Ivey Publishing

Organizational Behavior: An Introduction to Your Life in Organizations

Andre, R.,1/e (United States, Pearson, 2008)
Prepared By Daniel Woodward, Professor
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Why Mastering Organizational Behavior is Essential to Your Career

AGCHEMCO COMPANY
William J. Russell

Product Number: 9B08C001
Publication Date: 10/31/2008
Length: 14 pages

This case involves a personnel matter at an agricultural chemical industry mining complex. A middle-level supervisor has been accused of gender-based and other discrimination. The complaint has come primarily from one employee who works under that supervisor's direction, but is supported at least in part by the testimony of other employees. The evidence is typical of the sorts of evidence that usually attend human resource disputes. Company policy manuals bear on the propriety of the mill coordinator's conduct apart from the issue of discrimination. Ultimately, an appellate process is also integrated into the procedural tools. This case considers the process by which the employment discrimination complaint is investigated, considered and resolved, including the weighing and evaluation of information gathered from those in the workplace. Various practical, legal and ethical issues typical to such cases are apparent.

Teaching Note: 8B08C01 (12 pages)
Issues: Perception; Work-Force Management; Risk Management; Morale; Mining; Ethical Issues; Employee Grievances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AT THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT (CENTRAL INDIA CAMPUS) (A)
Ranjeet Nambudiri, K.R. Jayasimha

Product Number: 9B08C020
Publication Date: 11/17/2008
Revision Date: 5/1/2009
Length: 25 pages

The case describes existing performance management systems at a leading business school in India, the National Institute of Management - Central India campus (NIM CI campus). The institution, which is ranked among the top 20 business schools in India, is facing critical issues of attracting and retaining faculty members. The director of the NIM CI campus has implemented a unit based performance measurement and incentive system, which has worked favorably and enabled the institute to recruit top academicians. However, the management committee believes that the system has outlived its utility and desires to replace it with more robust systems that are less vulnerable to misuse. The faculty members, however, support retention of the existing system. The key teaching objective of this case is to understand performance management systems from the perspectives of different stakeholders and develop a framework that meets all objectives of performance management. The case enables users to understand all steps in performance management and examine shortcomings at each stage. The role of incentive systems, both as a tool to enhance individual performance and as a management control mechanism, is also discussed. The case provides users an opportunity to evaluate the strategic significance of performance management.

Teaching Note: 8B08C20 (13 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Management of Professionals; Incentives; Performance Measurement; Educational Administration
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTINATIONAL PERSONNEL SELECTION SYSTEM
Diana E. Krause, Reiner Piske

Product Number: 9B07C041
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Length: 17 pages

The owner of a company with production plants in various regions in the world wants to standardize the methods of personnel selection for the Asian-Pacific region (APAC). A new system of personnel selection has to be developed for middle management positions in APAC. The owner delegates this task to a cross-functional, multinational project team that operates in Hong Kong headed by a human resources (HR) executive and expatriate from Germany. In terms of the new personnel selection system, he has two opposing goals in mind: the new personnel selection system should be highly specific for a particular country and simultaneously valid for different countries. A series of issues must be resolved in order for the project to be successful. Some of these issues are related to the personnel selection system; the job requirements to be assessed, the modules it must include, the stages and methods of each module, and the implementation of the system across countries in APAC. Other issues are interpersonal, such as the cultural differences and the heterogeneous perspectives that exist among the team members, and a conflict between the HR executive and the owner.

Teaching Note: 8B07C41 (9 pages)
Issues: Cross Cultural Management; Aptitude Diagnostics; International Personnel Selection; Teamwork
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SURGERY WITH BLUNT TOOLS: RESTRUCTURING AND AMBIGUITY AT UMBRA HEALTH PARTNERS
Claus Rerup, Jim Tuan

Product Number: 9B07C038
Publication Date: 7/7/2008
Length: 26 pages

This case explores the transformation of Umbra Health Partners (Umbra), a privately owned Canadian healthcare organization, as it undergoes an extensive restructuring, through the perspective of the branch manager, who is a recent graduate of a master of business administration program in health services administration. The first part of the case examines the branch manager's role and the last part of the case examines his new role in the corporate office. When he is first hired at Umbra, he assesses the organizational problems inherent in the branch office and in the organization as a whole. As branch manager, he attempts to find solutions to those problems and improve the reliability of his branch. Later, he is promoted to a position in the corporate office, where he addresses the organizational problems at the corporate level (some of which mirror those at the branch office), such as a lack of interdependence and a vague sense of the direction in which the organization is headed. Taken together, the case offers a host of material to discuss the complexities of organizational change.

Teaching Note: 8B07C38 (22 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Collective Mind; Operations Management; Leadership; Success and Failure; Ambiguity of Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Your Personality and Style

EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT AT MODERN APPLIANCES INC. (A)
Jeffrey Gandz

Product Number: 9B07C035
Publication Date: 9/17/2007
Revision Date: 12/4/2007
Length: 10 pages

The chief executive officer of Modern Appliances wants to change the culture in the company towards one of engagement of people at all levels of the organization. The (A) case describes the ModernIzation initiative and provides a basis for analyzing the reason for the initiative and identifying some of the issues that may arise from it. The (B) case looks at specific problems that arise and the (C) case discusses the process used by the company.

Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Employee Engagement; Productivity; Change Management; Employee Participation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DR. JACK PERRY, DDS
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Eleni Mitsis

Product Number: 9B07C016
Publication Date: 5/15/2007
Length: 6 pages

Dr. Jack Perry, a sole practitioner dentist in a small town in Ontario, had a meeting with one of his employees who suggested that there were several problems in the office. These include: low morale, lack of motivation to grow the business, fill cancellations, follow up on collections, and engage in cross-sell procedures. He had noticed these problems previously but felt unsure about his personnel and business management skills. Using his notes from a presentation made by a business consultant at a dental conference, he must decide how to act in order to address these problems.

Teaching Note: 8B07C16 (5 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Morale; Motivation; Employee Attitude; Compensation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
Decision Making

MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE IRAQ WAR CASE
Claus Rerup, Jordan Mitchell, Robin Cooper

Product Number: 9B07C034
Publication Date: 7/4/2008
Length: 22 pages

In March 2003, the U.S.-led coalition forces waged war on Iraq. After a few months, President George W. Bush declared Mission Accomplished. However, five years later, in 2008, the United States and other coalition forces remain in Iraq and are facing increased violence and casualties. The U.S. death toll is approximately 4,000 people whereas Iraqi deaths are estimated by conflicting sources to range from 150,000 to 1,033,000. This case examines the U.S. government's engagement in Iraq over the last four years and offers a brief background of the conflict. Next, it examines the statements made by the U.S. government to explain the purpose and aim of the war to the American people and the international community. The case describes the progress of the war as well as the U.S. government's response to that progress. The case is used to illustrate the ways in which ambiguous outcomes (the war in Iraq) are experienced by and responded to by actors (the U.S. government). This case has been developed to address two related issues: first, at business schools we teach students about success more than we teach them about failure. The case is written to make students more mindful about the way they use success, failure and the grey zone between success and failure to frame and make sense of events and experiences; the second issue is that students are not usually taught about the grey zone that exist between success and failure. The central idea of this theory is that although the success/failure dichotomy of evaluating organizational performance is simple and as a result, appealing, organizational life does not always comply with these categories.

Teaching Note: 8B07C34 (25 pages)
Issues: Decision Making; Visioning; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GOOGLE'S WAY - DON'T BE EVIL
Pratima Bansal, Marlene J. Le Ber

Product Number: 9B07M067
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Revision Date: 7/3/2008
Length: 14 pages

Wall Street's darling, Google Inc., offered more than a pretty financial picture. Poverty, communicable diseases and climate change - some of the world's largest problems - were also key interests of Google's cofounders. By applying innovation and significant resources, Google's cofounders hoped that their efforts in these areas would one day eclipse Google itself in worldwide impact. On February 22, 2006, Google Inc. announced the appointment of an executive director of the newly created Google.org. With one per cent of Google Inc.'s equity and profit as seed money, Google.org's mandate was to address climate change, global public health, economic development and poverty. Although charity by successful entrepreneurs was not unusual, this press release signaled a new organizational form, a for-profit philanthropic company. The new executive director's task ahead was unprecedented. How could he leverage the company's for-profit status to make the biggest impact possible with the resources trusted to Google.org? What decision-making criteria should be used for strategic investments? How would he measure Google.org's success?

Teaching Note: 8B07M67 (11 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Corporate Governance; Strategic Decision Making; Business Sustainability; New Organizational Forms
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OQOQO: SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS FASHIONS
Kyle Murray, Ken Mark, Megan Sherritt

Product Number: 9B06A023
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Length: 8 pages

Chip Wilson, founder of lululemon athletica, a Vancouver-based manufacturer, distributor and retailer of high quality yoga apparel, started a new streetwear line of apparel that would combine fashion with social consciousness. The apparel sold at OQOQO was made from natural and organic materials, under safe and fair working conditions, and it was produced in a way to reduce environmental impact. There were some problems regarding the sourcing of materials and the customer's perception of certain materials such as soy and hemp. Chip must decide whether to expand the number of OQOQO stores.

Teaching Note: 8B06A23 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Decision Theory; Decision Analysis; Corporate Responsibility; Retailing; Product Strategy; Growth Strategy; Market Strategy; Decision Trees; Decision Support Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Fundamentals of Motivation

ROBERT'S CENTER OF PERFORMING ARTS
James A. Erskine, Felix Gernburd

Product Number: 9B08M023
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Length: 8 pages

Robert's Center of Performing Arts (RCPA), founded and owned by Robert Gernburd, was a music school. In addition to individual instrument lessons and group lessons in music theory and music history, the RCPA sold second-hand pianos. It was difficult to find a supplier of used pianos but after a great deal of research, Gernburd found a supplier in Japan. Recently, an invoice containing supplier information had been temporarily misplaced. Since then, Gernburd had learned that his in-house piano tuner had been selling pianos without his knowledge. Gernburd was unsure how to proceed.

Teaching Note: 8B08M23 (4 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Management of Professionals; Ethical Issues; Conflict Resolution; Small Business
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



DICKINSON COLLEGE: INSPIRATION FOR A LEADERSHIP STORY (IN THE VISION OF A FOUNDING FATHER)
Michael J. Fratantuono

Product Number: 9B08M012
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 23 pages

In January 1999, William Durden was named the 27th president of his alma mater, Dickinson College. He quickly came to understand that for much of the 20th century, the Dickinson community had lacked a strong sense of organizational purpose. By autumn, Durden had turned to the life and writings of Dr. Benjamin Rush, the man responsible for securing the college charter in 1783, as the inspiration for the story. After introducing Durden and the challenges confronting Dickinson, the case describes the early history of the college and the ideas and accomplishments of Rush. It then provides students with a brief overview of the strategic challenges that had surfaced for Dickinson by the mid1990s. Finally, the conclusion indicates that Durden still had to resolve many issues associated with the identity story.

Teaching Note: 8B08M12 (19 pages)
Industry: Educational Services, Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Leadership; Management of Change; Management Style; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STEVE JONES - STONEHILL CAPITAL
James A. Erskine, Dan Nir

Product Number: 9B07C009
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 6 pages

Steve Jones, senior investment analyst at Stonehill Capital, among other responsibilities, had to ensure that his team prepared a pitch book which presented all the numbers and graphs necessary to acquire a client's business. Jones was already overworked so he enlisted his intern, Joe Livingston, to help with the task. As the deadline approached, Jones and Livingston worked 18-hour days preparing the pitch book and were very tired and sleep deprived. The morning after the day of the pitch, Jones received an email from the vice-president of Investment Banking telling him that the bank's deal team had been embarrassed by having to explain an error in the pitch book during their meeting to try to secure the deal. Jones is now being asked to explain what happened.

Teaching Note: 8B07C09 (3 pages)
Issues: Management Style; Management of Professionals; Interpersonal Skills; Relationship Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LOUISE CHEN
Jeffrey Gandz, Elizabeth Spracklin

Product Number: 9B06C013
Publication Date: 10/2/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 7 pages

Louise Chen must decide what performance assessment to give one of her employees who has, uncharacteristically, failed to meet one of her key objectives for the year. The situation is difficult for several reasons; the causes of the unacceptable performance are not clear; the employee has previously received excellent appraisals, including a recent one by the vice-president; and the employee was absent for a good part of the year on maternity leave. The various factors that influence sustained performance (ability, motivation, resources, role clarity, reinforcement) are examined, as well as steps leaders can take in improving performance of those for whom they are responsible.

Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Management Behaviour; Motivation; Performance Evaluation; Management Performance
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Motivating Individuals in their Jobs

ACME MEDICAL IMAGING
Donald A. Pillittere

Product Number: 9B08D004
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 6 pages

After negotiations with a key supplier for lower prices and quicker turnaround go nowhere, two employees of Acme Medical Imaging realize there's no more low-hanging fruit to pick to keep their project on time and on budget -- no more concessions from external parties, no more superficial, short-term fixes. They have to convince their chief executive officer and the project team to take a hard look at internal processes. From the perspective of Operations, this case examines the challenges that can arise - and some steps that can be taken - when the greatest obstacles to a project are the people and procedures responsible for its success.

Teaching Note: 8B08D04 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Commercialization Process; Project Objective; New Product Development; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KENEXA
Joerg Dietz, Chetan Joshi

Product Number: 9B07C004
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Revision Date: 3/25/2008
Length: 15 pages

This case describes the measurement and evaluation of high performance principles of people management in a retail bank by a consulting company. This case serves as a platform for students to deliberate on what is involved in an organization's quest to achieve competitive success through its workforce. A unique strength of the case is that students are asked to quantitatively test their arguments with data provided in an Excel spreadsheet that accompanies the case (Ivey product #7B07C004). The case is intended as an integrated case across organizational behavior, management science and communication. The organizational behavior teaching approach is included to demonstrate that effective people management is associated with competitive advantages. For management science, the case serves to practice correlation and regression analyses. For communication, the case allows students to prepare a presentation that effectively communicates the complex and comprehensive results of their analyses.

Teaching Note: 8B07C04 (18 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Communications; Regression Analysis; Human Resources Management; Consulting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JINJIAN GARMENT FACTORY: MOTIVATING GO-SLOW WORKERS
Tieying Huang, Junping Liang, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B04M033
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 10/14/2009
Length: 6 pages

Jinjian Garment Factory is a large clothing manufacturer based in Shenzhen with distribution to Hong Kong and overseas. Although Shenzhen had become one of the most advanced garment manufacturing centres in the world, managers in this industry still had few effective ways of dealing with the collective and deliberate slow pace of work by the employees, of motivating workers, and of resolving the problem between seasonal production requirements and retention of skilled workers. However, the owner and managing director of the company must determine the reasons behind the deliberately slow pace of the workers, the pros and cons of the piecework system and the methods he could adopt to motivate the workers effectively.

Teaching Note: 8B04M33 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Productivity; Employee Attitude; Piece Work; Performance Measurement; Work-Force Management; Peking University
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Health and Stress at Work

HEALTH NUT
Colleen Sharen, Vanessa M. Strike

Product Number: 9B08M053
Publication Date: 8/25/2008
Revision Date: 8/11/2009
Length: 13 pages

Late in the afternoon on January 20, 2006, one of the owners of The Health Nut hung up the phone. Her account manager had just called to tell her that the bank was not going to extend any further credit to her small retail natural health products (NHP) store located in Grand Bend, Ontario. She and her life and business partner had owned The Health Nut since May 2003. While they had successfully grown sales, the business was not generating enough cash to sustain itself and provide the partners with adequate compensation. As a result, the business relied heavily on borrowing from the bank. Now that the bank was no longer a source of financing, the owners had a major problem on their hands. What should they do now? Something was going to have to change. They had about four weeks left before the business ran out of cash. The students will learn: 1. The role of emotion in decision making. 2. The nature and importance of due diligence. 3. When to let go of the business. 4. The importance of having enough working capital. 5. The dangers of over reliance on debt. 6. The challenges of cash flow management.

Teaching Note: 8B08M53 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Decision Theory; Bankruptcy; Cash Flow; Organizational Behaviour; Human Resources Management; Opportunity Recognition
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PRASHANT LAKHERA: SENIOR ANALYST
James A. Erskine, Unnat Kohli

Product Number: 9B07C033
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Length: 11 pages

Prashant Lakhera, senior analyst at Credit Rating Agency Limited (CRA), has been working with Deepak Ghosh, project manager of the Construction Development Board, on a report that needs to be submitted within the next few days. Because Ghosh had been acting inappropriately in front of clients, Lakhera and Gagan Vedi, the other analyst working on the report, was concerned about how this might damage the image of CRA. Shortly before the report was due, Lakhera asked Ghosh for his contribution to the report. Ghosh indicated that he did not care and he walked away from the team. Now Lakhera had to decide what to do about the urgent deadline for the report.

Teaching Note: 8B07C33 (3 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Interpersonal Skills; Conflict Resolution; Interpersonal Relations; Crisis Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Communication and Interpersonal Relationships

CARNEGIE INDUSTRIAL: THE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CENTRE
Michael Sider, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B08C002
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Length: 6 pages

A director within the leadership development program of a large multinational organization must decide how to manage a very difficult conversation she must have with her assistant director. The assistant director, who is older and more experienced (although less educated), interviewed for the director's position and didn't get it. The assistant director has never been happy reporting to her much younger boss, and has felt consistently left out of major decisions. The assistant director had confronted the director about her feelings and threatened to resign. How should the director handle this difficult conversation?

Teaching Note: 8B08C02 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Conflict Resolution; Career Development; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RSM RICHTER LLP
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Simon Leith, Michelle Rosenstock

Product Number: 9B06D013
Publication Date: 8/30/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 10 pages

The human resources manager of the Toronto office of RSM Richter LLP, reflected upon the company's efforts and outcomes in relation to recruiting junior accountants from the Richard Ivey School of Business at The University of Western Ontario. Although Richter had similar salary and benefits to those of the Big Four accounting firms, it offered a unique environment in which employees were able to get to know one another personally and junior accountants were likely to become exposed to different aspects of auditing that they would not encounter in larger firms. Yet, Ivey students seemed more likely to accept offers from one of the Big Four. The human resources manager considered various alternatives.

Teaching Note: 8B06D13 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LAUREL UPHOLSTERY
Michael Sider, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06M032
Publication Date: 4/28/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 5 pages

A senior manager at Laurel Upholstery learns from an unexpected meeting with a former senior manager at the firm's Montreal factory that only managers of a certain origin - regardless of seniority or performance - were being promoted into top management positions. Although the former manager alleged he had no interest in pursuing the matter, he was frustrated enough to leave the firm, and indicated the matter seemed serious enough to warrant further investigation.

Teaching Note: 8B06M32 (3 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Human Resources Management; Discrimination; Communications; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ANITA JAIRAM AT METROPOLE SERVICES
Alison Konrad, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06C003
Publication Date: 2/6/2006
Revision Date: 9/15/2009
Length: 5 pages

The senior project manager at Metropole Services is getting the sense that her business relationship with her software development group is taking a turn for the worse. According to her, she was their project manager and it seemed strange that her team members - all subordinates, were excluding her from an important client meeting. She must figure out what the issue is, and if something truly is wrong, take the appropriate steps to correct it immediately.

Teaching Note: 8B06C03 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Personnel Management; Leadership; Human Behaviour; Communications
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 8:
Cross-Cultural Relationships

ROARING DRAGON HOTEL
Stephen Grainger

Product Number: 9B08M004
Publication Date: 3/5/2008
Length: 7 pages

The case looks at the takeover of the Roaring Dragon Hotel (RDH), a state owned enterprise in south-west China, by global hotelier Hotel International (HI) and discusses the cultural collision and organizational adoptions resulting from the intersections of two significantly different business cultures. Specifically in this case, the focus is on the challenge involved with downsizing, redundancy, communication, cultural sensitivity, strategic planning and in developing strategy. In south-west China in 2002, the RDH business environment was just emerging from the shadow of the planned economy and had retained its guanxi-based organizational culture. At RDH, relationship development and the exchange of favors were still important and occurring on a daily basis and there was little system or efficiency in the hotel's domestic management style and processes. In comparison, Hotel International had a wealth of international experience in providing accommodation, marketing and professional management in servicing the needs of a global market steeped in corporate governance. At the commencement of the management contract there was a deep division separating the organizational cultures of RDH and HI.

Teaching Note: 8B08M04 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Cross Cultural Management; Strategic Planning; Cross Cultural Communication; Cultural Sensitivity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAPITAL COAST HEALTH LIMITED: BEING A GOOD EMPLOYER IN THE MIDST OF CHANGE (A)
Anne Marie Francesco, Alvin Hwang

Product Number: 9B05M009
Publication Date: 2/21/2005
Revision Date: 9/30/2009
Length: 6 pages

Capital Coast Health Limited is a public healthcare facility in central New Zealand. The new chief executive is confronted with serious internal problems and a persistent annual financial deficit that has been with the organization since its inception. Working in an uncertain and rapidly changing healthcare environment and constrained by government regulations, the chief executive officer must find a way to deliver quality care to the community and at the same time, motivate a large team of professionals who were already weary after years of change. The supplement Capital Coast Health Limited: Being a Good Employer in the Midst of Change (B), product 9B05M010 looks at one of the policies the chief executive officer must focus on.

Teaching Note: 8B05M09 (6 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Environmental Change; Strategy Development; Change Management; Employment Equity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HARMONIZATION OF COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS FOR FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK
Edward Akhentoolove Corbin, Betty Jane Punnett

Product Number: 9B04C053
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 10/9/2009
Length: 9 pages

The merger of the Caribbean holdings of Barclays Bank Plc. and the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) is going ahead, and the reality of integration of very diverse systems and procedures has to be faced. The case deals with understanding the current situation in terms of existing policies and designing policies that would be acceptable to employees from both banks in the organization - FirstCaribbean International Bank - which would be created by the merger. A critical aspect of the merger is the harmonization of compensation and benefits that must be resolved as a matter of priority. This case may be taught on a stand alone basis, or in combination with any of four additional cases that deal with various functional issues: 1) General Management - CIBC and Barclays: Should Their Operations be Merged, product 9B04M067. 2) Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032. 3) Accounting and Finance: CIBC Barclays: Accounting for Their Merger, product 9B04B022 4) Technical note: Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B04C53 (6 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Consolidations and Mergers; Benefits Policy; Compensation; Change Management; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHAMPION PRODUCTS
Derrick Neufeld, Puneet Talwar

Product Number: 9B03E009
Publication Date: 4/2/2003
Revision Date: 10/19/2009
Length: 8 pages

The general manager of a janitorial wholesaling firm, Champion Products, is faced with a resignation letter from the company's network administrator and systems programmer. The general manager would not be disappointed to see the network administrator and his poor attitude leave the firm, but he wondered how easy it would be to replace him, particularly in the wake of the company's recent acquisition ISG Products. The general manager must decide whether to negotiate better terms with the network administrator or let him go.

Teaching Note: 8B03E09 (6 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Information Systems; Consolidations and Mergers; Knowledge Management; Personnel Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Groups and Their Influence

ARLA FOODS AND THE CARTOON CRISIS (A)
Henry W. Lane, Mikael Sondergaard, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B08M005
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 12 pages

After a Danish newspaper publishes cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad, consumers across the Middle East decide to boycott Danish goods. Arla Foods (Arla) is one of Europe's largest dairy companies. Suddenly, it finds itself caught in the middle of a crisis that appears to be beyond its control. Prior to the boycott, the Middle East was Arla's fastest growing region and represented an important component of the company's long-term growth strategy. As the largest Danish company in the region, it stands to lose up to $550 million in annual revenues. Students are asked to take the role of the communication director for Arla, who, along with other members of the newly formed Crisis and Communication Group, must decide on a course of action to deal with the crisis. The case addresses a variety of topics, including culture and religion, international management, risk management, crisis communications, and managing in a boycott situation. It also creates an opportunity to discuss doing business in the Middle East and management in an Islamic context.

Teaching Note: 8B08M05 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Boycott; Crisis Management; Women in Management; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STARS AIR AMBULANCE: AN INFORMATION SYSTEMS CHALLENGE
Malcolm Munro, Sid L. Huff

Product Number: 9B08E004
Publication Date: 2/26/2008
Length: 12 pages

Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society (STARS) in Calgary, Canada, provides a safe, rapid, highly specialized, emergency medical transport system for the critically ill and injured by dispatching helicopters and air medical crew at anytime. STARS operates a sophisticated communication system that links together hospitals, ground ambulance services, police, firefighters, search and rescue organizations, and park wardens. The recently appointed chief information officer (CIO) expected to inherit a sound information systems (IS) operation but soon discovered a number of problems that seriously impeded his ability to manage progress. These included a poorly organized department, excessive and undisciplined use of consultants, inadequate project management, independent IS operations and IS staff in other departments, other managers possibly resistant to change, and an IS department with no clearly organized role or mission. The basic issue in this case concerns what action the new CIO must undertake to ensure that the IS department can fully support the organization's mission.

Teaching Note: 8B08E04 (9 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Management of Technology; Management of Change; Corporate Culture; Management Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPECTRUM BRANDS, INC. - THE SALES FORCE DILEMMA
Donald W. Barclay, Joe Falconi

Product Number: 9B06A035
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 20 pages

In 2005, the vice-president of sales and marketing for the Canadian division of Spectrum Brands Inc. must determine his next steps regarding the structure of his sales force. Spectrum Brands (Spectrum), a global consumer products company formerly known as Rayovac Corporation, had made a number of acquisitions to diversify and expand its product and brand portfolio. With these changes, Spectrum had become a leading supplier of consumer batteries, lawn and garden care products, specialty pet supplies, and shaving and grooming products. The vice-president of sales and marketing was charged with the task of creating a national sales force from the teams of the newly merged companies. Knowing the importance of the sales function to each of these companies, he wanted to ensure; despite the differences among the diverse groups, that he still maintained a team which would effectively and efficiently continue to increase the sales of each business unit.

Teaching Note: 8B06A35 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales Organization; Acquisitions; Change Management; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Improving Team Effectiveness

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN? AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD’S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B07M041
Publication Date: 4/10/2007
Length: 11 pages

This team-building and familiarization activity can be used in the initial class or session of an international management program. It assesses one's exposure to the rest of the world's peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a classes' collective exposure to the world's people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one's business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

Teaching Note: 8B07M41 (6 pages)
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Team Building; Internationalization; Career Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEO BURNETT COMPANY LTD.: VIRTUAL TEAM MANAGEMENT
Joerg Dietz, Fernando Olivera, Elizabeth O'Neil

Product Number: 9B03M052
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 16 pages

Leo Burnett Company Ltd. is a global advertising agency. The company is working with one of its largest clients to launch a new line of hair care products into the Canadian and Taiwanese test markets in preparation for a global rollout. Normally, once a brand has been launched, it is customary for the global brand centre to turn over the responsibility for the brand and future campaigns to the local market offices. In this case, however, the brand launch was not successful. Team communications and the team dynamics have broken down in recent months and the relationships are strained. Further complicating matters are a number of client and agency staffing changes that could jeopardize the stability of the team and the agency/client relationship. The global account director must decide whether she should proceed with the expected decision to modify the global team structure to give one of the teams more autonomy, or whether she should maintain greater centralized control over the team. She must recommend how to move forward with the brand and determine what changes in team structure or management are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B03M52 (14 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RICHARD IVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS - THE LEADER PROJECT (A)
Joerg Dietz, Krista Ewing

Product Number: 9B03C046
Publication Date: 11/5/2003
Revision Date: 10/17/2009
Length: 13 pages

A student-run, not-for-profit program, Leading Education and Development in Emerging Regions (LEADER) sent teams of business students to teach western business practices in the former Soviet Union. In preparation for the three-week assignment at the end of the school term, the students were expected to participate in social events to build team spirit, as well as practical work, such as preparing teaching materials, making travel arrangements and fundraising. The program's annual budget was $110,000 and each team member was expected to provide a minimum of $250. Despite efforts to raise the needed funds, the program failed to reach its goal. As a result, team members were required to contribute $1,800, substantially more than originally anticipated. Some of the team members quit, expressing their dissatisfaction with the increased financial obligation. Other team members are boasting about the little time they spent working on the project. The once successful program is facing a dilemma. How can it sustain enthusiasm, raise the needed funds and recruit members who are willing to work to ensure its success? Supplement Richard Ivey School of Business - The LEADER Project - Kiev Site (B), product 9B03C047 explores a personality conflict that begins when one team begins preparation for its trip. The problem escalates when the team is teaching in Kiev, Ukraine. One of the team members wonders what role she can play in resolving the situation that threatens the success of the teaching assignment.

Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Human Resources Management; Funding; Team Building; Non-Profit Organization
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate


Chapter 11:
The Challenge of Leadership

GOEDEHOOP: WHEN SOCIAL ISSUES BECOME STRATEGIC
Margaret Sutherland, Verity Hawarden

Product Number: 9B08M067
Publication Date: 12/15/2008
Length: 17 pages

This case chronicles a change process to counteract the epidemic of HIV/AIDS on a coalmine in South Africa that impacts the sustainability of the organization. The case describes the business case for dealing with the problem and the sequence of events that were instituted. It illustrates the type of leadership activities needed to deal with a compelling environmental force impacting business. It shows how a wide range of stakeholders needs to be involved and systems and practices instituted for sustainable change to be implemented. It raises the question of the role of business in society. The case also provides insights into doing business in emerging economies. The challenge at the end of the case is how to roll out (replicate) the intervention into other divisions of a large multinational.

Teaching Note: 8B08M67 (8 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Health; Cost/Benefit Analysis; Ethical Issues; Change Management; Leadership; Human Resources Management; Triple Bottom-line Reporting; Impact of HIV/AIDS on Business; Emerging Markets; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



FUZZY MATH
Gerard Seijts, Ivy Kyei-Poku

Product Number: 9B08C007
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Length: 15 pages

The case explains the ordeal of the newly appointed manager of planning and reporting at Connectco, an outbound call centre in Ontario, Canada, who suspected wrong-doing early on at work. After his fears were confirmed, he was very uncomfortable with the situation he found himself in. However, he had to make a choice about how he would respond. This case also portrays, among other things, how young professionals find themselves in situations that create moral distress when they are aware of unethical conduct but feel constrained from taking action to correct it.

Teaching Note: 8B08C07 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Ethical Issues; Leadership; Whistleblower; Accountability
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEADERS WANTED: CHINESE ATHLETIC VANCOUVER ASSOCIATION
Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, Francine Schlosser, Philip Law, Clement Chu

Product Number: 9B08C008
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Length: 14 pages

After 10 years of rapid growth, the Chinese Athletic Vancouver Association (CAVA) was threatened with a leadership vacuum. To deal with the recent loss of their president, the vice-president had to devise a plan that would sustain CAVA's benefit to the Vancouver Chinese community, by locating and developing leaders who could carry this organization forward. As the vice-president was expected to assume the president's role at the end of 2005, he needed to develop and implement leadership and succession planning strategies for CAVA.

Teaching Note: 8B08C08 (10 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Non-Profit Organization; Leadership; Board of Directors
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Leadership Roles and Skills

JOHN MEREDITH OF HUTCHISON PORT HOLDINGS
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Jeffrey Gandz, Nigel Goodwin

Product Number: 9B07C027
Publication Date: 6/4/2007
Revision Date: 5/24/2007
Length: 18 pages

This case examines the life, career and leadership style of John Meredith, the group managing director of Hutchison Port Holdings (HPH). Meredith established the company in 1972 based on his vision for more efficient global trade. Under his leadership, the company grew to become the world's largest container port operator. The company grew from owning and managing a single container port to owning and managing 45 container ports by May 2007. This case also examines the importance of leadership at all levels of organizations. When a company grows quickly and sets up operations around the world, it must constantly train new leaders. However, HPH had difficulty finding and training enough leaders who were willing to lead the company's new port operations in far-off destinations. The case examines HPH's actions thus far and asks what other measures may be appropriate in the future.

Teaching Note: 8B07C27 (7 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Management in a Global Environment; Management Development; Leadership
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ING INSURANCE ASIA/PACIFIC
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Andreas Schotter

Product Number: 9B06M083
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Length: 15 pages

The new chief executive officer (CEO) of ING Insurance Asia/Pacific wants to improve the regional operation of the company. ING Group was a global financial services company of Dutch origin with more than 150 years of experience. As part of ING International, ING Insurance Asia/Pacific was responsible for life insurance and asset/wealth management activities throughout the region. The company was doing well, but the new CEO believed that there were still important strategic and operational improvements possible. This case can be used to discuss the local versus regional or global management issue and will yield best results if the class has already been introduced to different strategic and organizational alternatives in the international business context.

Teaching Note: 8B06M83 (12 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Subsidiaries; Organization; Leadership; International Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEADING CHANGE AT SJHC AND LHSC: BURR UNDER THE SADDLE OR A GRAIN OF SAND IN THE OYSTER
Gerard Seijts, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06C010
Publication Date: 10/12/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 19 pages

The transfer of perinatal services at St. Joseph's Health Care Centre (SJHC) to the Women's and Children's Services at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC), included the relocation of clinical programs, 500 staff and about 40 physicians. SJHC's perinatal program had been among the hospital's premier programs and was recognized as a world-class tertiary perinatal program for more than 30 years. The hospital's comprehensive care for newborns included providing care for very sick infants and extremely premature babies. The move to LHSC was a source of much concern to key stakeholders, leading scientists and specialists with much negative impact on recruitment, retention and staff morale. The vice-president, acute and ambulatory care at SJHC and the vice-president, women and children's clinical business unit at LHSC were appointed to help prepare leaders throughout all stages of the restructuring. On their agenda were the following issues: culture, safety procedures, team conflict, excessive turnover, structure, leadership orientation, among others. Where should they start; and how could they get physicians, patient care leaders and staff to think past six months, given that there are numerous issues that keep them busy on a daily, weekly and monthly basis?

Teaching Note: 8B06C10 (10 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Personal Development; Consolidations and Mergers; Leadership; Organizational Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Power and Influence

QILING RESEARCH HOSPITAL
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Kevin Leung

Product Number: 9B09C002
Publication Date: 1/20/2009
Length: 17 pages

The QiLing Research Hospital (QiLing), located in Beijing, China, headed by Dr. Tien Tzu, CEO, is in a partnership with the China Research Network (CRN). This partnership was formed in an effort to mutually benefit both parties in terms of becoming a leader in health-care quality standards and creating more effective health-care techniques. Due to the intertwined nature of this relationship, the acquisition of human capital for specific positions within the hospital requires CRN to provide the candidates. Dr. Tien Tzu is increasingly concerned that CRN's hiring conditions are hindering QiLing's potential - specifically referencing the latest batch of candidates CRN has provided to fill a key spot in the neurology department. She is aware that the right people are the key to maintaining QiLing's growth and loyalty and has analyzed how the candidate selection process, overall compensation, and job retention efforts affect the quality of the human capital pool. She is entertaining thoughts about overhauling the process for the benefit of QiLing, and is unsure how CRN will respond to any proposals she might make.

Teaching Note: 8B09C02 (4 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: China; Manpower Planning; Employee Selection; Career Development; Intercultural Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AT COCA-COLA: THE REAL THING
W. Glenn Rowe, Suhaib Riaz

Product Number: 9B08M040
Publication Date: 11/4/2008
Length: 15 pages

Muhtar Kent had just been promoted to the CEO position in Coca-Cola. He was reflecting upon the past leadership of the company, in particular the success that Coca-Cola enjoyed during Robert Goizueta's leadership. The CEOs that had followed Goizueta were not able to have as positive an impact on the stock value. When his promotion was announced, Kent mentioned that he did not have immediate plans to change any management roles but that some fine-tuning might be necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B08M40 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Performance Evaluation; Management Style; Leadership; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CALLMATE TELIPS (A) - CHOICE OF ACCOUNTING POLICY
Muntazar Bashir Ahmed

Product Number: 9B08N028
Publication Date: 12/15/2008
Revision Date: 4/23/2009
Length: 15 pages

Callmate Telips Telecom Limited (Callmate) was in the telecommunications business, an industry in which the regulatory controls were gradually being undone by the government of Pakistan as part of an economic deregulation program. Callmate was the pioneer in the payphones and prepaid calling card industries in Pakistan. The events in the case demonstrate that the company strategy, as well as aggressive share price management, could be dangerous if there were no checks on the directors. All the directors of Callmate were close family members and the audit committee consisted of three of the directors. The external audit firm that audited Callmate was A.F. Ferguson & Co. (Ferguson), an affiliate of Price Waterhouse Coopers International. As Callmate was listed on the Karachi Stock Exchange, it was required to publish its financials quarterly after these had been reviewed by Ferguson. The company had received permission during early 1995 to enter into the long distance international market. A disagreement arose between the auditors and the company on the accounting policy related to revenue recognition. This dispute, along with the company trying to manage its share price, led to a number of problems that became public knowledge as the company tried to malign the auditors. The case examines corporate governance by examining the role of the external auditor, the conduct of the board of directors and the regulator of publicly listed companies.

Teaching Note: 8B08N28 (9 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management Style; Auditing; Accounting Standards; Corporate Governance
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ANUPAM MAJUMDAR: RELATIONSHIP MANAGER
James A. Erskine, Unnat Kohli

Product Number: 9B07C032
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Length: 8 pages

Anupam Majumdar, relationship manager, and Aditya Mehta, regional head of Hindustan Neon General Insurance Limited, India, were meeting an important client. Mehta asked Majumdar to serve them tea. This really embarrassed and infuriated Majumdar. It was not the first time that Mehta, Majumdar's boss, had treated him like a peon. Majumdar was about to take a three-week leave of absence to attend his brother's wedding in New York so he was not sure if this was the right time, if ever, to do anything about the situation.

Teaching Note: 8B07C32 (4 pages)
Issues: Management Style; Interpersonal Skills; Conflict Resolution; Morale; Action Planning and Implementation; Managing Your Boss
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Conflicts Good and Bad

VERTISOFT INC.: RAISING THE BAR
Jeffrey Gandz

Product Number: 9B08C003
Publication Date: 1/7/2008
Revision Date: 9/18/2008
Length: 7 pages

New metrics have been introduced to a software technical support call center operation. These metrics have revealed a wide range of performance between employees both for time taken to answer customers' questions and the customer's perceived quality of service. The call center manager is wondering how to make use of these metrics. He is inclined to go public with them, whereas the head of human resources believes that this could be damaging to employee morale and will also make it more difficult for the company to recruit in a market experiencing labor shortages.

Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Employee Relations; Performance Measurement; Performance Metrics; Productivity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EPCOR UTILITIES INC. (A): A CRITICAL COMMUNITY CONSULTATION
Pratima Bansal, Tom Ewart

Product Number: 9B07M009
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Length: 10 pages

In January 2003, EPCOR Utilities (EPCOR) was facing great pressure from a radical community group that wanted the company out of its community of Rossdale - where EPCOR was founded in 1891 and had been operating since. The pressure had mounted to the point that EPCOR's sole shareholder, the City of Edmonton, had asked that EPCOR prepare a long-term plan for its operations in Rossdale as part of a formal review of the land use at the site. Operations of EPCOR were $3 billion. The case encourages students to think through the senior vice-president of public and government relations job of engaging (or at least placating) the community from a philosophical level to the practical details of implementation.

Industry: Utilities
Issues: Communications; Stakeholder Analysis; Conflict Resolution; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EPCOR UTILITIES INC. (B): BALANCING STAKEHOLDER INTERESTS
Pratima Bansal, Tom Ewart

Product Number: 9B07M010
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Length: 4 pages

Supplement to EPCOR Utilities Inc. A Critical Community Consultation (A), product 9B07M009.

Industry: Utilities
Issues: Corporate Responsibility; Communications; Stakeholder Analysis; Conflict Resolution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ROYAL DUTCH SHELL IN NIGERIA: OPERATING IN A FRAGILE STATE
Isaiah A. Litvak

Product Number: 9B06M021
Publication Date: 3/17/2006
Revision Date: 3/3/2009
Length: 19 pages

Stuck in a quagmire of violence and political issues in Nigeria, Royal Dutch Shell's challenge was to establish socially responsible business practices to enable the company to sustain and expand its operations in Nigeria and the Niger Delta in particular. A conflict resolution and public policy consultant was brought in to develop some constructive ideas on how best to address the problems Royal Dutch Shell faced in Nigeria. This case is intended to introduce students to some of the complex issues faced by multinational corporations in developing countries.

Teaching Note: 8B06M21 (8 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Corporate Responsibility; Corporate Governance; Conflict Resolution; Pressure Groups
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
Designing Effective Organizations

RESEARCH IN MOTION: MANAGING EXPLOSIVE GROWTH
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Daina Mazutis

Product Number: 9B08M046
Publication Date: 5/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 19 pages

Research in Motion (RIM) is a high technology firm that is experiencing explosive sales growth. David Yach, chief technology officer for software at RIM, has received notice of an impending meeting with the co-chief executive officer regarding his research and development (R&D) expenditures. Although RIM, makers of the very popular BlackBerry, spent almost $360 million in R&D in 2007, this number was low compared to its largest competitors, both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of sales (e.g. Nokia spent $8.2 billion on R&D). This is problematic as it foreshadows the question of whether or not RIM is well positioned to continue to meet expectations, deliver award-winning products and services and maintain its lead in the smartphone market. Furthermore, in the very dynamic mobile telecommunications industry, investment analysts often look to a firm's commitment to R&D as a signal that product sales growth will be sustainable. Just to maintain the status quo, Yach will have to hire 1,400 software engineers in 2008 and is considering a number of alternative paths to managing the expansion. The options include: (1) doing what they are doing now, only more of it, (2) building on their existing and satellite R&D locations, (3) growing through acquisition or (4) going global.

Teaching Note: 8B08M46 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Change Management; Globalization; Staffing; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN MULTINATIONAL BANKS IN TANZANIA
Paul W. Beamish, Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi

Product Number: 9B07C040
Publication Date: 10/30/2007
Length: 18 pages

The case examines how the best practices of two banks were organized and managed to provide financial services to a small niche of foreign customers in the mining, tourism and construction sectors in Tanzania. The two banks claimed to be similar in many ways. They both were from countries whose economies were run broadly on neo-liberal lines, in that there was little state intervention in either economy, however, differences existed with respect to how they managed their operations. The case is ideally suited to illustrate the on-going tension and different types of best practices in cross-market integration. It provides opportunities to explore the challenges faced by multinational company banks in managing global workforces, the evolution of the banking sector, and the influence of technology in shaping work in organizations.

Teaching Note: 8B07C40 (16 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: International Management; Expatriate Management; Trade Unions; Management Training; Emerging Markets; Performance Evaluation; Recruiting; Subsidiaries; Career Development; Employee Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MARIMEKKO
Alison Konrad, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06C014
Publication Date: 1/30/2007
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 19 pages

Kirsti Paakkanen has achieved a celebrity status in Finland for her enigmatic leadership of the Finnish design company Marimekko. Purchasing the company in a state of near bankruptcy in 1991, Paakkanen took several actions to restore profitability and realize growth. As of 2006, the company has sales of $64 million (of which 80 per cent are from Finland) and net profits of $8.4 million. Over the last few years, Paakkanen and her team have focused on growing international sales. Recently, the company has opened concept shops in Japan, United Arab Emirates, Iceland, Sweden and the United States owned by foreign partners. In light of the international expansion, Paakkanen is wondering if any changes to Marimekko's personnel policies and/or organization structure are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B06C14 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Succession Planning; Women in Management; Organizational Structure; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



IVEY BUILDS: THE SECOND ACT
Murray J. Bryant

Product Number: 9B06M017
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 14 pages

Ivey Builds: The Second Act examines the process and outcome of a student lead initiative to build a Habitat for Humanity house and organize an international conference on corporate social responsibility. Students will learn how to identify the importance of contributing to their communities as both students and alumni.

Teaching Note: 8B06M17 (11 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: Communications; Change Management; Team Building; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Organizational Structure as a Design Tool

ALICE SADDY: CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY
Colleen Sharen

Product Number: 9B08C016
Publication Date: 8/11/2008
Revision Date: 5/6/2014
Length: 10 pages

The human resources manager at the Alice Saddy Association (Alice Saddy), a non-profit agency in London, Ontario, Canada, supporting people with developmental disabilities who lived independently rather than in group homes, informed the executive director that some of the support workers believed that the current organizational structure caused confusion, slowed decision making and created potential risk for the people served by Alice Saddy. The executive director agreed that there were some problems related to the structure of the organization. However, the structure reflected the mission of Alice Saddy and changes were likely to be resisted by the management team for that reason. The executive director had to decide how to proceed.

Teaching Note: 8B08C16 (8 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Organizational Structure; Corporate Culture; Mission Statements; Organizational Change
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



REHABILITATION ALLIANCE HONG KONG: NEXT STEP FORWARD
Terence Tsai, Barbara Li

Product Number: 9B08M026
Publication Date: 5/30/2008
Length: 15 pages

The case describes the unique business model of Rehabilitation Alliance Hong Kong (RAHK) beginning with its strategic alliance with Dairy Farm to run 7-Eleven convenience stores, with an aim to create job opportunities for its disabled members. The two managers then try out other forms of business, but they are not commercially effective. The case explores the challenges of managing a cooperative relationship with a social conscience and achieving social enterprise sustainability through innovation.

Teaching Note: 8B08M26 (9 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: Marketing Management; Joint Ventures; Human Resources Management; Social Marketing; Strategic Alliances; Sustainable Development
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ISTOCKPHOTO.COM: TURNING COMMUNITY INTO COMMERCE
Rebecca A. Grant, Meghan Stothers

Product Number: 9B07E013
Publication Date: 1/26/2007
Revision Date: 5/28/2007
Length: 12 pages

When the founder of iStockphoto.com started the company in 2000, his objective was to share his vast collection of stock photography with graphic designers worldwide, and, in the process, help others do the same. By 2002, the organization was a respected and successful online community, but the founder and his partners now had to consider the profitability of their company. iStock was founded on community and collaboration - not commerce. Should the model change and if so, what would it take to make a significant culture change work? The case examines the culture and business opportunities for this start-up. It demonstrates the challenges of generating profit from an online community, as well as the key factors needed to build a community that can be turned into a profitable business.

Teaching Note: 8B07E13 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Organizational Change; E-Business Models; Strategy Implementation; E-Commerce
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EAGLE SERVICES ASIA
Edward D. Arnheiter

Product Number: 9B07D019
Publication Date: 10/10/2007
Length: 13 pages

This case chronicles the creation and transformation of a Singaporean joint venture, Eagle Services Asia (ESA). It describes some early start-up problems, including a forced shutdown by the Civilian Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). The resulting shakeup of the ESA management team provides a fresh start and an opportunity to reinvigorate the company using lean management principles. Managerial decisions play a key role in ESA's success, together with the discipline and training of the workforce. Students will gain an understanding of cultural difficulties associated with international joint ventures, and learn fundamental aspects of lean management including how to create and sustain a lean culture. The case also provides insight into the worldwide aircraft engine business, the engine overhaul process and cultural barriers that may arise when managing operations in foreign countries.

Teaching Note: 8B07D19 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Expatriate Management; Cultural Customs; Organizational Behaviour; Joint Ventures; Management of Change; Human Resources Management
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 17:
Organizational Culture

CRITICAL MASS: THE IT CREATIVITY CHALLENGE
Malcolm Munro, Sid L. Huff

Product Number: 9B08E010
Publication Date: 11/4/2008
Length: 10 pages

Critical Mass was a highly successful Internet marketing services firm with a blue chip client list. The rapidly changing Internet environment demanded continuous innovation and an exceptional level of creativity from the Technology Group. The company invested substantial resources in a creative-friendly physical environment and organized an array of activities intended to keep creativity bubbling. The company was ready to embark on a significant expansion in its customer base and management had decided to review and reassess these activities to determine if they were having the desired effect and if corrective changes were required.

Teaching Note: 8B08E10 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Management of Technology; Corporate Culture; Internet Marketing; Management Information Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BANKING OR CONSULTING: THAT IS THE QUESTION
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Brad Baker, Rob Levy

Product Number: 9B08D002
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 4/3/2008
Length: 12 pages

Emily Holland-Power was eager to start looking for permanent employment. Holland-Power was entering the final year of the two-year honours bachelor of arts program in business administration at the Richard Ivey School of Business at The University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario. From her summer work at Lalani, O'Hagan & John, an accounting firm in London, she had concluded that accounting was not for her. However, she had also decided that she wanted to work in a professional firm. Thus, Holland-Power wanted to learn more about opportunities in management consulting and investment banking. She decided to meet with two of her classmates who had worked in each of these occupations. After asking them about various aspects of their jobs and the firms for which they worked, Holland-Power needed to decide which career path to pursue.

Teaching Note: 8B08D02 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Job Requirements; Management of Professionals; Corporate Culture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WALKING THE WALK: PUTTING SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY INTO ACTION AT THE WHITE DOG CAFE
Diane M. Phillips, Jason Keith Phillips

Product Number: 9B07M049
Publication Date: 10/24/2007
Revision Date: 9/8/2009
Length: 10 pages

This case is designed to examine the issue of corporate social responsibility in a small firm. The key issue is how a small organization can maintain its strong social responsibility philosophy when (a) the organization is growing, (b) the environment in which the organization exists is extremely competitive, and (c) the entrepreneurial visionary who started the firm is getting ready to step down. The case describes the dilemma the owner of White Dog Cafe has regarding the transition of current management to the new management team and the development of the White Dog Cafe's social responsibility philosophy, the challenges that other socially responsible organizations have had as they have grown, and the strategies that the company has used to successfully keep its philosophies and goals at the forefront of its business operations.

Teaching Note: 8B07M49 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Ethical Issues; Corporate Culture; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Social Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A DIFFICULT HIRING DECISION AT CENTRAL BANK
Mark S. Schwartz, Hazel Copp

Product Number: 9B06C004
Publication Date: 3/1/2006
Revision Date: 9/15/2009
Length: 21 pages

The case is designed to encourage readers to select among three highly qualified candidates for an important managerial position. In doing so, readers are required to establish the set of criteria that they believe should be taken into account when making an important hiring decision for the bank. Through the process of considering and prioritizing potential criteria with respect to the three potential candidates, readers are led to evaluate and reflect upon the vision, mission and core ethical values of the bank.

Teaching Note: 8B06C04 (13 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Ethical Issues; Corporate Culture; Human Resources Management; Employee Selection
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 18:
Changing Organizations

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN? AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD’S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M069
Publication Date: 8/26/2008
Length: 11 pages

This team-building and familiarization activity can be used in the initial class or session of an international management program. It assesses one's exposure to the rest of the world's peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a classes' collective exposure to the world's people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one's business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

Teaching Note: 8B08M69 (6 pages)
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Internationalization; Team Building; Career Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COLOPLAST A/S - ORGANIZATIONAL CHALLENGES IN OFFSHORING
Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt, Bo Bernhard Nielsen

Product Number: 9B08M031
Publication Date: 7/25/2008
Length: 16 pages

Coloplast's future global manufacturing strategy was based on relocation of volume production of mature product lines to low cost countries like Hungary and China, whereas most creative and innovative activities (pilot production, ramp-up and range care) were retained in Denmark. The large scale project of offshoring, first volume production and later perhaps other activities, to Tatabanya, Hungary constituted a major shift in the operational strategy for Coloplast, which resulted in a series of organizational and managerial challenges. An important feature of the case is the surprise to the management team of how challenging it was to globalize the operations despite Coloplast's international experience operating a network of subsidiaries in more than 26 countries. The management team learned how important it is to have the structure, the organization and the mindset in place when offshoring production. Sourcing internationally is very different from selling internationally as it involves the entire organization. The learning process of the management team and the challenges they faced is unfolded in this case.

Teaching Note: 8B08M31 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Operations Management; Human Resources Management; Centralization; Management Science and Info. Systems; Management Information Systems; Organizational Behaviour; International Management; Change Management; Value Chain
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHRISTINA GOLD LEADING CHANGE AT WESTERN UNION
Alison Konrad, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B06M007
Publication Date: 1/13/2006
Revision Date: 9/17/2009
Length: 11 pages

The chief executive officer of Western Union had just begun implementing a new organization structure. Changing the structure set out a clear message of Gold's desire to change the company's mindset to a new more global culture. Already the CEO was finding that leaders in the United States were reluctant to give up control of product lines. At the regional level, she had keen leaders in place who wanted to push out the responsibility within their own regions and move towards a decentralized plan. While the CEO supported this notion in principle, she wanted to ensure that the right leaders could be placed in decentralized offices in order to execute on the six strategic pillars that she had laid out for the organization. One thing was certain - the CEO had made it clear that no revenue decreases would be forgiven amidst the change. Many considerations had arisen: What pace of change should she take? How would she deal with resistance to change? How could she ensure that the new structure would support Western Union's global expansion?

Teaching Note: 8B06M07 (13 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Organizational Change; Globalization; Organizational Design; Corporate Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BOMAN COMMUNICATIONS
John S. Haywood-Farmer, Erika Lundholm

Product Number: 9B06D016
Publication Date: 8/30/2006
Revision Date: 9/16/2009
Length: 11 pages

The owner and founder of Boman Communications, was proud of the company's business concept which utilized technology to allow flexibility and efficiency in the production of marketing materials. However, despite this strategic advantage, the company had been unable to attract more than one large client. More importantly, recent events had led the owner to believe that many of his own employees did not understand the company's business concept. If they did not understand the company's business concept, how could they sell it to customers? Bowman knew he had to address these issues soon but was unsure how to do so.

Teaching Note: 8B06D16 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Corporate Strategy; Advertising; Technology; Personnel Management; Management of Change; Marketing Communication; Management of Technology
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 19:
OB is for Life

VICTORIA HEAVY EQUIPMENT LIMITED
Tom A. Poynter, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M037
Publication Date: 4/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 12 pages

Victoria Heavy Equipment (Victoria) was a family owned and managed firm which had been led by an ambitious, entrepreneurial chief executive officer who now wanted to take a less active role in the business. Victoria had been through two reorganizations in recent years, which contributed to organizational and strategic issues which would need to be addressed by a new president.

Teaching Note: 8B08M37 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Growth Strategy; Organizational Structure; Leadership; Decentralization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ASIAN PAINTS LTD. INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE
Jean-Louis Schaan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07M056
Publication Date: 10/24/2007
Length: 13 pages

The president of Asian Paints Ltd., India's largest paint manufacturer, was wondering how he could improve the way the company's International Business division was managing its team of 120 global managers. The company had operations throughout Asia in various locations such as China, Singapore and Thailand; throughout Africa in countries such as Oman, Egypt and Mauritius; and in the Americas in Jamaica. The team of global management was critical to the success of the company's globalization endeavour, which was expected to gather momentum once the ongoing consolidation was complete. The president must decide how to structure the management of this global team.

Teaching Note: 8B07M56 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Manager; Growth; Management Systems; Organizational Structure
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIVISION AT THE HONG KONG JOCKEY CLUB
Anne Marie Francesco, Bee-Leng Chua

Product Number: 9B05C005
Publication Date: 3/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/28/2009
Length: 10 pages

The Hong Kong Jockey Club, a non-profit gaming organization and social club founded in 1884, was unusual, for through its payment of taxes and donations to the community, it had over the years funded a sizeable portion of Hong Kong government expenses and charitable work. The newly hired director of the information technology department is concerned about inefficient operation. The IT division had been an established part of the club for many years, and throughout time, had been organized and reorganized to meet the changing needs of the club. A task force is put together and an external consultant is brought in to review the division's organization. Upon completion of the review, the director of the division learns that the person heading the review plans to resign and must decide what to do.

Teaching Note: 8B05C05 (8 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Organizational Structure; Group Behaviour; Corporate Culture; Change Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA