Ivey Publishing

Quantum Leadership: Advancing Innovation, Transforming Health Care

Porter-O’Grady, T. & Malloch, K.,3/e (United States, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2009)
Prepared By Karin Schnarr, Ph.D. Candidate, General Management and Alexander Kunsch, Intern, Ivey International Centre for Health Innovation
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
A New Vessel for Leadership: New Rules for a New Age

NOVO NORDISK: MANAGING SUSTAINABILITY AT HOME AND ABROAD
Jette Steen Knudsen, Dana Brown

Product Number: 9B12M081
Publication Date: 9/7/2012
Revision Date: 2/14/2013
Length: 17 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Corporate Social Responsibility Award, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. This case study deals with the opportunities and challenges faced by Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk with regard to its sustainability approach in China as of 2012. Novo Nordisk is well known for striving to integrate its business activities in a financially, environmentally, and socially responsible way, and many Novo Nordisk employees proudly refer to Novo Nordisk as a “triple bottom line (TBL) company.” Novo Nordisk has been active in China for more than 50 years; however, since the Chinese economy has expanded tremendously, this increase in wealth and a more sedentary Western lifestyle have led to growing problems with obesity. As a result, China’s insulin market is booming.

Novo Nordisk therefore faces new challenges concerning how best to organize its TBL program in a way that ensures a comprehensive approach throughout the organization, yet allows Novo Nordisk China to adopt initiatives that fit the Chinese business context. Furthermore, with ever-increasing competition for access to China’s lucrative insulin market, Novo Nordisk’s competitors are also engaging in sustainability, which means that Novo Nordisk must keep innovating to stand out, and must use sustainability as a source of competitive advantage.


Teaching Note: 8B12M081 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Corporate Social Responsibility; Non-market Strategy; China; Europe
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MEDICALTECH: CO-CREATING VALUE WITH CUSTOMERS
Barbara L. Marcolin, Sasha Romano Lopez

Product Number: 9B11E037
Publication Date: 9/25/2012
Revision Date: 9/25/2012
Length: 14 pages

The head of research and development at MedicalTech, a new manufacturer of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coils and software, had just met with MedicalTech's founder and chief executive officer (CEO). They had been discussing the technology development requirements decided so far in their attempts to build MedicalTech's first technology offering for diagnosing cancer. The head of research and development needed to advise the CEO regarding the best technology development approach (services-oriented technology co-creation and product-oriented technology creation); selecting the appropriate hospital partner to co-create the first public prototype; and determining the value propositions of all end-users for the features and functions chosen. The head of research and development gave some thought to seeking the advice and partnership of more developed competitors in the industry, as she was confident that this start-up company could be a success, but wondered whether the company could succeed on its own.

Teaching Note: 8B11E037 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: End User Value Proposition; First Customer Piloting; Technology Development Approaches; Business and Profit; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NETCARE'S INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Saul Klein, Albert Wöcke

Product Number: 9B09M005
Publication Date: 5/22/2009
Revision Date: 6/2/2010
Length: 22 pages

In 2008, the acquisition of the General Healthcare Group (GHG) in the United Kingdom had propelled Netcare Limited (Netcare) from a predominantly South African operation into one of the largest private hospital groups in the world. One of Netcare's key long-term goals was to deliver innovative, quality health-care solutions to patients in every continent. Recent South African parliamentary legislation had introduced the potential for regulated pricing and collective bargaining in medical centres, which could change the industry structure and possibly affect Netcare's strategy. As acquisition at home would be increasingly subject to stringent scrutiny from competition regulators, Netcare wondered what the impact of global acquisition would have on executing its strategy. What lessons could be learned from the GHG acquisition, how could those lessons be leveraged for further international growth, and what continent would be best suited to expansion? The case illustrates the international expansion strategies of Netcare, and illustrates the challenges of operating in an emerging market. The ability to overcome these challenges is the basis of a competitive advantage when entering developed markets.

Teaching Note: 8B09M05 (4 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Business and Society; Global Strategy; Emerging Markets; Hospitals; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 2:
Thriving in Complexity: Ten Principles for Leaders in the Quantum Age

MEDICALTECH: CO-CREATING VALUE WITH CUSTOMERS
Barbara L. Marcolin, Sasha Romano Lopez

Product Number: 9B11E037
Publication Date: 9/25/2012
Revision Date: 9/25/2012
Length: 14 pages

The head of research and development at MedicalTech, a new manufacturer of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coils and software, had just met with MedicalTech's founder and chief executive officer (CEO). They had been discussing the technology development requirements decided so far in their attempts to build MedicalTech's first technology offering for diagnosing cancer. The head of research and development needed to advise the CEO regarding the best technology development approach (services-oriented technology co-creation and product-oriented technology creation); selecting the appropriate hospital partner to co-create the first public prototype; and determining the value propositions of all end-users for the features and functions chosen. The head of research and development gave some thought to seeking the advice and partnership of more developed competitors in the industry, as she was confident that this start-up company could be a success, but wondered whether the company could succeed on its own.

Teaching Note: 8B11E037 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: End User Value Proposition; First Customer Piloting; Technology Development Approaches; Business and Profit; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HEALTH CARE CENTER FOR THE HOMELESS: CHANGING WITH THE TIMES
Mary Conway Dato-on, Eileen Weisenbach Keller

Product Number: 9B10A032
Publication Date: 4/28/2011
Length: 12 pages

Bakari Burns, CEO of the Health Care Center for the Homeless (HCCH) in Orlando, Florida, was faced with the daunting task of rebranding the organization. He knew that the organization experienced difficulty with recognition and marketplace distinction, primarily due to the public’s misconceptions about the relationship between HCCH and the Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida. An external consulting team offered several recommendations for change, including an amended name and redesigning all marketing materials. This advice and changes in the external environment made it an excellent time to reposition and refocus the organization. Recognizing the need for a new strategy and implementing that strategy were not the same; Burns was not sure how to lead the organization through the change process.

Teaching Note: 8B10A032 (14 pages)
Issues: Change Management; Branding; Brand Orientation; Health Care; Non-profit Management; Florida, United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



QILING RESEARCH HOSPITAL
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Kevin Leung

Product Number: 9B09C002
Publication Date: 1/20/2009
Length: 17 pages

The QiLing Research Hospital (QiLing), located in Beijing, China, headed by Dr. Tien Tzu, CEO, is in a partnership with the China Research Network (CRN). This partnership was formed in an effort to mutually benefit both parties in terms of becoming a leader in health-care quality standards and creating more effective health-care techniques. Due to the intertwined nature of this relationship, the acquisition of human capital for specific positions within the hospital requires CRN to provide the candidates. Dr. Tien Tzu is increasingly concerned that CRN's hiring conditions are hindering QiLing's potential - specifically referencing the latest batch of candidates CRN has provided to fill a key spot in the neurology department. She is aware that the right people are the key to maintaining QiLing's growth and loyalty and has analyzed how the candidate selection process, overall compensation, and job retention efforts affect the quality of the human capital pool. She is entertaining thoughts about overhauling the process for the benefit of QiLing, and is unsure how CRN will respond to any proposals she might make.

Teaching Note: 8B09C02 (4 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Manpower Planning; Employee Selection; Career Development; Intercultural Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Evidentiary Leadership: An Expanded Lens to Determine Healthcare Value

APOLLO HOSPITALS ENTERPRISE LTD. CLINICAL SCORECARD
Murray J. Bryant, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B11M066
Publication Date: 8/9/2011
Length: 13 pages

In January 2011, the group medical director of Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd (AHEL), India’s largest integrated health care provider in the private sector, is weighing his options in promoting clinical excellence among group hospitals. AHEL has been using a clinical scorecard, called ACE@25, as a tool to measure and monitor clinical excellence, which is becoming a source of differentiation in the Indian health care industry. ACE@25 measures 25 clinical parameters, benchmarked against the best hospitals globally, every month. The group medical director is wondering whether his role should be limited to monitoring clinical outcomes or whether, in order to drive clinical excellence, he should also prescribe the steps that the medical superintendents of individual hospitals should take in improving outcomes on their watch.

Teaching Note: 8B11M066 (5 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Managerial Accounting and Control; Clinical Governance; Health Care; Performance Management; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PARTNERS HEALTHCARE SYSTEM (PHS): TRANSFORMING HEALTH CARE SERVICES DELIVERY THROUGH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
Richard M. Kesner

Product Number: 9B09E023
Publication Date: 12/11/2009
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 15 pages

This case considers the process of organizational transformation undertaken by Partners Healthcare System (PHS) since the 1990s as their hospital and affiliated ambulatory medical practices have adopted both EMR and CPOE systems. Encompassing a strategic investment in information technologies, wide-spread process change, and the pervasive use of institutional clinical decision support and knowledge management systems, this story has been 15 years in the making, culminating in 2009 with the network-wide use of EMR and CPOE by all PHS doctors. These developments in turn opened the door to the redefinition of services delivery and to the replacement of established therapies through the leveraging of the knowledge residing in 4.6 million now-digitized PHS patient records. As such, the PHS experience serves as a window into how one organization strove to address the daunting challenges of 21st century health care services information management, as a template for success in the implementation of large-scale information systems among research-based hospitals across the United States, and more broadly as a learning platform for industry executives in their efforts to transform health care delivery through data and knowledge management.

Teaching Note: 8B09E23 (18 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Change Management; Health Administration; Decision Support Systems; Information Systems; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOM BAKER CANCER CENTRE
Murray J. Bryant, Eileen Pepler

Product Number: 9B07M078
Publication Date: 9/18/2008
Length: 17 pages

The director for the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC) and vice-president of the Alberta Cancer Board (ACB) took a moment to reflect on the past six months. He had assumed the leadership of the TBCC in December 2006. Alberta Health & Wellness had created an ambitious provincial vision for cancer in which the director would play a key role. The director recognized that it would be difficult to gain buy-in from the different stakeholders because they were used to a different way of operating. Before moving forward, the director wanted to have several discussions with ACB, his management team and the front-line staff, and present to them some preliminary objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B07M78 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health; Change Management; Evidence-based Decision Making
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 4:
Creating Context: Innovation as a Way of Life

ALBERTA HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT PILOT PROJECT: CHANGING THE PROVINCIAL MODEL OF HIP AND KNEE CARE
Michael J. Rouse, Aish Sundaram

Product Number: 9B12M057
Publication Date: 5/17/2012
Revision Date: 5/17/2012
Length: 16 pages

This case examines methods to incorporate the best evidence into clinical practice. More particularly, it considers the issue of knowledge translation from the perspective of implementing an evidence-based hip and knee care pathway in Alberta, Canada. A secondary problem would be bringing together multiple stakeholders with different incentives to implement a large-scale health care change.

Teaching Note: 8B12M057 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health Care; Evidence-based Practice; Knowledge Translation; Organizational Change; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CENTRE FOR CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY: THE COMMERCIALIZATION CHALLENGE
Nita Sachan, Prasad Vemuri, Anand Nandkumar, Charles Dhanaraj

Product Number: 9B11M064
Publication Date: 7/28/2011
Length: 17 pages

This case deals with the commercialization challenges that a premier research institute in an emerging economy faces despite conducting cutting-edge research. The case is set in 2009 in Hyderabad, India, soon after the appointment of CCMB’s new director, Dr. Mohan Rao. Rao has to decide how to proceed with incentivizing the scientists to find potential applications for their research when most scientists are merely interested in doing basic research and when, at the same time, the government is increasing its emphasis on the use of public science for societal good. The case also deals with the role of commercialization and technology transfer, publishing versus patenting, basic versus translation sciences, and incentives.

Teaching Note: 8B11M064 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Commercialization; Technology Transfer; R&D; Translational Science; Incentives; India; Ivey/ISB
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GDR VERSUS KODAK - BART FILM SCANNER
Donald A. Pillittere

Product Number: 9B09M059
Publication Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 7 pages

Georginelli Dental Research (GDR) has transitioned from an agile entrepreneurial company to one that has become overly cautious as its high-margin film sales have eroded. Even though the phases-and-gates process in place at GDR provides guidance to projects, the spirit that led the company to past success has been removed from the organization. The two main characters of the case want to bring back that can-do spirit as they attempt to rapidly commercialize the Bart scanner and extend the life of film. The issues in the case concern: a) entrepreneurial companies and their business strategies and processes for managing new product development b) the implications these strategies and processes have on addressing the needs of customers, shareholders and employees c) the role people can play in pushing through corporate processes and culture to improve time-to-market. The case focuses on the ways individuals might overcome internal company resistance or roadblocks by partnering with an OEM partner that possesses complementary capabilities. When seeking a strategic partner, most think in terms of technical skills; however, the culture or DNA of a partner is just as important. The case is intended for use in courses in managing new product commercialization, managing technology and innovation, strategic thinking, international business and leadership.

Teaching Note: 8B09M59 (6 pages)
Issues: International Business; Corporate Culture; Corporate Strategy; Product Design/Development; Organizational Change; Operations Management; International Joint Venture; Product Development Alliances; Technological Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Innovation Leadership

LV PRASAD EYE INSTITUTE
Vasantha Kumar, S Ramakrishna Velamuri, Wei Zhang

Product Number: 9B13C007
Publication Date: 5/10/2013
Revision Date: 10/16/2013
Length: 21 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Best case in the Entrepreneurship & Indian Family Business category, 2012 ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition. An entrepreneur puts his entire lifetime into building an organization. When it comes to health care in India, it is all the more difficult as there are so many hurdles, such as a huge population that cannot afford to pay, shortage of trained manpower and increasing cost of supplies. LV Prasad Eye Institute has been successful, largely because of its founder’s dedication, hard work and innovative pyramid model of organizational structure. In spite of its success, this healthcare institution faces challenges from increased competition and the lack of a succession strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B13C007 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Innovation; rural markets; organization life cycle; India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GREEN HILLS HOSPITAL: LEADING CHANGE MANAGEMENT
Jim Kayalar

Product Number: 9B12C037
Publication Date: 9/26/2012
Revision Date: 9/24/2012
Length: 11 pages

The case presents a change initiative at a large health care facility that aims to maximize shareholder value by introducing lean health care. While change management performance can be measured in financial terms, what happens when a mishandled change initiative starts to endanger the lives of patients?

Teaching Note: 8B12C037 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Change Management; organizational change; lean health care; restructuring; Asia
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (IP) MANAGEMENT AND INNOVATION: BRINGING NEW IDEAS TO MARKET AT PARTNERS HEALTHCARE
Richard M. Kesner

Product Number: 9B11E006
Publication Date: 3/7/2011
Length: 16 pages

This case identifies the approach taken by Partners HealthCare to better manage the commercialization of its intellectual property (IP). Existing processes did not leverage the shared resources, such as business development efforts and the research centres created as a consequence of the formation of Partners HealthCare in 1995. Partners was the largest hospital organization and second-largest non-university recipient of research funding from the National Institute of Health (NIH). As such, it generated a vast and varied body of IP constituting an asset of considerable value to Partners and those it served. The leadership of Partners viewed it as their mission to the organization and to the greater health care community to vigorously pursue commercializing innovation generated through research efforts.

The case considers the organizational structure and how this structure enabled a cohesive commercialization effort. It includes three vignettes that involve research projects that precede the creation of the Research, Ventures and Licensing (RVL) unit in 2005. RVL served as the centralized office for overseeing the processes of IP protection, licensing, translational research project funding, new venture creation, and industry partnerships to bring forward the inventions that emerged from the research of Partners affiliates and their primary investigators. The case demonstrates how a large health care organization can bring innovative products and services to market through appropriate organizational transformation.


Teaching Note: 8B11E006 (11 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Innovation; Health Sciences; Technology Transfer; Intellectual Property; United States; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
The Leader as Peacemaker: Managing the Conflicts of a Multifocal Workplace

L’OSERAIE — TURNAROUND CHALLENGE
Justin Paul, Marc Chaix, Shruti Gupta

Product Number: 9B11C018
Publication Date: 7/11/2011
Length: 15 pages

This case deals with the challenges faced at L’Oseraie, a nursing home located in the northeast of France. The director of L’Oseraie had to meet her new boss and brief him on the organization’s challenges while offering suggestions. A key obstacle involved employee motivation and engagement, particularly after a recent absenteeism episode. Furthermore, the lack of health care staff in France meant that employees might need to be sourced from abroad, perhaps from Eastern Europe or the French-speaking countries of North Africa. How could the director implement a strategy that would alleviate the day-to-day problems of the nursing home?

Teaching Note: 8B11C018 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health Care Administration; Organizational Structure; Employee Retention; Human Resource Management; France
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



DR. AMITA JOSHI AT SAMUEL DRUGS LIMITED
Anup K. Singh, Abhinav Gupta

Product Number: 9B11C006
Publication Date: 2/3/2011
Length: 8 pages

AWARD-WINNING CASE: Adjudged second-best case at the ISB Case Competition 2010 held in partnership with the Richard Ivey School of Business and the Association of Indian Management Schools and sponsored by the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants.

This case describes the successful journey of Dr. Amita Joshi in a medium-sized Indian pharmaceuticals organization, Samuel Drugs, which was facing serious performance problems. As CEO, Joshi realized that the organization had strong manufacturing capability but that it lacked marketing excellence and badly needed someone who could be tasked with making the company marketing-oriented. Joshi selected a young general manager of sales, Rajesh Mishra, as director of marketing. He proved to be an excellent choice and performed very well in his new role. Samuel Drugs had three subsidiaries and one of them, Eastern Pharmaceuticals Limited, required a managing director and Mishra was selected. He also continued to perform his previous role of director of marketing. Then conflict ensued between Joshi and Mishra. This case reveals the important roles of communication, co-ordination, multiple and diverse stakeholders, and organizational conflict in determining organizational effectiveness. It also highlights the point that managers need to tackle both formal and informal aspects of an organization, rational and social sides of organizational life, and changing dynamics of relationships.


Teaching Note: 8B11C006 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Organizational Structure; Communications; Conflict Management; Women in Management; Pharmaceuticals; India; Ivey/ISB
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 7:
Crisis Management: Leading Constant Change

CANADIAN CANCER SOCIETY: FUNDRAISING CONTROVERSY
Jana Seijts, Paul Bigus

Product Number: 9B11M098
Publication Date: 10/17/2011
Revision Date: 3/30/2016
Length: 8 pages

On July 6, 2011, the communication director for the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) in Toronto, Ontario, was faced with a challenging situation. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) had just released an online article that focused on the 2011 CCS budget and how the CCS allocated millions of dollars each year. The article provided details on how the proportion of donation money that the CCS spent on cancer research each year had decreased from 40 per cent in 2000 to under 22 per cent in 2011. With the CBC report circulating in both television and online media, public speculation into the CCS’s financial management of public donations was starting to grow. It was clear that the CCS communication team would need to respond. A communication strategy would need to be developed for the CCS to follow, along with a press release to be posted the next day on the CCS website.

Teaching Note: 8B11M098 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Non-profit Organization; Communications; Media Relations; Crisis Management; Fundraising; Research; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GOOD INTENTIONS GONE AWRY AT THE NATIONAL KIDNEY FOUNDATION
Hwee Sing Khoo, Audrey Chia, Vivien K. G. Lim

Product Number: 9B10M017
Publication Date: 4/21/2010
Length: 14 pages

This case illustrates the rise and fall of the former chief executive officer (CEO) of the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) Singapore, T.T. Durai. In June 2007, Durai was charged with corruption and sentenced to three months in jail. Just less than two years prior, he had been the prolific CEO who had transformed the NKF from a small foundation into Singapore's largest charity, with 21 dialysis centres. Durai spent 37 years of his life volunteering and working with the NKF, and initiated research, marketing and fund-raising strategies for the charity. Under Durai's helm, the charity's revenue grew from $17 million to $116 million. Dialysis centres in other parts of the world sought Durai's expertise to improve their dialysis programs. This case documents the unfolding events that led to surprising revelations in court. These include Durai's leadership style, controversial decisions, bountiful entitlements and debatable actions taken to achieve his aims. In all, the case provides a perceptive insight into how differing perceptions of responsible leadership affected the stakeholders of the NKF, and encourages readers to analyze and propose how things could be improved, or could have turned out differently.

Teaching Note: 8B10M17 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health Administration; Transformational Leadership; Ethical Issues; Non-Profit Organization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SWINE FLU TOUR
Stephen Grainger

Product Number: 9B09C021
Publication Date: 12/8/2009
Length: 8 pages

An Australian business professor has just arrived in China with a group of students, when one of the group members comes down with the H1N1 virus. The entire group is hospitalized or quarantined. The professor, who is also the tour director, must determine how to deal with the crisis, and quickly. This case is designed for use in a crisis management course, or in an early class in an international management course to illustrate the sorts of differences one may confront in international settings.

Teaching Note: 8B09C21 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Health Care; Contingency Management; Crisis Management; Swine Flu
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Living Leadership: Vulnerability Risk Taking, and Stretching

COLOPLAST: TEN YEARS OF GLOBAL OPERATIONS
Marcus Moller Larsen, Torben Pedersen

Product Number: 9B12M070
Publication Date: 8/2/2012
Revision Date: 7/23/2012
Length: 16 pages

In just a decade, the Danish health care product manufacturer Coloplast underwent a major transformation from a local Danish manufacturing company to a truly multinational corporation. In 2001, Coloplast conducted all its production in-house in three production facilities in Denmark. Ten years later, the company had relocated almost 90 per cent of the production to four different countries, with the majority in Hungary and China. However, a transformation of this caliber rarely comes without challenges. Coloplast’s relocation of production had largely been carried out through a trial-and-error process without an overarching corporate strategy. In this process, the company had experienced many difficulties. Although Coloplast had by 2011 successfully identified and changed the critical issues created by the offshoring initiatives, the executive management now faced a substantial challenge in understanding what Coloplast had learned over the last 10 years and how it could excel based on this history.

Teaching Note: 8B12M070 (15 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Operations Strategy; Strategic Change; Global Production Network; Offshoring; Denmark; Hungary; China
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



RIVERSIDE HOSPITAL'S PHARMACY SERVICES
Anne Snowdon, Hannah Standing Rasmussen

Product Number: 9B11D014
Publication Date: 1/31/2012
Revision Date: 2/6/2014
Length: 16 pages

Riverside District Memorial Hospital is a small rural hospital that must work within an operational budget that is determined by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. This case identifies the emergence of concerns for patient safety related to medication administration, and the challenges of ensuring that professional services are maintained by the pharmacy department to serve patients admitted to hospital. The chief nursing executive must decide what steps should be taken to reduce medication errors, in the context of the complex relationships at Riverside.

Teaching Note: 8B11D014 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health Care; Technological Change; Operations Analysis; Pharmacy; Drug Administration; Hospitals; Canada
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



ORAL INSULIN: BREAKTHROUGH INNOVATION AT BIOCON
Nita Sachan, Prasad Kaipa, Anand Nandkumar, Charles Dhanaraj

Product Number: 9B11M065
Publication Date: 7/28/2011
Length: 18 pages

This case deals with the innovation challenges of a medium-sized firm (under $1 billion) in an emerging economy (India), particularly the challenges of product development and commercialization. The management has to decide how to proceed with a promising novel formula for oral insulin — promising both in terms of financial returns as well as social impact. The company has spent several years of research and development in getting the drug through Phase I and Phase II trials, and is entering the most critical stage, Phase III. The case is set in 2009, a period that was punctuated with a lot of economic uncertainty. Students are asked to decide if Biocon should go ahead with Phase III and, if so, whether it should be done locally or globally and with a partner or alone. The case also deals with transitioning research and development strategies in emerging markets, wherein firms that have traditionally focused on “imitation” (or generic drugs) are moving to high-risk drug discovery.

Teaching Note: 8B11M065 (11 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Innovation; Technology Commercialization; Technology Licensing; Research and Development (R&D); Pharmaceutical Industry; India; Ivey/ISB
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Healing Brokenness: Error as Opportunity

ASTERAND: LEARNING FROM FAILURE
Anne Snowdon, Hannah Standing Rasmussen, David Maslach

Product Number: 9B12D018
Publication Date: 10/29/2012
Revision Date: 10/26/2012
Length: 11 pages

This case chronicles the challenges of establishing an innovative tissue bank service to accelerate the research and development processes of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies worldwide. Asterand’s two major challenges involved achieving a standardized approach to collecting tissue samples in hospitals all over the world and achieving the highest possible quality of tissue samples shipped to their primary customer, Amgen. Despite the identified need for high-quality tissue samples, Asterand was experiencing multiple quality control problems in their processes and procedures. Tissue samples were being packaged poorly, labeled incorrectly or delivered at the wrong time or to the wrong place. Additionally, there were quality issues with the RNA analysis of the samples, which was a critical factor in the usability of the tissue sample for research and development of new therapies and drugs.



The head of pathology at Amgen’s California facility was threatening to terminate their existing order and communicate the failure of Asterand to all company employees, which would have a devastating ripple effect across the industry and likely destroy opportunities for any future orders with Asterand. If this happened, Asterand would not be able to secure contracts with customers and was at risk of losing investors and going bankrupt.


Teaching Note: 8B12D018 (11 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health sector; medical products; product quality; customer relationship; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CEO DECISION-MAKING AT PRAIRIE HEALTH SERVICES
Valerie Wallingford, Sharon Gritzmacher

Product Number: 9B11M063
Publication Date: 8/11/2011
Length: 3 pages

This case focuses on a significant problem faced by county-owned Prairie Health Service’s administrators: What could be done to reduce multiple billings and other redundancies among the four divisions of the organization? The administrators’ goal was to implement an integrated records management system that would streamline the registration and billing processes for patients, thereby increasing efficiency and timeliness, as well as reduce financial losses. While this was a fiscally responsible goal for the organization, the records management software package selected by the CEO was inadequate for the task. Rather than listen to the recommendations of his division administrators who had spent considerable time researching potential software, the CEO seemed to be basing his selection decision on the personal relationship he had developed with sales representatives from one of the software firms.

Teaching Note: 8B11M063 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Management Behaviour; Records Management Software; Board/management Relations; Ethics
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



ADCOCK INGRAM: DECISIONS AND MOTIVES THAT STEER ACQUISITIONS
Charlene C. Lew

Product Number: 9B10C008
Publication Date: 6/10/2010
Revision Date: 6/18/2010
Length: 16 pages

The case sketches the story of a charismatic and ambitious young business leader who, through value-adding commercial transactions, has helped set a South African pharmaceutical company, Adcock Ingram, on a trajectory of growth. In May 2009, he faces lack of closure and an ambiguous outcome to an offer to acquire a smaller pharmaceutical company. The case demonstrates the power of relationships, where the ambitions of different parties around the negotiations table and the incentives that shape their alliances can make or break a strategic business deal. The case presents students with an opportunity to analyze an unfavourable outcome of a business deal, and build a concept of behavioural requirements of success in business transactions. The case has been designed for class discussion and analysis of factors of leadership that underpin or influence acquisitions. It focuses on the behavioural components of leadership decision-making and their effect on business results. The case can provide a platform for the discussion of motives, interpersonal skills and relationships, and business activities in acquisitions.

Teaching Note: 8B10C08 (22 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Interpersonal Skills; Personal Values; Acquisition Strategy; Behaviours of effective negotiation; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 10:
Emotional Competence: A Vital Leadership Skill

MASSCHALLENGE, INC.: LAUNCHING A NON-PROFIT BUSINESS ACCELERATOR (A)
Gordon K. Adomdza, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B13M013
Publication Date: 2/11/2013
Revision Date: 2/6/2013
Length: 13 pages

MassChallenge Inc. is a large non-profit startup accelerator that connects new ventures with other stakeholders within an established business ecosystem. For this new company to engage stakeholders in the numbers envisaged and create a crowd-sourced deal management system, the founders need to develop a model that brings in as many quality or attractive startups as possible. Instead of taking equity in participating ventures as traditional accelerators do, MassChallenge focuses on developing a marketplace for stakeholders to gain access to startups and for startups to access the resources provided by investors and other stakeholders, including government; angel investors, venture capitalists and lawyers; and businesses, foundations and universities. The founders also need to find ways to build MassChallenge through possible expansion and funding opportunities.

Teaching Note: 8B13M013 (6 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: New Venture; Venture Capital; Non-profit Organization; Government and Business; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MASSCHALLENGE, INC.: LAUNCHING A NON-PROFIT BUSINESS ACCELERATOR (B)
Gordon K. Adomdza, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B13M014
Publication Date: 2/11/2013
Revision Date: 2/6/2013
Length: 2 pages

This is a supplement to MassChallenge, Inc.: Launching a Non-Profit Business Accelerator (A), product 9B13M013.

Teaching Note: 8B13M013 (6 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: New Venture; Venture Capital; Non-profit Organization; Government and Business; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DR. MAK LAP MING
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Josephine Chiu

Product Number: 9B11D017
Publication Date: 1/19/2012
Length: 15 pages

Dr. Mak Lap Ming, an obstetrician and gynecologist who operated two clinics in Wan Chai, Hong Kong, was contemplating retirement. Now that his own child was financially independent and thus relieved some of the pressure on Mak, he was wondering if it made financial sense to retire soon. He also wondered what the immediate consequences of retirement would be and if semi-retirement was a viable option. To that end, he could work with a partner and shift control to that partner at some point; he could work at his clinics part-time; or he might be able to close one clinic completely and practice out of the remaining one. Mak also thought of retiring completely at the end of the year. Evaluating his options brought Mak significant internal conflict: part of him longed to attain the freedom to travel, yet he experienced great emotional satisfaction when he attended a birth and saw the joy that birth gave to the parents. Mak wondered whether, in his particular case, the pros of retirement outweighed the cons.

Teaching Note: 8B11D017 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Partnership; Business Valuation; Family-work Interaction; Exit Strategy; Retirement; Medical Profession; Hong Kong
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (B)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M011
Publication Date: 2/25/2008
Revision Date: 9/15/2014
Length: 9 pages

This case, which outlines the product recall, is a supplement to Mattel and the Toy Recalls (A).

Teaching Note: 8B08M11 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Toxic Organizations and People: The Leader as Transformer

PATIENT SAFETY AT GRAND RIVER HOSPITAL & ST. MARY'S GENERAL HOSPITAL
Murray J. Bryant, Alex Cestnik, Ashok Sharma

Product Number: 9B12M080
Publication Date: 11/21/2012
Revision Date: 11/21/2012
Length: 14 pages

Patient safety is a critical issue in health care and remains a problem in almost all health care institutions. The challenge is to change the culture so that all providers of care put patient safety as job one. Traditionally physicians have suggested that patient safety is due to individual error. In contrast, patient safety is a system and cultural change. The joint chief of staff at a medium-sized community hospital wants to address patient safety by influencing his fellow physicians to change practices of patient care without appearing paternalistic. The arena of patient care and changing attitudes is a new concept at Grand River Hospital. The case examines the various means that the joint chief of staff can employ to introduce a patient safety culture at the hospital.

Teaching Note: 8B12M080 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Safety; Health Care; Change Management; Professionalization; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HOSPITAL SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS (A)
Elizabeth M.A. Grasby, Jason Stornelli

Product Number: 9B07C018
Publication Date: 8/3/2007
Length: 12 pages

The customer care team lead at Hospital Software Solutions was becoming increasingly distressed in her workplace. Her supervisors were not managing her or the department effectively; her responsibilities did not align with her job description; she was being blamed for computer system failures; and she felt she was being viewed as the office slacker. The case provides for the application of theoretical concepts surrounding leadership, power/influence, motivation, corporate culture and conflict. The supplement case, Hospital Software Solutions (B), product # 9B07C019, follows the events after the customer care team lead attends a town hall meeting to air her concerns about computer systems problems.

Teaching Note: 8B07C18 (9 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Corporate Culture; Conflict Resolution; Motivation; Leadership
Difficulty: 1 - Introductory


Chapter 12:
Transformational Coaching: Leading the Membership Community

COLOPLAST: TEN YEARS OF GLOBAL OPERATIONS
Marcus Moller Larsen, Torben Pedersen

Product Number: 9B12M070
Publication Date: 8/2/2012
Revision Date: 7/23/2012
Length: 16 pages

In just a decade, the Danish health care product manufacturer Coloplast underwent a major transformation from a local Danish manufacturing company to a truly multinational corporation. In 2001, Coloplast conducted all its production in-house in three production facilities in Denmark. Ten years later, the company had relocated almost 90 per cent of the production to four different countries, with the majority in Hungary and China. However, a transformation of this caliber rarely comes without challenges. Coloplast’s relocation of production had largely been carried out through a trial-and-error process without an overarching corporate strategy. In this process, the company had experienced many difficulties. Although Coloplast had by 2011 successfully identified and changed the critical issues created by the offshoring initiatives, the executive management now faced a substantial challenge in understanding what Coloplast had learned over the last 10 years and how it could excel based on this history.

Teaching Note: 8B12M070 (15 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Operations Strategy; Strategic Change; Global Production Network; Offshoring; Denmark; Hungary; China
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SOLUTIONS CARE ASSOCIATION: DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED CSR STRATEGY
Vesela Veleva

Product Number: 9B11M004
Publication Date: 3/23/2011
Length: 19 pages

This case focuses on Solutions Care Association (SCA) — a nonprofit health care organization established in 2000 that quickly became a leader in environmental stewardship and social responsibility. With headquarters in Nevada, United States, the company had a strong mission and socially responsible culture, which helped attract talent and launch social and environmental initiatives. Despite its numerous achievements and awards, however, there was limited awareness internally and externally about these initiatives and their impact on business and society. In addition, the company did not have a comprehensive way to track and report these achievements. As an emerging leader of the integrated health care plan in the United States, Solutions Care Association had both the responsibility and the opportunity to be a model of what American health care should look like. With growing concerns over and scrutiny of the health care industry, there was no better time for Solutions Care Association to continue to strengthen its leadership position in addressing key social and environmental problems, such as providing affordable health care, reducing climate change impacts, phasing out toxic chemicals and creating a safe, culturally sensitive, and supportive environment for employees, patients, and suppliers.

Teaching Note: 8B11M004 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Strategy Development; Communications; Health Care; Corporate Social Responsibility; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IMMUNOVACCINE (IMV): PREPARING TO CROSS THE VALLEY OF DEATH
Ella Korets-Smith, Suhaib Riaz

Product Number: 9B10M072
Publication Date: 10/19/2010
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 18 pages

The case describes the challenges faced by Immunovaccine (IMV), a small biotechnology company founded in Halifax, Canada. The company has seen early success in the effectiveness of its technology in animal health and is looking for ways to exploit the potential of its technology more broadly, particularly in human health. The company's challenges are presented in the context of the evolving relationship between the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The case describes the various issues the company faces around 2008, shortly after the new president and CEO has taken over. It then provides details on strategy formulation and execution under the new CEO.

Teaching Note: 8B10M72 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Pharmaceuticals; Strategy Development; Biotechnology; Strategy Execution; Strategy and Resources; Strategy Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
The Leader's Courage to Be Willing: Building a Context for Hope

GORAN KAPICIC AT ACTAVIS CHINA
Joo Yong Lowe

Product Number: 9B13C001
Publication Date: 2/22/2013
Revision Date: 2/25/2013
Length: 14 pages

The managing director of a multinational company turns a loss-making business into a profit-making venture by using his unique brand of leadership to change the organizational culture and develop a responsible proactive attitude in his employees. Throughout this process, many difficult personnel decisions must be made, including the decision to remove some senior employees who resist the necessary changes.

Once under the new leadership team, recruitment and talent development become essential to the future growth of the company. The managing director wonders how to manage this challenge.


Teaching Note: 8B13C001 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Leadership; change management; cross-cultural communication; pharmaceutics; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HEALTH INSURANCE TO THE BASE OF THE PYRAMID
Suresh B.P., S.R. Asokan

Product Number: 9B11A015
Publication Date: 7/27/2011
Length: 16 pages

This case describes a unique insurance scheme in India called Krupa Arogya Suraksha, promoted by the Shree Krishna Arogya Trust. The product was designed with the aim of extending basic health coverage to the “base-of-the-pyramid” population at an affordable premium. The services were provided by Shree Krishna Hospital, of which the Trust was an associate. The Trust and the hospital were looking at a win-win situation: in providing modern health services to a larger, lower-income group, the facilities of the hospital would be better utilized. In the five years since the scheme’s creation, membership had increased threefold to 43,000. These members accounted for 13 per cent of patients treated by the hospital. Thus, the dual objectives of extending affordable health care to the lower-income segment and increased utilization of the hospital facilities had been achieved, to some extent. However, the Trust was unable to meet the cost of the health care offered under the scheme from the premiums collected and was dependent on donors to cover the difference. The Trust’s management was concerned about the sustainability of such an arrangement and was looking for ways to make the scheme pay for itself.

Teaching Note: 8B11A015 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Base of the Pyramid; Health Insurance; Hospitals; Service Marketing; India; Ivey/ISB
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ORGANIZATION, FOUNDER AND CLIENTELE TRANSFORMATION AT VGKK
G. Ramesh, L. Prasad, G.S. Goutham

Product Number: 9B09C022
Publication Date: 7/29/2010
Length: 17 pages

The literature on change and transformation mostly focuses on for-profit organizations, even though not-for-profit organizations offer a richer context for study, and social entrepreneurs are most often at the forefront of large-scale change. The case is an attempt to examine the evolution of a development organization. It centres on a medical professional and his thirty-year struggle in ushering in social transformation in the BR Hills of Southern India, working for tribal and forest development based on a foundation of ethics, self-organization and the assertion of human and individual rights. In 1994, he was awarded the Right Livelihood Award (also known as the Alternative Nobel Prize) for his efforts.

This case can teach the evolution of a) a social entrepreneur into a leader; b) an amorphous service entity into an institution with a network of organizations and c) a low-profile, undemanding clientele with no voice to a demanding clientele expecting choices and rights. The case can also be used to explore the growth of a social enterprise (in terms of objectives, service delivery, roles, scale, etc.); concepts of change and social transformation; and the organizational life cycle and evolution of systems over the cycle. The case highlights the path civic service organizations (CSOs) and social actors tread over time in undertaking to provide public service.


Teaching Note: 8B09C22 (11 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Organizational Change; Evolution of Social Organization; Leadership Development; Social Entrepreneurship
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 14:
Renewing the Spirit of Leadership: Becoming a Living Leader

PERKINELMER: OLD INSTRUMENT REUSE AND RECYCLING
Vesela Veleva, Anna Montanari, Peter Clabby, Jonathan Lese

Product Number: 9B12M115
Publication Date: 1/22/2013
Revision Date: 1/10/2013
Length: 14 pages

This case examines the business options for implementing a company-wide product take-back program. It focuses on PerkinElmer, a $1.9 billion global technology company developing diagnostics and biomedical products for the environmental and human health sectors. The company, which operates in more than 150 countries, is committed to community engagement, sustainable and ethical business practices and eco-innovative products, including a commitment to continuously reducing the environmental and health impacts of its products throughout their useful lives. As of 2012, PerkinElmer was required to comply with two European Union regulations restricting hazardous substances and monitoring the disposal of electronic waste, but there were no similar broad-based federal U.S. regulations at that time. One of the European Union directives required the company to practise end-of-life management, that is, to take back and responsibly manage its products at the end of their useful lives. PerkinElmer used a study group at Boston College to examine the different options for handling old products and to discover if there was a profitable or at least profit neutral business model for doing so, in light of what its competitors were doing in this area. If the benefits outweigh the risks, how should the company roll out a corporate-wide product take-back strategy?

Teaching Note: 8B12M115 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Sustainability; biotechnology; environmental strategy; product stewardship; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CRAIG KIELBURGER: A MOVEMENT IS BORN
Mary M. Crossan, Mark Reno

Product Number: 9B12M031
Publication Date: 3/26/2012
Revision Date: 2/5/2014
Length: 1 pages

This six-part video case series features social entrepreneur Craig Kielburger as he faces pivotal moments in his life and the remarkable evolution of his organization. The primary dilemmas are strategic in nature and their solutions rely on leadership and social entrepreneurship. Students assume the role of Craig Kielburger in each case, which begins with a video set-up, followed by a short one- or two-page case and a discussion, and concludes with Craig describing what happened in a video clip. (This product consists of one of the six cases. Use product #9B12M031B to order the remaining five cases.)

Teaching Note: 8B12M031 (8 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Strategic Renewal; Leadership Character; Social Entrepreneurship; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GERM WARFARE: COMBATING HEALTH CARE-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS THROUGH COMMUNICATION
Mary Weil, Paul Bigus

Product Number: 9B12M117
Publication Date: 12/18/2012
Revision Date: 12/18/2012
Length: 14 pages

The director of the Infection Prevention and Control Unit at the University Health Network (UHN), in Toronto, Canada, is working to reduce healthcare acquired infections (HAIs) by using a different way to communicate with hospital staff. Through positive deviance (PD), participants are gaining new perspectives to help identify the changes that are needed to reduce HAIs. The initiative has been successful at UHN. Now the director needs to figure out how to spread the success of positive deviance to more health care regions and facilities in Canada and the United States to improve patient lives and the quality of health care.

Teaching Note: 8B12M117 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Communications; Employee Engagement; Organizational Culture; Sustainability; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA