was to reposition itself and build its equity after taking into consideration the perceptual results of the study and the existing positioning of soap brands.

Teaching Note: 8B13A048 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Brand positioning; herbal brand; brand repositioning; consumer behaviour; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



FRET AND REGRET: A CONSUMER DECISION-MAKING DILEMMA
June Cotte, Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

Product Number: 9B12A018
Publication Date: 5/10/2012
Revision Date: 5/10/2012
Length: 3 pages

As a birthday present, Mike has just been given a new smartphone by his girlfriend, Molly. However, it is not the phone he wants. Over the course of a few days, Mike struggles with the decision of whether to return the phone and get the one he wants, or keep the one he received as a gift. The case is written from the perspective of the consumer, and deals with consumer behaviour issues such as anticipatory regret. It would be useful in an introductory marketing or undergraduate consumer behaviour course.

Teaching Note: 8B12A018 (3 pages)
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Mobile Telephones; United States
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



LOUIS VUITTON IN JAPAN
Justin Paul, Charlotte Feroul

Product Number: 9B10M067
Publication Date: 10/19/2010
Revision Date: 2/22/2017
Length: 20 pages

This case deals with the opportunities and challenges of Louis Vuitton, the leading European luxury-sector multinational firm, in Japan, taking into account the unique features of brand management and integrating culture and consumer behaviour in Japan. In the last decade, Japan has been Louis Vuitton’s most profitable market, but the global economic crisis has presented challenges.

Facing a weak economy and a shift in consumer preferences, Louis Vuitton has been adapting its unique strategy in the Japanese market. The days of relying on a logo and a high price seem to be gone, as there is more interest in craftsmanship and value for money. To promote sales, the company has had to launch less expensive collections made with cheaper materials. The brand has also been opening stores in smaller cities, where the lure of the logo still works.

Over the years, Japanese consumers have demonstrated fascination with and passion for the iconic brand. What have been the keys to Louis Vuitton’s successful business model in the Japanese market?


Teaching Note: 8B10M67 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Marketing; Strategic Management; Brand Management; Luxury Goods; Financial Crisis; Japan; France
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOYOTA: DRIVING THE MAINSTREAM MARKET TO PURCHASE HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES
Jeff Saperstein, Jennifer Nelson

Product Number: 9B04A003
Publication Date: 1/16/2004
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 23 pages

Toyota is a large, international automobile manufacturer headquartered in Japan, with plans to become the largest worldwide automaker, striving for 15 per cent of global sales. Toyota is committing itself to be the leader of the hybrid-electric automotive industry, and is relying on changes in the industry and customer perceptions to bring its plan to fruition. Toyota's challenge is to develop consumer attitude and purchase intent, from an early adopter, niche market model into universal mainstream acceptance.

Teaching Note: 8B04A03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Product Design/Development; Multinational; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Business, Government, and Institutional Buying

CARGILL INDIA PVT.LTD.
Dante Pirouz, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B13A022
Publication Date: 8/2/2013
Revision Date: 7/7/2016
Length: 14 pages

Cargill Inc., a U.S.-based multinational company, is known for its skills in business-to-business (B2B) marketing. It processes food products and markets them in bulk to large institutional buyers with whom it has a strong customer orientation. However, the head of the refined edible oils business at Cargill India, the company’s fully owned subsidiary, is facing a problem with the parent company's value proposition around B2B. While developing the annual marketing plans for the next financial year, he finds that the volatility of commodity price movements has made the task of revenue forecasts at Cargill India difficult. This volatility is compounded by frequent changes introduced by the federal government to official regulations governing the edible oil business in India. In order to gain control over the two variables, he is examining the prospect of moving into the business-to-consumer (B2C) space in India. This is a new strategic direction not only for the Indian subsidiary but also for Cargill Inc. Can he achieve buy-in not only from the parent company but also from his own managers? Will he be able to attract marketing professionals who can promote his new brands successfully to the Indian consumer?

Teaching Note: 8B13A022 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retailing; Consumer Marketing; Operations; Strategy; Go-To-Market Planning; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



THE POPCORN PREDICAMENT: COMPETITION, CONFLICT AND BUYING BEHAVIOUR
Michael Taylor

Product Number: 9B12A021
Publication Date: 6/22/2012
Revision Date: 6/18/2012
Length: 2 pages

This B2B role-play case, with its six supplements, is a six part interaction between competing Original Equipment Manufacturers, Distributors and End Users, each with their own business priorities. It is an excellent case to explore organizational buying behaviour, the discipline of the selling process, and the management of sales resources (time) as an asset. It can be included in an introductory marketing course at the MBA or undergraduate level. It is equally effective for executive development. It also fits in a B2B marketing course to explore organizational buying behaviour, or in the introduction module of a sales management course.

Teaching Note: 8B12A021 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales Force Resource Management; Selling Process; Channel Management; North America
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BOISE AUTOMATION CANADA LTD.: THE LOST ORDER AT NORTHERN PAPER (A) (REVISED)
Michael Taylor

Product Number: 9B12A008
Publication Date: 3/9/2012
Revision Date: 6/11/2015
Length: 13 pages

A senior account manager at Boise Automation Canada Ltd. was disappointed with the news that he had just lost the $1.2 million order with Northern Paper Inc. (Northern), a paper mill. The opportunity was to design, supply, and install an automated control system for Northern’s wood-chip handling system. He had over 20 years’ experience selling automation systems in heavy industry, and had he won the order it would have easily put him over his target quota for 2011 and significantly boosted his incentive payout. Now, with less than three months before the end of the year, he was unlikely to meet his target for the year. The senior account manager wanted to understand what had gone wrong, and to learn from the experience in order to avoid repeating it. What should he have done differently? See supplement 9B15A029.

Teaching Note: 8B12A008 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Selling process; sales force resource management; organizational buying behaviour; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Market Segmentation

CUSTOMER SEGMENTATION AND BUSINESS MODEL EVOLUTION AT UNBOUNCE
Raymond Pirouz, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B14A029
Publication Date: 7/8/2014
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 7 pages

In December 2011, the co-founder of Unbounce, a Vancouver-based software services start-up, is considering expanding into the enterprise user space. Unbounce got its start providing turnkey landing pages — web pages specific to current advertising campaigns — to the small and medium-sized enterprise market. Within 18 months, the company has achieved thought leadership in this space, has a list of paying customers and has built its support team from six to 25 people. The challenge is that since the entire company is focused on its core market segment, entering the enterprise user space means that different capabilities will have to be developed. Will developing the enterprise user market prevent the competition from invading this space or will it mean alienating and perhaps losing its current customers? What is the best plan for going forward?

Teaching Note: 8B14A029 (4 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Social media; landing pages; monetization; growth; pricing strategy; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BURBERRY
June Cotte, Marta Jarosinski

Product Number: 9B14A014
Publication Date: 4/28/2014
Revision Date: 4/28/2014
Length: 16 pages

In 2006, Burberry appointed a new chief executive officer (CEO) with many years of experience in senior positions in the fashion and luxury industries. Though Burberry had enjoyed continued year over year growth, the sales growth was not on par with the growth seen within the personal luxury industry. Big changes within Burberry were expected to come as the new CEO took the reins in July 2006. What were the transformations and changes that Burberry would need to make in order to successfully adapt to the dynamic and innovative global business environment of the luxury industry?

Teaching Note: 8B14A014 (11 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Luxury; fashion; strategy; United Kingdom; global
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ABERCROMBIE & FITCH: IS IT UNETHICAL TO BE EXCLUSIVE?
Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, June Cotte, Danae Blanchard

Product Number: 9B14A009
Publication Date: 4/9/2014
Revision Date: 4/9/2014
Length: 5 pages

The CEO of clothing manufacturer and retailer Abercrombie and Fitch defends his decision that the company will not offer plus sizes for women, although extra large sizes are available for men, because average- to large-sized female consumers do not fit the company’s target market. This insistence on a standard of female beauty as young, svelte and tall has enraged consumers who have criticized the company, and the CEO in particular, in both the traditional and social media for exacerbating problems of body image and gender stereotypes, especially among teens. Increasing sizes, however, presents not only logistical and manufacturing challenges but may lead to charges that the company is encouraging obesity and unhealthy lifestyles as happened when a competitor, H&M, introduced large-size models and mannequins in its stores. Abercrombie and Fitch’s popularity with its target teen market depends on its promulgation of exclusivity, which in turn depends on its vision of what is “cool.” Yet, in the face of mounting criticism and declining sales, does sticking to the segmentation strategy make sense?

Teaching Note: 8B14A009 (3 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Marketing ethics; social media; targeting/segmentation; United States
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD OF ONTARIO (A): MARKET SEGMENTATION
Michael R. Pearce, Brad Hause

Product Number: 9B00A020
Publication Date: 8/28/2002
Revision Date: 1/7/2009
Length: 29 pages

The project manager for the Liquor Control Board of Ontario faces store network decisions in southeast Toronto. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario has developed a new five-year strategy in which all of their stores will be revamped into one of the four new formats, which has led to a review of every one of their nearly 600 retail locations. With a store within five minutes of 86% of the population of Ontario, the project manager's task is not about expanding coverage but rather improving the performance of the retail network. The (A) case focuses on what to do about a particular store in the area. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario (B): Market Segmentation, product 9B00A021 is a short follow-up about further decisions on store layout and merchandising. (A higher price applies to this case due to color exhibits.)

Teaching Note: 8B00A20 (14 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Analysis; Retailing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Product and Brand Strategy

ONERGY: DEVELOPING A SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP START-UP BRAND
Saikat Banerjee, Amit Aneja

Product Number: 9B13A045
Publication Date: 1/14/2014
Revision Date: 1/10/2014
Length: 14 pages

ONergy, a for-profit social enterprise in the renewable-energy-based products industry is poised to scale up its operations — namely, providing electricity to the underserved, bottom-of-pyramid market in India. Creating a brand in this market has proved difficult, as competition comprises many large and small players. However, given the government’s support of renewable-energy-based products, the company expects substantial and continuous growth and aims to carve out a prominent position in this up-and-coming market. ONergy views investment in brand building as a way to ensure better acceptance by consumers and it is exploring innovative branding strategies that may be adopted by start-up social enterprises to create unique brands in a strategically profitable way. The key question now facing ONergy’s founder is how to maintain brand-building momentum and take the brand to the next level.

Teaching Note: 8B13A045 (7 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Start-up branding; social enterprise; brand development; brand execution; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



THE WOWPRIME CORP.: THE OWNER OF MULTIPLE RESTAURANT BRANDS IN TAIWAN
Shih-Fen Chen, Hui-Mei Liu

Product Number: 9B12A047
Publication Date: 9/11/2012
Revision Date: 9/10/2012
Length: 19 pages

This case covers the story of Wowprime Corp., a Taiwanese food service company that grew from a single-restaurant operation in 1993 to a conglomerate that owned hundreds of restaurants in 2011. The uniqueness of Wowprime’s growth was its multiple-brand strategy, where the company introduced 11 restaurant brands in total, each with a unique customer value proposition. The décor, menu, and price point also varied across all brands, each catering to specific segments of Taiwanese consumers. All brands, while being positioned distinctly in the market, also had certain commonalities in their operations within the group.

Teaching Note: 8B12A047 (10 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Brand Management; Service Marketing; Service Differentiation; Restaurant Operations; Taiwan
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEST BUY INC. - DUAL BRANDING IN CHINA
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A016
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Revision Date: 5/11/2010
Length: 17 pages

A month after Best Buy Inc. (Best Buy), the largest retailer of consumer electronics in the United States, acquired Five Star, the third largest retailer of appliances and consumer electronics in China in May 2006, the management of Best Buy is weighing in on a branding option. Should Five Star lose its identity and be marketed as Best Buy? Or should Best Buy retain the Five Star brand and let the two brands compete with each other in the Chinese market? The option has a sense of déjà vu because, when it first stepped out of its home turf in January of 2002 by acquiring Future Shop, the largest consumer electronics retailer in Canada, Best Buy was facing a similar dilemma. The company had decided, at the time, in favour of dual brand strategy. It had worked. There was no evidence of cannibalization, the single largest risk in dual branding. Best Buy and Future Shop had both grown together as independent brands in Canada. But, does dual brand strategy work in the vastly different retail environment of China?

Teaching Note: 8B09A16 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Brand Management; Retailing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STELLA ARTOIS IN THE U.K.
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B01A017
Publication Date: 12/6/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 15 pages

Stella Artois, Interbrew company's flagship brand of beer, has experienced phenomenal success on the international market. The United Kingdom market has played a critical role in that success, and Interbrew needs to assess the reasons for this. Interbrew's managing director and its chief marketing officer are meeting to have a discussion about how to proceed in developing the Stella Artois brand. First, they need to understand what part of the company's success was due to expert marketing practices and what part might possibly be due to being in the right place at the right time. As well, they want to assess what possible steps might be taken to spread these practices across the corporation for use in the company's global marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B01A17 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Management; European Market; Product Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
New Product Planning and Development

WHIRLPOOL AND THE BUILT-IN APPLIANCE INDUSTRY IN INDIA
Sandeep Puri, Adeshwar Raja Balaji Prasad, Natarajan ANC, Parasaran VS, Sashikanth Yenika, Vijay Kumar Venna

Product Number: 9B13M082
Publication Date: 9/24/2013
Revision Date: 9/24/2013
Length: 8 pages

India’s real estate boom led to the built-in appliances industry’s biggest opportunity. In 2010 and 2011, a total of 533,954 residential units were launched in seven top cities: Mumbai, National Capital Region, Pune, Kolkata, Bengaluru, Chennai and Hyderabad. As the market evolved and demand increased, investments and improvements in infrastructure, software, education, work force, installation, after-sales service, logistics were guaranteed to occur. This was expected to initiate a cycle of profitable growth. Whirlpool was already an established player in the home appliances segment. Given the improving industry described above, should Whirlpool tap this emerging market? If so, what might be its strategic objectives and positioning strategies for dealing with the competition and appealing to its prospective customers?

Teaching Note: 8B13M082 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New product management; business development; business environment; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



APPLE V. SAMSUNG: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND THE SMARTPHONE PATENT WARS
Gloria Barczak, Susan Montgomery, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B13A009
Publication Date: 4/23/2013
Revision Date: 4/30/2013
Length: 20 pages

In 2012, Apple, Inc. won the largest patent infringement case in history against Samsung Electronics for Samsung’s willful copying of Apple’s iPhone and iPad. Samsung, which recently overtook Apple as the leading smartphone maker, must now devise a strategy to address the court verdict and its potential impact on new product development.

Teaching Note: 8B13A009 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intellectual Property; Legal System; Innovation; Patents; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IDEAFORGE: MECHANICAL CHARGER
Atanu Adhikari, Rama Deshmukh

Product Number: 9B12A013
Publication Date: 8/31/2012
Revision Date: 7/24/2012
Length: 17 pages

In an era of ever-changing technology, the challenge for a social entrepreneur is to cope with the fast pace of change. With a concern for the environment and energy conservation, the entrepreneur in this case became an entrepreneur with the development of a new product – a mechanical charger. His company, ideaForge, manufactured and sold two types of products: mechanical chargers and other conventional chargers such as bike chargers. The mechanical charger, an innovation of ideaForge, was a product that could produce electricity through mechanical operation. The sales of other conventional chargers were increasing, while the sales of mechanical chargers were decreasing.

The company faced two major challenges while running the business: how to market this innovative product to customers used to traditional mobile phone chargers, and whether the company should increase the product range or concentrate on existing products. The decision that had to be made was whether to sell only through distribution channels or through a sales force, or both. The young entrepreneur, along with his two cofounders, also had to make decisions on how to position and price their products in the market. With a changing market scenario, several initiatives and calculated risks would have to be taken if they wanted to develop new product offerings, such as laptop chargers and bicycle chargers, both of which would mean diversifying the business.


Teaching Note: 8B12A013 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Product Development; Social Entrepreneurship; Innovation; Business Sustainability; Distribution Channel; Green Energy; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PEARSON'S SUCCESSMAKER: PUTTING THE CUSTOMER FIRST IN TRANSFORMING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES
T.S. Raghu, Collin Sellman

Product Number: 9B11E040
Publication Date: 2/23/2012
Length: 13 pages

Pearson Plc is an education company that operates worldwide, with headquarters in London, England. Its six primary business units are North American Education, International Education, Professional, The Financial Times, Interactive Data, and Penguin Publishing. The vice president of product management within the Digital Learning division of the North American Education unit based in Chandler, Arizona, begins to transform the product development processes to better meet the needs of his customers in the education market, specifically in transitioning from using an off-shored Waterfall software development model to an on-shore Agile model.

When the vice president first joined Pearson a year earlier, the Digital Learning unit had spent significant resources developing a major upgrade for one of its educational software products. The first version of this new product was challenged by the disconnect between what the software development group was delivering and what the vice president’s customers desired. He is now faced with a decision to continue focusing on the specific methodology the group had implemented (Scrum) or move to a new one (Kanban). Additionally, he has to consider expanding his focus to help drive Agile methodologies both with other groups in his business unit and outside his business unit. These decisions must be made at a potentially critical time for his products as his organization deals with the growing pains associated with the shift to Agile.


Teaching Note: 8B11E040 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Product Development; Process Design; Agile Methodology; Systems Development; Educational Software; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Integrated Marketing Communications

THE MONTREAL STARS
Christopher A. Ross, Dave A. McKenzie

Product Number: 9B13A043
Publication Date: 4/16/2014
Revision Date: 4/10/2014
Length: 17 pages

In September 2012, the general manager of the Montreal Stars, a women's hockey team, faces several challenges. One of six in the Canadian Women’s Hockey League, a not-for-profit organization that aspires to be the professional league for women's hockey in North America, the team has won the league championship three times and its players have won a number of awards, including Olympic gold medals. Yet, average attendance per game has been sparse. The first issue is how to increase the awareness and the fan base of the team in Montreal. Secondly, the league allows a team to keep only $25,000 of whatever funds it raises; any amount above that limit must be submitted to the league to support it and other teams less successful at fundraising. Given this, it is difficult to raise funds from and maintain support among donors for the local team. Finally, not only the players but the administrative staff, including the general manager, are volunteers. How can the league be persuaded to relax the constraints on fundraising so that the team can develop the organizational capacity to pay its players and staff? In sum, the general manager faces both external and internal marketing problems.

Teaching Note: 8B13A043 (9 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Sports marketing; fund raising; internal marketing; not-for-profit; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CCM HOCKEY: THE RE-LAUNCH OF THE U+ PRO SKATE
Christopher A. Ross

Product Number: 9B11A038
Publication Date: 11/18/2011
Length: 18 pages

CCM Hockey had been losing market share to competitors in the hockey skate business. In order to counter this trend, in March 2008 the most innovative pair of hockey skates ever developed by CCM was made available to customers. Soon after the launch, however, some quality issues developed. In 2009, new and improved skates were put on the market but they looked identical to the previous model. Buyers were skeptical and, as a result, sales were poor. Both the trade and individual consumers had lost confidence in the brand. CCM returned to the drawing board and redesigned the skates but also decided to launch them in fall 2010, instead of the normal industry cycle time of spring 2010. The decision was complicated by a stagnant market and indistinct consumer segments. The brand manager and his assistant were faced with developing a strong launch strategy because the future of the CCM skate brand depended on it.

Teaching Note: 8B11A038 (12 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Brand Management; Integrated Marketing Communications; Product Positioning; Competitor Analysis; Product Management; Customer Analysis; Ice Hockey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIJI WATER AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - GREEN MAKEOVER OR "GREENWASHING"?
James McMaster, Jan Nowak

Product Number: 9B09A008
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

This case analysis traces the establishment and subsequent operation of FIJI Water LLC and its bottling subsidiary, Natural Waters of Viti Limited, the first company in Fiji extracting, bottling and marketing, both domestically and internationally, artesian water coming from a virgin ecosystem found on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. The case reviews the growth and market expansion of this highly successful company with the brand name FIJI Natural Artesian Water (FIJI Water). The company has grown rapidly over the past decade and a half, and now exports bottled water into many countries in the world from its production plant located in the Fiji Islands. In 2008, FIJI Water was the leading imported bottled water brand in the United States. In the context of great marketing success of the FIJI brand, particularly in the U.S. market, the case focuses on how the company has responded to a number of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, including measuring and reducing its carbon footprint, responsibilities to key stakeholders, and concerns of the Fiji government with regard to taxation and transfer pricing issues. The case provides a compelling illustration of how CSR challenges may jeopardize the sustainability of a clever marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B09A08 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environment; Corporate Responsibility; Marketing Communication; Transfer Pricing; International Marketing; Greenwashing; Green Marketing; Brand Positioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Personal Selling, Relationship Building, and Sales Management

PARKIN LABORATORIES: SALES FORCE EFFECTIVENESS
Sandeep Puri

Product Number: 9B14A015
Publication Date: 5/23/2014
Revision Date: 5/21/2014
Length: 10 pages

The profits of a generic-pharmaceutical company, Parkin Laboratories, are dwindling as a result of recent legislation implemented by the Indian government. To compensate for the loss in value, the company needs to increase its sales volumes. The general manager of sales is exploring the idea of investing in a program of sales force effectiveness to increase the efficacy of the sales team.

Teaching Note: 8B14A015 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales force effectiveness; sales management; sales performance; pharmaceutical selling; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ASCLEPIUS CONSULTING: THE SALES FORCE DILEMMA
Sreeram Sivaramakrishnan

Product Number: 9B13A036
Publication Date: 1/10/2014
Revision Date: 1/9/2014
Length: 13 pages

Asclepius Consulting is one of the many small software companies in India that have aspirations to become product companies as opposed to being services companies. Asclepius Consulting deals in hospital management information systems and has a product and service offering that is competitive and well received by customers. However, due to lack of capital, the company has been unable to invest in a sales force, and this has created a problem of reach. It is currently selling through a combination of resellers (external parties contracted to sell the software) and an inside sales force. Now, one of its three co-founders, whose expertise is in business process restructuring and business planning and strategy, is looking at revisiting the sales and marketing model in this complex marketplace.

Teaching Note: 8B13A036 (14 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Sales management; sales organization; business-to-business marketing; channel management; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ADVANTAGE FOOD & BEVERAGE SALES REPRESENTATIVE
Michael A. Levin, Bruce C. Bailey

Product Number: 9B13A023
Publication Date: 11/7/2013
Revision Date: 11/1/2013
Length: 5 pages

Advantage Food & Beverage (AF&B), a sales and service vending machine company, has added an Avanti kiosk division and hired a sales representative to devote all their time to selling the kiosk service to businesses within a specific geographic market. In the first year of the kiosk operation, AF&B hired and fired three sales representatives while acquiring seven Avanti customers. A management review uncovered issues with the selling process and the lack of presentations to prospective customers. AF&B’s owner pondered the relationship between the personal selling process and AF&B’s current compensation approach for sales representatives. How could AF&B’s compensation approach be changed to meet senior management’s new emphasis on presentations, and how would the various options impact AF&B’s profit and loss statement?

Teaching Note: 8B13A023 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Sales; selling process; United States
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



FOUNDATION FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE/PRODUCTIVE COOPERATIVES HAITI: INCREASING ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY
Colleen Sharen

Product Number: 9B12A037
Publication Date: 7/16/2013
Revision Date: 7/15/2013
Length: 17 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Best Case Award, 2013 Administrative Sciences Association of Canada (ASAC) Conference. Since the 2010 earthquake, the executive director of the Foundation for International Development Assistance (FIDA) had been managing exploding demand for economic development from Haitians, the international development community and from individual Canadians. While there was a lot of money available for earthquake relief and micro-finance, far less was available for sustainable long-term economic development. FIDA needed an additional $2 million over the next three years to support projects that had been approved by both FIDA and its Haitian partner, productive cooperatives Haiti (pcH). FIDA needed to find investors who understood and supported the unique vision, principles and methods of FIDA/pcH.

Teaching Note: 8B12A037 (10 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Non-profit management; social enterprise; brand positioning; marketing strategy; Canada; Haiti
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Distribution Strategy

D.LIGHT DESIGN
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B14A023
Publication Date: 6/5/2014
Revision Date: 6/4/2014
Length: 15 pages

Five years earlier, a U.S.-based social enterprise, d.light design, launched its innovative brand of solar lamp in India. Although the company has gained market share, the category as a whole is not growing. The solar lamp market in India is complex, as a result of being both fragmented and disorganized. The company’s new head of Indian operations faces three dilemmas: How can the company scale up? How can the company improve the productivity of its distribution channels? How can the company leverage its first-mover advantage to make its brand synonymous with the category?

Teaching Note: 8B14A023 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Category creation; sustainable development; BOP markets; solar products; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



THE ESPRESSO LANE TO GLOBAL MARKETS
Ilan Alon, Meredith Lohwasser

Product Number: 9B12M058
Publication Date: 5/23/2012
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 16 pages

Founded in Trieste, Italy, Illy marketed a unique blend of coffee drinks in over 140 countries and in more than 50,000 of the world’s best restaurants and coffeehouses. The company wanted to expand the reach of its own franchised coffee bar, Espressamente, through international expansion. Potential markets included Brazil, China, Germany, Japan, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The managing director of Espressamente knew that global expansion meant prioritizing markets, but where did the greatest potential lie? In addition to market selection, mode of entry was vital and included options such as exporting, franchising, and joint ventures. This case provides a practical example of the challenges faced in international business.

Teaching Note: 8B12M058 (7 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: International Market Selection; Modes of Entry; Franchising; Retailing; International Business; Coffee; Italy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COMPFED: THE DAIRY COOPERATIVE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
Subhash Jha, Atanu Adhikari

Product Number: 9B11A047
Publication Date: 3/16/2012
Length: 19 pages

Bihar State Milk Cooperative Federation (COMPFED) had been marketing its milk and milk-related products under the Sudha brand name in the Bihar and Jharkhand regions of India for three decades. It operated through six unions and two dairies to process the milk collected from nearly 4,000 village-level cooperatives. COMPFED appeared to have a competitive advantage for its supply of milk, since it maintained the largest network for milk procurement, which spanned a large area and was unmatched by its competitors. However, due to various environmental forces, the ability to procure an adequate supply had declined in the last two years, which negatively affected the profitability of the organization.

The marketing manager of COMPFED had been facing difficulty in serving the growing demand and maintaining profitability. Since he operated in an industry with high fixed costs, the declining supply of milk procurement meant lower sales. As a result, there was no opportunity to significantly lower operating costs to match the limited supply.

The marketing manager thought of two reasons in the external environment that contributed to this situation. First, a series of floods had caused damage to grazing land and livestock operations. Additionally, private players were disrupting the supply chain by offering short-term higher payments to some suppliers/farmers. These players did not face the same regulatory and hygiene guidelines that COMPFED did. The marketing manager’s options included two very different alternatives: trying to work with these agents or securing a process to minimize or eradicate their activities.


Teaching Note: 8B11A047 (8 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Agribusiness; Distribution System; Cooperatives; Distribution Channel; Dairy Farming; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



INTERNATIONALIZATION OF KOYO JEANS FROM HONG KONG
Kevin Au, Bernard Suen, Na Shen, Justine Tang

Product Number: 9B11M053
Publication Date: 9/26/2011
Length: 11 pages

William Cheung owned an apparel wholesaler and a boutique shop that sold his clothing designs in Hong Kong. After attending a fashion exhibition in France, he realized his products were lacking compared to European brands. This experience motivated him to improve his jeans designs, and he soon registered “Koyo” as an independent company. He went on to become the first Hong Kong designer embraced by the French department store Galeries Lafayette. While Cheung had had commendable success, including many franchises in mainland China, he faced challenges related to expansion and funding as Koyo Jeans strove for international success.

Teaching Note: 8B11M053 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Expansion; Brand Management; Franchising; Retail Marketing; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Hong Kong; Ivey/CUHK
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SYNNEX INTERNATIONAL: TRANSFORMING DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH-TECH PRODUCTS
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B08A019
Publication Date: 12/1/2008
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 22 pages

The case describes how Synnex Technology International Corporation (Synnex) in Taiwan transformed itself from a local distributor of electronic components into a global logistic conglomerate of communication and information products between 1985 and 2007. The case analyzes the channel structure of electronic product distribution and explains how Synnex introduced innovative practices to transform its operation. The case is designed for MBA students to grasp some fundamental issues related to distribution channel design and supply chain management in a marketing or logistic management course.

Teaching Note: 8B08A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Logistics; Distribution Channels; Supply Chain Management; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Pricing Strategy

LUDHIANA CITY BUS SERVICES LIMITED: PRICING FOR PROFITS
Neeraj Pandey, Gaganpreet Singh

Product Number: 9B14A019
Publication Date: 5/26/2014
Revision Date: 5/26/2014
Length: 12 pages

Ludhiana City Bus Service Limited (LCBSL) was created to improve the urban transportation system in the city of Ludhiana, India. As per the existing pricing strategy, bus fares (one of key revenue source for LCBSL) were set by the state government. LCBSL management was convinced that there was ample scope for raising the bus fares. The partial project implementation had been generating a return on capital of 1.9 per cent. To reduce this breakeven period and achieve targeted returns on capital of 4 per cent, management was considering the option to increase fares across different distance categories. Would this price restructuring be a game changer for LCBSL and a benchmark pricing strategy for other city bus service projects to follow?

Teaching Note: 8B14A019 (8 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Pricing over product life; profit; target returns; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



A COUPLE OF SQUARES: PRICING FOR THE FUTURE (A)
Dante Pirouz, Raymond Pirouz, Dina Ribbink, Emily Chen-Bendle

Product Number: 9B13A004
Publication Date: 3/14/2013
Revision Date: 3/21/2013
Length: 14 pages

A small upscale bakery produces artisan-quality, hand-decorated cookies, generating $1 million in annual revenue. In the (A) case, the two co-owners investigate the role of pricing in driving growth for their business and allowing them to achieve several fundamental financial goals. In the (B) case 9B13A005, the partners explore the possibility of a website to drive direct-to-consumer sales on an e-commerce platform.

The multimedia elements of the case 7B13A004 will add to the richness of the conversation. (A higher price applies to this case due to color exhibits.)


Teaching Note: 8B13A004 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Pricing; Operations; Small Business; Social Media; B2C; B2B; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHRISTIE DIGITAL: MAXIMIZING THE DIGITAL CINEMA OPPORTUNITY (A)
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B12A044
Publication Date: 8/24/2012
Revision Date: 8/24/2012
Length: 18 pages

The co-president and co-CEO of Christie Digital, a digital projector firm based in Cypress, California, and Kitchener, Waterloo, is speaking with his counterpart and trying to decide how Christie should tackle the rest of the 65,000-screen theatre market that has not yet converted to digital. The co-president has to consider that Christie is one of three viable competitors in the market and that there is a real risk of rapidly declining margins if a price war breaks out.

Teaching Note: 8B12A044 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategy Implementation; Game Theory; Competitive Reaction; Pricing Strategy; Product Extension; Canada
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



CARVEL ICE CREAM - DEVELOPING THE BEIJING MARKET
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A017
Publication Date: 8/5/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 12 pages

The manager of business development for Carvel Asia Limited is trying to determine how best to increase ice cream cake sales in Beijing. In doing so, he needs to develop a complete marketing program which includes decisions about product offerings, pricing, placement (distribution) and promotion - the 4 Ps. Carvel Asia was a 50-50 joint venture between Carvel (USA) and China's Ministry of Agriculture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A17 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Pricing Strategy; Product Concept; Marketing Communication; Distribution
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 12:
The Marketing of Services

CALLE 13: THE URBAN BAND ROUTE TO FAME
Valerie Rivera Lozada, Victor Quiñones

Product Number: 9B13A035
Publication Date: 11/18/2013
Revision Date: 11/18/2013
Length: 14 pages

A Latin-based urban music ensemble, Calle 13, shapes its art form to redefine the rap/reggaeton scene that is predominant in Latin America. This redefinition includes political and social backlash towards the leaders of various countries, including the band members’ homeland of Puerto Rico. While the group’s political and social criticism results in some welcome exposure for the musicians, it also results in cancelled shows. The group wants to expand its market, and the members must decide how to proceed: Should the band shed its controversial image in an effort to gain a broader degree of public acceptance? Should it maintain the current style, provoking and delighting listeners with its sometimes scandalous antics?

Teaching Note: 8B13A035 (8 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Entertainment marketing; strategic marketing; services marketing; Puerto Rico; Latin America
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HDFC LIFE INSURANCE: BUILDING A SERVICE BRAND
S. Ramesh Kumar, Akshat Kumar

Product Number: 9B12A049
Publication Date: 10/24/2012
Revision Date: 9/8/2014
Length: 9 pages

HDFC Life Insurance (HDFC Life) was competing in a changing environment as established banks began entering the insurance business. Even though several brands in the category advertised with different positioning strategies, consumers were not receptive. HDFC Life commissioned a survey that seemed to lead the senior manager of digital marketing to a dead end. The challenge was to introduce a differentiation that could be associated with the HDFC brand despite the limitations of the category and the unreceptive mindset of the target segment. The case also takes into consideration the changing lifestyles of potential insurance buyers in India, their new interest in purchasing insurance online and the complexities of developing a services brand in an emerging market.

Teaching Note: 8B12A049 (6 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Brand positioning; service brand; emerging markets; brand perception; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



NETFLIX INC.: STREAMING AWAY FROM DVDS
Luis Alfonso Dau, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B12M040
Publication Date: 4/5/2012
Revision Date: 4/5/2012
Length: 10 pages

This case examines two of the leading video rental services in the United States, Blockbuster and Netflix, and how each adapted to changing technology and market forces. At the end of the case, Blockbuster has declared bankruptcy and Netflix has seen its first decline in subscribers since its founding in 1997. Netflix also faces a number of new threats, including illegal file sharing, rental kiosks, and new low-cost video-on-demand (VOD) services. Netflix responds to these threats by announcing that it will split the company in two — Netflix will focus exclusively on streaming content, while a new subsidiary called Qwikster will be restricted to providing DVDs by mail. Customers overwhelmingly react negatively to the announcement, and Netflix’s stock price plunges by more than 50 per cent.

Teaching Note: 8B12M040 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Competitive Advantage; Innovation; Technological Change; Technological Disruption; Movie Rental Industry; United States
Difficulty: 2 - Intro/Undergraduate



DO IT SHOW: A NEW MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE IN KOREA
Youngchan Kim, Changjo Yoo

Product Number: 9B08A012
Publication Date: 8/28/2008
Revision Date: 5/12/2010
Length: 18 pages

This case presents points of contention and issues in the brand launch of a new telecommunication service of KTF, one of Korea's mobile telecommunication companies. As the second-place player in the 2G service market, which offered voice and text-messaging services, KTF decided to be the number one player in the new 3G service market, which offered stable video communication and high-speed data transmission as well as voice and text-messaging services. To do so, KTF developed a new brand, called SHOW, and implemented various integrated marketing communication (IMC) strategies to attract customers. After only four months since its launch, KTF had successfully attracted more than one million members. Several critical points for successfully launching a new brand in the mobile telecommunication service can be determined from this case. The introduction highlights the success of KTF's new brand launch strategy. Then the mobile telecommunication service market situation in South Korea is summarized. The next section provides a brief explanation of KTF and its new brand launch strategy in the 3G service market, covering topics from the market survey for 3G service to the brand-building processes. This is followed by an examination of how KTF used marketing-integrated communication for its new SHOW 3G service brand. Finally, the competitor's reaction to KTF's successful brand launch is summarized.

Teaching Note: 8B08A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Mobile Communication Industry; Brands; New Brand Launching Strategy; Integrated Marketing Strategy; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Global Marketing

MARKS AND SPENCER ENTERS CHINA
Jane Menzies, Ilan Alon, Jennifer Dugosh

Product Number: 9B12A036
Publication Date: 2/26/2013
Revision Date: 2/20/2013
Length: 18 pages

Marks and Spencer (M&S) had first ventured into international markets 70 years ago. By 2012, M&S had 337 stores in 41 countries. Although M&S saw itself as a U.K. retailer that exported its products, the company had been attempting to reduce its dependency on the U.K. economic cycle. Its goal was to increase international sales from £800 million to £1.0 billion by 2013/14. By 2020, M&S wanted to be an international, multi-channel retailer. When the company entered the Chinese market in 2008, it faced many difficulties. It had failed to conduct proper market research to understand the Chinese consumer, which had led to many issues. The company had neglected to address the cultural gaps between the United Kingdom and China. It had also taken an approach of standardizing its products, instead of adapting products to the new market. Students must consider the marketing mix policies of product, price, placement and promotion to recommend changes to M&S’s entry into China.

Teaching Note: 8B12A036 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China market entry; culture; emerging markets; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



APPLE IPAD IN INDIA: WAS THERE A WAY OUT?
Sanjeev Prashar, Adeshwar Raja Balaji Prasad, Parasaran VS, Vijay Kumar Venna

Product Number: 9B12A009
Publication Date: 5/2/2012
Revision Date: 10/16/2012
Length: 12 pages

This case considers Apple’s entry into the Indian tablet PC market. In spite of stiff competition, Apple’s iPad had invariably become the market leader in many countries across the world. However, Samsung and RIM had surpassed its market share in India. This case offers students a unique opportunity to understand the reality of entering a new market and losing the coveted market leader position.

Teaching Note: 8B12A009 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Foreign Market Entry; First Movers; Market Evaluation; Apple; Tablet Computers; Technology; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA