Ivey Publishing

Global Marketing: Foreign Entry, Local Marketing & Global Management

Johansson, J.K.,5/e (United States, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2009)
Prepared By Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, PhD Candidate
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
The Global Marketing Task

MOBILE LANGUAGE LEARNING: PRAXIS MAKES PERFECT IN CHINA
Ilan Alon, Allen H. Kupetz

Product Number: 9B10M021
Publication Date: 4/21/2010
Length: 8 pages

Praxis Language is a small company in China started by three non-Chinese entrepreneurs. Originally focused on teaching Chinese to native English speakers using podcasting and other online tools, Praxis has also developed content to teach English to native Chinese speakers, which the company perceives as a much bigger market. The case describes the challenges facing the co-founder of Praxis as he navigates emerging mobile technology (hardware and software), the complexities of doing business in China, and the consequences of explosive growth.

Teaching Note: 8B10M21 (4 pages)
Industry: Educational Services
Issues: China; Entrepreneurial Marketing; Technological Change; Marketing Management; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CORRUPTION: THE INTERNATIONAL EVOLUTION OF NEW MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES
David W. Conklin

Product Number: 9B09M065
Publication Date: 10/21/2009
Length: 21 pages

Many countries have become increasingly concerned with the subject of corruption, and managers today must deal with changes in ethical norms and laws. New laws and international agreements seek to create a worldwide shift towards the reduction of corruption, and so management responsibilities are continually evolving. Both Transparency International and the World Bank provide estimates of the relative pervasiveness of corruption in different countries. Yet this subject is ambiguous and complex, creating significant challenges for managers. Both Volkswagen and Siemens have recently experienced public criticism and legal prosecution over corruption issues, some relating to internal and inter-corporate relations. Some cultures appear to accept corrupt practices as part of normal business-government relations. In China, guanxi is widely seen as a requirement for business success with the establishment of personal relationships that include an ongoing exchange of gifts and personal favours. Some managers may argue that the giving of gifts is acceptable, that bribes to expedite decisions may be necessary, and that only certain types of bribes should be seen as inappropriate corruption. However, this perspective involves the difficulty of drawing a line to guide decisions of corporate employees, and for many managers it is now necessary to implement clear corporate guidelines in regard to what they consider to be corruption. In this context, some managers may decide to avoid investing in certain countries until the culture of corruption has changed.

Teaching Note: 8B09M65 (3 pages)
Industry: Public Administration
Issues: Globalization; International Business; Business and Society
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RUTH'S CHRIS: THE HIGH STAKES OF INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Ilan Alon, Allen H. Kupetz

Product Number: 9B06A034
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 8 pages

In 2006, Ruth's Chris Steak House was fresh off of a sizzling initial public offering and was now interested in growing their business internationally. With restaurants in just four countries outside the United States, a model to identify and rank new international markets was needed. This case provides a practical example for students to take quantitative and non-quantitative variables to create a short list of potential new markets.

Teaching Note: 8B06A34 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Strategy; International Business; International Strategy; Market Entry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Theoretical Foundations

GENICON: A SURGICAL STRIKE INTO EMERGING MARKETS
Allen H. Kupetz, Adam P. Tindall, Gary Haberland

Product Number: 9B10M041
Publication Date: 5/5/2010
Revision Date: 5/3/2017
Length: 13 pages

A critical question facing a company's ability to grow its business internationally is where it should go next. One company facing that decision was GENICON, a U.S.-based firm that manufactured and distributed medical instruments for laparoscopic surgeries. Although the minimally invasive surgical market in the United States had long been the largest in the world, international markets were anticipated to grow at a much faster rate than the U.S. market for the foreseeable future. GENICON was already in over 40 international markets and was looking in particular at the rapidly emerging markets - Brazil, Russia, India and China - as potential new opportunities for growth. This case is appropriate for use in an international business course to introduce market selection strategy. It can also be used in sessions on international marketing, entrepreneurship and business strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B10M41 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; International Expansion; Entrepreneurial Marketing; Emerging Markets; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



QUEST FOODS ASIA PACIFIC AND THE CRM INITIATIVE
Allen Morrison, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B01M011
Publication Date: 4/30/2001
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 15 pages

Quest Foods International is one of the world's largest manufacturers of fragrances, flavors and textures for the food, beverage and consumer products industries. Quest Foods' regional vice-president is in the process of implementing a business process re-engineering project for the company. His current efforts focus on developing an information technology-based customer relationship management (CRM) system that he believes could give the company a sustainable competitive advantage with customers in the region and throughout the world. His ultimate goal is to bring Quest to the next phase of e-business. Despite high ambitions, his initiatives are making little headway. Internal opposition to change is significant and some key customers are growing concerned that Quest's CRM plans might miss the mark. Faced with considerable time and resource pressures, he is wondering how to set priorities and where to focus his energies.

Teaching Note: 8B01M11 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Leveraging Information Technology; Business Process Re-Engineering; Customer Relations
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SWATCH AND THE GLOBAL WATCH INDUSTRY
Allen Morrison, Cyril Bouquet

Product Number: 9A99M023
Publication Date: 5/9/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The efforts of Swatch to reposition itself in the increasingly competitive global watch industry are reviewed in this case. Extensive information on the history and structure of the global watch industry is provided and the shrinking time horizons decision makers face in formulating strategy and in responding to changes in the industry are highlighted. In particular, the case discusses how technology and globalization have changed industry dynamics and have caused companies to reassess their sources of competitive advantage. Like other companies, Swatch faces the difficult task of deciding whether to emphasize product breadth, or focus on a few key global brands. It also must decide whether to shift manufacturing away from Switzerland to lower cost countries like India.

Teaching Note: 8A99M23 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Industry Analysis; Competing with Multinationals; Globalization
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 3:
Cultural Foundations

LAUNCH OF THE FORD FIESTA DIESEL: THE WORLD'S MOST EFFICIENT CAR
Francis Spital, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B10M040
Publication Date: 5/21/2010
Length: 20 pages

The case describes the challenges faced by Ford and other automobile manufacturers in an era of declining oil reserves and volatile fuel prices. The Ford diesel decision seems to reflect classic thinking constrained by mental models that were developed in a different world. Diesels constitute over 50 per cent of automobile sales in Europe, because fuel is extremely expensive there. If fuel gets extremely expensive in the United States, one would expect diesels to become more attractive. Yet Ford seems to be stuck in the old mental model that says Americans don't like diesels. Ford can't prove in a PowerPoint presentation that there is a big market for small diesels mostly because there are few small diesels available to U.S. consumers. But that traps them into a position where they will never lead the industry or innovate outside of current market and technology conditions.

Teaching Note: 8B10M40 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; Product Strategy; New Products; Automotive; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?: AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B09M086
Publication Date: 10/19/2009
Length: 11 pages

This team-building and familiarization activity can be used in the initial class or session of an international management program. It assesses one's exposure to the rest of the world's peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a classes' collective exposure to the world's people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one's business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

Teaching Note: 8B09M86 (6 pages)
Issues: Career Development; Intercultural Relations; Team Building; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAMBRIDGE LABORATORIES: PROTEOMICS
Henry W. Lane, Dennis Shaughnessy, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B04M013
Publication Date: 4/5/2004
Revision Date: 9/22/2006
Length: 24 pages

Cambridge Laboratories is essentially a fee-for-service provider of laboratory tests. It spends less than 0.5 per cent of revenues on research and development and holds relatively few patents for a biotech company. It now has an opportunity to invest $5 million to establish a joint venture with an Australian proteomics company that operates on a drug discovery (royalty) model. The founder of this company believed that his technology could eventually result in the discovery of new drugs that would generate significant royalties. While the proteomics firm has superb technology, some of the intellectual leaders in the field on its staff, and partnerships with some impressive companies, its technology is yet unproven. Cambridge Labs is also concerned that its existing relationships with big pharmaceutical companies could be jeopardized if it begins to take an intellectual property position in proteomics. In addition, the Australian company consists primarily of PhDs in molecular biology, while Cambridge Labs is dominated by business executives whose primary focus is generating strong financial returns for shareholders. The cultural differences between an Australian science-oriented laboratory and a publicly traded American outsourcing company become apparent during the negotiation phase of the joint venture proposal. Students are asked to evaluate the joint venture and consider whether the cultural and strategic differences can be reconciled.

Teaching Note: 8B04M13 (12 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Joint Ventures; Biotechnology Management; Cross Cultural Management; Patents; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
Country Attractiveness

PHIL CHAN (A)
Paul W. Beamish, Jean-Louis Schaan

Product Number: 9A98M022
Publication Date: 11/5/1998
Revision Date: 2/1/2010
Length: 8 pages

The case deals with a scam that has been run out of Nigeria since 1990. In it, foreign companies are approached for their assistance in facilitating an international transfer of funds in order to receive a very large but unearned commission. In the case, a Hong Kong-based manager who is travelling to Nigeria is unaware that he is walking into a situation where his company is about to be cheated. The objective of the case is to raise the issue of ethics in the conduct of international business. A follow-up case (9A98M023) is available.

Teaching Note: 8A98M22 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Negotiation; Human Behaviour; Ethical Issues; Personal Values
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MALAWI BUSINESS ACTION AGAINST CORRUPTION
Oonagh Fitzgerald, James Ng'ombe

Product Number: 9B07M037
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Length: 18 pages

The founding executive director of the African Institute for Corporate Citizenship (AICC), felt very tense as he typed the last revisions to the speech he would be giving to a Llongwe merchants' association later in the week. He really enjoyed proudly describing his initiative, "Business Action Against Corruption", and the Business Code of Conduct for Combating Corruption in Malawi, to potential new partners. However, the founding executive director was beginning to feel concerned about its slow pace of adoption. He was particularly worried about how to manage the delicate relationship with the government.

Teaching Note: 8B07M37 (6 pages)
Issues: Negotiation; Ethical Issues; Corporate Responsibility; Globalization; Political Environment; Procurement
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DIVESTING THE ZAMBIAN MINING INDUSTRY
Luka Powanga

Product Number: 9B04M060
Publication Date: 10/13/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 19 pages

The Zambian government embarked on a divesture of its mining industry in 1992. However, by July of 2004, 67 per cent of the mining assets were still in government hands and the government is still looking for equity partners. This case can be used as a basis for discussing political and country risk analysis, international negotiations, feasibility study analysis, managing strategic failure, and ethical and social responsibility issues.

Teaching Note: 8B04M60 (13 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Mining; Nationalization; Political Environment; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Export Expansion

PAN BORICUA: DEVELOPING A MARKET STRATEGY FOR THE HISPANIC MARKET IN THE UNITED STATES
Victor Quiñones, Julia Sagebien, Marisol Perez-Savelli, Eva Perez, Jennifer Catinchi

Product Number: 9B09A020
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 10 pages

Two inexperienced, but strongly committed, entrepreneurs face the hassles of a new venture: exporting dough from Puerto Rico to cities in the United States with large numbers of Puerto Rican immigrants who are longing nostalgically for their beloved pan sobao (bread made with vegetable shortening). With thousands of Puerto Ricans living in and/or moving to the United States and after several incidents of fraud by partners of the entrepreneurs, they are thinking about how to take advantage of what seems to be an opportunity for doing business outside their Caribbean home. These entrepreneurs are confronting several challenges: 1) Preparing to detect opportunities and to get personally involved in a demanding export business 2) Differentiating and positioning the brand in a crowded market. Is a nostalgic feeling enough of a motivator to engage customers with the brand? 3) Deciding whether institution is a substitute for market data and feasibility determination.

Teaching Note: 8B09A20 (7 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Hispanic; Minority; Market Adaptation; New Markets
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EXPORTING TO GHANA
David J. Sharp, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05B006
Publication Date: 1/31/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 4 pages

A loan assessment officer at Export Development Canada is evaluating a proposed deal involving the export of refurbished machines used in the forestry industry. He must decide whether Export Development Corporation should extend loans to a foreign firm that is interested in purchasing from a Canadian supplier. Issues include international business risk and the role of an export development agency in facilitating a country's exports.

Teaching Note: 8B05B06 (4 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Uncertainty; Risk Analysis; Forestry; Exports
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHINESE FIREWORKS INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish, Ruihua Jiang

Product Number: 9A99M031
Publication Date: 10/28/1999
Revision Date: 1/18/2010
Length: 12 pages

The Chinese fireworks industry thrived after China adopted the open door policy in the late 1970s, and grew to make up 90 per cent of the world's fireworks export sales. However, starting from the mid-1990s, safety concerns led governments both in China and abroad to set up stricter regulations. At the same time, there was rapid growth in the number of small family-run fireworks workshops, whose relentless price-cutting drove down profit margins. Students are asked to undertake an industry analysis, estimate the industry attractiveness, and propose possible ways to improve the industry attractiveness from an individual investor's point of view. Jerry Yu is an American-born Chinese in New York who has been invited to buy a fireworks factory in Liuyang, Hunan.

Teaching Note: 8A99M31 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Exports; Market Analysis; International Marketing; Industry Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Licensing, Strategic Alliances, FDI

INDIA'S NEGOTIATIONS CONCERNING THE DABHOL POWER COMPANY 2001-2005
David W. Conklin, Danielle Cadieux

Product Number: 9B06M074
Publication Date: 8/22/2006
Revision Date: 9/21/2009
Length: 2 pages

In 2001, the Dabhol Power Company (DPC) ceased operations following several years of bitter acrimony between the state of Maharashtra and the foreign owners. GE and Bechtel each owned 10 per cent of the equity, the Maharashtra State Energy Board (MSEB) owned 15 per cent and Enron owned 65 per cent. The Overseas Private Insurance Corporation (OPIC), a U.S. government agency, had lent $138 million and also had provided insurance against political risk for some of the other 19 foreign lenders. The lengthy and convoluted experiences of the Enron Dabhol power project are described in detail in Andrew Inkpen's case Enron and the Dabhol Power Company, Thunderbird Case # A07020008. The purpose of India's Negotiations Concerning the Dabhol Power Company 2001-2005 is to discuss the negotiation between the various foreign investors and the government of India in an attempt to reactivate the Dabhol project. Ultimately, in 2005 a settlement was negotiated. This case adds a further dimension to the case by Andrew Inkpen, and it can be taught most effectively as a sequel to that case.

Teaching Note: 8B06M74 (3 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: International Business; Government and Business; Globalization
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BOWATER'S ACQUISITION OF ALLIANCE FOREST PRODUCTS: CONSOLIDATION IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY
David W. Conklin, Danielle Cadieux

Product Number: 9B02M046
Publication Date: 2/6/2003
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 23 pages

The takeover of Alliance Forest Products by United States-based Bowater Inc. resulted in job loss for members of the Canadian board of directors and head office staff as well as loss of corporation shares from the Toronto Stock Exchange. Bowater's strategy to reduce costs and enhance productivity may result in additional Canadian job losses in the future. Corporations in the forest products industry are merging or acquiring companies to stay competitive. These mergers are a public policy concern for both Canada and the United States. The frequency and the size of the mergers raise concerns whether antitrust and competition policies should be used to restrain the price increases that the consolidation might entail.

Teaching Note: 8B02M46 (13 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Globalization; International Business; Business Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NES CHINA: BUSINESS ETHICS (A)
Joerg Dietz, Xin Zhang

Product Number: 9B01C029
Publication Date: 10/18/2001
Revision Date: 12/16/2009
Length: 9 pages

NES is one of Germany's largest industrial manufacturing groups. The company wants to set up a holding company to facilitate its manufacturing activities in China. They have authorized representatives in their Beijing office to draw up the holding company application and to negotiate with the Chinese government for terms of this agreement. In order to maximize their chances of having their application accepted, the NES team in Beijing hires a government affairs coordinator who is a native Chinese and whose professional background has familiarized her with Chinese ways of doing business. NES's government affairs coordinator finds herself in a difficult position when she proposes that gifts should be given to government officials in order to establish a working relationship that will better NES's chance of having its application approved. This method of doing business is quite common in China. The other members of the NES team are shocked at what would be considered bribery and a criminal offence in their country. The coordinator must find a practical way to bridge the gap between working within accepted business practices in China and respecting her employers' code of business ethics. The complementary (B) case (9B01C030) gives a brief summary of the eventual solution to this problem.

Teaching Note: 8B01C29 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Ethical Issues; Cross Cultural Management; Management Behaviour; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Understanding Local Customers

GPS-TO-GO TAKES ON GARMIN
Donald A. Pillittere

Product Number: 9B09A027
Publication Date: 1/25/2010
Length: 9 pages

GPS-to-GO is a successful company that has a wealth of brilliant researchers and scientists who have created advanced global positioning systems (GPSs) for complex air-traffic control and logistics systems. Now, the vision of one of the up and coming managers is to use GPS-to-GO's knowledge to dominate the consumer market with premium-priced and feature-rich GPS units. Even though GPS-to-GO is far ahead in terms of GPS technology, the consumer market demands low-cost units and yearly follow-on products, which requires drastically different skills than GPS-to-GO's typical five- to 10-year cost-plus government projects. One of the managers is tasked with how to meet the cost target and market window for the new product, while working with the same engineering group that caused the unit manufacturing problem and launch delays in the first place. The key issues concern 1) engineering-centric companies and their culture, business strategies and processes for managing new product development 2) the implications these strategies and processes have on addressing the needs of customers, shareholders and employees in a totally new market segment 3) the role managers can play in making critical decisions with a keen eye on roadblocks to success, such as culture, inadequate skills and overly optimistic and myopic visionaries. The case includes an Excel spreadsheet with break-even scenarios that professors can use to complement the teaching note. The case is intended for courses in managing new product commercialization, managing technology and innovation, strategic thinking, operations management and leadership.

Teaching Note: 8B09A27 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Costs; Break-Even Analysis; Management Behaviour; Manufacturing Strategy; Corporate Culture; New Product Development; Change Management; Management Style
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KIDS MARKET CONSULTING
Paul W. Beamish, Stephanie Taylor, Oleksiy Vynogradov

Product Number: 9B04M065
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 8 pages

The founder of Kids Market Consulting, a market research firm dedicated to the kids, tweens and teens segment, was faced with increasing competition and slowing revenue, and was exploring a variety of possibilities for the future strategic direction of the business. In particular, she had to formulate the best plan for protecting the niche market and decide how aggressively to pursue expansion. In addition, there was the existing relationship with her business partner, and Kids Market Consulting was part of his group of marketing firms. Any changes the founder chose had to respect this relationship and she was therefore restricted to a limited number of options. The over-arching corporate objective for the company was to defend the market from larger businesses who were trying to increase their share of the market research industry.

Teaching Note: 8B04M65 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Strategy Development; Strategic Planning; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Local Marketing in Mature Markets

MICROSOFT AND THE XBOX 360 RING OF DEATH
Gloria Barczak, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B10A005
Publication Date: 4/19/2010
Length: 16 pages

The case chronicles Microsoft's difficulties with the Xbox 360 home video game console. Microsoft launched the Xbox 360 one year ahead of the competition, and used its advantage to gain a solid lead in the market for next generation video game consoles. Despite early technical problems, users were willing to accept a certain degree of unreliability because the Xbox 360 was the only high definition console on the market. Microsoft also had valuable game franchises. To play any of the exclusive video game content available for the Xbox 360, users had no choice but to buy a system. However, Microsoft's early lead quickly disappeared after Nintendo's Wii become all the rage, especially among families and casual gamers. Sony also began to catch up to its Redmond rival following media reports that the PlayStation 3 was far more reliable. When Toshiba abandoned HD-DVD, a high definition movie format supported by Microsoft, Sony's Blu-Ray players (including the PlayStation3) became the de facto standard. Finally, Sony began to release its own exclusive games and began to quickly close the gap between its online service and Microsoft's Xbox Live. Microsoft's inability to resolve the quality problems that had plagued the Xbox 360 since its launch caused a loss of goodwill among its core customers. By extending the console's warranty to an unprecedented three years, Microsoft was able to allay the fears of some buyers. Nevertheless, by the end of the case, Microsoft has fallen to second place in overall console sales and third place in monthly sales. Moreover, it was unable to reverse the huge losses that Microsoft's gaming division had incurred every year since the launch of the original Xbox. The case may be used with The Launch of the Sony PlayStation 3 (Ivey case 9B07A014) and A Note on Computer Games (Ivey case 9B07A013).

Teaching Note: 8B10A05 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Production Management/Control; Market Strategy; Quality Control; Product Design/Development; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



A FAMILY OF BRAND CANNIBALS? THE CASE OF OMNICOM AND INTERBRAND
Matthew Thomson, Jared Breski

Product Number: 9B10A009
Publication Date: 4/19/2010
Length: 7 pages

The differences between specialized marketing agencies become blurred as clients increasingly expect these agencies to provide a more comprehensive portfolio of service offerings. The case thrusts students into the roles of three different marketing leaders: the chief executive officer (CEO) of Interbrand (the world's leading brand consultancy), the CEO of DDB Worldwide (the world's largest advertising agency) and the CEO of Omnicom (the world's largest media conglomerate and the parent company of both Interbrand and DDB Worldwide). These leaders are about to meet to discuss the future of the marketing industry, focusing specifically on how the industry's future direction will affect Omnicom's strategic plans. The two agency CEOs will need to defend their own company's value proposition. Will their respective arguments be enough to escape elimination on the Omnicom chopping block?

Teaching Note: 8B10A09 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Advertising versus branding; communications; public relations; consumer-packaged goods; strategic consulting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEN & JERRY'S - JAPAN
James M. Hagen

Product Number: 9A99A037
Publication Date: 4/13/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 17 pages

The CEO of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc. needed to give sales and profits a serious boost; despite the company's excellent brand equity, it was losing market share and struggling to make a profit. The company's product was on store shelves in all U.S. states, but efforts to enter foreign markets had only been haphazard with non-U.S. sales accounting for just three per cent of total sales. The CEO needed to focus serious attention on entering the world's second largest ice cream market, Japan. An objective of Ben & Jerry's was to use the excess manufacturing capacity it had in the U.S., and it found that exporting ice cream from Vermont to Japan was feasible from a logistics and cost perspective. The company identified two leading partnering options. One was to give a Japanese convenience store chain exclusive rights to the product for a limited time. The other was to give long-term rights for all sales of the product in Japan to a Japanese-American who would build the brand. For the company to enter Japan in time for the upcoming summer season, it would have to be through one of these two partnering arrangements.

Teaching Note: 8A99A37 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Market Entry; International Marketing; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Local Marketing in New Growth Markets

DABUR INDIA LTD. - GLOBALIZATION
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A017
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Length: 18 pages

Dabur, an Indian consumer package goods company, had established a strong brand equity in India by offering, for decades, a vast portfolio of over-the-counter products. In seeking international expansion in 1987, it first took the export route. It also followed the customer, targeting the Indian diaspora in the Middle East, Africa and the United States, already familiar with the brand. By 2006, Dabur had set up five manufacturing facilities outside India. In June 2007, Dabur had to make, in countries such as Nigeria for example, some critical choices. It had to choose between sticking to the diaspora, a market it understood best, and targeting the mainstream population. It had to choose its growth options between categories like personal care, in which it had built up competencies, and categories such as oral care and home care, which were the new engines of growth in its international markets but in which the company had no track record, either on the home front or overseas. The case study helps students deal with issues of growth and consolidation in a global market from the perspective of the company's chief executive officer and the head of its international operations.

Teaching Note: 8B09A17 (4 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Growth Strategy; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ITC IN RURAL INDIA
Sushil Vachani

Product Number: 9B09M036
Publication Date: 6/10/2009
Length: 17 pages

The case describes the Indian business environment and the enormous opportunities and challenges presented by rural markets as they expand rapidly. It focuses on the innovative business model deployed by ITC to engage the rural population in multiple ways and create a platform for procuring commodities and providing a range of goods and services to the bottom of the pyramid in rural India. It gives students the opportunity to evaluate the future of ITC's rural business.

Teaching Note: 8B09M36 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Developing Countries; Information Technology; Innovation; Competitive Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ELI LILLY IN INDIA: RETHINKING THE JOINT VENTURE STRATEGY
Charles Dhanaraj, Paul W. Beamish, Nikhil Celly

Product Number: 9B04M016
Publication Date: 5/14/2004
Revision Date: 3/13/2017
Length: 18 pages

Eli Lilly and Company is a leading U.S. pharmaceutical company. The new president of intercontinental operations is re-evaluating all of the company's divisions, including the joint venture with Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited, one of India's largest pharmaceutical companies. This joint venture has run smoothly for a number of years despite their differences in focus, but recently Ranbaxy was experiencing cash flow difficulties due to its network of international sales. In addition, the Indian government was changing regulations for businesses in India, and joining the World Trade Organization would have an effect on India's chemical and drug regulations. The president must determine if this international joint venture still fits Eli Lilly's strategic objectives.

Teaching Note: 8B04M16 (20 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Joint Ventures; Emerging Markets; International Management; Strategic Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Local Marketing in Emerging Markets

ASIMCO TECHNOLOGIES: 2005
Xi (Lucy) Liu, Taehoo Kim, Liang Liu, Guangyu Nie, Wanhong Shao, Xiaotian Xie

Product Number: 9B10A001
Publication Date: 5/5/2010
Length: 15 pages

In April 2005, the chairman of ASIMCO Technologies, a company headquartered in China and supplying automotive components to both Chinese and global clients, was trying to decide on his company's reaction to the Chinese government's latest regulations on auto emissions. Guo-san (National Standards III) was to take effect on August 1, 2008. By that date, automakers would not be allowed to supply the Chinese market with non-Guo-san-compliant products. ASIMCO's major diesel engine customers had already sent requests for upgraded engine components to ASIMCO as well as other suppliers. While three technologies seemed to provide the Chinese market with a solution, divergent views existed among the management team as to where ASIMCO should focus to enhance the fuel systems that it supplied. The case can be used in an international marketing course (in sessions on product strategy in developing market or customer relations in industrial marketing).

Teaching Note: 8B10A01 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Product Strategy; Automotive; Customer Relations; Tsinghua/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAKING WAVES IN RURAL KENYA
Sebastian Herrmann, Glenn Brophey, Denyse Lafrance-Horning

Product Number: 9B09A015
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 10 pages

The developers of a simple, inexpensive, locally produced rain water harvesting system tackle the social marketing issues in the undeveloped market of rural Kenya. The benefits of the product are obvious but the poverty levels and entrenched traditions create significant and unique marketing challenges.

Teaching Note: 8B09A15 (7 pages)
Industry: Social Advocacy Organizations
Issues: New Products; International Marketing; Market Entry; Marketing Communication; Marketing Channels; Marketing without Advertising; International Management; Decision Making
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COLA WARS IN CHINA: THE FUTURE IS HERE
Niraj Dawar, Nancy Dai

Product Number: 9B03A006
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 18 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case won the Emerging Chinese Global Competitors, 2003 EFMD Case Writing Competition. The Wahaha Hangzhou Group Co. Ltd. is one of China's largest soft-drink producers. One of the company's products, Future Cola, was launched a few years ago to compete with Coca Cola and PepsiCo and has made significant progress in the soft-drink markets that were developed by these cola giants. The issue now is to maintain the momentum of growth in the face of major competition from the giant multinationals, and to achieve its goal of dominant market share.

Teaching Note: 8B03A06 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Market Strategy; Competition; Brand Management; Emerging Markets
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 11:
Global Marketing Strategy

FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK: THE MARKETING AND BRANDING CHALLENGES OF A START-UP
Gavin Chen, Derrick Deslandes

Product Number: 9B05A012
Publication Date: 6/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 17 pages

FirstCaribbean International Bank was the new banking entity created from the combination of the Caribbean operations of two foreign banks, Barclays Bank plc of the United Kingdom and headquarters in London, England and CIBC - formally the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce - of Canada and headquartered in Toronto, Ontario. A marketing team was formed with the specific responsibility of developing the marketing function and the brand strategy, as well as guiding the branding process of the new entity. The head of the marketing team has a number of concerns: Would geography, history and commercial practices support or mitigate against a single, centralized marketing strategy for the entire region, what should the new brand be and how should it be articulated, should the new brand reflect one or both of the heritage banks or should the new brand break with the past and reflect a totally new identity, and how quickly could the new brand be rolled out? This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the five additional Cross-Enterprise cases that deal with various functional issues associated with the eventual merger: Human Resources - Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean, product 9B04C053; Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032; General Management - CIBC-Barclays: Should Their Caribbean Operations Be Merged?, product 9B04M067; Accounting and Finance - CIBC-Barclays: Accounting For Their Merger, product 9B04B022; FirstCaribbean International Bank: The Marketing and Branding Challenges for a Start-up, product 9B05A012; and technical note - Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B05A12 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Brand Management; Brand Positioning; Market Strategy; Marketing Planning; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KTM - READY TO RACE
Charlene Zietsma, Rob Wong

Product Number: 9B05M036
Publication Date: 5/30/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 26 pages

KTM is a successful European off-road motorcycle manufacturer with sales in 72 countries. KTM has been experiencing impressive growth in both its top and bottom lines over the past several years, but it is facing significant growth pressure from its venture capitalist investor. The chief financial officer must determine how the company could achieve its growth objectives. Options include geographic expansion (increase U.S. emphasis, or expansion to new European Union countries) or product expansion. Implementation options include a merger, acquisition or internal growth. Several opportunities for geographic expansion and product diversification exist, and implementation options include make, buy or ally decisions.

Teaching Note: 8B05M36 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Strategy; New Products; International Business; Diversification
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Global Products and Services

LAUNCH OF THE FORD FIESTA DIESEL: THE WORLD'S MOST EFFICIENT CAR
Francis Spital, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B10M040
Publication Date: 5/21/2010
Length: 20 pages

The case describes the challenges faced by Ford and other automobile manufacturers in an era of declining oil reserves and volatile fuel prices. The Ford diesel decision seems to reflect classic thinking constrained by mental models that were developed in a different world. Diesels constitute over 50 per cent of automobile sales in Europe, because fuel is extremely expensive there. If fuel gets extremely expensive in the United States, one would expect diesels to become more attractive. Yet Ford seems to be stuck in the old mental model that says Americans don't like diesels. Ford can't prove in a PowerPoint presentation that there is a big market for small diesels mostly because there are few small diesels available to U.S. consumers. But that traps them into a position where they will never lead the industry or innovate outside of current market and technology conditions.

Teaching Note: 8B10M40 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; Product Strategy; New Products; Automotive; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOYOTA: DRIVING THE MAINSTREAM MARKET TO PURCHASE HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES
Jeff Saperstein, Jennifer Nelson

Product Number: 9B04A003
Publication Date: 1/16/2004
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 23 pages

Toyota is a large, international automobile manufacturer headquartered in Japan, with plans to become the largest worldwide automaker, striving for 15 per cent of global sales. Toyota is committing itself to be the leader of the hybrid-electric automotive industry, and is relying on changes in the industry and customer perceptions to bring its plan to fruition. Toyota's challenge is to develop consumer attitude and purchase intent, from an early adopter, niche market model into universal mainstream acceptance.

Teaching Note: 8B04A03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Product Design/Development; Multinational; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Global Branding

BEST BUY INC. - DUAL BRANDING IN CHINA
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A016
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Revision Date: 5/11/2010
Length: 17 pages

A month after Best Buy Inc. (Best Buy), the largest retailer of consumer electronics in the United States, acquired Five Star, the third largest retailer of appliances and consumer electronics in China in May 2006, the management of Best Buy is weighing in on a branding option. Should Five Star lose its identity and be marketed as Best Buy? Or should Best Buy retain the Five Star brand and let the two brands compete with each other in the Chinese market? The option has a sense of déjà vu because, when it first stepped out of its home turf in January of 2002 by acquiring Future Shop, the largest consumer electronics retailer in Canada, Best Buy was facing a similar dilemma. The company had decided, at the time, in favour of dual brand strategy. It had worked. There was no evidence of cannibalization, the single largest risk in dual branding. Best Buy and Future Shop had both grown together as independent brands in Canada. But, does dual brand strategy work in the vastly different retail environment of China?

Teaching Note: 8B09A16 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Brand Management; Retailing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DO IT SHOW: A NEW MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE IN KOREA
Youngchan Kim, Changjo Yoo

Product Number: 9B08A012
Publication Date: 8/28/2008
Revision Date: 5/12/2010
Length: 18 pages

This case presents points of contention and issues in the brand launch of a new telecommunication service of KTF, one of Korea's mobile telecommunication companies. As the second-place player in the 2G service market, which offered voice and text-messaging services, KTF decided to be the number one player in the new 3G service market, which offered stable video communication and high-speed data transmission as well as voice and text-messaging services. To do so, KTF developed a new brand, called SHOW, and implemented various integrated marketing communication (IMC) strategies to attract customers. After only four months since its launch, KTF had successfully attracted more than one million members. Several critical points for successfully launching a new brand in the mobile telecommunication service can be determined from this case. The introduction highlights the success of KTF's new brand launch strategy. Then the mobile telecommunication service market situation in South Korea is summarized. The next section provides a brief explanation of KTF and its new brand launch strategy in the 3G service market, covering topics from the market survey for 3G service to the brand-building processes. This is followed by an examination of how KTF used marketing-integrated communication for its new SHOW 3G service brand. Finally, the competitor's reaction to KTF's successful brand launch is summarized.

Teaching Note: 8B08A12 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Mobile Communication Industry; Brands; New Brand Launching Strategy; Integrated Marketing Strategy; Ivey/Yonsei
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



JUST US! COFFEE ROASTERS
Julia Sagebien, Scott Skinner, Monica Weshler

Product Number: 9B06A027
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Length: 22 pages

The founders of Just Us! Coffee Cooperative (Just Us!) are involved in a strategic planning process. The growing demand and acceptance of fair trade products is good news for the industry and opens many opportunities for Just Us!, but there are also risks. Just Us! will likely face increased market competition from major U.S. retail coffee brands and Canadian supermarket brands, pressure on margins as more brands crowd the shelves, and more competition for access to top quality sources of supply. Just Us! will have to make strategic choices and will have to develop a clear and focused marketing plan.

Teaching Note: 8B06A27 (7 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Social Venturing; Fair Trade; Corporate Social Responsibility; Brand Management; Social Entrepreneurship; Co-operatives; International Trade; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Global Pricing

SASKTEL
Elizabeth M.A. Grasby, Marsha Watson

Product Number: 9B09A009
Publication Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 9 pages

The executive committee of SaskTel had recently approved a proposal to launch its LifeState health monitoring system to the Canadian marketplace. The company's senior director of marketing must develop a marketing plan, including distribution and promotion, for the proposed product launch in six months' time. She will have to make decisions quickly in order to present a proposal to the executive committee within two weeks.

Teaching Note: 8B09A09 (13 pages)
Issues: Marketing Communication; Marketing Channels; Market Analysis; Market Strategy
Difficulty: 1 - Introductory



CHERRIES WITH CHARM: TURKEY'S ALARA AGRI
Michael R. Pearce, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B09A019
Publication Date: 6/25/2009
Revision Date: 7/15/2009
Length: 20 pages

The chief executive officer (CEO) and owner of Alara Agri, a major Turkish cherry and fig producer, wants to convince retailers in Belgium and Germany (and, later, other parts of Europe) to change cherries from a bulk product to a higher-end luxury product packaged in small carry bags. The move from bulk to small packages has been highly successful in the United Kingdom where retailers reduced waste and increased margins. The German and Belgian retailers are resisting the change, claiming greater price sensitivity in their consumer base. The CEO thinks he needs a detailed test marketing plan to offer to selected retailers.

Teaching Note: 8B09A19 (13 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Consumer Marketing; Agriculture; Test Marketing; Market Analysis; International Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CARVEL ICE CREAM - DEVELOPING THE BEIJING MARKET
Mark B. Vandenbosch, Tom Gleave

Product Number: 9A99A017
Publication Date: 8/5/1999
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 12 pages

The manager of business development for Carvel Asia Limited is trying to determine how best to increase ice cream cake sales in Beijing. In doing so, he needs to develop a complete marketing program which includes decisions about product offerings, pricing, placement (distribution) and promotion - the 4 Ps. Carvel Asia was a 50-50 joint venture between Carvel (USA) and China's Ministry of Agriculture.

Teaching Note: 8A99A17 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Pricing Strategy; Product Concept; Marketing Communication; Distribution
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 15:
Global Distribution

MARKET STRETCH
Gavin Price, Margaret Sutherland

Product Number: 9B09M046
Publication Date: 6/25/2009
Length: 11 pages

Bio-Oil is a multi-purpose skin care product that has gone from being sold only in South Africa to being the No. 1 scar treatment product in 16 of the 17 countries in which it is distributed. Retail sales have jumped from R3 million per annum to R1 billion from 2000 to 2008. Justin and David Letschert made key decisions to eliminate all of the other 119 products that were being manufactured by the company that they took over in 2000, and focused on the mainstay product of Bio-Oil. Union-Swiss accomplished its successful sales through the use of a hybrid distribution model that compelled its distributors in each country to communicate and share knowledge with each other. Union-Swiss also ensured that it remained focused on building the brand through limiting its activities in the value chain to that of marketing. It did this to such an extent that it created a separate entity to run the distribution of Bio-Oil in South Africa.

Teaching Note: 8B09M46 (8 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Market Entry; International Business; Supply Chain Management; Strategic Positioning; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



LOUIS VUITTON IN INDIA
Shih-Fen Chen, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B08A020
Publication Date: 12/23/2008
Length: 16 pages

The case portrays a subtle situation in international marketing -- the marketing of a high-end brand into a low-income nation, or the expansion of Louis Vuitton into India. This luxury good marketer faced practical problems in India, such as the challenge of identifying potential customers, the lack of media to build its brand, and the absence of high streets to open stores. In Europe and the U.S., luxury goods are often sold through company-owned stores that cluster in a particular area of the city (i.e., luxury retail cluster). After opening a store each in New Delhi and Mumbai inside two luxury hotels, Louis Vuitton teamed up with other western brands to develop a shopping mall. The case is designed to explore the possibility of using a luxury mall as a replacement of luxury retail clusters.

Teaching Note: 8B08A20 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Marketing; Store Formats; Retail Marketing; Marketing Channels
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SYNNEX INTERNATIONAL: TRANSFORMING DISTRIBUTION OF HIGH-TECH PRODUCTS
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B08A019
Publication Date: 12/1/2008
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 22 pages

The case describes how Synnex Technology International Corporation (Synnex) in Taiwan transformed itself from a local distributor of electronic components into a global logistic conglomerate of communication and information products between 1985 and 2007. The case analyzes the channel structure of electronic product distribution and explains how Synnex introduced innovative practices to transform its operation. The case is designed for MBA students to grasp some fundamental issues related to distribution channel design and supply chain management in a marketing or logistic management course.

Teaching Note: 8B08A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Logistics; Distribution Channels; Supply Chain Management; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Global Advertising

THE ULTIMATE FIGHTING CHAMPIONSHIPS (UFC): THE EVOLUTION OF A SPORT
Matthew Thomson, Jesse Baker

Product Number: 9B10A012
Publication Date: 5/18/2010
Revision Date: 6/16/2010
Length: 16 pages

This case looks at the Ultimate Fighting Championships (UFC) and its parent company, Zuffa LLC (Zuffa), through the role of the recently hired chief marketing officer (CMO). As the CMO of the largest organization in the world's fastest growing sport, mixed martial arts, he faces many decisions about the future of the organization. The CMO must determine the best way to both manage the organization's ambitious international expansion initiatives and protect the UFC brand in new markets, while also preserving the experience for the league's core North American fan base. The CMO must evaluate the company's sponsorship relationships and develop a strategy to cope with increasing competition in both domestic and international markets.

Teaching Note: 8B10A12 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Brand Meanings; Equity; International Expansion; Celebrity CEO; Labour Relations
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEO BURNETT COMPANY LTD.: VIRTUAL TEAM MANAGEMENT
Joerg Dietz, Fernando Olivera, Elizabeth O'Neil

Product Number: 9B03M052
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 16 pages

Leo Burnett Company Ltd. is a global advertising agency. The company is working with one of its largest clients to launch a new line of hair care products into the Canadian and Taiwanese test markets in preparation for a global rollout. Normally, once a brand has been launched, it is customary for the global brand centre to turn over the responsibility for the brand and future campaigns to the local market offices. In this case, however, the brand launch was not successful. Team communications and the team dynamics have broken down in recent months and the relationships are strained. Further complicating matters are a number of client and agency staffing changes that could jeopardize the stability of the team and the agency/client relationship. The global account director must decide whether she should proceed with the expected decision to modify the global team structure to give one of the teams more autonomy, or whether she should maintain greater centralized control over the team. She must recommend how to move forward with the brand and determine what changes in team structure or management are necessary.

Teaching Note: 8B03M52 (14 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 17:
Global Promotion, E-Commerce, and Personal Selling

EXPATICA.COM: 10 YEARS OF A DUTCH BORN-GLOBAL
Christopher Williams

Product Number: 9B10M029
Publication Date: 5/5/2010
Length: 12 pages

In December 2009, the management team at Expatica.com was undertaking a strategic review of the progress of the company and of the future opportunities for growth. The management team needed to take stock: the external environment was rapidly changing and threats from competitors were on the rise. Expatica.com was founded 10 years earlier to provide English language information and news to the expatriate community in Europe, delivering its services primarily over the Internet. Over the course of the 10 years, Expatica.com had experienced significant challenges in its organization and environment. The central issue was how to make its core business effective across multiple markets. The company had made tremendous progress over the decade but now needed to re-evaluate its position and identify new opportunities for growth. The management team realized that it needed to make a number of critical decisions, especially in the areas of internationalization and product development. 1) How should Expatica.com now internationalize into new markets? Which markets should it consider? How should it select new markets? Should it pull out of any existing markets? 2) What product development strategy should it adopt? What line extensions should it make to existing products? What kinds of more radical innovation could be appropriate? Should it phase out any existing products? 3) What else should the company do to drive success?

Teaching Note: 8B10M29 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Product Development; Media; Internet; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MEDICAL EQUIPMENT INC. IN SAUDI ARABIA
Joerg Dietz, Ankur Grover, Laura Guerrero

Product Number: 9B07C042
Publication Date: 3/17/2008
Revision Date: 3/24/2009
Length: 14 pages

A recently hired U.S.-trained sales account manager at Medical Equipment Inc. (Medical Equipment) returned to his office after meeting with the head of the cardiology department at a specialist hospital and research center in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He had worked very hard to secure his first sale of US$725,000 for healthcare equipment, but was disheartened when the head of cardiology told him that the hospital's purchasing director intended to give the order to Medical Equipment's main competitor. The competition's sales representative and the purchasing director had known each other for 10 years and the head cardiologist implied that there might be side payments involved. The sales account manager knew Medical Equipment's product was superior and wondered how he could secure the order without having a history with the purchasing director or without engaging in practices he found ethically questionable.

Teaching Note: 8B07C42 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Sales Management; International Business; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WAVERIDER COMMUNICATIONS INC.: THE SPARTA DEAL
Donald W. Barclay, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01A001
Publication Date: 5/18/2001
Revision Date: 12/3/2009
Length: 12 pages

The vice-president international of WaveRider Communications, a developer of wireless information technology, was working out a deal for a Spanish partner to sell US$21 million of WaveRider's products into the Spanish market over the next two years. After months of negotiation, a memorandum of understanding was signed and he was looking forward to the final agreement within the next 30 days and finalizing the ground-level support that needed to be in place to facilitate the working relationship between the two companies. He hired a consultant who worked in Spain for a number of years to be the company's contact in Spain. To move towards the signing of the final agreement, the vice-president needed to decide on how best to manage and work with this company over the next few months and over the longer term.

Teaching Note: 8B01A01 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Action Planning and Implementation; Sales Management; International Business; Control Systems
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 18:
Organizing for Global Marketing

ARE WE READY FOR AN AUTOMOTIVE PLANT?
Yi-Chia Wu, Joo Y. Jung

Product Number: 9B09D014
Publication Date: 2/5/2010
Length: 15 pages

The city of McAllen, Texas and its partners have worked on attracting an automotive assembly plant to the region for over fifteen years. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provision, this region enjoys the advantages offered by both sides of the Mexican-U.S. border. Even during the economic downturn of 2007 to 2008, McAllen experienced a lower unemployment rate compared to other cities in the United States. One of the primary reasons was its close proximity and economic ties to Mexico. Lower labour cost, a right-to-work state and proximity to Mexico were some of this region's strengths, while a high illiteracy rate, limited numbers of automotive suppliers and small workforce were among its weaknesses. Based on publicly available data and aggregate score evaluation methods, McAllen is compared to other potential sites. The case addresses a wide range of issue regarding site selection factors within the automotive industry. Teaching objectives include: 1) to examine essential factors for site location of different industries, including the automotive industry 2) to evaluate the potential sites based on a quantitative method, such as the relative aggregate score 3) to understand other qualitative factors that can affect the decision. The case is suitable for courses and workshops concerning operations management, supply chain management, production management, project management, decision science and management science. Exhibits can be omitted for graduate and executive levels, requiring the students to research and come up with their own factors.

Teaching Note: 8B09D14 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Automotive; Site Selection; Global Strategy; Decision Making
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MAJESTICA HOTEL IN SHANGHAI?
Paul W. Beamish, Jane W. Lu

Product Number: 9B05M035
Publication Date: 4/11/2005
Revision Date: 9/21/2011
Length: 14 pages

Majestica Hotels Inc., a leading European operator of luxury hotels, was trying to reach an agreement with Commercial Properties of Shanghai regarding the management contract for a new hotel in Shanghai. A series of issues require resolution for the deal to proceed, including length of contract term, name, staffing and many other control issues. Majestica was reluctant to make further concessions for fear that doing so might jeopardize its service culture, arguably the key success factor in this industry. At issue was whether Majestica should adopt a contingency approach and relax its operating philosophy, or stick to its principles, even if it meant not entering a lucrative market.

Teaching Note: 8B05M35 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Market Entry; Negotiation; Control Systems; Corporate Culture
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STELLA ARTOIS IN THE U.K.
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B01A017
Publication Date: 12/6/2001
Revision Date: 12/4/2009
Length: 15 pages

Stella Artois, Interbrew company's flagship brand of beer, has experienced phenomenal success on the international market. The United Kingdom market has played a critical role in that success, and Interbrew needs to assess the reasons for this. Interbrew's managing director and its chief marketing officer are meeting to have a discussion about how to proceed in developing the Stella Artois brand. First, they need to understand what part of the company's success was due to expert marketing practices and what part might possibly be due to being in the right place at the right time. As well, they want to assess what possible steps might be taken to spread these practices across the corporation for use in the company's global marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B01A17 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Management; European Market; Product Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA