Ivey Publishing

Understanding Business Strategy: Concepts and Cases

Ireland, R.D., Hoskisson, R.E., Hitt, M.A.,3/e (United States, South-Western Cengage Learning, 2012)
Prepared By Michael J.D. Roberts, Ph.D. Candidate
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
The Foundations of Strategic Management

DELL INC. IN 2009
Stewart Thornhill, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B08M093
Publication Date: 1/20/2009
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 18 pages

The Dell story is well-known in the business world: a young Michael Dell, while attending the University of Texas in Austin, founds a computer sales company that eventually revolutionizes the industry. The case puts students in the position of a senior executive at Dell who is preparing for an investor relations meeting. As the senior executive reviews information on his company, he wonders how best to convey to skeptical investors that Dell's strategy will return the company to growth. In examining the Dell story, students learn about how Dell built up a set of competitive advantages that seemed unassailable until the early 2000s. The second part of the case illustrates the impermanence of competitive advantages - it describes how Dell is attempting to remake itself after falling behind its competitors.

Teaching Note: 8B08M93 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategy Development; Strategic Change; Globalization; Strategic Balance
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (B)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M011
Publication Date: 2/25/2008
Revision Date: 9/15/2014
Length: 9 pages

This case, which outlines the product recall, is a supplement to Mattel and the Toy Recalls (A).

Teaching Note: 8B08M11 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DIGITAL ECONOMY - THE NEED FOR CHANGE
Mary M. Crossan, Shaherose Charania

Product Number: 9B04M063
Publication Date: 12/20/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 16 pages

Digital Economy was founded in 1994 as a private think tank focused on researching the effects of emerging technologies on competitive strategies and high performance organizations. By the late 1990s, clients demanded consulting services to compliment previously purchased research services. The company's business model and offerings flourished in the technology boom. In the first quarter of 2001, the technology boom began to deflate. Digital Economy's decision makers were confident that the changes in the environment would be short lived and that the company's business model and offerings were infallible. Unfortunately, this assessment and subsequent decisions lead to substantial losses in the next two years. The parent firm pressured Digital Economy to realize a profit by the following fiscal year or be completely shut down or consolidated. Digital Economy was in a state of crisis yet the management team did not see the need for change. This case illustrates how biased environmental analysis and personal beliefs can affect decision making and lead to and sustain organizational crisis.

Teaching Note: 8B04M63 (15 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management Decisions; Crisis and Change; Environmental Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Leading Strategically

STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AT COCA-COLA: THE REAL THING
W. Glenn Rowe, Suhaib Riaz

Product Number: 9B08M040
Publication Date: 11/4/2008
Length: 15 pages

Muhtar Kent had just been promoted to the CEO position in Coca-Cola. He was reflecting upon the past leadership of the company, in particular the success that Coca-Cola enjoyed during Robert Goizueta's leadership. The CEOs that had followed Goizueta were not able to have as positive an impact on the stock value. When his promotion was announced, Kent mentioned that he did not have immediate plans to change any management roles but that some fine-tuning might be necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B08M40 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Performance Evaluation; Management Style; Leadership; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GENERAL ELECTRIC: FROM JACK WELCH TO JEFFREY IMMELT
Stewart Thornhill, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B08M009
Publication Date: 4/29/2008
Length: 10 pages

This case describes the leadership initiatives of two of General Electric’s (GE) chief executive officers: Jack Welch and Jeffrey Immelt. Under Jack Welch’s leadership, GE, one of the most admired firms in the world, began its transformation from a manufacturing conglomerate to one that focused on services. Welch’s stature as a management leader grew as GE’s stock price increased. Many of Welch’s management practices were adopted by U.S. and global organizations. While his changes resulted in excellent financial performance sustained over a long period of time, not everyone in GE agreed with his methods. Welch’s departure in 2001 triggered a steep decline in GE’s stock price. His successor, Jeffrey Immelt, took over the company days before the terrorist attacks in September 2001 and spent the following years preparing the firm for its next stage of growth.

Teaching Note: 8B08M09 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Planning; Strategic Change; Strategic Scope; Strategy Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PARAGON INFORMATION SYSTEMS
W. Glenn Rowe, John R. Phillips

Product Number: 9B02M038
Publication Date: 1/9/2003
Revision Date: 3/4/2011
Length: 9 pages

Paragon Information Systems is a small business unit owned by NewTel Enterprises Limited that manufacturers hardware for information technology and systems integration. The newly appointed chief executive officer is faced with a crisis. Days after his appointment, two vice-presidents resign and start a new company. The new company recruits the entire sales team, members of the technical unit and support staff from Paragon Information Systems, a loss of almost one third of Paragon's staff within two months. The new chief executive officer must meet short-term stakeholder needs, assess, formulate and implement long-term strategies, deal with the competitive threat of the new company, and consider the leadership style and control systems required to make the necessary level of change.

Teaching Note: 8B02M38 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Leadership; Strategy Development; Strategy Implementation; Organizational Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Analyzing the External Environment

BARING PRIVATE EQUITY PARTNERS INDIA LIMITED: BANKING SERVICES FOR THE POOR IN BANGLADESH
Ram Kumar Kakani, Munish Thakur

Product Number: 9B09M052
Publication Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 23 pages

From the 1970s onward, after the emergence of microfinance, lending for the poor started shifting from informal sources (e.g. moneylenders) to formal sources. The Grameen Bank (Grameen) led this change, primarily due to its chief executive officer (CEO) and his innovative microcredit model. On the basis of the CEO's rich understanding of on-the-ground realities, he began to experiment and modify the business model for microfinance, which, in the past few years in Bangladesh, was largely dominated by a few big players. As a result of some very interesting and insightful experiments that had been conducted, the microfinance landscape was changing the way banking services were modeled for the poor, not only in Bangladesh but throughout the world. The case profiles a situation wherein Baring Private Equity Partners India, one of the largest private equity players in emerging markets, was looking to invest in the high-growth, profitable microfinance industry of South Asia.This case is oriented toward helping students understand the credit needs of the poor and their perspective on money management, hunger, investment and savings. Students should be made to appreciate how an innovative business model can be developed through a deeper understanding of the local context combined with conceptual thinking. The case strongly vouches for the development of sustainable solutions that require both financial viability and sensitivity to the conditions of the poor. The most important point to be highlighted about the microfinance landscape is that the entrepreneurship model is changing from being socially focused to being business focused. Earlier, most players entered the microfinance arena as a not-for-profit venture; however, many for-profit organizations have now entered this sector.

Teaching Note: 8B09M52 (18 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance, Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Micro Finance; Private Equity; Innovation; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



AMERICAN FAST FOOD IN KOREA
Paul W. Beamish, Jae C. Jung, Hun-Hee Kim

Product Number: 9B03M016
Publication Date: 4/2/2003
Revision Date: 10/22/2009
Length: 12 pages

A major U.S.-based fast food company with extensive operations around the world was contemplating whether or not they should enter the Korean market. The Korean fast food market was hit badly by the Asian economic crisis in the late 1990s, but the economy was turning around. Thus, fast food demand in Korea was expected to increase. For the industry analysis, this case provides information on various competitors, substitute foods, new entrants, consumers and suppliers. In addition, social issues are included as potential forces.

Teaching Note: 8B03M16 (15 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Industry Analysis; Market Entry; Fast Food; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NOTE ON THE CUBAN CIGAR INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish, Akash Kapoor

Product Number: 9B03M001
Publication Date: 2/27/2003
Revision Date: 10/21/2009
Length: 20 pages

The cigar industry in Cuba has a mythical aura and renown that give it unparalleled recognition worldwide. The relationship between Cuba and the United States makes the situation in this industry particularly intriguing. Cuban cigars cannot currently be sold in the United States, even though it is the largest premium cigar market in the world. This note provides an opportunity for a structured analysis using Porter's five forces model and to consider several scenarios including the possible lifting of the U.S. embargo and the relaxation of Cuba's land ownership laws.

Teaching Note: 8B03M01 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Government and Business; Internationalization; International Business; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Analyzing the Firm

ENTREPRENEURS AT TWITTER: BUILDING A BRAND, A SOCIAL TOOL OR A TECH POWERHOUSE?
Simon Parker, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B10M028
Publication Date: 3/22/2010
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 10 pages

Twitter has become an incredibly popular micro-blogging service since its launch in 2006. Its founders have ambitious plans for the service, and are backed by hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital funding, which values the company at $3.7 billion in 2011. Twitter seems to attract a diverse audience of users, such as political organizers looking to disseminate information to their followers; businesses looking to reach out, in real time, to potential customers; and social users. The company charges consumers nothing for its service. By 2011, competitors have emerged, some of whom are financially strong. It remains unclear - at least to some observers - whether the company will ever make money from its service.

Teaching Note: 8B10M28 (10 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Social Networking Media; Strategic Positioning; New Venture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TAVAZO CO.
Paul W. Beamish, Majid Eghbali-Zarch

Product Number: 9B10M093
Publication Date: 11/12/2010
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 13 pages

In June 2010, Naser Tavazo, one of the three owner/manager brothers of both Tavazo Iran Co. and Tavazo Canada Co., was considering the company's future expansion opportunities, including further international market entry. Candidate cities of interest were Los Angeles, Dubai and other cities with a high Iranian diaspora. Another question facing the owners was where to focus on the value chain. Should the family business use its limited resources to expand its retailer business into more international markets, or to expand their current retailer/wholesale activities within Canada and Iran?

The objectives of this case are: (A) to discuss the typical problems that small companies confront when growing internationally and the implication of being a family business in this transition; (B) to provide a vehicle for developing criteria for market selection; (C) to highlight the importance of focus in the value chain regarding horizontal vs. vertical integration.

This case can be used in international business, strategic management or family business (entrepreneurship) courses. In international business, it may be used as an internationalization case and positioned early in the course. In a strategic management course, it might be positioned in sections dealing with managerial preferences, or diversification.


Teaching Note: 8B10M93 (9 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting, Manufacturing
Issues: Market Selection; Family Business; Internationalization; Imports; Exports; SME
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WESTJET IN 2009: THE FLEET EXPANSION DECISION
Stewart Thornhill, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B09M063
Publication Date: 9/24/2009
Revision Date: 8/26/2010
Length: 18 pages

Thirteen years after it began operations with three airplanes, WestJet is the second-largest airline in Canada. It has grown revenues at an annual rate of 37 per cent per year for the past 11 years, and is poised to become the country’s dominant airline in the future. As it has grown, WestJet seems to have made changes to its original strategy of low-cost, no-frills, point-to-point, single-class service. The case examines WestJet’s strategy over the years and focuses on the company’s latest decision point: whether to add smaller planes to its single-model Boeing fleet. The objective of the case is to examine changes in a company’s strategy over time, and to review the potential impact of these changes on a company’s future performance.

Teaching Note: 8B09M63 (10 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Strategic Planning; Strategy Development; Strategic Positioning; Change Management; Airline Industry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SWIMMING IN THE VIRTUAL COMMUNITY POOL WITH PLENTYOFFISH
Michael Parent, Wilfred Cheung, Chris Ellison, Prarthana Kumar, Jeremy Kyle, Stacey Morrison

Product Number: 9B08M015
Publication Date: 3/6/2008
Revision Date: 11/17/2014
Length: 9 pages

PlentyofFish.com is the world's most profitable website on a per capita basis, the 96th most popular website in terms of page views, and the most popular online dating site in existence. Remarkably, it is managed by its owner and founder and only one other employee. It is a free dating site that generates $10 million in ad revenues per year, and a profit to the owner in excess of $9 million. The case describes PlentyofFish.com's stellar growth in the face of stringent competition, and asks students to consider whether it is sustainable. A number of possible alternatives are offered for analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B08M15 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Strategic Planning; Staffing; Decision Making; Sustainability; Growth
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STARBUCKS
Mary M. Crossan, Ariff Kachra

Product Number: 9A98M006
Publication Date: 5/14/1998
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 23 pages

Starbucks is faced with the issue of how it should leverage its core competencies against various opportunities for growth, including introducing its coffee in McDonald’s, pursuing further expansion of its retail operations, and leveraging the brand into other product areas. The case is written so that students need to first identify where Starbucks competencies lie along the value chain, and assess how well those competencies can be leveraged across the various alternatives. It also provides an opportunity for students to assess what is driving growth in this company. Starbucks has a tremendous appetite for cash since all its stores are corporate, and investors are betting that it will be able to continue its phenomenal growth, so it needs to walk a fine line between leveraging its brand to achieve growth while not eroding it in the process. This is an exciting case that quickly captures the attention of students.

Teaching Note: 8A98M06 (13 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: competitiveness; industry analysis; growth strategy; core competence; coffee
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Business-Level Strategy

SHER-WOOD HOCKEY STICKS: GLOBAL SOURCING
Paul W. Beamish, Megan (Min) Zhang

Product Number: 9B12M003
Publication Date: 2/13/2012
Revision Date: 11/17/2014
Length: 11 pages

In early 2011, the senior executives of the venerable Canadian hockey stick manufacturer Sher-Wood Hockey were considering whether to move the remainder of the company’s high-end composite hockey and goalie stick production to its suppliers in China. Sher-Wood had been losing market share as retail prices continued to fall. Would outsourcing the production of the iconic, Canadian-made hockey sticks to China help Sher-Wood to boost demand significantly? Was there any other choice?

Teaching Note: 8B12M003 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Offshoring; Outsourcing; Insourcing; Nearshoring; R&D Interface; Labour Costs; Canada; SME
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IMAX: LARGER THAN LIFE
Anil Nair

Product Number: 9B09M019
Publication Date: 5/22/2009
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 18 pages

IMAX was involved in several aspects of the large-format film business: production, distribution, theatre operations, system development and leasing. The case illustrates IMAX's use of its unique capabilities to pursue a focused differentiation strategy. IMAX was initially focused on large format films that were educational yet entertaining, and the theatres were located in institutions such as museums, aquariums and national parks. However, IMAX found that its growth and profitability were constrained by its niche strategy. In response, IMAX sought to grow by expanding into multiplexes. Additionally, IMAX expanded its film portfolio by converting Hollywood movies, such as Harry Potter and Superman, into the large film format. This shift in strategy was supported by the development of two technological capabilities - DMR for conversion of standard 35 mm film into large format, and DMX to convert standard multiplexes to IMAX systems. The shift in strategy was partially successful, but carried the risk of IMAX losing its unique reputation.

Teaching Note: 8B09M19 (11 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Business Policy; Strategic Positioning; Industry Analysis; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PARADISE VACATIONS
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Jonathan Michel

Product Number: 9B08A009
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Revision Date: 4/5/2019
Length: 10 pages

In February 2008, the president of Vacances Paradis Inc. (Paradise) was assessing his options for the company's competitive strategy for the future. Paradise was Quebec's market leader in the tour operating industry but was facing a significant challenge: FunTours Holidays (FunTours) had stolen a sizeable portion of Ontario's market share in only two years and was planning on conquering the Quebec market for the 2008/09 winter season. FunTours' aggressive strategy was to provide large capacity at low prices, thus creating a price war and decreased margins. The president had to consider how to meet FunTours' threat in the face of several challenges: the tour industry was fundamentally changing as a result of shifting from traditional travel agents towards Internet distribution; limited differentiation in product offering forced competing on price; and a growing customer base as more people could afford travel. Price had emerged as the dominant criteria for travelers and a huge consideration for tour operators. The president wondered which strategy would be best for the company's short- and long-term viability.

Teaching Note: 8B08A09 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Strategy; Competition
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Multi-Product Strategies

YUNNAN BAIYAO: TRADITIONAL MEDICINE MEETS PRODUCT/MARKET DIVERSIFICATION
Paul W. Beamish, George Peng

Product Number: 9B06M088
Publication Date: 1/23/2007
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 17 pages

In 2003, 3M initiated contact with Yunnan Baiyao Group Co., Ltd. to discuss potential cooperation opportunities in the area of transdermal pharmaceutical products. Yunnan Baiyao (YB), was a household brand in China for its unique traditional herbal medicines. In recent years, the company had been engaged in a series of corporate reforms and product/market diversification strategies to respond to the change in the Chinese pharmaceutical industry and competition at a global level. By 2003, YB was already a vertically integrated, product-diversified group company with an ambition to become an international player. The proposed cooperation with 3M was attractive to YB, not only as an opportunity for domestic product diversification, but also for international diversification. YB had been attempting to internationalize its products and an overseas department had been established in 2002 specifically for this purpose. On the other hand, YB had also been considering another option namely, whether to extend its brand to toothpaste and other healthcare products. YB had to make decisions about which of the two options to pursue and whether it was feasible to pursue both.

Teaching Note: 8B06M88 (12 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Product Diversification; Internationalization; Brand Extension; Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND PRESERVE COMPANY: TURNAROUND
Paul W. Beamish, Nathaniel Lupton

Product Number: 9B08M049
Publication Date: 5/15/2008
Revision Date: 11/17/2014
Length: 18 pages

In April 2008, Bruce MacNaughton, president of Prince Edward Island Preserve Co. Ltd. (P.E.I. Preserves), was focused on turnaround. The company he had founded in 1985 had gone into receivership in May 2007. Although this had resulted in losses for various mortgage holders and unsecured creditors, MacNaughton had been able to buy back his New Glasgow shop/cafe, the adjacent garden property and inventory, and restart the business. He now needed a viable product-market strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B08M49 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing, Retail Trade
Issues: Bankruptcy; Product Diversification; Growth Strategy; Exports; Tourism; SME
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SWATCH AND THE GLOBAL WATCH INDUSTRY
Allen Morrison, Cyril Bouquet

Product Number: 9A99M023
Publication Date: 5/9/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The efforts of Swatch to reposition itself in the increasingly competitive global watch industry are reviewed in this case. Extensive information on the history and structure of the global watch industry is provided and the shrinking time horizons decision makers face in formulating strategy and in responding to changes in the industry are highlighted. In particular, the case discusses how technology and globalization have changed industry dynamics and have caused companies to reassess their sources of competitive advantage. Like other companies, Swatch faces the difficult task of deciding whether to emphasize product breadth, or focus on a few key global brands. It also must decide whether to shift manufacturing away from Switzerland to lower cost countries like India.

Teaching Note: 8A99M23 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Industry Analysis; Competing with Multinationals; Globalization
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 7:
Acquiring and Integrating Businesses

CHARTWELL TECHNOLOGIES: UPPING THE ANTE WITH INTERNET POKER
Michael J. Rouse, David Maslach

Product Number: 9B08M055
Publication Date: 12/9/2008
Length: 12 pages

On March 12, 2005, the founder and chief executive officer (CEO) of Chartwell Technologies (Chartwell), a company that specialized in Internet gaming development, noticed something interesting. The CNN headline news ticker on his television read: Online Poker Industry Expected to Grow by Billions within the Year. The CEO and his partner, the vice-president of business development, were about to decide whether to acquire MicroPower Inc. (MicroPower), an online poker company, for US$2.6 million in cash. The industry certainly had the potential for explosive growth. The CEO had to decide whether Chartwell should upgrade its current technology or purchase MicroPower to gain instant access to its C++ platform to take advantage of the growth on the online poker industry.

Teaching Note: 8B08M55 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services, Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation, Manufacturing
Issues: Human Resources Management; Integration; Technological Growth; Acquisitions
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ROARING DRAGON HOTEL
Stephen Grainger

Product Number: 9B08M004
Publication Date: 3/5/2008
Length: 7 pages

The case looks at the takeover of the Roaring Dragon Hotel (RDH), a state owned enterprise in south-west China, by global hotelier Hotel International (HI) and discusses the cultural collision and organizational adoptions resulting from the intersections of two significantly different business cultures. Specifically in this case, the focus is on the challenge involved with downsizing, redundancy, communication, cultural sensitivity, strategic planning and in developing strategy. In south-west China in 2002, the RDH business environment was just emerging from the shadow of the planned economy and had retained its guanxi-based organizational culture. At RDH, relationship development and the exchange of favors were still important and occurring on a daily basis and there was little system or efficiency in the hotel's domestic management style and processes. In comparison, Hotel International had a wealth of international experience in providing accommodation, marketing and professional management in servicing the needs of a global market steeped in corporate governance. At the commencement of the management contract there was a deep division separating the organizational cultures of RDH and HI.

Teaching Note: 8B08M04 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Cross Cultural Management; Strategic Planning; Cross Cultural Communication; Cultural Sensitivity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



VINCOR AND THE NEW WORLD OF WINE
Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M001
Publication Date: 1/14/2004
Revision Date: 11/18/2014
Length: 17 pages

Vincor International Inc. was Canada's largest wine company and North America's fourth largest in 2002. The company had decided to internationalize and as the first step had entered the United States through two acquisitions.The company's chief executive officer felt that to be among the top 10 wineries in the world, Vincor needed to look beyond the region. To the end, he was considering the acquisition of an Australian company, Goundrey Wines. He must analyze thestrategic rationale for the acquisition of Goundrey as well as to probe questions of strategic fit and value.

Teaching Note: 8B04M01 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Internationalization; Market Entry; Acquisitions; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CIBC-BARCLAYS: ACCOUNTING FOR THEIR MERGER
Archibald Campbell, Noel Reynolds

Product Number: 9B04B022
Publication Date: 3/7/2005
Revision Date: 10/8/2009
Length: 12 pages

The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) and Barclays Bank PLC have signed an agreement to combine their retail, corporate and offshore banking operations in the Caribbean to create FirstCaribbean International Bank. In principle, it appeared that both parties were agreeing to a combination of their assets to form a new entity, in which case a new holding company could be constituted to absorb the assets being merged. Alternately, as Barclays interest in the merger was substantially greater than that of CIBC, the transaction could be construed as an outright purchase of the CIBC interests by Barclays. The problem with this second approach, however, was that Barclays Caribbean presently had no separate legal form in the region. This case illustrates the procedures for accounting for mergers and acquisition, and lends itself to discussion on a myriad of issues and concepts. This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the four additional cases which deal with various functional issues regarding the actual merger/integration which occurred. The four additional cases are Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean Bank, product 9B04C053; Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032; CIBC-Barclays: Should Their Caribbean Operations be Merged?, product 9B04M067; and Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B04B22 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Accounting - Tax; Accounting - Transactions; Mergers & Acquisitions; Integration; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Competing Across Borders

CHINESE FIREWORKS INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B11M006
Publication Date: 1/11/2011
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 13 pages

The Chinese fireworks industry thrived after China adopted the open-door policy in the late 1970s, and grew to make up 90 per cent of the world’s fireworks export sales. However, starting in the mid-1990s, safety concerns led governments both in China and abroad to set up stricter regulations. At the same time, there was rapid growth in the number of small family-run fireworks workshops, whose relentless price-cutting drove down profit margins. Students are asked to undertake an industry analysis, estimate the industry attractiveness, and propose possible ways to improve the industry attractiveness from an individual investor’s point of view. Jerry Yu is an American-born Chinese in New York who has been invited to buy a fireworks factory in Liuyang, Hunan.

Teaching Note: 8B11M006 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Analysis; Industry Analysis; International Marketing; Exports; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INTERNATIONALIZATION OF KOYO JEANS FROM HONG KONG
Kevin Au, Bernard Suen, Na Shen, Justine Tang

Product Number: 9B11M053
Publication Date: 9/26/2011
Length: 11 pages

William Cheung owned an apparel wholesaler and a boutique shop that sold his clothing designs in Hong Kong. After attending a fashion exhibition in France, he realized his products were lacking compared to European brands. This experience motivated him to improve his jeans designs, and he soon registered “Koyo” as an independent company. He went on to become the first Hong Kong designer embraced by the French department store Galeries Lafayette. While Cheung had had commendable success, including many franchises in mainland China, he faced challenges related to expansion and funding as Koyo Jeans strove for international success.

Teaching Note: 8B11M053 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Expansion; Brand Management; Franchising; Retail Marketing; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Hong Kong; Ivey/CUHK
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MICHELIN IN THE LAND OF THE MAHARAJAHS (A): NOTE ON THE TIRE INDUSTRY IN INDIA
Pierre-Xavier Meschi

Product Number: 9B07M030
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 20 pages

As opposed to other emerging countries, the tire market in India was almost exclusively dominated by local players: 90 per cent of all tires on the Indian market were made and sold by local Indian companies. It is important to note that the big names of the world tire industry - Michelin, Bridgestone, Goodyear and Continental - were hardly visible in India. Michelin was absent from the Indian tire market and it is very surprising that the world leader of the tire industry had neither a production facility nor a distribution network in India. Why such an absence? Why did Michelin have so little presence in Asian emerging countries and especially in India? This case presents the main features of the tire industry in India. The case allows students to carry out a comprehensive strategic evaluation of the industry's attractiveness as well as an in-depth analysis of the structure of competition. Students will also conduct performance analysis for each company.

Teaching Note: 8B07M30 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Industry Analysis; International Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RUTH'S CHRIS: THE HIGH STAKES OF INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Ilan Alon, Allen H. Kupetz

Product Number: 9B06A034
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 8 pages

In 2006, Ruth's Chris Steak House was fresh off of a sizzling initial public offering and was now interested in growing their business internationally. With restaurants in just four countries outside the United States, a model to identify and rank new international markets was needed. This case provides a practical example for students to take quantitative and non-quantitative variables to create a short list of potential new markets.

Teaching Note: 8B06A34 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Strategy; International Business; International Strategy; Market Entry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Creating and Maintaining Alliances

CIBC MELLON: MANAGING A CROSS-BORDER JOINT VENTURE
Paul W. Beamish, Michael Sartor

Product Number: 9B10M091
Publication Date: 11/5/2010
Revision Date: 5/24/2012
Length: 15 pages

During his 10-year tenure, the president and CEO of CIBC Mellon had presided over the dramatic growth of the jointly owned, Toronto-based asset servicing business of CIBC and The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation (BNY Mellon). In mid-September 2008, the CEO was witnessing the onset of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. The impending collapse of several major firms threatened to impact all players in the financial services industry worldwide. Although joint ventures (JVs) were uncommon in the financial sector, the CEO believed that the CIBC Mellon JV was uniquely positioned to withstand the fallout associated with the financial crisis. Two pressing issues faced the JV’s executive management team. First, it needed to discuss how to best manage any risks confronting the JV as a consequence of the financial crisis. How could the policies and practices developed during the past decade be leveraged to sustain the JV through the broader financial crisis? Second, it needed to continue discussions regarding options for refining CIBC Mellon’s strategic focus, so that the JV could emerge from the financial meltdown on even stronger footing.

Teaching Note: 8B10M91 (13 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Financial Crisis; Joint Ventures; Leadership; Alliance Management; Managing Multiple Stakeholders; Canada; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NORA-SAKARI: A PROPOSED JV IN MALAYSIA (REVISED)
Paul W. Beamish, R. Azimah Ainuddin

Product Number: 9B06M006
Publication Date: 11/30/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2012
Length: 16 pages

This case presents the perspective of a Malaysian company, Nora Bhd, which was in the process of trying to establish a telecommunications joint venture with a Finnish firm, Sakari Oy. Negotiations have broken down between the firms, and students are asked to try to restructure a win-win deal. The case examines some of the most common issues involved in partner selection and design in international joint ventures.

Teaching Note: 8B06M06 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Third World; Negotiation; Joint Ventures; Finland; Malaysia
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELI LILLY IN INDIA: RETHINKING THE JOINT VENTURE STRATEGY
Charles Dhanaraj, Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M016
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 3/13/2017
Length: 18 pages

Eli Lilly and Company is a leading U.S. pharmaceutical company. The new president of intercontinental operations is re-evaluating all of the company's divisions, including the joint venture with Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, one of India's largest pharmaceutical companies. This joint venture has run smoothly for a number of years despite their differences in focus, but recently Ranbaxy was experiencing cash flow difficulties due to its network of international sales. In addition, the Indian government was changing regulations for businesses in India, and joining the World Trade Organization would have an effect on India's chemical and drug regulations. The president must determine if this international joint venture still fits Eli Lilly's strategic objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B04M16 (18 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Joint Ventures; Emerging Markets; International Management; Strategic Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WIL-MOR TECHNOLOGIES: IS THERE A CRISIS?
Andrew C. Inkpen

Product Number: 9A99M042
Publication Date: 2/16/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 11 pages

The CEO of Wilson Industries, a U.S. firm, is concerned about the performance of a joint venture between Wilson Industries and a Japanese firm, Morota Manufacturing. He wants the joint venture president to make some changes to improve financial performance. However, the president is unsure of what action to take because the Japanese partner, Morota, is satisfied with the performance and is considering expansion plans.

Teaching Note: 8A99M42 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Manufacturing Strategy; Management Philosophy; Joint Ventures
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Innovating through Strategic Entrepreneurship

3M TAIWAN: PRODUCT INNOVATION IN THE SUBSIDIARY
Christopher Williams, Emily Liaw

Product Number: 9B11M101
Publication Date: 11/3/2011
Revision Date: 9/28/2017
Length: 14 pages

On January 17, 2005, 3M Taiwan’s function head of its health care business division found himself in a meeting with the Acne Dressing project team. In 2004, the function head had initiated a project team to exploit local market needs for 3M hydrocolloid dressing, a technology that had existed in the company for many years without any practical applications. The local project team suggested applying the material for acne treatment. The product would be known as Acne Dressing. There was no standardized solution for acne treatment in Taiwan. If developed, Acne Dressing would be a brand new product in the local market.

The biggest challenge would be how to change local consumer behaviours on new acne treatment products. In addition, since there were no similar products in the market, the project team only had limited information and potential sales and volumes were uncertain. If the local development was launched, Acne Dressing would be 3M’s first product application of hydrocolloid dressing technology. With little previous experience in product development and no similar products existing in the market, the function head had to decide fast whether to proceed with this new product development. If so, what options did the local project team have? What kind of resources and support should the local health care business segment seek from headquarters for the product development? Should the local project team collaborate with other subsidiaries?


Teaching Note: 8B11M101 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Risky Innovations; Project Management; Project Development, Health Care; Taiwan
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PAN BORICUA: DEVELOPING A MARKET STRATEGY FOR THE HISPANIC MARKET IN THE UNITED STATES
Victor Quiñones, Julia Sagebien, Marisol Perez-Savelli, Eva Perez, Jennifer Catinchi

Product Number: 9B09A020
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 10 pages

Two inexperienced, but strongly committed, entrepreneurs face the hassles of a new venture: exporting dough from Puerto Rico to cities in the United States with large numbers of Puerto Rican immigrants who are longing nostalgically for their beloved pan sobao (bread made with vegetable shortening). With thousands of Puerto Ricans living in and/or moving to the United States and after several incidents of fraud by partners of the entrepreneurs, they are thinking about how to take advantage of what seems to be an opportunity for doing business outside their Caribbean home. These entrepreneurs are confronting several challenges: 1) Preparing to detect opportunities and to get personally involved in a demanding export business 2) Differentiating and positioning the brand in a crowded market. Is a nostalgic feeling enough of a motivator to engage customers with the brand? 3) Deciding whether institution is a substitute for market data and feasibility determination.

Teaching Note: 8B09A20 (7 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Hispanic; Minority; Market Adaptation; New Markets
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BELL CANADA: THE VOIP CHALLENGE
Rod E. White, Daniel Day

Product Number: 9B06M009
Publication Date: 2/16/2006
Revision Date: 3/19/2010
Length: 12 pages

Voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) is beginning to disrupt plain old telephone service (POTS). Ron Close has been offered the job of heading Bell Canada's nascent VoIP business. Bell is Canada's largest telco and supplier of POTS. The case provides a platform for discussing a disruptive innovation (VoIP) and its implications for an incumbent player. Ron Close explains how Bell addressed the technology challenge, and its managerial and organizational consequences in an available video, product 7B06M009.

Teaching Note: 8B06M09 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Technological Change; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA