Ivey Publishing

Information Technology for Management: Transforming Business in the Digital Economy

Turban, McLean, Wetherbe,3/e (United States, Wiley, 2001)
Prepared By Phoebe Tsai, Ph.D. Candidate (Information Systems)
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Information Technology in the Digital Economy

FLOWER AUCTION WESTLAND: THE COSMOS PROJECT
Duncan G. Copeland, Iain Spooner

Product Number: 9A94E001
Publication Date: 1/28/1994
Revision Date: 2/23/2010
Length: 17 pages

The manager of information and technology at a flower auction house must decide on the pace at which information technology changes should be introduced. The issues raised in the case pertain to the formulation and implementation of information technology strategies, and illustrate the potentially integrative role of information technology, different levels of information technology strategy, online bidding, and the establishment and maintenance of information systems for clearing channels.

Teaching Note: 8A94E01 (7 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Management Information Systems; Organizational Change; Management of Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CISCO SYSTEMS INC.: MANAGING CORPORATE GROWTH USING AN INTRANET
Michael Parent, Debra Rankin

Product Number: 9A97E018
Publication Date: 12/5/1997
Revision Date: 2/3/2010
Length: 10 pages

Cisco is the world's largest, and leading manufacturer and distributor of routers and switches. In order to achieve this position, it has adopted an aggressive growth strategy, acquiring companies, their employees, and new employees at a rate of 250 to 300 employees per month. The Cisco Employee Connection (CEC), a corporate intranet, is the primary means by which new employees are absorbed and acculturated. The CEC is also the principal means of interaction for the multi-functional work team approach Cisco employs. This case critically assesses this approach to scaling an organization, and the extent to which it can be maintained and transferred.

Teaching Note: 8A97E18 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Internet; Computer Industry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Information Technologies: Concepts and Management

MEYERS NORRIS PENNY: PRACTICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Deborah Compeau, Helen Kelley

Product Number: 9B02E006
Publication Date: 5/23/2002
Revision Date: 12/1/2009
Length: 14 pages

Meyers Norris Penny is one of the leading chartered accountancy and business advisory firms in Canada. The vice-president of technology must decide whether to replace the company's practice management system or continue to upgrade the system as needs arise. The system has performed well, has stable hardware and software and staff are familiar and satisfied with using the system, however, he must consider the company's need to be innovative and proactive to maintain the firm's competitive advantage.

Teaching Note: 8B02E06 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management Information Systems; Information System Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DELTA BANK: SOFTWARE CHANGES WITH A RIGID DEADLINE
Scott L. Schneberger, Ying Wang

Product Number: 9A99E019
Publication Date: 7/20/1999
Revision Date: 1/15/2010
Length: 12 pages

Delta Bank, a full service bank with 28,000 employees worldwide and $189 billion in asset value, faced the Y2K problem with only months to spare. The consequences of failure were enormous, the project was very complex, and the deadline was unmovable.

Teaching Note: 8A99E19 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Computer Applications; Operations Management; Information Systems; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Strategic Information Systems for Competitive Advantage

INFORMATION SYSTEMS STRATEGY AT THE TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE
Michael Parent, Derrick Neufeld, Nicole R.D. Haggerty

Product Number: 9B00E005
Publication Date: 5/1/2000
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 10 pages

The president and CEO of the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSE) is faced with the task of reconstructing the TSE to succeed in the face of significant industry and technological change. The exchange industry is undergoing a transformation brought about by globalization of financial markets, consolidation of exchanges, and the introduction of new competitive players due to technological advancements. The TSE is Canada's largest equity market and has created and started to implement a plan to deal with these threats. Concurrently, the TSE has been recreating its technological platform, moving from its computer assisted trading system to the Torex system purchased from the Paris Bourse. Implementation problems have delayed the project from its original release date to three years later. During the time frame of this implementation, the TSE suffered several computer glitches causing closure of the exchange for temporary periods of time. The president and CEO needs to review the priorities of the TSE and consider what actions she should take to ensure the successful implementation of this new technology, and the long term alignment of information technology with TSE business strategies.

Teaching Note: 8B00E05 (8 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Implementation; Information Technology; Information System Design; Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GOOD NIGHT BEN
Sid L. Huff, David Koltermann

Product Number: 9A99E020
Publication Date: 6/24/1999
Revision Date: 1/15/2010
Length: 9 pages

Good Night Ben was a high-end baby furniture store based in a medium-sized southwestern city in Ontario, Canada. The store's proprietor, was an early adopter of the worldwide web as a way to get the word out about his store and products. Through his own experimentation, he has discovered numerous tricks and techniques for using the WWW to better develop the reputation of his company. In particular, he has discovered that he can take business away from distributors across the border in Detroit, due to the fact that shoppers in that region find his site on the worldwide web, compare his prices with the local Detroit outlets, and end up placing their orders with him. He then makes the deliveries himself, by truck. Interestingly, some of the furniture suppliers allocate exclusive distribution districts to their retailers. He is in effect using the WWW to end-run these exclusive distribution arrangements. His retail competitors in Detroit are becoming upset. How long the suppliers will allow this to go on, and what their response might be, are important issues the proprietor faces.

Teaching Note: 8A99E20 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Internet; E-Commerce; Product Management; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WIRED WELLINGTON: THE INFO CITY PROJECT AND THE CITY LINK NETWORK
Sid L. Huff

Product Number: 9A98E009
Publication Date: 3/25/1998
Revision Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 34 pages

As a central component of its Vision 2020 strategy, the city of Wellington, New Zealand has developed preliminary plans to transform itself into a wired city. The overarching project was called Info City. One of the sub-projects was called City Link. The objective of City Link was to create a high-speed digital communications infrastructure for the downtown business district. Fibre optic cable was to be used to wire up, simply and inexpensively, the city's downtown businesses, to provide a backbone network that businesses could utilize, however they wished, to make themselves more competitive. A consortium of interested parties had recently been formed, a telecommunications architecture was being developed, and plans for stringing cable were under way. While the project champion was unclear about the utility of the new system, he was confident that once the infrastructure was in place, ideas for its utilization would readily emerge. This case provides a setting for exploring the issue of the role of IT in competitive strategy. It also raises interesting social policy questions, about who should pay for such undertaking, who should benefit, and so forth.

Teaching Note: 8A98E09 (10 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Competitiveness; Information Technology; E-Commerce; Networks
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Network Computing: Discovery, Communication, and Collaboration

THOSE !*@! WIRELESS NETWORK CARDS
Deborah Compeau, Derrick Neufeld, E.F. Peter Newson, Michael Parent, Scott L. Schneberger

Product Number: 9B00E020
Publication Date: 1/31/2001
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 4 pages

The Richard Ivey School of Business had recently introduced a wireless network and required all students to purchase laptops and network cards. After a year of use, the faculty decided to restrict laptop usage in class by disallowing the use of network cards. They felt the students were using the network cards for unrelated activities in class and that this was compromising the learning process. Reaction from the students was mixed, with some students quite vocal about the (un)fairness of this new policy. The section head for one of the MBA sections knew that finding a long-term solution would be a difficult process. There were valid points in the arguments to both restrict and not restrict the use of the cards. She had to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages in order to make a recommendation to the faculty at a section meeting the following day.

Teaching Note: 8B00E20 (11 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Management Information Systems; Information Technology; Networks
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Electronic Commerce

DOUBLECLICK INC.: GATHERING CUSTOMER INTELLIGENCE
Scott L. Schneberger, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01E005
Publication Date: 3/5/2001
Length: 16 pages

DoubleClick Inc., with global headquarters in New York City and over 30 offices around the world, was a leading provider of comprehensive Internet advertising solutions for marketers and Web publishers. It combined technology, media and data expertise to centralize planning, execution, control, tracking and reporting for online media companies. DoubleClick was able to track Internet-users' surfing habits (but not the surfers' identities) allowing it to personalize ads for specific market groups. When DoubleClick announced it was merging with Abacus Direct, a direct marketing company with a database of consumer names, addresses and retail purchasing habits of 90 per cent of American households, it raised many privacy-related questions and concerns. Several Internet privacy activists had filed a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission after being informed by media sources that DoubleClick had the ability to divulge a person's identity by merging the databases of the two companies and matching the information in cookies with a surfer's profile. The president of DoubleClick was confident that its internal practices were sound, but he wondered if they would placate advertising clients afraid of consumer backlash, the concerns of Internet surfers and the company's investors.

Teaching Note: 8B01E05 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: High Technology Products; E-Commerce; Privacy Issues; Risk Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELANCE.COM: PROJECTS VERSUS PERSONNEL
Scott L. Schneberger, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B00E022
Publication Date: 1/10/2001
Revision Date: 1/8/2010
Length: 8 pages

eLance.com had just opened its online services to the public. The site was designed as a platform allowing buyers to post projects that freelancers (sellers) could bid on. After three days of operation, three requests for temporary positions appeared. Recruitment was not the intended purpose of the site and the co-founders disagreed on whether these requests should be allowed to stay on the site. Both founders knew that the choices they made now would directly affect future Web site development as features to support a projects-only site would be somewhat different from a combined projects and personnel site. They had to look ahead and consider the strategic and IT implications, and determine the objectives of the site and what products they would launch.

Teaching Note: 8B00E22 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: E-Business Models; Startups; E-Commerce; Strategic Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WWW.CENTRALMBA.COM
Michael Parent, Robert J. Fisher

Product Number: 9A99E028
Publication Date: 10/28/1999
Revision Date: 1/15/2010
Length: 4 pages

Central University has developed a highly successful Executive MBA Program. Its closest competitor, State University, has aggressively responded, to the point of registering the internet domain name www.centralmba.com and meta-tagging the State University Executive MBA home page with this domain name. The associate dean of programs at Central must decide what course of action to take. The case describes the domain name registration process, explains meta-tagging, and raises a number of ethical, marketing, and information management issues.

Teaching Note: 8A99E28 (10 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Ethical Issues; Marketing Communication; Internet; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Supply Chain Management and ERP

LIPTON CANADA
E.F. Peter Newson, Olga Volkoff

Product Number: 9A99E017
Publication Date: 5/13/1999
Revision Date: 1/15/2010
Length: 5 pages

Lipton Canada was replacing a highly-tailored, 15-year-old information system with SAP R/3 because the old system was not Y2K compliant. The project leader encountered difficulties configuring SAP to handle the particular way the company managed trade spending, which was how Lipton supported cooperative promotional work with its customers. To date, it had proved impossible to configure SAP to emulate this key process exactly. Three options were under consideration: should the implementation team rewrite the SAP R/3 software? Change the way trade spending was handled to a process that was easily configured in SAP? Or continue to search for a configuration that would produce the exact trade spending process required? The project was already behind schedule.

Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Managing Implementation; Computer System Implementation; Project Management; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



METALCO: THE SAP PROPOSAL
Sid L. Huff, Elspeth Murray

Product Number: 9A98E012
Publication Date: 5/27/1998
Revision Date: 6/20/2000
Length: 20 pages

Metalco is a large Australian mining company. It has a rocky history in terms of its effective use of information systems (IS), and there is widespread dissatisfaction in the company concerning IS and the IS department. A recent resignation of the chief information officer led to the decentralization of the IS function, to move it closer to the operating departments. At the same time, one of the division heads has proposed that the company buy the SAP enterprise-wide system, to replace an earlier internal system which had been poorly received. The price tag for SAP is very high, $23 million. Implementing it would also require substantial changes in company processes. In light of its history, recent IS decentralization, and the high SAP price tag, the company is faced with making the decision of whether to go ahead with SAP. An appendix in the case provides extensive information on the procedure used to evaluate SAP, and results thereof.

Teaching Note: 8A98E12 (4 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Information Systems; Information Technology; Information System Design; Computer System Implementation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Transaction Processing, Innovative Functional Systems, CRM, and Integration

CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE WIRELESS STRATEGY
Mike Wade, David Hamilton

Product Number: 9B01E001
Publication Date: 3/7/2001
Revision Date: 12/17/2009
Length: 23 pages

The director of business development of the electronic banking division of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) had just won a long-fought battle to implement a wireless banking initiative for customers with mobile devices such as cell phones and personal digital assistants. Now he had to make a number of key decisions relating to the strategy. These decisions included which services to offer (banking as well as non-related services), which devices and standards to support and whether to partner with a third-party content supplier. An extensive glossary of wireless technology terminology is included with this case.

Teaching Note: 8B01E01 (3 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Strategy Implementation; Technological Change; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LARG*NET
E.F. Peter Newson, Olga Volkoff-Richardson

Product Number: 9A96E003
Publication Date: 5/28/1996
Revision Date: 2/9/2010
Length: 8 pages

This case documents the origins and development of a collaborative interorganizational system. This system is an experimental broadband network being used to trial both ATM technology and new applications such as the transmission, retrieval and archiving of medical images. Director of LARG*net confronts the difficulties of technological innovation and interorganizational management. It provides an illustration of the technical difficulties in integrating different systems, ensuring security, and the ramifications to an organization's own systems when connectivity with other organizations is attempted. It highlights the fact that IT infrastructure is more than just physical hardware. At the same time it raises the issues of handling accountability and responsibility across organizational boundaries.

Teaching Note: 8A96E03 (5 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Information Systems; Strategic Alliances; Strategic Planning; Organizational Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
IT Planning and BPR

METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE: E-COMMERCE
Scott L. Schneberger, Murray McCaig

Product Number: 9A99E011
Publication Date: 3/24/1999
Revision Date: 1/15/2010
Length: 17 pages

In 1998, Metropolitan Life's first vice president of Interactive Commerce faced a plethora of opportunities, challenges, and decisions in charting MetLife's strategy for e-commerce. He wanted to move quickly into transacting Web-based commerce, but he had to consider executive support, infrastructure requirements, possibly disenfranchising the sales force, fast-moving competitors, and the frenzied rate of technology change. The case covers almost all e-commerce start-up issues, but from the perspective of a large, established bricks and mortar business. (A 19-minute video is available for purchase with this case.)

Teaching Note: 8A99E11 (9 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Market Strategy; Information Systems; Insurance
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CERNET: MANAGING INTERNET GROWTH IN CHINA
Michael Parent, Harvey G. Enns

Product Number: 9A98E001
Publication Date: 1/28/1998
Revision Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 13 pages

CERNET, the China Education and Research Network, is a not-for-profit, central government body formed to oversee the development and implementation of a university-based nation-wide Internet backbone. Fulfilling this mandate was well underway. CERNET was connected to 280 of China's 3,035 universities and colleges. Much work nonetheless remained. The case deals with managing the growth of the network from the perspective of the director of the Technical Board and Network Centre. Issues he had to contend with include hardware and bandwidth upgrades and installations, access, security, connectivity, costs, and tariffs. With over half the country's population not yet having made their first telephone call, these tasks proved daunting.

Teaching Note: 8A98E01 (10 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: China; Internet; Information Systems; Capital Budgeting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Knowledge Management

IVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS: THE DOCTORAL TRACKING DATABASE
Sid L. Huff, David Koltermann

Product Number: 9A98E015
Publication Date: 8/19/1998
Revision Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 7 pages

Richard Ivey School of Business has a need for the creation of a database, to be used for managing information about students and their courses of study, in its Business PhD program. Information on students to date has been maintained in a mix of paper and computer-file systems. The program director would like to develop a database, using a facility such as Microsoft Access, to be used for this purpose. The case provides examples of the actual forms and data maintained currently, and challenges the students to first create an entity-relationship data model, then a design for a relational database.

Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Information System Design; System Design; Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Supporting Management and Decision Making

XEROX (HONG KONG): SALES ACTIVITY MANAGEMENT PROCESS (A)
E.F. Peter Newson, Michael Zhao

Product Number: 9A99E015
Publication Date: 4/9/1999
Revision Date: 1/15/2010
Length: 21 pages

The sales director of Xerox (Hong Kong) has a vision to transform sales force management processes which would require radical changes to both the organization and the information technology infrastructure. The design includes a company-wide database to be available to the sales force by remote access through Intranet/Internet. From this database the sales force could manage their territory using notebook computers while travelling, working at client sites, sitting in meetings, or talking on the phone. At the time of sale, they could check inventory, quote prices, notify delivery or service schedules, and make billing arrangements. Successful implementation of the plan requires the sales director to overcome financial constraints, ingrained habits, traditional cultural values, an inadequate information technology infrastructure, and the effects of the change beyond the sales organization. The purpose of this case is to present the challenges of planning and implementing a major technology initiative in a cross-cultural setting. The student is expected to outline an implementation plan. A (B) case is available as a follow-up, case 9B00E002.

Teaching Note: 8A99E15 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Data Management: Warehousing, Analyzing, Mining, and Visualization

DATA WAREHOUSING AT CANADIAN TIRE
Michael Parent, Shawn Finkbeiner

Product Number: 9A98E016
Publication Date: 10/17/1998
Revision Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 8 pages

Canadian Tire's information warehouse has become the victim of its own success. Both the end-user and IT communities have become increasingly frustrated with interruptions in service. The data architect for the warehouse needs to decide what needs to be met, in what priority, and with what programs.

Teaching Note: 8A98E16 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Decision Analysis; Consumer Marketing; Information Systems; Data Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Intelligent Support Systems

CLEARWATER FINE FOODS INC.: USING A GROUP SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR STRATEGIC PLANNING
Michael Parent

Product Number: 9A97E015
Publication Date: 10/24/1997
Revision Date: 2/3/2010
Length: 12 pages

Clearwater Fine Foods Inc. is a Canadian-based multinational seafood harvester and producer with a fleet of over 35 ships and 4 offices. The finance and accounting group, headquartered in Bedford, Nova Scotia, used a Group Support System (GSS) to complete the initial stage of its strategic plan. This case deals with the results of a facilitated-GSS session, and participants' reactions to the technology. The MIS manager must decide whether to continue using this technology, and if so, for which tasks and organizational groups.

Teaching Note: 8A97E15 (10 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Information Systems; Computer Applications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Information Technology Economics

FIRST FIDELITY BANCORPORATION (A)
Paul W. Beamish, Barbara L. Marcolin, Kerry McLellan

Product Number: 9A92M017
Publication Date: 1/21/1993
Revision Date: 12/24/2002
Length: 19 pages

First Fidelity Bancorporation, a holding company for eight independent banks in the New Jersey and Pennsylvania areas, was going through a major restructuring and rationalization in response to serious financial problems, threats of regulatory control and changing market demands. In this reorganization, the head of corporate operations and systems was considering ways to facilitate the restructuring. He was seriously considering outsourcing as an alternative way to manage the internal information systems. The case explores the simple economics behind an outsourcing strategy and the complicated technical, political and cultural rationalization of a hierarchical, independent organization into a centrally-managed operation. Follow-up cases First Fidelity Bancorporation (B): Selecting an Outsourcing Vendor and First Fidelity Bancorporation (C): Managing an Outsourcing Relationship With EDS are available.

Teaching Note: 8A92M17 (16 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Outsourcing; Strategic Planning; Information Systems; Corporate Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ZS ASSOCIATES
Deborah Compeau, Arfat Qayyum

Product Number: 9B02E007
Publication Date: 5/23/2002
Revision Date: 12/1/2009
Length: 13 pages

ZS Associates is a consulting company with offices in the United States, Europe and plans to establish an office in Canada. The manager of scheduling realizes that the company's scheduling system would not be able to keep up with the needs of the firm. The current system tracks the consultant's skills and their assignments to various projects. An MBA student working as an intern with the firm must provide a recommendation whether to develop software in-house, have new software custom built externally or purchase off-the-shelf software. He must analyse the options while considering the growth needs of the firm, features required in the software and cost.

Teaching Note: 8B02E07 (11 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Systems Analysis; Management Information Systems; Computer System Implementation; Information System Design
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Building Information Systems

WATERLOO REGIONAL POLICE SERVICES: THE CIMS PROJECT (A)
Deborah Compeau, Scott L. Schneberger, Jane Gravill

Product Number: 9B01E013
Publication Date: 9/5/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 12 pages

Waterloo Regional Police Service, along with seven other police services, collaborated and invested resources in a computer system project that would streamline functions such as computer aided dispatching, records management, mobile workstation environments and most importantly, information sharing between these police services. The project has been in progress for several years, and a number of major issues with the computer system vendor were still unresolved. The chief of the Waterloo Regional Police Service must decide whether to continue with the installation of the computer system or move on to other options.

Teaching Note: 8B01E13 (10 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Information Systems; Strategy and Resources; Relationship Management; Project Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOYBOX: MANAGING DYNAMIC DIGITAL PROJECTS
Darren Meister, David Singer

Product Number: 9B02E014
Publication Date: 2/6/2003
Revision Date: 12/1/2009
Length: 12 pages

Toybox is the visual effects division of Command Post, Canada's largest full service postproduction company and industry leader in technical and creative services for film, television, video and digital audio productions. Toybox's visual special effects manager believes that an improved information system for managing digital projects is required to cope with future growth. For example, during recent production work on a feature film, difficulties in workload, signoffs and rework reached an unsustainable level. The visual special effects manager must choose between an off-the-shelf product and a custom in-house solution. However, his decision is complicated by the creative work environment and the number of systems to which the new system must be integrated.

Teaching Note: 8B02E14 (7 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Make or Buy Decision; Information Technology; Animation Studio; Computer Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RIVERBANK FINANCIAL: BALANCING THE PENDULUM
Duncan G. Copeland, Sid L. Huff, Kathryn Brohman

Product Number: 9A98E005
Publication Date: 3/25/1998
Revision Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 17 pages

The information technology (IT) group at a large Canadian financial institution has recently undergone a dramatic change from a controlled, technology centric environment, to a much more participative, customer-focused environment. A new operating framework has been implemented that introduced a competency (resource) centre into the group's structure and altered operations related to process and project execution. Consistent with their vision, the IT group have effectively partnered with their customers and are delivering cost-competitive and innovative solutions. IT executives are satisfied with the change and the internal customers of the IT group have recognized short-term advantages. However, looking long-term, one key customer can't help but wonder if the new structure and operations may jeopardize Riverbank Financial's traditional reputation of extraordinary technical expertise. Recognizing the customer's concern, the executive vice-president of IT must consider whether the new operating framework has taken too much focus away from the proprietary technology and identify possible adjustments to the IT group's structure and operations.

Teaching Note: 8A98E05 (9 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Integration; Management Information Systems; Project Management; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Managing Information Resources and Security

MICROSOFT SECURITY RESPONSE CENTER (A)
Mike Wade, Jeffrey Clayman

Product Number: 9B01E019
Publication Date: 7/25/2001
Revision Date: 12/18/2009
Length: 9 pages

Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) is a key component of the security infrastructure for Microsoft, the large, internationally known software manufacturer. The program manager of the center has been informed by a hacker of a potentially damaging security vulnerability in a piece of Microsoft's Internet server software. Neither the hacker nor MSRC knows for sure if systems using the software have been compromised, but they do know that the vulnerability has been discussed in hacker news groups. The program manager must determine who should be told, what needs to be done and when. This case and the accompanying Microsoft Security Response Center (B) and (C) cases (products 9B01E020 and 9B01E021) look at the strategy to solve the problems and deal with any possible public relations issues that arise from it.

Teaching Note: 8B01E19 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Planning; Public Relations; Internet Security; Risk Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIRST VIRTUAL HOLDINGS INCORPORATED (A)
Sid L. Huff, Mike Wade

Product Number: 9A98E007
Publication Date: 3/25/1998
Revision Date: 1/27/2010
Length: 18 pages

First Virtual Holdings Inc. (FVHI) is an Internet payments company based in San Diego, California. The company developed a technology by which consumers can securely purchase goods and services over the Internet. Each participating consumer is provided with a VirtualPIN number, which is used in place of a credit card number to make purchases from participating online vendors. The vendors forward the consumer's VirtualPIN number, along with the amount of the transaction to FVHI. FVHI then sends an e-mail to the consumer asking for confirmation of the transaction. When confirmation is received, FVHI processes the transaction and pays the vendor. The technology ensures that a consumer's credit card number is never sent across the Internet. The system is secure but embodies a certain amount of inconvenience as each purchase requires two steps. The company faces strong competition from established industry players such as software developers, banks and credit card companies. In addition, continued consumer reluctance to embrace online commerce has hampered the development of a critical mass of users and thus their progress. A follow-up case (9A98E008) is available.

Teaching Note: 8A98E07 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Internet; E-Commerce; Virtual Business; Internet Security
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
The Impacts of IT on Organizations, Individuals, and Society

GENERAL MOTORS OF CANADA: COMMON SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION
Scott L. Schneberger, Antoni Krajewski

Product Number: 9A98E014
Publication Date: 10/5/1998
Revision Date: 1/28/2010
Length: 20 pages

As part of General Motors' overall strategy to standardize systems across GM's global operations, GM planned to implement a new timekeeping information system throughout GM plants in Canada. A common timekeeping system could increase plant efficiency, standardize reporting for headquarters, and facilitate productivity benchmarking across North America. Existing GM Canada timekeeping practices differed considerably within Canada and with U.S. operations, however, and Canadian resistance was threatening system implementation.

Teaching Note: 8A98E14 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Information Systems; Management in a Global Environment; Management Information Systems; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DIGITAL CANADA'S NEW WORK ENVIRONMENT
Chris A. Higgins, Derrick Neufeld

Product Number: 9A95E007
Publication Date: 8/31/1995
Revision Date: 12/13/2002
Length: 20 pages

A project manager at Digital Canada has designed a work-at-home program to encourage field personnel to spend less time working in the office and more time working at client sites, on the road and at home. He believes his plan will save Digital Canada millions of dollars annually and result in increased productivity. Unfortunately, the response from U.S. headquarters has been lukewarm, and the affected employees are reacting quite negatively. The manager is uncertain how to generate support for his plan in order to move forward.

Teaching Note: 8A95E07 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Program Design/Implementation; Personnel Management; Organizational Change; Facilities Planning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA