Ivey Publishing

Global Marketing: A Decision-Oriented Approach

Hollensen, S.,5/e (United States, Prentice Hall/Financial Times, 2010)
Prepared By Michael J.D. Roberts, Ph.D. Candidate
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Global Marketing in the Firm

CANADA GOOSE: THE SOUTH KOREA OPPORTUNITY
June Cotte, Jesse Silvertown

Product Number: 9B11A036
Publication Date: 1/30/2012
Revision Date: 12/5/2012
Length: 17 pages

Canada Goose was a Canadian maker of high-end winter outdoor clothing that was available in 40 countries. The company’s CEO was considering entering the South Korean market, which would entail resolving several problems. There were distributor complications, and it was unclear which style of jacket to sell to the new customer groups. Finally, deciding how to position Canada Goose in order to reach the two target groups for Canada Goose in South Korea was something that had bothered the CEO ever since he had first received the market research. Those issues aside, the firm also had to consider how the current state of the company, both in North America and Western Europe, would impact the success of a full-scale entry into South Korea. The CEO was excited for the opportunity for Canada Goose in South Korea, yet he was unsure how to maximize growth while positioning the brand as strongly as possible.

Teaching Note: 8B11A036 (3 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: New Market Entry; Winter Outdoor Clothing; Canada; South Korea
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HTC CORPORATION: A SMARTPHONE PIONEER FROM TAIWAN
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B11A031
Publication Date: 8/12/2011
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 22 pages

The case describes how HTC, a pioneer in mobile computing from Taiwan, evolved from a local subcontractor of personal data assistants (PDAs) to a global player in smartphones. It analyzes the successful transition of the company from an anonymous supplier of Western clients (such as HP and Palm) to a brand marketer that is considered a major threat to Apple Computer. The key issue in this case is the introduction of the HTC brand in products delivered to network operators worldwide, such as AT&T, British Telecom, NTT DoCoMo, Rogers, Verizon, and Vodafone. Unlike most subcontractors in Asia that encountered strong resistance or even harsh retaliation from their current clients, HTC had the support of many Western buyers in the introduction of its own brand name. This case identifies the structural issues between a subcontractor and a client that can potentially dictate the branding status of the final product sold to end-users — specifically, when a subcontractor should remain anonymous to end-users and when it should appeal to end-users by branding its own product.

Teaching Note: 8B11A031 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Outsourcing; Branding Strategy; Subcontractors; Smartphones; Personal Data Assistants; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STELLA ARTOIS IN THE U.K.
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B01A017
Publication Date: 12/6/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 15 pages

Stella Artois, Interbrew company's flagship brand of beer, has experienced phenomenal success on the international market. The United Kingdom market has played a critical role in that success, and Interbrew needs to assess the reasons for this. Interbrew's managing director and its chief marketing officer are meeting to have a discussion about how to proceed in developing the Stella Artois brand. First, they need to understand what part of the company's success was due to expert marketing practices and what part might possibly be due to being in the right place at the right time. As well, they want to assess what possible steps might be taken to spread these practices across the corporation for use in the company's global marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B01A17 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Management; European Market; Product Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Initiation of Internationalization

BESTSELLER — FACING A NEW COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE IN CHINA
Michael W. Hansen, Marcus Moller Larsen, Torben Pedersen

Product Number: 9B11M054
Publication Date: 8/29/2011
Length: 20 pages

In the fall of 1996, Bestseller became one of the first international fashion companies to enter the Chinese retail market. Earlier that year, Allan Warburg and Dan Friis had made contact with the CEO of Bestseller A/S, Troels Holch Povlsen, regarding the prospect of selling Bestseller brands in China, where they felt there were many business opportunities. Holch Povlsen found himself convinced by the two entrepreneurs’ enthusiasm for the Chinese market.

They quickly proved that they had been right about China. A decade after the first store opened, Bestseller China had almost 2,000 stores, and accounted for more than one-third of the total turnover of Bestseller A/S. The secret to Bestseller China’s extraordinary success was its ability to sell price-competitive European designs with a Chinese touch, which was achieved by locating all production in China and modifying Bestseller A/S’s designs to suit the size and tastes of Chinese middle-class consumers. With a 10-year headstart over potential competitors, Bestseller China had by the end of 2007 managed to establish a strong presence in China. However, high economic growth and the growing middle class were making the Chinese market highly attractive for other companies. Although global giants, such as Zara and H&M, were devoting big chunks of their budgets to entering China and capturing market share, these aggressive new entrants were not Bestseller China’s biggest concern. In fact, the competition from local companies was seen as the real threat.


Teaching Note: 8B11M054 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Franchising; Marketing Management; Global Strategy; Fashion; Clothing; Denmark; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RUTH'S CHRIS: THE HIGH STAKES OF INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Ilan Alon, Allen H. Kupetz

Product Number: 9B06A034
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 8 pages

In 2006, Ruth's Chris Steak House was fresh off of a sizzling initial public offering and was now interested in growing their business internationally. With restaurants in just four countries outside the United States, a model to identify and rank new international markets was needed. This case provides a practical example for students to take quantitative and non-quantitative variables to create a short list of potential new markets.

Teaching Note: 8B06A34 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Strategy; International Business; International Strategy; Market Entry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JEWELLWORLD.COM - ONLINE JEWELRY SHOPPING IN CHINA
Shige Makino, Anthony Fong

Product Number: 9B05A009
Publication Date: 9/23/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 19 pages

The marketing manager of Jewellworld.com was faced with the problem of a saturated Hong Kong market, and has to consider ways in which to expand the business. In a meeting with the marketing director, who was responsible for the development of the Hong Kong and Chinese Jewelry markets, one of the main topics was the expansion of the online shopping strategy into the B2C area in China; however, the staff of the marketing department held different views. The immediate question was whether Jewellworld.com should move into the B2C area at full speed or wait and see how other competitors fared in the China online market. The other issue was the segmentation that Jewellworld should employ if they decide to enter the B2C market in China. A competitor had established retail stores across China. The question was whether Jewellworld should aim to cover all market segments and product lines, or target young people who tend to use the Internet more frequently.

Teaching Note: 8B05A09 (6 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Internet; Retail Marketing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Internationalization Theories

A CRACK IN THE MUG: CAN STARBUCKS MEND IT?
Michael Herriman, Motohiro Wanikawa, Ryoko Ichinose, Shobhana Darak, Yumana Chaivan

Product Number: 9B08A016
Publication Date: 11/28/2008
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 15 pages

After 20 years of rapid expansion, the last six months of 2007 saw Starbucks jolted by a decline in share price of 50 per cent and a decrease in customer visits. Its share price was hovering around $19 to $20. By mid-2008, it had declined to $18. Its fiscal first-quarter profit in 2007 rose by less than two per cent, and in January 2008, it announced the closing of 100 U.S. stores. In July, the number was increased to 600. The case was written to encourage classroom discussion and research into the company policy and marketing practices in order to discover the means for a possible turnaround of the company.

Teaching Note: 8B08A16 (22 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Operations Management; Expansion; Management Decisions; Licensing; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RUTH'S CHRIS: THE HIGH STAKES OF INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Ilan Alon, Allen H. Kupetz

Product Number: 9B06A034
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 8 pages

In 2006, Ruth's Chris Steak House was fresh off of a sizzling initial public offering and was now interested in growing their business internationally. With restaurants in just four countries outside the United States, a model to identify and rank new international markets was needed. This case provides a practical example for students to take quantitative and non-quantitative variables to create a short list of potential new markets.

Teaching Note: 8B06A34 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Strategy; International Business; International Strategy; Market Entry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INFOSYS: THE CHALLENGE OF GLOBAL BRANDING
Jeff Saperstein, Padmini Murty, Viren Desai

Product Number: 9B05A001
Publication Date: 8/2/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 25 pages

Information technologies outsourcing is one the emergent fast-growth industries in the global high-tech economy. India is the leading country for IT outsourcing and Infosys is the largest Indian company in this sector. The branding challenge for Infosys is to leverage its reputation for predictable excellent results for information technology outsourcing. Management had identified overall company top-line revenue growth to achieve 30-40 per cent annual increases while allocating a negligible budget for marketing communications. Therefore, the key to the global brand strategy would not be through brand image advertising, but through communications of product strategy developments to large global IT outsourcing companies. The goal for Infosys is to be on the short-list of providers for the large, most sophisticated assignments for IT services to bid against IBM and Accenture, while leapfrogging over other competitors in the fast growing and fragmented information technology outsourcing market.

Teaching Note: 8B05A01 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brands; Marketing Communication; Corporate Strategy; Consulting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEN & JERRY'S - JAPAN
James M. Hagen

Product Number: 9A99A037
Publication Date: 4/13/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 17 pages

The CEO of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc. needed to give sales and profits a serious boost; despite the company's excellent brand equity, it was losing market share and struggling to make a profit. The company's product was on store shelves in all U.S. states, but efforts to enter foreign markets had only been haphazard with non-U.S. sales accounting for just three per cent of total sales. The CEO needed to focus serious attention on entering the world's second largest ice cream market, Japan. An objective of Ben & Jerry's was to use the excess manufacturing capacity it had in the U.S., and it found that exporting ice cream from Vermont to Japan was feasible from a logistics and cost perspective. The company identified two leading partnering options. One was to give a Japanese convenience store chain exclusive rights to the product for a limited time. The other was to give long-term rights for all sales of the product in Japan to a Japanese-American who would build the brand. For the company to enter Japan in time for the upcoming summer season, it would have to be through one of these two partnering arrangements.

Teaching Note: 8A99A37 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Market Entry; International Marketing; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Development of the Firm's International Competitiveness

CHINESE FIREWORKS INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B11M006
Publication Date: 1/11/2011
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 13 pages

The Chinese fireworks industry thrived after China adopted the open-door policy in the late 1970s, and grew to make up 90 per cent of the world’s fireworks export sales. However, starting in the mid-1990s, safety concerns led governments both in China and abroad to set up stricter regulations. At the same time, there was rapid growth in the number of small family-run fireworks workshops, whose relentless price-cutting drove down profit margins. Students are asked to undertake an industry analysis, estimate the industry attractiveness, and propose possible ways to improve the industry attractiveness from an individual investor’s point of view. Jerry Yu is an American-born Chinese in New York who has been invited to buy a fireworks factory in Liuyang, Hunan.

Teaching Note: 8B11M006 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Analysis; Industry Analysis; International Marketing; Exports; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HTC CORPORATION: A SMARTPHONE PIONEER FROM TAIWAN
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B11A031
Publication Date: 8/12/2011
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 22 pages

The case describes how HTC, a pioneer in mobile computing from Taiwan, evolved from a local subcontractor of personal data assistants (PDAs) to a global player in smartphones. It analyzes the successful transition of the company from an anonymous supplier of Western clients (such as HP and Palm) to a brand marketer that is considered a major threat to Apple Computer. The key issue in this case is the introduction of the HTC brand in products delivered to network operators worldwide, such as AT&T, British Telecom, NTT DoCoMo, Rogers, Verizon, and Vodafone. Unlike most subcontractors in Asia that encountered strong resistance or even harsh retaliation from their current clients, HTC had the support of many Western buyers in the introduction of its own brand name. This case identifies the structural issues between a subcontractor and a client that can potentially dictate the branding status of the final product sold to end-users — specifically, when a subcontractor should remain anonymous to end-users and when it should appeal to end-users by branding its own product.

Teaching Note: 8B11A031 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Outsourcing; Branding Strategy; Subcontractors; Smartphones; Personal Data Assistants; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CARREFOUR CHINA, BUILDING A GREENER STORE
Andreas Schotter, Paul W. Beamish, Robert Klassen

Product Number: 9B08M048
Publication Date: 5/9/2008
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Carrefour, the second largest retailer in the world, had just announced that it would open its first Green Store in Beijing before the 2008 Olympic Games. David Monaco, asset and construction director of Carrefour China, had little experience with green building, and was struggling with how to translate that announcement into specifications for store design and operations. Monaco has to evaluate the situation carefully both from ecological and economic perspectives. In addition, he must take the regulatory and infrastructure situation in China into account, where no official green building standard exists and only few suppliers of energy saving equipment operate. He had already collected energy and cost data from several suppliers, and wondered how this could be used to decide among environmental technology options. Given that at least 150 additional company stores were scheduled for opening or renovation during the next three years in China, the project would have long term implications for Carrefour.

Teaching Note: 8B08M48 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Strategy Implementation; Emerging Markets; Environmental Business Management; Operations Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPLASH: READY TO MAKE WAVES?
Hari Bapuji, Niraj Dawar, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B06A033
Publication Date: 3/20/2007
Length: 19 pages

Splash Corporation has been dubbed the next Unilever - not bad for a consumer packaged goods company that was started in a garage in the Philippines no more than 20 years ago. As one of the largest consumer packaged goods companies in the Philippines, it is now considering international expansion options. Should the company tackle the nearby markets of Indonesia and Malaysia, or should it look farther afield at the lucrative markets of Europe and North America? The company is not short of ambition but resources are scarce.

Teaching Note: 8B06A33 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Goods; Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Internationalization; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Global Marketing Research

ESTIMATING DEMAND IN EMERGING MARKETS FOR KODAK EXPRESS
Ilan Alon, David M. Currie

Product Number: 9B11A026
Publication Date: 6/23/2011
Length: 10 pages

An executive must estimate the demand for Kodak Express outlets in various developing countries based on socioeconomic and demographic data about the countries. The case requires students to think about how to transform data on a national scale (GDP per capita, population, income distribution) into a form that is meaningful for a managerial decision — here, the number of outlets that could be supported by a country’s market demographics. In this instance, doing so can be accomplished effectively through modeling on a spreadsheet.

Teaching Note: 8B11A026 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Demand Analysis; Retailing; Franchising; Market Selection; Market Assessment; Microsoft Excel
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KIDS MARKET CONSULTING
Paul W. Beamish, Stephanie Taylor, Oleksiy Vynogradov

Product Number: 9B04M065
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 8 pages

The founder of Kids Market Consulting, a market research firm dedicated to the kids, tweens and teens segment, was faced with increasing competition and slowing revenue, and was exploring a variety of possibilities for the future strategic direction of the business. In particular, she had to formulate the best plan for protecting the niche market and decide how aggressively to pursue expansion. In addition, there was the existing relationship with her business partner, and Kids Market Consulting was part of his group of marketing firms. Any changes the founder chose had to respect this relationship and she was therefore restricted to a limited number of options. The over-arching corporate objective for the company was to defend the market from larger businesses who were trying to increase their share of the market research industry.

Teaching Note: 8B04M65 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Strategy Development; Strategic Planning; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



3M CHILE - HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS (A)
Terry H. Deutscher, Daniel D. Campbell

Product Number: 9A99A004
Publication Date: 5/5/1999
Revision Date: 11/7/2002
Length: 17 pages

Looking for a creative option to promote 3M products to medical professionals, a 3M Chile sales manager developed the idea of a first-aid kit or botiquin that could be used as a promotional gift. Managers at the company's world headquarters had not previously focused on branded first-aid kits. It was the same all over the world, a plain white box with the red cross in front. You just can't brand a first-aid kit! they replied. At the same time, the Chilean managers lacked the resources necessary for adequate market research. Should they go ahead with the botiquin concept anyway? If they did, questions such as channels, packaging, promotion, and pricing, would still have to be addressed. (A sequel to this case is available, titled 3M Chile - Health Care Products (B), case 9A99A005.)

Teaching Note: 8A99A04 (11 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Management in a Global Environment; Marketing Channels; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



3M CHILE - HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS (B)
Terry H. Deutscher, Daniel D. Campbell

Product Number: 9A99A005
Publication Date: 5/5/1999
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 4 pages

Looking for a creative option to promote 3M products to medical professionals, a 3M Chile sales manager developed the idea of a first-aid kit or botiquin that could be used as a promotional gift. 3M Chile launched the product with a limited promotional budget. Sales quickly exceeded their expectations. Now 3M Chile must decide whether a more aggressive promotional campaign will work. (This case is a sequel to 3M Chile - Health Care Products (A), case 9A99A004.)

Teaching Note: 8A99A04 (11 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Marketing Research; International Marketing; Management in a Global Environment; Marketing Channels
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
The Political and Economic Environment

ARAVIND EYE CARE SYSTEM: PROVIDING TOTAL EYE CARE TO THE RURAL POPULATION
Sanal Kumar Velayudhan, R. Meenakshi Sundaram, R.D. Thulasiraj

Product Number: 9B11A028
Publication Date: 9/29/2011
Length: 17 pages

The case deals with poor acceptance of Aravind’s eye care service by the rural population in the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu. One of the factors causing poor acceptance is the lack of awareness among the rural population that many cases of blindness are curable. Fear of surgery and cost are the other major barriers to acceptance by these consumers. Aravind is the largest eye care provider in the world and has pioneered many process innovations that have reduced the cost of eye treatment substantially. The company has a culture that encourages responsive service by a trained and motivated staff. It has experimented with a number of options to educate and provide eye care service to rural consumers. The manager must examine options in the areas of promotion and service delivery to enhance the acceptance of eye care service by rural consumers.

Teaching Note: 8B11A028 (12 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Emerging Markets; Services Marketing; Rural Marketing; Health Care; Eye Care; Distribution; Tamil Nadu, India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BAYER CROPSCIENCE IN INDIA (A): AGAINST CHILD LABOR
Charles Dhanaraj, Oana Branzei, Satyajeet Subramanian

Product Number: 9B10M061
Publication Date: 1/27/2011
Length: 19 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Indian Management Issues and Opportunities Award, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. This case explores value-driven strategy formulation and implementation by bringing to the fore issues of ethics, responsible leadership, social intiatives in emerging markets, and the global-local tensions in corporate social responsibility. It examines how Bayer CropScience addressed the issue of child labor in its cotton seed supply chain in rural India between 2002 and 2008. Bayer had been operating in India for more than a century. In December 2002, the Bayer Group completed the acquisition of India-based Aventis CropScience. Bayer CropScience first learned about the occurrence and prevalence of child labor in its newly acquired India-based cotton seed operations a few months post-acquisition, in April 2003. The Aventis acquisition had brought onboard a well-known Indian company, Proagro, which already had operations in the cotton seed production and marketing - a new segment of the supply chain for Bayer. Child labor was widespread in cotton seed production — a traditional practice taken for granted not only by Indian farmers but also by several hundred Indian companies then accounting for approximately 90 per cent of the market share. The (A) case focuses on Bayer’s decision whether, when, and how to launch a self-run program that would take direct responsibility for tracking and eradicating child labor in rural India.

Teaching Note: 8B10M061 (11 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Emerging Markets; Strategy Implementation; Ethical Issues; Crisis Management; Corporate Responsibility; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MONSANTO EUROPE (A)
Francis Spital, Henry W. Lane, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B02A007
Publication Date: 5/1/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 15 pages

Monsanto, one of the world's largest producers of commodity chemicals, had decided to focus its operations on the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. The first shipment of genetically modified soybeans arrived in Europe in November of 1996. Genetic engineering promised to reduce the use of pesticides and curtail world hunger. Therefore, Monsanto was dismayed at the powerful opposition that developed over the next few years. A series of food safety concerns, the foremost being mad cow disease, only added to consumer skepticism. The company must examine its strategy and the relationships with key stakeholders (including governments, farmers, industry groups, environmentalists, grocers and consumers). The (A) case provides background on Monsanto, their corporate strategies and the climate in which they introduced genetically modified products in the United States and Europe. The supplement Monsanto (B), product 9B02A008, focuses on the roles of government and other regulatory bodies in the acceptance of genetically modified products.

Teaching Note: 8B02A07 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Agriculture; International Trade; European Market; International Marketing; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MONSANTO EUROPE (B)
Francis Spital, Henry W. Lane, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B02A008
Publication Date: 5/1/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 7 pages

This supplement to Monsanto Europe (A), product 9B02A007 discusses the non-acceptance to genetically modified products showing up in the poor performance of Monsanto's agricultural division, affecting its successful divisions and the survival of the company. In order to win back its respectable standing in the marketplace, Monsanto must develop new strategies to educate consumers and influence political decision makers in order to gain greater acceptance of its products.

Teaching Note: 8B02A07 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: European Market; International Marketing; Agriculture; International Trade; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
The Sociocultural Environment

LUNDBECK KOREA: MANAGING AN INTERNATIONAL GROWTH ENGINE
Paul W. Beamish, Michael Roberts

Product Number: 9B10M012
Publication Date: 2/11/2010
Revision Date: 2/12/2010
Length: 16 pages

In 2005, the vice-president of Lundbeck, a Danish based pharmaceutical firm, needed to decide what to do with one of his most promising subsidiaries, Lundbeck Korea. Over its short lifetime, under the leadership of the country manager and the Asia regional manager, the subsidiary had grown well beyond the original goals set for it. The vice-president wanted to create a reporting structure and management mix that would balance the local demands that Lundbeck Korea required for growth with Lundbeck's overall strategy of specialization, speed, integration and results. The case also traces Lundbeck's internationalization efforts in Asia over the past 20 years. The company had grown from pure licensing arrangements to establishing its own country level subsidiaries. This case introduces the dynamic tensions between taking advantage of local management expertise and executing a corporate strategy developed for an entire global group. In addition, it illustrates the importance, but difficulties, of being sensitive to local management goals, while promoting a global corporate culture.

Teaching Note: 8B10M12 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: MNE Reporting Structures; International Strategy; Emerging Markets
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MORGAN'S ROCK HACIENDA & ECOLODGE
Shuo Wang, Judy Siguaw, Penny M. Simpson

Product Number: 9B05A013
Publication Date: 9/1/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 21 pages

An upscale ecolodge in southern Nicaragua hopes to achieve a 53 per cent occupancy rate within three years of opening, and has hired a management company to prepare a marketing strategy. Despite its proximity to Costa Rica and its focus on providing a unique luxury vacation retreat for one of the fastest growing segments in the travel industry - the ecotourist - the hotel faces numerous hurdles. The greatest challenge is to overcome Nicaragua's negative reputation, based on its recent history of political and social unrest, still fresh in the minds of tourists. The hotel must also operate within the country's rural infrastructure, characterized by interruptions in the power supply, poorly maintained roads and below-standard sanitation. Additionally, Nicaragua does not have a pool of skilled employees to work in the high-end service industry. The effects of these factors on the hotel's market positioning and market penetration rate are addressed in the preparation of the marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B05A13 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Tourism; Market Analysis; International Business; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FAIRMONT CHATEAU LAKE LOUISE
Robin Ritchie, Paul Artiuch

Product Number: 9B03A032
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 20 pages

An historic hotel faces the twin challenges of seasonal demand and a decline in its most important market. The hotel's general manager is considering several expansion/renovation proposals to address these problems, each of which implies a different strategic focus. The decision is complicated by the fact that the hotel is located in world-renowned Banff National Park, an environmentally sensitive area administered by the Canadian government. Growing public concern over development in national parks implies that an overly ambitious expansion plan is likely to be rejected, yet this may be the hotel's last chance to add significant capacity for the long-term. The case demonstrates the role of social and political forces in business decisions, while underscoring the interdependency of target market, positioning and marketing mix decisions.

Teaching Note: 8B03A32 (14 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Analysis; Marketing Management; Sustainable Development; Tourism
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
The International Market Selection Process

EL MAWARDY JEWELRY: EXPANSION DURING A RECESSION
Marina Apaydin, Hend Mostafa, Sherif Ashraf Salem, Ali Tawfik, Jylan Sekaly, Lila Mehrez

Product Number: 9B11M051
Publication Date: 7/7/2011
Length: 11 pages

El Mawardy Jewelry was an Egyptian jewelry company located in Cairo, Egypt. The company was able to attract many customers due to its variety of designs, high-quality products, and competitive prices. The friendly atmosphere and customized services provided by the salespeople helped the company gain a competitive advantage. The Mawardy family was able to build on its success and open different stores across Egypt. In 2009, the financial crisis hit Egypt and many businesses were negatively affected. Faced with this challenge and a goal to go international, the Mawardy family considered different possibilities. The company had many options, but decided to focus on Qatar and the United Kingdom. It needed to decide whether it was better to expand now or later. It also needed to consider where to expand first — Qatar or the United Kingdom.

Teaching Note: 8B11M051 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Expansion; Growth Opportunities; Gold; Jewelry; United Kingdom; Egypt; Qatar; Middle East
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BIRZEIT PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY: MARKETING FROM PALESTINE
Yara Asad, Ilan Alon

Product Number: 9B10A027
Publication Date: 3/3/2011
Length: 15 pages

Birzeit Pharmaceutical Company (BPC), established in 1974, had successfully completed a number of mergers and had overcome challenges and development phases in order to secure a strong position in its local market, Palestine, as well as introduce a wide range of products in the export market. BPC’s continuous success, despite political instability and continuous restrictions on its growth and expansion, led the company to focus beyond its local presence. Despite the growth of BPC and its financial solidity, it was very similar to other Arab businesses, which were reluctant to invest significantly and take big risks in growing outside their areas. BPC did not wish to risk large amounts of money, and instead chose to expand to new markets or introduce new niche products on a conservative basis. BPC invested in an Algerian packaging company in 2006 and aimed to meet its vision of growth by entering new markets and introducing new products. It wanted the packaging company to later grow to a manufacturing company, and accordingly to an export location. In a business environment that was characterized by quick decisions and high competition, the company needed to make faster decisions, invest more money, and choose a new path to secure its business development and growth. Competition in pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially among generics, was increasing greatly, and the faster BPC moved, the more competitive it would be.

Teaching Note: 8B10A027 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Pharmaceuticals; Product Diversification; New Markets; Risk Management; International Marketing; Palestine; Algeria; Middle East
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TAVAZO CO.
Paul W. Beamish, Majid Eghbali-Zarch

Product Number: 9B10M093
Publication Date: 11/12/2010
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 13 pages

In June 2010, Naser Tavazo, one of the three owner/manager brothers of both Tavazo Iran Co. and Tavazo Canada Co., was considering the company's future expansion opportunities, including further international market entry. Candidate cities of interest were Los Angeles, Dubai and other cities with a high Iranian diaspora. Another question facing the owners was where to focus on the value chain. Should the family business use its limited resources to expand its retailer business into more international markets, or to expand their current retailer/wholesale activities within Canada and Iran?

The objectives of this case are: (A) to discuss the typical problems that small companies confront when growing internationally and the implication of being a family business in this transition; (B) to provide a vehicle for developing criteria for market selection; (C) to highlight the importance of focus in the value chain regarding horizontal vs. vertical integration.

This case can be used in international business, strategic management or family business (entrepreneurship) courses. In international business, it may be used as an internationalization case and positioned early in the course. In a strategic management course, it might be positioned in sections dealing with managerial preferences, or diversification.


Teaching Note: 8B10M93 (9 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting, Manufacturing
Issues: Market Selection; Family Business; Internationalization; Imports; Exports
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPLASH CORPORATION (A): COMPETING WITH THE BIG BRANDS
Niraj Dawar, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B06A014
Publication Date: 4/28/2006
Revision Date: 9/11/2009
Length: 21 pages

Set in November 2005, the case examines a company that has been extremely successful in several product categories in its own domestic market and is defending its market position against intense competition from powerful multinational corporations, emerging domestic rivals and newer low-cost alternatives. The multinational corporations include some of the world's most sophisticated marketing companies. The case may be used independently or with the supplement Splash Corporation (B): International Expansion, product 9B06A015.

Teaching Note: 8B06A14 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Competing with Multinationals; Branding; Consumer Marketing; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPLASH CORPORATION (B): INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Niraj Dawar, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B06A015
Publication Date: 4/28/2006
Revision Date: 9/11/2009
Length: 10 pages

The Splash Corporation (A) case, product 9B06A014 focuses on the domestic Philippine market, particularly the competitive dynamics in the existing product lines of skin care and hair care. The Splash Corporation (B) case focuses on international expansion and the introduction of a new line of nutraceutical products. Both cases are set between late 2005 and early 2006 but deal with very different issues.

Teaching Note: 8B06A15 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Growth Strategy; Competing with Multinationals; Branding; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Some Approaches to the Choice of Entry Mode

FIRST ENERGY
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B12A001
Publication Date: 2/17/2012
Revision Date: 2/17/2012
Length: 13 pages

In September 2011, the CEO of First Energy Private Ltd, a start-up enterprise in the alternative energy industry in India, is at a critical juncture. The company has commercialized the technology of biomass cook stoves and has been providing, since 2007, clean and affordable cooking solutions to customers in rural India. A marginal rise in the price of biomass fuel in early 2011 has, however, led to a steep fall in demand, making the continuance in the rural household market unsustainable. The company is at a disadvantage in the household segment because the competing product, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), enjoys a price subsidy provided by the federal government. First Energy has been quick to target a niche in the urban commercial market consisting of restaurants, eateries, and hostels. While the margins are high in this segment, the volumes are low. The company must therefore build scale to be able to service the investments in plant capacity, which is under-utilized. The case enables students to come up with strategies for the CEO for market expansion. They will also decide whether to exit from or hold on to the household segment, where the margins are low but the volumes, considering the imminent de-subsidization of LPG, will be high.

Industry: Utilities
Issues: Sustainability; Alternative Energy; Business to Business Marketing; Customer Segmentation; Household Appliances; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PHASE SEPARATION SOLUTIONS (PS2): THE CHINA QUESTION
George Peng, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B12M032
Publication Date: 4/3/2012
Revision Date: 3/29/2016
Length: 17 pages

In mid-2010, the president and chief executive officer of Phase Separation Solutions (PS2) needed to address potential cooperative opportunities with separate Chinese organizations regarding its Thermal Phase Separation (TPS) technology. PS2 was a Saskatchewan-based small environmental solutions company that had grown under the president's entrepreneurial direction to become a North American leader in the treatment of soil, sludge, and debris impacted with various organic contaminants. The company specialized in the cleanup of two waste streams using its TPS technology. The first was the remediation of soil contaminated with persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The second was recovering usable oil from industrial sludge generated in various industries such as the oil and gas industry.

Teaching Note: 8B12M032 (17 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Growth Option; Pollution; Technological Change; Joint Venture; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Entry Mode; Canada; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMERON AUTO PARTS (A) - REVISED
Harold Crookell, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M015
Publication Date: 1/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

This case is about a small American auto parts producer trying to diversify his way out of dependence on the major automakers. A promising new product is developed and the company gets a chance to license it to a Scottish manufacturer. The issue of whether to license or go it alone in international markets is central to the case. (A sequel to this case is available titled Cameron Auto Parts (B) - Revised, case 9B06M016.)

Teaching Note: 8B06M15 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Exports; Licensing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMERON AUTO PARTS (B) - REVISED
Harold Crookell, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B06M016
Publication Date: 1/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 10 pages

Two years after signing a license agreement in the U.K., the company now faces an opportunity to establish with another firm a joint venture in France for the European market. However, the prospect upsets the U.K. licensee who is clearly doing very well, and who even wants Cameron to consider joint venturing with him in Australia. The case ends with Cameron, run off its feet in North America, trying to decide whether to enter Europe via licensing, joint venture or direct investment. (This case is a sequel to Cameron Auto Parts (A) - Revised, case 9B06M015.)

Teaching Note: 8B06M16 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Licensing; Joint Ventures; International Business; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAJESTICA HOTEL IN SHANGHAI?
Paul W. Beamish, Jane W. Lu

Product Number: 9B05M035
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 14 pages

Majestica Hotels Inc., a leading European operator of luxury hotels, was trying to reach an agreement with Commercial Properties of Shanghai regarding the management contract for a new hotel in Shanghai. A series of issues require resolution for the deal to proceed, including length of contract term, name, staffing and many other control issues. Majestica was reluctant to make further concessions for fear that doing so might jeopardize its service culture, arguably the key success factor in this industry. At issue was whether Majestica should adopt a contingency approach and relax its operating philosophy, or stick to its principles, even if it meant not entering a lucrative market.

Teaching Note: 8B05M35 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Market Entry; Negotiation; Control Systems; Corporate Culture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Export Modes

LOUIS VUITTON IN INDIA
Shih-Fen Chen, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B08A020
Publication Date: 12/23/2008
Length: 16 pages

The case portrays a subtle situation in international marketing -- the marketing of a high-end brand into a low-income nation, or the expansion of Louis Vuitton into India. This luxury good marketer faced practical problems in India, such as the challenge of identifying potential customers, the lack of media to build its brand, and the absence of high streets to open stores. In Europe and the U.S., luxury goods are often sold through company-owned stores that cluster in a particular area of the city (i.e., luxury retail cluster). After opening a store each in New Delhi and Mumbai inside two luxury hotels, Louis Vuitton teamed up with other western brands to develop a shopping mall. The case is designed to explore the possibility of using a luxury mall as a replacement of luxury retail clusters.

Teaching Note: 8B08A20 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Store Formats; Retail Marketing; Marketing Channels
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SELKIRK GROUP IN ASIA
Paul W. Beamish, Lambros Karavis

Product Number: 9A99M003
Publication Date: 2/20/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 16 pages

A family-owned brick manufacturer has built an export business to Japan and other Asian markets from zero to 10 per cent of its volume in seven years. The case examines the company's export strategy and organization in light of the recent Asian economic crisis and the reasons for their competitive success both in Australia and Asia. The managing director is raising the question of whether it is time to change their regional export strategy and organizational structure.

Teaching Note: 8A99M03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Organizational Structure; International Marketing; International Business; Exports
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHINESE FIREWORKS INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B11M006
Publication Date: 1/11/2011
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 13 pages

The Chinese fireworks industry thrived after China adopted the open-door policy in the late 1970s, and grew to make up 90 per cent of the world’s fireworks export sales. However, starting in the mid-1990s, safety concerns led governments both in China and abroad to set up stricter regulations. At the same time, there was rapid growth in the number of small family-run fireworks workshops, whose relentless price-cutting drove down profit margins. Students are asked to undertake an industry analysis, estimate the industry attractiveness, and propose possible ways to improve the industry attractiveness from an individual investor’s point of view. Jerry Yu is an American-born Chinese in New York who has been invited to buy a fireworks factory in Liuyang, Hunan.

Teaching Note: 8B11M006 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Analysis; Industry Analysis; International Marketing; Exports; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Intermediate Entry Modes

CIBC MELLON: MANAGING A CROSS-BORDER JOINT VENTURE
Paul W. Beamish, Michael Sartor

Product Number: 9B10M091
Publication Date: 11/5/2010
Revision Date: 5/24/2012
Length: 15 pages

During his 10-year tenure, the president and CEO of CIBC Mellon had presided over the dramatic growth of the jointly owned, Toronto-based asset servicing business of CIBC and The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation (BNY Mellon). In mid-September 2008, the CEO was witnessing the onset of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. The impending collapse of several major firms threatened to impact all players in the financial services industry worldwide. Although joint ventures (JVs) were uncommon in the financial sector, the CEO believed that the CIBC Mellon JV was uniquely positioned to withstand the fallout associated with the financial crisis. Two pressing issues faced the JV’s executive management team. First, it needed to discuss how to best manage any risks confronting the JV as a consequence of the financial crisis. How could the policies and practices developed during the past decade be leveraged to sustain the JV through the broader financial crisis? Second, it needed to continue discussions regarding options for refining CIBC Mellon’s strategic focus, so that the JV could emerge from the financial meltdown on even stronger footing.

Teaching Note: 8B10M91 (13 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Financial Crisis; Joint Ventures; Leadership; Alliance Management; Managing Multiple Stakeholders; Canada; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MARKET STRETCH
Gavin Price, Margaret Sutherland

Product Number: 9B09M046
Publication Date: 6/25/2009
Length: 11 pages

Bio-Oil is a multi-purpose skin care product that has gone from being sold only in South Africa to being the No. 1 scar treatment product in 16 of the 17 countries in which it is distributed. Retail sales have jumped from R3 million per annum to R1 billion from 2000 to 2008. Justin and David Letschert made key decisions to eliminate all of the other 119 products that were being manufactured by the company that they took over in 2000, and focused on the mainstay product of Bio-Oil. Union-Swiss accomplished its successful sales through the use of a hybrid distribution model that compelled its distributors in each country to communicate and share knowledge with each other. Union-Swiss also ensured that it remained focused on building the brand through limiting its activities in the value chain to that of marketing. It did this to such an extent that it created a separate entity to run the distribution of Bio-Oil in South Africa.

Teaching Note: 8B09M46 (8 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Market Entry; International Business; Supply Chain Management; Strategic Positioning; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



YUNNAN BAIYAO: TRADITIONAL MEDICINE MEETS PRODUCT/MARKET DIVERSIFICATION
Paul W. Beamish, George Peng

Product Number: 9B06M088
Publication Date: 1/23/2007
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 17 pages

In 2003, 3M initiated contact with Yunnan Baiyao Group Co., Ltd. to discuss potential cooperation opportunities in the area of transdermal pharmaceutical products. Yunnan Baiyao (YB), was a household brand in China for its unique traditional herbal medicines. In recent years, the company had been engaged in a series of corporate reforms and product/market diversification strategies to respond to the change in the Chinese pharmaceutical industry and competition at a global level. By 2003, YB was already a vertically integrated, product-diversified group company with an ambition to become an international player. The proposed cooperation with 3M was attractive to YB, not only as an opportunity for domestic product diversification, but also for international diversification. YB had been attempting to internationalize its products and an overseas department had been established in 2002 specifically for this purpose. On the other hand, YB had also been considering another option namely, whether to extend its brand to toothpaste and other healthcare products. YB had to make decisions about which of the two options to pursue and whether it was feasible to pursue both.

Teaching Note: 8B06M88 (12 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Product Diversification; Internationalization; Brand Extension; Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Hierarchical Modes

LOUIS VUITTON IN INDIA
Shih-Fen Chen, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B08A020
Publication Date: 12/23/2008
Length: 16 pages

The case portrays a subtle situation in international marketing -- the marketing of a high-end brand into a low-income nation, or the expansion of Louis Vuitton into India. This luxury good marketer faced practical problems in India, such as the challenge of identifying potential customers, the lack of media to build its brand, and the absence of high streets to open stores. In Europe and the U.S., luxury goods are often sold through company-owned stores that cluster in a particular area of the city (i.e., luxury retail cluster). After opening a store each in New Delhi and Mumbai inside two luxury hotels, Louis Vuitton teamed up with other western brands to develop a shopping mall. The case is designed to explore the possibility of using a luxury mall as a replacement of luxury retail clusters.

Teaching Note: 8B08A20 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Store Formats; Retail Marketing; Marketing Channels
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HUXLEY MAQUILADORA
Paul W. Beamish, Jaechul Jung, Joyce Miller

Product Number: 9B02M033
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 6/28/2011
Length: 14 pages

A senior manager in a U.S. manufacturing firm must make a recommendation about whether 57 labour intensive jobs should be moved from the existing California plant to a new facility in a Mexican maquiladora. If the Mexican opportunity is pursued, decisions are also required regarding the entry mode (subcontracting, shelter operator or wholly-owned subsidiary) and location (border or interior).

Teaching Note: 8B02M33 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Plant Location; Third World; Subsidiaries
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TV ASAHI THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS, INC.
Paul W. Beamish, C. Patrick Woodcock

Product Number: 9A96G004
Publication Date: 10/31/1996
Revision Date: 2/10/2010
Length: 14 pages

Kenji Sudo, the head of TV Asahi's Theatrical Productions subsidiary in New York, was simultaneously experiencing record success and parent company concerns about the long term role of this unit within the larger Japanese organization. Asahi's dilemma was whether to reinvest and grow this subsidiary, close it, or not take any action at the present time. An action plan is required.

Teaching Note: 8A96G04 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Arts Administration; Implementation; Subsidiaries; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
International Sourcing Decisions and the Role of the Sub-Supplier

SHER-WOOD HOCKEY STICKS: GLOBAL SOURCING
Paul W. Beamish, Megan (Min) Zhang

Product Number: 9B12M003
Publication Date: 2/13/2012
Revision Date: 11/17/2014
Length: 11 pages

In early 2011, the senior executives of the venerable Canadian hockey stick manufacturer Sher-Wood Hockey were considering whether to move the remainder of the company’s high-end composite hockey and goalie stick production to its suppliers in China. Sher-Wood had been losing market share as retail prices continued to fall. Would outsourcing the production of the iconic, Canadian-made hockey sticks to China help Sher-Wood to boost demand significantly? Was there any other choice?

Teaching Note: 8B12M003 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Offshoring; Outsourcing; Insourcing; Nearshoring; R&D Interface; Labour Costs; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FRANZ COLLECTION, INC.: THE ROAD FROM SUBCONTRACTING TO BRAND MARKETING
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B10M030
Publication Date: 5/28/2010
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 21 pages

The case describes the three-stage transformation of a Taiwanese company - from an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of small gifts for Western European customers, to an original design manufacturer (ODM) providing design and production of home decor and gifts to customers in Europe and the United States, to an own brand manufacturing (OBM) company launching its brand of porcelain tableware targeted at the global market. The story of Franz Collection is a story of product outsourcing and international cooperation, where OEM subcontractors in Asia have tried to set up their own marketing channels and brand names to bypass their Western clients and appeal directly to consumers. This case describes the managerial dilemmas in establishing a global brand faced by manufacturers in Taiwan and the neighbouring countries.

Teaching Note: 8B10M030 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Inter-firm Cooperation; Global Branding; MNEs From Emerging Markets; Subcontract Manufacture; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (B)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M011
Publication Date: 2/25/2008
Revision Date: 9/15/2014
Length: 9 pages

This case, which outlines the product recall, is a supplement to Mattel and the Toy Recalls (A).

Teaching Note: 8B08M11 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SCOTTS MIRACLE-GRO: THE SPREADER SOURCING DECISION
John Gray, Michael Leiblein, Shyam Karunakaran

Product Number: 9B08M078
Publication Date: 11/14/2008
Revision Date: 6/22/2009
Length: 11 pages

The Scotts Miracle-Gro company is the world's largest marketer of branded consumer lawn and garden products, with a full range of products for professional horticulture as well. Headquartered in Marysville, Ohio, the company is a market leader in a number of consumer lawn and garden and professional horticultural products. The case describes a series of decisions regarding the ownership and organization of the assets used to manufacture fertilizer spreaders. This case is intended to illustrate the application of and tradeoffs between financial, strategic and operations perspectives in a relatively straightforward manufacturing make-buy decision. The case involves a well-known, easily-described product that most students would assume is made overseas. Sufficient information is provided to roughly estimate the direct financial cost associated with internal (domestic) production, offshore (non-domestic) production and outsourced production. In addition, information is included that may be used to estimate potential transaction costs as well as costs associated with foreign exchange risk.

Teaching Note: 8B08M78 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Human Resources Management; Outsourcing; Globalization; Operations Management; Supply Chain Management; Operations Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 14:
Product Decisions

LEGO GROUP: BUILDING STRATEGY
Darren Meister, Paul Bigus

Product Number: 9B11M086
Publication Date: 9/13/2011
Revision Date: 2/1/2013
Length: 12 pages

The world famous toymaker, The LEGO Group, assembled an internal management team to create a strategic report on LEGO’s different product lines and business operations. In recent years, numerous threats to LEGO had emerged in the toy industry. The acquisition of Marvel Entertainment by The Walt Disney Company created major implications for valuable toy license agreements. LEGO had also recently lost a long legal battle with major competitor MEGA Brands, makers of MEGA Bloks, with a European Union court decision that removed the LEGO brick trademark. Furthermore, the second-largest toymaker in the world, Hasbro, was preparing to launch a new rival product line called Kre-O. It was critical for the management team to identify where to expand LEGO’s product lines and business operations, in order to develop a competitive strategy to continue the organization’s recent years of financial success and dominance in the building toy market.

Teaching Note: 8B11M086 (6 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Opportunity Recognition; Licensing; Competitive Strategy; Business Growth; Toy Industry; Denmark
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GROWING THE MAMAS & PAPAS BRAND
Michael Goldman, Jennifer Lindsey-Renton

Product Number: 9B11A044
Publication Date: 2/2/2012
Revision Date: 10/16/2012
Length: 17 pages

Nawaal Motlekar is the managing director of Kwenta Media and founding editor of Mamas & Papas, a recently launched parenting magazine in South Africa. From her early entrepreneurial experiences, Motlekar developed a personal and professional interest in parenting magazines. As a Black South African woman married to an Indian man in an increasingly multi-racial and multi-cultural society, Motlekar recognized a gap for a parenting magazine that would appeal to a wider and more racially and culturally inclusive target market. After extensive research and development, she launched the Mamas & Papas magazine in early 2009. The case charts Motlekar’s journey as an entrepreneur, as well as her efforts between 2006 and 2009 to bring the magazine to life. The case explores the quantitative and qualitative research approaches employed by Motlekar, as well as her marketing and branding initiatives towards building a Mamas & Papas brand beyond just the physical magazine. With the magazine having been on shelves for 12 months, Motlekar and her board faced a number of decisions. These included options to increase advertising revenues and circulation, as well as choosing how to extend the Mamas & Papas brand into related categories.

Teaching Note: 8B11A044 (9 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Brand Extension; Brand Management; Brand Positioning; Consumer Research; Marketing Research; Magazines; South Africa; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



PRODUCT PORTFOLIO PLANNING AT ESTONIA'S SAKU BREWERY
Michael R. Pearce, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B05A028
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 2/18/2010
Length: 21 pages

The chief executive officer and the marketing director of Saku Olletehase AS of Estonia must decide on the company's product portfolio plan. Saku enjoyed market leadership in Estonia with its brand Saku Originaal; however, the strength in market share has weakened in recent years due to increasing competition and greater marketing acumen from other domestic producers. While domestic beer sales have fallen, the company has experienced increases in other product lines such as alcoholic long drinks, cider and non-alcoholic beverages, which compliment its existing agreement to sell Pepsi and 7Up. For the last three years, the company has had the exclusive right to resell three well-known international beer brands (Guinness, Kilkenny and Carlsberg) in Estonia. With so many options and finite marketing resources, the company needs to decide where to focus its effort.

Teaching Note: 8B05A28 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Marketing; Global Product; Portfolio Management; Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ADVANCED BOOK EXCHANGE: GEOGRAPHIC GROWTH OF AN INTERNET-BASED BUSINESS
Anthony Goerzen, Travis Cramb

Product Number: 9B04M024
Publication Date: 8/10/2004
Revision Date: 10/13/2009
Length: 16 pages

Advanced Book Exchange is an Internet-based used book marketer. It has been very successful, but larger firms such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble were looking into this market. The chief operating officer must decide whether to grow through geographic diversification or consolidate and stay focused on its current markets.

Teaching Note: 8B04M24 (4 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Internet; Global Product; International Business; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Pricing Decisions and the Terms of Doing Business

THE HOME DEPOT CANADA: ECOOPTIONS
Kyle Murray, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B06A032
Publication Date: 11/23/2006
Length: 11 pages

In December 2005, The Home Depot Canada (THDC) rolls out its EcoOptions product line. The market for environment-friendly products has been changing in terms of vendor interest, consumer demand and competitive dynamics. THDC has been pushing that change with EcoOptions, which started off as a pilot project in March 2004. The project was driven by a larger vision of making EcoOptions the leading environmental brand in the global home-improvement market. Translated into measurable goals, it meant that 10 per cent of THDC's assortment of about 50,000 SKUs would be designated as EcoOptions by 2010. This case introduces many of the critical issues in strategic merchandising and assortment decisions, with a focus on the management of a major shift in the retailer's product assortment.

Teaching Note: 8B06A32 (5 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Pricing Strategy; Retailing; Retail Marketing; Assortment
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAVESA'S NELLY BRAND: PRICING TO GAIN MARKET CONTROL
Niraj Dawar, Natasha Ebanks

Product Number: 9B00A008
Publication Date: 6/19/2000
Revision Date: 1/6/2010
Length: 23 pages

The economy segment in the market for mayonnaise in Venezuela has become extremely competitive. Mavesa, Venezuela's largest and most professional consumer goods firm, finds its pioneer Nelly brand under assault from large players such as Kraft, and small nimble regional players such as Albeca. In this competitive scenario, Nelly's managers decide to cut price on the brand. The managers must analyze the implications of cutting price, including both the profitability impact of a pricing decision, as well as strategic competitive considerations.

Teaching Note: 8B00A08 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Emerging Markets; Brand Management; Pricing; Competitiveness
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



CARVEL ICE CREAM - DEVELOPING THE BEIJING MARKET
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A017
Publication Date: 8/5/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 12 pages

The manager of business development for Carvel Asia Limited is trying to determine how best to increase ice cream cake sales in Beijing. In doing so, he needs to develop a complete marketing program which includes decisions about product offerings, pricing, placement (distribution) and promotion - the 4 Ps. Carvel Asia was a 50-50 joint venture between Carvel (USA) and China's Ministry of Agriculture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A17 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Pricing Strategy; Product Concept; Marketing Communication; Distribution
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 16:
Distribution Decisions

SYNNEX INTERNATIONAL: TRANSFORMING DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH-TECH PRODUCTS
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B08A019
Publication Date: 12/1/2008
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 22 pages

The case describes how Synnex Technology International Corporation (Synnex) in Taiwan transformed itself from a local distributor of electronic components into a global logistic conglomerate of communication and information products between 1985 and 2007. The case analyzes the channel structure of electronic product distribution and explains how Synnex introduced innovative practices to transform its operation. The case is designed for MBA students to grasp some fundamental issues related to distribution channel design and supply chain management in a marketing or logistic management course.

Teaching Note: 8B08A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Logistics; Distribution Channels; Supply Chain Management; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ROUGEMONT FRUIT NECTAR: DISTRIBUTING IN CHINA
Paul W. Beamish, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A016
Publication Date: 7/20/1999
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 14 pages

Gervais Lavoie, managing director of the Canadian-Chinese joint venture, Beijing Oasis High Nutrition Food Co., needs to decide what means of distribution is most appropriate for the company's newly-developed fruit nectars. The decision is complicated by the fact that different means of distribution have different implications for the ultimate pricing and promotion of the products.

Teaching Note: 8A99A16 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Distribution; Pricing; Promotion Policy; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PROFORM
John R. Kennedy, Thomas Reutterer, Peter Schnedlitz

Product Number: 9A96A002
Publication Date: 12/16/1996
Revision Date: 2/5/2010
Length: 11 pages

A high end modern-design Austrian furniture retailer is under price and margin pressures for a number of reasons. A key reason for the margin pressure is that foreign suppliers, in an attempt to generate higher export sales, have moved to agents rather than selling direct. The Austrian retailer, together with a small group of individuals in the retail furniture business, has developed a buying group concept that the group believes will enable them to negotiate direct buying at better prices. However, they are unsure of the acceptance of the concept by the very individualistic owners of the single unit firms that make up most of this segment of Austrian furniture retailing.

Teaching Note: 8A96A02 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Retail Marketing; Supplier Relations; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 17:
Communication Decisions (promotion strategies)

EXPERIENCE CHINA: A NATIONAL IMAGE CAMPAIGN IN THE UNITED STATES
William Wei, Yuanfang Lin, Mei Qin Kok

Product Number: 9B11A033
Publication Date: 10/6/2011
Revision Date: 7/26/2017
Length: 8 pages

The China national image film “People Chapter” — officially a sub-series of the “Experience China” campaign — was launched by the Chinese government to coincide with President Hu Jintao’s visit to the United States in mid-January 2011. The one-minute promotional video was played on six giant electronic screens about 300 times per day, and had appeared approximately 8,400 times when the broadcast ended on February 14, 2011. The video showed a series of Chinese people, ranging from ordinary citizens to celebrities. It was a publicity effort aimed at promoting a truer image of China abroad, and signalling that China was opening to embrace the world. However, reactions from both Chinese and overseas audiences had been fairly mixed since the initial release of the promotional film. Experts from China and abroad were skeptical of the effectiveness of the campaign in promoting the national image of modern China to the world. This case presents the opportunity to examine the basic elements in the marketing communication process, analyze how decisions in marketing design affect outcomes, and understand the differences between nation and product promotion.

Teaching Note: 8B11A033 (6 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Advertising Strategy; Advertising Media; Cultural Sensitivity; Public Relations; Target Market; China and United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE 2006 WORLD CUP: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS (A)
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B07A016
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 14 pages

The manager of Mobile Media for adidas International is debating what to do, given the sparse amount of traffic to date at the adidas FIFA World Cup mobile portal. By February, there had been only 3,000 visits to the mobile site, compared to the one million visits predicted earlier based on the previous success of a Lucas Films Star Wars mobile campaign. Given that the World Cup is a global event viewed by millions of people in person and more than one billion TV viewers worldwide, it represents a global stage for adidas to promote its brand and communicate its continued involvement and leadership in the sport of football. The manager of Mobile Media is worried that the brand's mobile efforts for this major event could fail miserably.

Teaching Note: 8B07A16 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Marketing Communication; Marketing Channels; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE 2006 WORLD CUP: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS (B)
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B07A017
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 3 pages

The manager of Mobile Media for adidas International is debating what to do, given the sparse amount of traffic to date at the adidas FIFA World Cup mobile portal. The (B) case describes the results of a new effort to use a popular portal to advertise the adidas World Cup mobile site. The case can be used to discuss the impact of using different media channels to deliver marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B07A16 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



"HIPS FEEL GOOD" - DOVE'S CAMPAIGN FOR REAL BEAUTY
Thomas Gey, Nick Nugent, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B07A010
Publication Date: 5/1/2007
Revision Date: 2/24/2010
Length: 16 pages

Dove is one of Unilever's better-known personal care brands. It has significant top-of-mind awareness among women in many countries. In an attempt to increase sales volume by 80 per cent, Unilever re-launched Dove in 2004. The campaign asks the question What is real beauty? and attempts to redefine it in ways that challenge commonly portrayed stereotypes. This case examines the re-launch of Dove, Unilever's well-known international personal care brand, and the marketing issues behind its phenomenal success. It also raises questions about how to maintain the brand's momentum as the next phase unfolds. In 2007, Dove products are still well thought of by consumers and the campaign has attracted imitators, including brands outside the cosmetics and beauty care sector.

Teaching Note: 8B07A10 (17 pages)
Issues: Ethical Issues; Marketing Communication; Marketing Channels; International Marketing; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 18:
Cross-Cultural Sales Negotiations

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT INC. IN SAUDI ARABIA
Joerg Dietz, Ankur Grover, Laura Guerrero

Product Number: 9B07C042
Publication Date: 3/17/2008
Revision Date: 3/24/2009
Length: 14 pages

A recently hired U.S.-trained sales account manager at Medical Equipment Inc. (Medical Equipment) returned to his office after meeting with the head of the cardiology department at a specialist hospital and research center in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He had worked very hard to secure his first sale of US$725,000 for healthcare equipment, but was disheartened when the head of cardiology told him that the hospital's purchasing director intended to give the order to Medical Equipment's main competitor. The competition's sales representative and the purchasing director had known each other for 10 years and the head cardiologist implied that there might be side payments involved. The sales account manager knew Medical Equipment's product was superior and wondered how he could secure the order without having a history with the purchasing director or without engaging in practices he found ethically questionable.

Teaching Note: 8B07C42 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Sales Management; International Business; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPECTRUM BRANDS, INC. - THE SALES FORCE DILEMMA
Donald W. Barclay, Joe Falconi

Product Number: 9B06A035
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 20 pages

In 2005, the vice-president of sales and marketing for the Canadian division of Spectrum Brands Inc. must determine his next steps regarding the structure of his sales force. Spectrum Brands (Spectrum), a global consumer products company formerly known as Rayovac Corporation, had made a number of acquisitions to diversify and expand its product and brand portfolio. With these changes, Spectrum had become a leading supplier of consumer batteries, lawn and garden care products, specialty pet supplies, and shaving and grooming products. The vice-president of sales and marketing was charged with the task of creating a national sales force from the teams of the newly merged companies. Knowing the importance of the sales function to each of these companies, he wanted to ensure; despite the differences among the diverse groups, that he still maintained a team which would effectively and efficiently continue to increase the sales of each business unit.

Teaching Note: 8B06A35 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales Organization; Acquisitions; Change Management; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INTEL IN CHINA
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Donna Everatt, Xiaojun Qian

Product Number: 9A99C007
Publication Date: 6/23/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 8 pages

The newly appointed division head must examine organizational or communication problems within a division of a billion dollar semiconductor manufacturer. The manager made a decision, which an employee emotionally responded to, creating the potential for conflict within the department. Cross-cultural issues come into play given that the manager, although originally from China, was educated and gathered extensive experience in the West and was thus considered an expatriate by his employees. The manager must also examine the effect of organizational culture on an employee's behavior.

Teaching Note: 8A99C07 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Interpersonal Relations; Intercultural Relations; Conflict Resolution; Management Communication
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 19:
Organization and Control of the Global Marketing Programme

DECATHLON CHINA: USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO PENETRATE THE INTERNET MARKET
Nicole R.D. Haggerty, Raymond Pirouz, Grace Geng

Product Number: 9B11A043
Publication Date: 11/16/2011
Length: 14 pages

After successfully establishing more than 33 retail stores in large cities across China, Decathlon, a large French sporting goods manufacturer and retailer, planned to open its official online shopping website in China. The marketing department head of Decathlon China had experimented with several new social media platforms in China in order to increase the brand awareness among online shoppers. At the upcoming executive meeting, the marketing department head wanted to persuade the chief executive officer to dedicate more resources to social media to both increase online sales in the short term and market share in the long term.

Teaching Note: 8B11A043 (6 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Social Media Strategy; Retail Marketing Strategy; Emerging Technology; France; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DHARMALA MANULIFE - A MARKETING STRATEGY
John S. Hulland, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9A99A022
Publication Date: 2/9/2000
Revision Date: 1/12/2010
Length: 17 pages

The president director of Dharmala Manulife, a large, successful Canadian-Indonesian joint venture life insurance company, faced a significant disruption to operations due to social unrest in Jakarta. Moreover, the Asian financial crisis had resulted in a massive devaluation of the rupiah, in terms of the U.S. dollar. Thus, premiums on U.S.-dollar denominated policies had become prohibitively expensive almost overnight. Policy surrenders, redemptions, and lapses were occurring at an alarming rate. This erosion of the company's client base also meant that sales agents (who worked solely on commissions) were not only losing clients, but were also facing a tremendous challenge in writing new policies in light of the economic, political, and social chaos. Given the external situation, the president director and his senior management team were forced to develop effective strategic marketing decisions. The case asks students to consider the marketing plan for the launch of a new product designed to address the market realities and how to manage the commissioned salesforce in light of the disruption to operations.

Teaching Note: 8A99A22 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Sales Strategy; New Products; Market Strategy; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DELTA GRAND PACIFIC HOTEL
John R. Kennedy, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A98A005
Publication Date: 3/5/1998
Revision Date: 2/3/2003
Length: 15 pages

The director of sales and marketing for the Delta Grand Pacific Hotel in Bangkok, Thailand, needed to devise a marketing strategy that would ensure the hotel's success in its very competitive market. He wanted to ensure that the hotel maintain and eventually increase its two key benchmarks of performance, namely, occupancy rates and average room rates, by milking the Sukhumvit Micromarket to its fullest potential. Compounding this challenge was the anticipation of a sharp drop in occupancy at the hotel due to the likelihood that an important client contract would not be renewed.

Teaching Note: 8A98A05 (7 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Marketing Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA