Ivey Publishing

International Management Behavior: Global and Sustainable Leadership

Lane, H.W., Maznevski, M.L.,7/e (United Kingdom, John Wiley & Sons, 2014)
Prepared By under review,
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
The Global Manager

SICKKIDS IN QATAR - RESPONDING TO A REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
Anne Snowdon, Alexander Smith, Heidi Cramm

Product Number: 9B14M025
Publication Date: 4/7/2014
Revision Date: 4/4/2014
Length: 20 pages

In January 2005, the vice-president of International Affairs at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, must decide how to respond to a request for proposal from the Hamad Medical Corporation of Qatar. In order to reach its global mission of “Healthier Children, A Better World,” the Toronto hospital, which had an international reputation for excellence in pediatric medicine, had established an arm called SickKids International. In addition, it was anxious to find new ways to recover from an operating deficit caused by the aftershock of the SARS outbreak. Hamad Medical Corporation, a major state hospital medical supplier in Qatar, was looking for international centres that would want to partner with it in the development of what it hoped would become the best children's hospital in the Middle East. The vice-president understood the enormous benefits that the partnership had to offer but recognized the need for a comprehensive strategy to mitigate all of the associated risks, such as the difference in cultures between Canada and Qatar, the pressure on the Toronto hospital’s staff to make the project successful and the uncertain political and business environment in the Middle East. Should she recommend to her executive team that they go ahead with their first international request for proposal?

Teaching Note: 8B14M025 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Globalization; health care; cross-cultural; leading change; Canada; Qatar
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?: AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B09M086
Publication Date: 10/19/2009
Length: 11 pages

This team-building and familiarization activity can be used in the initial class or session of an international management program. It assesses one's exposure to the rest of the world's peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a classes' collective exposure to the world's people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one's business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

Teaching Note: 8B09M86 (6 pages)
Issues: Career Development; Intercultural Relations; Team Building; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TATA MOTORS' ACQUISITION OF DAEWOO COMMERCIAL VEHICLE COMPANY
Meera Harish, Sanjay Singh, Kulwant Singh

Product Number: 9B08M094
Publication Date: 2/2/2009
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 15 pages

In January 2004, the chairman of the India-based Tata Group, announced that the Tata Group would focus its efforts on international expansion to become globally competitive. This largely domestic vehicle manufacturing firm subsequently acquired a leading established South Korean firm, Daewoo Commercial Vehicle Company (DCVC). This case focuses on the background of the firms and the acquisition, and the bidding and acquisition process. It provides information on the interests of the acquirer and target, and how both came to see the value in the acquisition. The Tata Group acquisition presents an uncommon situation of how an Indian firm acquired a firm in South Korea while overcoming a series of cultural and other barriers. An analysis of this case provides the basis for determining what criteria should be considered to guide a successful acquisition. A companion case is also available, Tata Motors' Integration of Daewoo Commercial Vehicle Company.

Teaching Note: 8B08M94 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Strategy; International Expansion; Management Decisions; Market Entry; Mergers & Acquisitions; Corporate Strategy; Business Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ASIAN PAINTS LTD. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE
Jean-Louis Schaan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07M056
Publication Date: 10/24/2007
Length: 13 pages

The president of Asian Paints Ltd., India's largest paint manufacturer, was wondering how he could improve the way the company's International Business division was managing its team of 120 global managers. The company had operations throughout Asia in various locations such as China, Singapore and Thailand; throughout Africa in countries such as Oman, Egypt and Mauritius; and in the Americas in Jamaica. The team of global management was critical to the success of the company's globalization endeavour, which was expected to gather momentum once the ongoing consolidation was complete. The president must decide how to structure the management of this global team.

Teaching Note: 8B07M56 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Manager; Growth; Management Systems; Organizational Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Understanding Culture: Through the Looking Glass

COLLISION COURSE: SELLING EUROPEAN HIGH PERFORMANCE MOTORCYCLES IN JAPAN
Jeff Hicks, Derek Lehmberg

Product Number: 9B12M025
Publication Date: 4/3/2012
Revision Date: 4/3/2012
Length: 15 pages

In 2006, the Japanese subsidiary of Tommasi Motorcycles, an Italian manufacturer of high-end motorcycles, was implementing a new customer data application to help its motorcycle dealerships increase the effectiveness of their sales and marketing activities. Horizon LLP, a consulting firm, was Tommasi’s global implementation partner for the application. To identify any dealer concerns regarding the new system, Tommasi Japan had brought in additional consultants from Horizon to conduct interviews with the dealers. As the consultants soon discovered, the dealers’ concerns with Tomassi went far beyond the new application. An unannounced visit by an influential dealer set all the players on a collision course, and soon exposed their widely differing views and a number of fundamental problems in the relationship between Tommasi Motorcycles Japan and its dealer network.

The case begins with a series of separate dialogues involving the director of sales and marketing; the expatriate president of Tommasi Motorcycles Japan; an influential owner of multiple dealerships; and two non-Japanese consultants from Horizon. When they meet in the board room of Tommasi Motorcycles Japan, the ensuing conversation reveals a number of issues: opportunistic behaviour by the bilingual director of sales and marketing, who limits and shapes communications between the dealers and Tommasi’s Japanese National Office; a limited understanding of local market conditions by expatriate Tommasi management; frustration on the part of business-savvy dealers; and naiveté on the part of the consultants, who do not see the social hierarchies at work, nor realize that their cultural and language fluency, which has in past projects always been an asset, could also be a threat.


Teaching Note: 8B12M025 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cross-cultural Communications; Consulting; Expatriate Management; Motorcycles and Vehicles; Italy; Japan
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAINTAINING THE “SINGLE SAMSUNG” SPIRIT: NEW CHALLENGES IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT
Shaista E. Khilji, Chang Hwan Oh, Nisha Manikoth

Product Number: 9B11C010
Publication Date: 8/2/2011
Length: 13 pages

This case examines how Samsung has grown to become one of the world’s leading companies. It presents a detailed description of Samsung’s “top priority to the people” philosophy and its strong cultural values, both of which have been instrumental in ensuring its continued success in recent decades. Since 1982, the Samsung Human Resource Development Center (SHRDC) has played a critical role in supporting Samsung’s corporate strategy of achieving global competitiveness through programs that focus on maintaining Samsung values and developing a cadre of effective next-generation leaders. New Employee Orientation (NEO), an intensive four-week in-house program for all Samsung employees, is one example of an SHRD program. NEO aligns employees across Samsung affiliates to its strategic direction, thereby fostering a stronger “Single Samsung” culture.

In recent years, however, NEO has been faced with new challenges. First, Samsung’s pool of new employees has become more diverse, with the recruitment of more experienced and foreign (non-Korean) employees in addition to the fresh college graduates whom Samsung has always relied upon. Second, Samsung has become aware of stark value differences between the older employees, who are obedient and easily follow rules, and the younger “digital native” employees, who are more individualistic and prefer egalitarian and open policies. Managers at SHRDC are concerned that the “Single Samsung” spirit, which forms the core of Samsung culture, is being threatened from within.

Students must address issues related to the need for maintaining a unified organizational culture among diverse groups of employees with conflicting values, and propose ways for Samsung to effectively employ and utilize all of its employees.


Teaching Note: 8B11C010 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Culture; Generational Differences; Human Resource Development; Consumer Electronics; South Korea
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOIVONEN PAPER IN THE U.S.: HUMAN RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS OF FOREIGN CORPORATE OWNERSHIP
Jannifer David, Ahmed Maamoun

Product Number: 9B08C019
Publication Date: 10/20/2008
Length: 5 pages

The growing globalization of many industries has led many U.S.-based companies to open facilities overseas. In the process, researchers have counselled U.S. companies to adopt many local customs and policies to increase their probability of success in these new locations. During this same time period, many foreign-owned companies have moved into the United States and either purchased existing facilities or started new operations. The purpose of this case is to investigate how a non-American company (Toivonen) has adapted to the U.S. environment. It assesses the role of the parent company culture in the day-to-day operations of the American subsidiary.

Teaching Note: 8B08C19 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cultural Customs; Acquisition Strategy; Management in a Global Environment; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EAGLE SERVICES ASIA
Edward D. Arnheiter

Product Number: 9B07D019
Publication Date: 10/10/2007
Length: 13 pages

This case chronicles the creation and transformation of a Singaporean joint venture, Eagle Services Asia (ESA). It describes some early start-up problems, including a forced shutdown by the Civilian Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). The resulting shakeup of the ESA management team provides a fresh start and an opportunity to reinvigorate the company using lean management principles. Managerial decisions play a key role in ESA's success, together with the discipline and training of the workforce. Students will gain an understanding of cultural difficulties associated with international joint ventures, and learn fundamental aspects of lean management including how to create and sustain a lean culture. The case also provides insight into the worldwide aircraft engine business, the engine overhaul process and cultural barriers that may arise when managing operations in foreign countries.

Teaching Note: 8B07D19 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Expatriate Management; Cultural Customs; Organizational Behaviour; Joint Ventures; Management of Change; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ELLEN MOORE (A): LIVING AND WORKING IN KOREA
Henry W. Lane, Chantell Nicholls, Gail Ellement

Product Number: 9A97G029
Publication Date: 6/3/1998
Revision Date: 2/23/2017
Length: 16 pages

Ellen Moore, a systems consultant, was sent to Korea to manage a project involving a team of North American and Korean consultants representing a joint venture between a major Korean conglomerate and a significant North American information technology company. The Americans were to be involved for the first seven months in order to transfer expertise and knowledge to the South Koreans, who had little experience in this area. Ellen's superior had played an integral part in securing the contract in Korea due to his depth of knowledge on the subject. He chose Ellen to be the key North American project manager because she had significant project management skills and impressive international experience. Upon Ellen's arrival, she discovered that the Korean consultants were far less skilled than she had expected. In addition, Ellen had understood that she and the Korean manager were to be co-managers, but immediately tensions arose regarding who was giving direction to the team, and the scope of the project. Tensions escalated until it was clear that the project was behind schedule and the Koreans were not taking direction from Ellen. The Koreans insisted that Ellen was the problem. Ellen’s superior disagreed; he and Ellen needed to decide how to proceed. The challenge was to balance strategic goals with individual action.

Teaching Note: 8A97G29 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Group Behaviour; Cross-cultural Relations; Women in Management; Team Building; United States; Korea
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Interpersonal Skills for International Management: The MBI Model for High Performance

BONAZZI INDO JOINT VENTURE: CULTURE CLASH OR PURE ECONOMICS?
Naresh Warrier, Gita Bajaj

Product Number: 9B13M105
Publication Date: 12/16/2013
Revision Date: 12/11/2013
Length: 8 pages

Owing to the rapidly growing automotive market, international joint venture activity in the auto-components sector has been increasing in India, both in terms of frequency and strategic importance.

Bonazzi Indo Fasteners Limited, a joint venture between the Turin-based Bonazzi Group and the Mumbai-based Indo Group, was set up to manufacture automotive fasteners, primarily for global original equipment manufacturers. There is a confrontational relationship between the two joint venture partners, and the chief executive officer has been unable to broker peace between them.


Teaching Note: 8B13M105 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cross-cultural negotiation; joint ventures; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN MULTINATIONAL BANKS IN TANZANIA
Paul W. Beamish, Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi

Product Number: 9B07C040
Publication Date: 10/30/2007
Length: 18 pages

The case examines how the best practices of two banks were organized and managed to provide financial services to a small niche of foreign customers in the mining, tourism and construction sectors in Tanzania. The two banks claimed to be similar in many ways. They both were from countries whose economies were run broadly on neo-liberal lines, in that there was little state intervention in either economy, however, differences existed with respect to how they managed their operations. The case is ideally suited to illustrate the on-going tension and different types of best practices in cross-market integration. It provides opportunities to explore the challenges faced by multinational company banks in managing global workforces, the evolution of the banking sector, and the influence of technology in shaping work in organizations.

Teaching Note: 8B07C40 (16 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: International Management; Expatriate Management; Trade Unions; Management Training; Emerging Markets; Performance Evaluation; Recruiting; Subsidiaries; Career Development; Employee Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ING INSURANCE ASIA/PACIFIC
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Andreas Schotter

Product Number: 9B06M083
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Length: 15 pages

The new chief executive officer (CEO) of ING Insurance Asia/Pacific wants to improve the regional operation of the company. ING Group was a global financial services company of Dutch origin with more than 150 years of experience. As part of ING International, ING Insurance Asia/Pacific was responsible for life insurance and asset/wealth management activities throughout the region. The company was doing well, but the new CEO believed that there were still important strategic and operational improvements possible. This case can be used to discuss the local versus regional or global management issue and will yield best results if the class has already been introduced to different strategic and organizational alternatives in the international business context.

Teaching Note: 8B06M83 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Subsidiaries; Organization; Leadership; International Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INTEL IN CHINA
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Donna Everatt, Xiaojun Qian

Product Number: 9A99C007
Publication Date: 6/23/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 8 pages

The newly appointed division head must examine organizational or communication problems within a division of a billion dollar semiconductor manufacturer. The manager made a decision, which an employee emotionally responded to, creating the potential for conflict within the department. Cross-cultural issues come into play given that the manager, although originally from China, was educated and gathered extensive experience in the West and was thus considered an expatriate by his employees. The manager must also examine the effect of organizational culture on an employee's behavior.

Teaching Note: 8A99C07 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Interpersonal Relations; Intercultural Relations; Conflict Resolution; Management Communication
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Managing Global Teams and Networks

SOGETI TEAMPARK - DESIGNING INTELLIGENT ORGANIZATIONS FOR THE FUTURE
Veena Vohra, Manjari Srivastava, Sharon Pande

Product Number: 9B13C047
Publication Date: 3/26/2014
Revision Date: 3/25/2014
Length: 17 pages

Sogeti, a global leader in providing technological services chooses to invest in a social collaboration platform for its employees with a view towards bringing about business transformation. Partnering with IBM, the company launched “TeamPark.” After the implementation, the company’s central challenge was to encourage employee engagement levels and how to increase utilization of the platform. A further issue: Should the platform be opened up to clients and other stakeholders? There was a lot of deliberation around the way the community should be created – should it be restricted or open? If the company decided to open its information-sharing platform with its clients, how should it manage the issues of security and trust?

Teaching Note: 8B13C047 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Social collaboration; intelligent organization; innovation; global
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



COLOPLAST A/S - ORGANIZATIONAL CHALLENGES IN OFFSHORING
Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt, Bo Bernhard Nielsen

Product Number: 9B08M031
Publication Date: 7/25/2008
Length: 16 pages

Coloplast's future global manufacturing strategy was based on relocation of volume production of mature product lines to low cost countries like Hungary and China, whereas most creative and innovative activities (pilot production, ramp-up and range care) were retained in Denmark. The large scale project of offshoring, first volume production and later perhaps other activities, to Tatabanya, Hungary constituted a major shift in the operational strategy for Coloplast, which resulted in a series of organizational and managerial challenges. An important feature of the case is the surprise to the management team of how challenging it was to globalize the operations despite Coloplast's international experience operating a network of subsidiaries in more than 26 countries. The management team learned how important it is to have the structure, the organization and the mindset in place when offshoring production. Sourcing internationally is very different from selling internationally as it involves the entire organization. The learning process of the management team and the challenges they faced is unfolded in this case.

Teaching Note: 8B08M31 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Operations Management; Human Resources Management; Centralization; Management Science and Info. Systems; Management Information Systems; Organizational Behaviour; International Management; Change Management; Value Chain
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



AN INTERNATIONAL PROJECT MANAGER'S DAY (A)
Henry W. Lane, Lorna Wright

Product Number: 9A86C069
Publication Date: 1/1/1986
Revision Date: 8/13/2015
Length: 4 pages

The newly appointed project manager of a highway project in Southeast Asia has a variety of issues to contend with all at once. The project is fully described in Hazelton International Limited. The Hazelton case can serve as a briefing and must be done before this one. This case provides the company schedule and infrastructure information. Decisions need to be made regarding the items in his in-basket. These items are described in An International Project Manager's Day (B) and An International Project Manager's Day (C).

Teaching Note: 8A84C40 (21 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Executing Global Strategy

AZZA FAHMY JEWELLERY: INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Marina Apaydin, Hend Mostafa, Mariam Mohamed Sherin, Mariam Ali Mobarak, Amal Mohsen Fahmy, Dina Sameh Labib

Product Number: 9B13M099
Publication Date: 3/31/2014
Revision Date: 3/31/2014
Length: 14 pages

This is the third case in the Azza Fahmy series. This case and the three others in this series (9B13M097, 9B13M098 and 9B14M023) can be used together or on a standalone basis.

This case series features a female Egyptian entrepreneur who faces the challenge of developing her self-titled jewellery brand. This case describes some of the first steps of doing business internationally in the West. Lacking international experience, the entrepreneur seeks to minimize risk by entering into a strategic alliance with renowned fashion designers. They systematically help her to introduce her brand to the international market, albeit on a limited scale. After the initial success, she begins to plan a more structured approach towards internationalization. She decides to commission a thorough study of France, Spain and Turkey, as they are historically familiar with Arabic jewellery designs. Accordingly, the case identifies specific information about the three countries so that students can compare them in order to reach the best decision about structured international expansion.


Teaching Note: 8B13M099 (23 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Internationalization;global strategy; Egypt
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAN B&W DIESEL A/S — MANAGING LICENSEES IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD
Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt, Bo Bernhard Nielsen

Product Number: 9B09M030
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Revision Date: 9/2/2011
Length: 20 pages

MAN B&W Diesel (MBD), a subsidiary of MAN AG, had become very successful by having its large two-stroke diesel engines produced under licence in Asia. The success had led it to the position of world leader in ship engines, with world market shares between 70 and 80 per cent. The relationship between MBD and the licensees was characterized by both parties leveraging each other’s competencies. It was critical for MBD to access new knowledge in order to optimize products from the producing licensees. Similarly, the licensees leveraged access to the design specifications of the engines as well as expert knowledge and service offerings from MBD. Despite MBD’s success with the licence business model during recent years, new developments had triggered some concerns over the model’s long-term sustainability and feasibility, particularly with regard to competitors and intellectual property rights in China. Hence, the main challenge facing MBD was how to future-proof and perhaps adjust its business model to secure more control of critical knowledge and the licensees without jeopardizing the productive and lucrative licensee relationships.

Teaching Note: 8B09M30 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Licensing; Global Strategy; Value Chain; Shipbuilding; Intellectual Property Rights; Europe; Korea; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NETCARE'S INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Saul Klein, Albert Wöcke

Product Number: 9B09M005
Publication Date: 5/22/2009
Revision Date: 6/2/2010
Length: 22 pages

In 2008, the acquisition of the General Healthcare Group (GHG) in the United Kingdom had propelled Netcare Limited (Netcare) from a predominantly South African operation into one of the largest private hospital groups in the world. One of Netcare's key long-term goals was to deliver innovative, quality health-care solutions to patients in every continent. Recent South African parliamentary legislation had introduced the potential for regulated pricing and collective bargaining in medical centres, which could change the industry structure and possibly affect Netcare's strategy. As acquisition at home would be increasingly subject to stringent scrutiny from competition regulators, Netcare wondered what the impact of global acquisition would have on executing its strategy. What lessons could be learned from the GHG acquisition, how could those lessons be leveraged for further international growth, and what continent would be best suited to expansion? The case illustrates the international expansion strategies of Netcare, and illustrates the challenges of operating in an emerging market. The ability to overcome these challenges is the basis of a competitive advantage when entering developed markets.

Teaching Note: 8B09M05 (4 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Business and Society; Global Strategy; Emerging Markets; Hospitals; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



RESEARCH IN MOTION: MANAGING EXPLOSIVE GROWTH
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Daina Mazutis

Product Number: 9B08M046
Publication Date: 5/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 19 pages

Research in Motion (RIM) is a high technology firm that is experiencing explosive sales growth. David Yach, chief technology officer for software at RIM, has received notice of an impending meeting with the co-chief executive officer regarding his research and development (R&D) expenditures. Although RIM, makers of the very popular BlackBerry, spent almost $360 million in R&D in 2007, this number was low compared to its largest competitors, both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of sales (e.g. Nokia spent $8.2 billion on R&D). This is problematic as it foreshadows the question of whether or not RIM is well positioned to continue to meet expectations, deliver award-winning products and services and maintain its lead in the smartphone market. Furthermore, in the very dynamic mobile telecommunications industry, investment analysts often look to a firm's commitment to R&D as a signal that product sales growth will be sustainable. Just to maintain the status quo, Yach will have to hire 1,400 software engineers in 2008 and is considering a number of alternative paths to managing the expansion. The options include: (1) doing what they are doing now, only more of it, (2) building on their existing and satellite R&D locations, (3) growing through acquisition or (4) going global.

Teaching Note: 8B08M46 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Change Management; Globalization; Staffing; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HONG KONG DISNEYLAND
Michael N. Young, Dong Liu

Product Number: 9B07M013
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 16 pages

Disney began internationalizing its theme park operations with the opening of Tokyo Disneyland in 1983, which is regarded as one of the most successful amusement parks in the world. Disney attempted to replicate this success in France, which is the largest consumer of Disney products outside of the United States. In 1992, they opened Disneyland Resort Paris, which is largely regarded to be much less successful than the park in Japan. This case explores Disney's efforts to open its third park outside the United States; Hong Kong Disneyland. It begins by discussing the experience of Tokyo and Paris Disneylands, and then discusses the opening of Hong Kong Disneyland, including the structure of the deal, and how the operations, human resources management and marketing were tailored to fit the Chinese cultural environment. The case also discusses the tourism industry in Hong Kong and the particular problems that were encountered during the first year of operations. The stage is set for students to discuss whether Disney's strategic assets have a good semantic fit with Chinese culture.

Teaching Note: 8B07M13 (5 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Industry Positioning; Cross Cultural Management; International Expansion; Competitive Dynamics
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Talent Management: Selecting and Developing Global Managers

HINDUSTAN UNILEVER LTD.: MEETING EMPLOYEE EXPECTATIONS
Shashank Shah, Ajith Sankar, David J. Sharp

Product Number: 9B13C036
Publication Date: 12/18/2013
Revision Date: 12/18/2013
Length: 22 pages

The executive director, human resources, at Hindustan Unilever Ltd., a market leader in the Indian fast moving consumer goods sector and the Indian subsidiary of the major multinational, Unilever Ltd., is concerned that the company may be losing its position as the “dream employer” for graduates from the top Indian business schools from which it recruits its management personnel. The shifting demographic profile of employees and their changing expectations have already resulted in changes in the company’s employment model. These include on-the-job training and classroom and e-learning program facilities at all levels of the organization and at all stages of one’s career; mentoring by senior management; communication of vision and goals throughout the company, especially through regular meetings with the CEO; a focus on corporate social responsibility; and an emphasis on work-life balance, such as offering sabbaticals and providing health and recreation facilities at the new headquarters. While the company has changed its traditional employment value proposition, in a highly competitive and talent-scarce job market, can it continue to be relevant in order to attract and retain the best talent in the country?

Teaching Note: 8B13C036 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Employee expectations; Indian FMCG sector; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL PERSONNEL SELECTION SYSTEM
Diana E. Krause, Reiner Piske

Product Number: 9B07C041
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Length: 17 pages

The owner of a company with production plants in various regions in the world wants to standardize the methods of personnel selection for the Asian-Pacific region (APAC). A new system of personnel selection has to be developed for middle management positions in APAC. The owner delegates this task to a cross-functional, multinational project team that operates in Hong Kong headed by a human resources (HR) executive and expatriate from Germany. In terms of the new personnel selection system, he has two opposing goals in mind: the new personnel selection system should be highly specific for a particular country and simultaneously valid for different countries. A series of issues must be resolved in order for the project to be successful. Some of these issues are related to the personnel selection system; the job requirements to be assessed, the modules it must include, the stages and methods of each module, and the implementation of the system across countries in APAC. Other issues are interpersonal, such as the cultural differences and the heterogeneous perspectives that exist among the team members, and a conflict between the HR executive and the owner.

Teaching Note: 8B07C41 (9 pages)
Issues: Cross Cultural Management; Aptitude Diagnostics; International Personnel Selection; Teamwork
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OLLY RACELA IN BANGKOK
Hemant Merchant

Product Number: 9B04C010
Publication Date: 8/18/2004
Revision Date: 10/6/2009
Length: 15 pages

A recent MBA graduate describes the joys and frustrations of an expatriate life - both at personal and professional levels - as experienced by a young, single woman. She has been living in Bangkok for three years and is slowly adjusting to the local way of life when she receives a job offer that will relocate her back to her home in Hawaii. Reaching a decision, however, is not easy given career-related uncertainties in both countries as well as the array of conflicting emotions that confront her. She must decide how to sort through these issues. Should she remain in Bangkok or return home? Her decision is complicated by the fact that she had not entertained the idea of returning to the United States.

Teaching Note: 8B04C10 (15 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Women in Management; Expatriate Management; Emerging Markets; Global Manager
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Managing Change in Global Organizations

BANCOLOMBIA: TALENT, CULTURE AND VALUE CREATION MANAGEMENT IN MERGERS
Juanita Cajiao

Product Number: 9B11C040
Publication Date: 12/19/2011
Length: 20 pages

The case reviews the main facts related to the merger process of three financial institutions — Bancolombia, Conavi, and Corfinsura — in Colombia in 2005 and 2006. The merger decision emerges from directors and senior executives foreseeing a major upcoming market transformation, including adjustment in industry regulation, improvement in international competence, and consolidation of main players, and their response in order to adapt to the new economic conditions. Considering the fact that the success rate of merger processes is not above 30 per cent, the sustained financial results achieved by Bancolombia from the very beginning of the integration process are robust indicators that invite exploration into what was done and how it was done.

Teaching Note: 8B11C040 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Mergers & Acquisitions; Human Resources Management; Corporate Culture; Change Management; South America; Colombia
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ACQUISITION AND RESTRUCTURING OF KIA MOTORS BY HYUNDAI MOTORS
Seungwha (Andy) Chung, Sunju Park

Product Number: 9B09M015
Publication Date: 2/9/2009
Length: 16 pages

In recent years, greater competition and diminished profits, due to domestic and global oversupplies as well as higher development costs, have led the automobile industry to engage in domestic and international mergers and strategic collaboration. This case examines one of the largest mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the Korean automobile market in recent years: the acquisition of Kia Motors (Kia) by Hyundai Motors (Hyundai). The case describes the background conditions of the acquisition, the integration processes after the acquisition, and the requisites for Kia Motors to normalize management within a short time. Hyundai, in acquiring Kia, enhanced its competitive power in both domestic and global markets, achieving economies of scale and scope and strengthening its global market basis. That said, Hyundai/Kia faced several pressing challenges, among them the cooperation of Renault and Samsung Motors, the unclear domestic treatment of Daewoo Motors, and M&As taking place among top motor companies worldwide. This case study asks students to analyze the process of post-acquisition restructuring and the resulting synergy effects, inviting them to think through the strategies by which Hyundai/Kia may thrive in the global automobile market. Further, it illustrates both the current state of the domestic Korean automobile industry and recent trends in the global automobile market.

Teaching Note: 8B09M15 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Restructuring; Mergers & Acquisitions; Organizational Change; Integration; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BOMBARDIER TRANSPORTATION AND THE ADTRANZ ACQUISITION
Allen Morrison, David Barrett

Product Number: 9B04M023
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 18 pages

Bombardier Transportation, one of the world's largest manufacturers of passenger rail cars, has successfully negotiated the purchase of Adtranz, a large European manufacturer of rail equipment. The newly appointed chief executive officer has been brought in to manage the acquisition. The new CEO faces many challenges including decisions about the pace of integration, location of headquarters, organization structure, personnel retention and personal management style. Students may use this case to discuss post-acquisition strategy and how fast companies should move to integrate acquisitions.

Teaching Note: 8B04M23 (13 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Management Decisions; Management in a Global Environment; Mergers & Acquisitions; Change Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Competing with Integrity in Global Business: Personal Integrity

BEER FOR ALL: SABMILLER IN MOZAMBIQUE
Margaret Sutherland, Tashmia Ismail

Product Number: 9B14M026
Publication Date: 5/12/2014
Revision Date: 5/12/2014
Length: 11 pages

SABMiller, the world’s second largest brewer, has developed a business model in Mozambique that represents a radical departure from the firm’s traditional approach to beer production. Despite this multinational’s well-developed global supply chains and heavily centralized processes, it has disrupted both established processes and products and has, instead, innovated to produce a cassava-based beer in an effort to serve the low-income consumers who comprise the bulk of the African economic pyramid. In a marked departure from corporate best practices, the manufacturing process begins outside of the brewery and in the vicinity of the scattered and rural cassava farming plots.

Teaching Note: 8B14M026 (23 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Innovation; low income markets; bottom of pyramid; Mozambique
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



LENHAGE AG: ETHICAL DILEMMA
Daniel Galindau, Won-Yong Oh

Product Number: 9B14M037
Publication Date: 5/2/2014
Revision Date: 4/23/2014
Length: 8 pages

The general manager at the Seoul location of a European manufacturing company faces an ethical dilemma involving bribery and “facilitation” payments. A key decision maker in a local construction company’s purchasing department has asked for a “facilitation” payment as a necessary condition for securing an order. If the expatriate manager decides to pay the money, he will secure an order that will lift his company to a new level of success for years to come. If he decides not to pay, the order and all the company has worked for over the last year will be lost. The expatriate manager must decide whether or not the payment would violate laws internationally, locally and in his home country. What are the real risks? Who can help him answer the many questions he has regarding this local practice?

Teaching Note: 8B14M037 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Ethics; decision making; bribery; facilitation payment; South Korea
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ASIS ELECTRONICS
Henry W. Lane, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B11M057
Publication Date: 7/21/2011
Length: 3 pages

The controller for Asis Electronics, a subsidiary of a European-based corporation, was concerned that Asis might have overcharged the U.S. Ministry of Defense in a contract for transmitters. However, Asis’s chief financial officer did not address the matter when he learned of it. After being asked to sign an annual compliance document related to anti-corruption practices, the controller needed to decide whether or not to report the irregularities through established “protected communications channels” that ensured confidentiality.

Teaching Note: 8B11M056 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Contract Law; Human Resource Management; Ethics; Accountability; Corruption; United States; Northeastern
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



REPUTATION RISK IN THE GLOBAL ART MARKET
Kimberley Howard, William Wei, Eric Zengxiang Wang

Product Number: 9B09M062
Publication Date: 10/9/2009
Revision Date: 7/27/2017
Length: 6 pages

When Yves Saint Laurent died in June 2008, his estate passed to his business partner, Pierre Bergé. Bergé decided to auction several items from Laurent's estate at Christie's international auction house, including two antique bronzes from China. The general feeling in China was that these artifacts had been looted and should be repatriated rather than auctioned. The case highlights issues of ethics, corporate governance and corporate responsibility.

Teaching Note: 8B09M62 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: ethical issues; corporate responsibility; customer relationship management; corporate governance; luxury goods
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SINYI REAL ESTATE IN TAIWAN
Terence Tsai, Borshiuan Cheng, Shubo Philip Liu

Product Number: 9B08M077
Publication Date: 1/12/2009
Revision Date: 6/11/2009
Length: 20 pages

As the economies of Greater China continued the process of rapid transformation and industrialization, newly industrialized countries (NICs), such as Taiwan and mainland China, experienced dramatic changes in their business settings. Accompanying the industrialization of east Asian economies, business ethics were in a state of flux, as traditional values were often swept aside to justify profit maximization. In this ever-changing business environment, what were the characteristics and benefits of Chinese business ethics? What role did they play? Could an integrity-based business practice serve as a source of competitive advantage? What business settings were supporting business ethics? Few studies have paid attention to these kinds of questions. Sinyi was one of the most successful real estate agent companies in Taiwan and mainland China. From a Confucian perspective, Sinyi's founder cultivated a people-centered culture for both its customers and employees. By applying business ethics as a central differentiating strategy, Sinyi established an excellent corporate image and was regarded by many as the role model of responsible business. Sinyi service was regarded as premier in Taiwan. Its customer satisfaction rating was also far above the industry average. Trustworthiness and fair dealing were the company's guiding principles. This was in contrast to the-then chaotic environment of the real estate industry in Taiwan, where basic trust between buyers and sellers was rare and deceit existed everywhere. Focusing on using business ethics as a central differentiating strategy, Sinyi had grown into Sinyi Group, which successfully integrated upstream, midstream and downstream industries and established a highly-acclaimed business model. Over the past two decades, Sinyi Group had expanded its operations to mainland China and forged an alliance with global real estate brokerage Coldwell Banker. The case can be used for MBA and EMBA courses in business ethics (in a module on culture and business ethics) and strategic management (in a module on strategic business ethics). This case should provoke holistic thinking and discussion on sustainable business, Confucian entrepreneurship and the relationship between business ethics and competitive advantages.

Teaching Note: 8B08M77 (13 pages)
Industry: Real Estate and Rental and Leasing
Issues: Ethical Issues; Sustainability; Management Science and Info. Systems; Human Resources Management; Corporate Social Responsibility; Differentiation; Strategy; CEIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 9:
Competing with Integrity in Global Business: Corporate Sustainability

NOVO NORDISK: MANAGING SUSTAINABILITY AT HOME AND ABROAD
Jette Steen Knudsen, Dana Brown

Product Number: 9B12M081
Publication Date: 9/7/2012
Revision Date: 2/14/2013
Length: 17 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Corporate Social Responsibility Award, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. This case study deals with the opportunities and challenges faced by Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk with regard to its sustainability approach in China as of 2012. Novo Nordisk is well known for striving to integrate its business activities in a financially, environmentally, and socially responsible way, and many Novo Nordisk employees proudly refer to Novo Nordisk as a “triple bottom line (TBL) company.” Novo Nordisk has been active in China for more than 50 years; however, since the Chinese economy has expanded tremendously, this increase in wealth and a more sedentary Western lifestyle have led to growing problems with obesity. As a result, China’s insulin market is booming.

Novo Nordisk therefore faces new challenges concerning how best to organize its TBL program in a way that ensures a comprehensive approach throughout the organization, yet allows Novo Nordisk China to adopt initiatives that fit the Chinese business context. Furthermore, with ever-increasing competition for access to China’s lucrative insulin market, Novo Nordisk’s competitors are also engaging in sustainability, which means that Novo Nordisk must keep innovating to stand out, and must use sustainability as a source of competitive advantage.


Teaching Note: 8B12M081 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Corporate Social Responsibility; Non-market Strategy; China; Europe
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BARRICK GOLD CORPORATION - TANZANIA
Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B10M020
Publication Date: 10/20/2010
Revision Date: 11/19/2014
Length: 15 pages

This case examines the giant Canadian mining corporation, Barrick Gold Corporation (Barrick), (called Africa Barrick Gold plc since 2009), and the way it engages in sustainable community developments that surround its mining activities in Tanzania. Following recent organized tensions and heightened criticism from local communities, media, international social lobbyists and local not-for-profit organizations (NFOs), Barrick has attempted to deal with the local communities in a responsible manner. At issue for senior management was whether there was much more that it could reasonably do to resolve the tensions.

The case considers: how MNEs seek social license and local legitimacy; the relevance of hybrid institutional infrastructures; the evolving global roles for MNEs and their subsidiaries. The case is appropriate for use in courses in international management, global corporations and society, and international development and sustainable value creation.


Teaching Note: 8B10M20 (17 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Subsidiaries; Business and Society; Corporate Social Responsibility; Cross Sector Social Partnership; Government Relations
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BAYER CROPSCIENCE IN INDIA (A): AGAINST CHILD LABOR
Charles Dhanaraj, Oana Branzei, Satyajeet Subramanian

Product Number: 9B10M061
Publication Date: 1/27/2011
Length: 19 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Indian Management Issues and Opportunities Award, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. This case explores value-driven strategy formulation and implementation by bringing to the fore issues of ethics, responsible leadership, social intiatives in emerging markets, and the global-local tensions in corporate social responsibility. It examines how Bayer CropScience addressed the issue of child labor in its cotton seed supply chain in rural India between 2002 and 2008. Bayer had been operating in India for more than a century. In December 2002, the Bayer Group completed the acquisition of India-based Aventis CropScience. Bayer CropScience first learned about the occurrence and prevalence of child labor in its newly acquired India-based cotton seed operations a few months post-acquisition, in April 2003. The Aventis acquisition had brought onboard a well-known Indian company, Proagro, which already had operations in the cotton seed production and marketing - a new segment of the supply chain for Bayer. Child labor was widespread in cotton seed production — a traditional practice taken for granted not only by Indian farmers but also by several hundred Indian companies then accounting for approximately 90 per cent of the market share. The (A) case focuses on Bayer’s decision whether, when, and how to launch a self-run program that would take direct responsibility for tracking and eradicating child labor in rural India.

Teaching Note: 8B10M061 (11 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Emerging Markets; Strategy Implementation; Ethical Issues; Crisis Management; Corporate Responsibility; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TALISMAN ENERGY INC.: THE DECISION TO ENTER IRAQ
Pratima Bansal, Natalie Slawinski

Product Number: 9B09M035
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 7/2/2009
Length: 17 pages

In June 2008, the chief executive officer of Talisman Energy Inc. (Talisman) and his senior executive team met with the company's board of directors. The purpose of this meeting was to debate Talisman's proposed entry into the oil-rich Kurdistan region of Iraq. This move was potentially very lucrative for Talisman but was fraught with risks. These risks were exacerbated by Talisman's previous foray into Sudan; during that expansion Talisman had been accused of complicity in human-rights abuses, stemming from industry-accepted royalties and fees it had paid to the government. This payment of fees was held as an example by public interest groups to allege that Talisman was indirectly funding the Sudanese civil war. Talisman's reputation had suffered to the point where the ire of investors and U.S. and Canadian governments was sufficient for Talisman to exit Sudan in 2003. There were many questions about the proposed move to Iraq, including the political situation, the views of the U.S. and Canadian government, and especially the US$220 million fee payable to the Kurdistan Regional Government. Should Talisman enter Iraq, and if so, could they avoid experiencing the same outcome as Sudan?

Teaching Note: 8B09M35 (11 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Corporate Responsibility; Risk Management; Political Environment; Sustainable Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ETHICS OF OFFSHORING: NOVO NORDISK AND CLINICAL TRIALS IN EMERGING ECONOMIES
Klaus Meyer

Product Number: 9B09M001
Publication Date: 1/9/2009
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 13 pages

The case outlines the conflicting ethical demands on a Danish pharmaceuticals company, Novo Nordisk, that is operating globally and is aspiring to high standards of corporate social responsibility. A recent report alleges that multinational pharmaceutical companies routinely conduct trials in developing countries under alleged unethical conditions. The company's director reflects on how to respond to a request from a journalist for an interview. This triggers a discussion on the appropriate ethical principles and how to communicate them. As a company emphasizing corporate responsibility, the interaction with the media presents both opportunities and risks to Novo Nordisk. The case focuses on clinical trials that are required to attain regulatory approval in, for example, Europe and North America, and that are conducted at multiple sites around the world, including many emerging economies. Novo Nordisk has implemented numerous procedures to protect its various stakeholders, yet will this satisfy journalists and non-governmental organizations, and how should the company communicate with these stakeholders?

Teaching Note: 8B09M01 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Location Strategy; Ethical Issues; Emerging Markets; Research and Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MALAWI BUSINESS ACTION AGAINST CORRUPTION
Oonagh Fitzgerald, James Ng'ombe

Product Number: 9B07M037
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Length: 18 pages

The founding executive director of the African Institute for Corporate Citizenship (AICC), felt very tense as he typed the last revisions to the speech he would be giving to a Llongwe merchants' association later in the week. He really enjoyed proudly describing his initiative, "Business Action Against Corruption", and the Business Code of Conduct for Combating Corruption in Malawi, to potential new partners. However, the founding executive director was beginning to feel concerned about its slow pace of adoption. He was particularly worried about how to manage the delicate relationship with the government.

Teaching Note: 8B07M37 (6 pages)
Issues: Negotiation; Ethical Issues; Corporate Responsibility; Globalization; Political Environment; Procurement
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA