Ivey Publishing

Essentials of Marketing Management

Marshall, G.W., Johnston M.W. (United States, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2011)
Prepared By Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee, PhD Candidate
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Marketing in Today’s Global Business Milieu

EXPATICA.COM: 10 YEARS OF A DUTCH BORN-GLOBAL
Christopher Williams

Product Number: 9B10M029
Publication Date: 5/5/2010
Length: 12 pages

In December 2009, the management team at Expatica.com was undertaking a strategic review of the progress of the company and of the future opportunities for growth. The management team needed to take stock: the external environment was rapidly changing and threats from competitors were on the rise. Expatica.com was founded 10 years earlier to provide English language information and news to the expatriate community in Europe, delivering its services primarily over the Internet. Over the course of the 10 years, Expatica.com had experienced significant challenges in its organization and environment. The central issue was how to make its core business effective across multiple markets. The company had made tremendous progress over the decade but now needed to re-evaluate its position and identify new opportunities for growth. The management team realized that it needed to make a number of critical decisions, especially in the areas of internationalization and product development. 1) How should Expatica.com now internationalize into new markets? Which markets should it consider? How should it select new markets? Should it pull out of any existing markets? 2) What product development strategy should it adopt? What line extensions should it make to existing products? What kinds of more radical innovation could be appropriate? Should it phase out any existing products? 3) What else should the company do to drive success?

Teaching Note: 8B10M29 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Product Development; Media; Internet; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RUTH'S CHRIS: THE HIGH STAKES OF INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION
Ilan Alon, Allen H. Kupetz

Product Number: 9B06A034
Publication Date: 1/9/2007
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 8 pages

In 2006, Ruth's Chris Steak House was fresh off of a sizzling initial public offering and was now interested in growing their business internationally. With restaurants in just four countries outside the United States, a model to identify and rank new international markets was needed. This case provides a practical example for students to take quantitative and non-quantitative variables to create a short list of potential new markets.

Teaching Note: 8B06A34 (6 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Market Strategy; International Business; International Strategy; Market Entry
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TOYOTA: DRIVING THE MAINSTREAM MARKET TO PURCHASE HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES
Jeff Saperstein, Jennifer Nelson

Product Number: 9B04A003
Publication Date: 1/16/2004
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 23 pages

Toyota is a large, international automobile manufacturer headquartered in Japan, with plans to become the largest worldwide automaker, striving for 15 per cent of global sales. Toyota is committing itself to be the leader of the hybrid-electric automotive industry, and is relying on changes in the industry and customer perceptions to bring its plan to fruition. Toyota's challenge is to develop consumer attitude and purchase intent, from an early adopter, niche market model into universal mainstream acceptance.

Teaching Note: 8B04A03 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Product Design/Development; Multinational; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEN & JERRY'S - JAPAN
James M. Hagen

Product Number: 9A99A037
Publication Date: 4/13/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 17 pages

The CEO of Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc. needed to give sales and profits a serious boost; despite the company's excellent brand equity, it was losing market share and struggling to make a profit. The company's product was on store shelves in all U.S. states, but efforts to enter foreign markets had only been haphazard with non-U.S. sales accounting for just three per cent of total sales. The CEO needed to focus serious attention on entering the world's second largest ice cream market, Japan. An objective of Ben & Jerry's was to use the excess manufacturing capacity it had in the U.S., and it found that exporting ice cream from Vermont to Japan was feasible from a logistics and cost perspective. The company identified two leading partnering options. One was to give a Japanese convenience store chain exclusive rights to the product for a limited time. The other was to give long-term rights for all sales of the product in Japan to a Japanese-American who would build the brand. For the company to enter Japan in time for the upcoming summer season, it would have to be through one of these two partnering arrangements.

Teaching Note: 8A99A37 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Strategic Alliances; Market Entry; International Marketing; Corporate Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
Elements of Marketing Strategy and Planning

LAUNCH OF THE FORD FIESTA DIESEL: THE WORLD'S MOST EFFICIENT CAR
Francis Spital, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B10M040
Publication Date: 5/21/2010
Length: 20 pages

The case describes the challenges faced by Ford and other automobile manufacturers in an era of declining oil reserves and volatile fuel prices. The Ford diesel decision seems to reflect classic thinking constrained by mental models that were developed in a different world. Diesels constitute over 50 per cent of automobile sales in Europe, because fuel is extremely expensive there. If fuel gets extremely expensive in the United States, one would expect diesels to become more attractive. Yet Ford seems to be stuck in the old mental model that says Americans don't like diesels. Ford can't prove in a PowerPoint presentation that there is a big market for small diesels mostly because there are few small diesels available to U.S. consumers. But that traps them into a position where they will never lead the industry or innovate outside of current market and technology conditions.

Teaching Note: 8B10M40 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; Product Strategy; New Products; Automotive; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STRATEGIC PLANNING AT APPLE INC.
Kyle Murray, Miranda R. Goode, Fabrizio Di Muro

Product Number: 9B09A026
Publication Date: 1/11/2010
Length: 12 pages

Apple Inc. is one of the world's most successful and most recognizable companies. Over its 30 year existence, the company had seen a lot of changes in the computer industry. What would the future hold for the computer giant in a rapidly changing world? How should the company allocate resources between its more traditional offerings (computers) and its newer products (iPods, iPhones, Apple TV, etc.) in order to maintain and improve its market position. Also, how should Apple's unique retail strategy be used to support the company's product decisions, and by capitalizing on new and emerging trends thus further maintaining its competitive advantage.

Teaching Note: 8B09A26 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Competitive Advantage; Strategic Planning; Retailing; New Products
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SAT & CO.: MARKET ORIENTATION
Satyendra Singh

Product Number: 9B08A006
Publication Date: 3/11/2008
Length: 10 pages

The Sat & Co. case demonstrates how market orientation can be achieved and how its implementation can lead to superior business performance in the context of the machine tool industry. Sat & Co. consisted of two divisions: the lathe division that manufactured the lathe machines, and the computer numerical control (CNC) division that assembled CNC machines. The capacity of both divisions was underutilized. The problem was that the lathe division manufactured very basic lathe machines and the CNC division assembled very technologically advanced machines. As a result, both divisions failed to satisfy their customers' needs. The lathe division was poorly market-oriented, whereas the CNC division was overly market-oriented. The chairperson of the board of directors was adamant that both divisions must survive, and that a market orientation must be achieved, i.e. the company must meet customers' needs and must improve its business performance.

Teaching Note: 8B08A06 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Performance Measurement; Market Strategy; Machinery and Equipment; Customer Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



COLA WARS IN CHINA: THE FUTURE IS HERE
Niraj Dawar, Nancy Dai

Product Number: 9B03A006
Publication Date: 8/6/2003
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 18 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - This case won the Emerging Chinese Global Competitors, 2003 EFMD Case Writing Competition. The Wahaha Hangzhou Group Co. Ltd. is one of China's largest soft-drink producers. One of the company's products, Future Cola, was launched a few years ago to compete with Coca Cola and PepsiCo and has made significant progress in the soft-drink markets that were developed by these cola giants. The issue now is to maintain the momentum of growth in the face of major competition from the giant multinationals, and to achieve its goal of dominant market share.

Teaching Note: 8B03A06 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Market Strategy; Competition; Brand Management; Emerging Markets
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 3:
Perspectives on CRM and Marketing Metrics

CINEPLEX ENTERTAINMENT: THE LOYALTY PROGRAM
Kenneth G. Hardy, Renee Zatzman

Product Number: 9B08A008
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Revision Date: 5/15/2009
Length: 17 pages

In 2007, the marketing director for Cineplex Entertainment is trying to decide whether or not to proceed with a loyalty program that would provide incentives for customers to see more movies and events, and spend more on concessions. An important by-product would be the collection of detailed customer buying data. She has crafted four possible combinations of rewards and received proposals from three suppliers with experience in managing customer data banks. She must decide the structure and richness of the program, the supplier, the likely response rate to determine financial feasibility, and whether to launch regionally or nationally.

Teaching Note: 8B08A08 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: New Product Launch; Customer Relationship Management; Loyalty Programs
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANDYM ENTERPRISES: FALLING SALES IN TERRITORY #61
June Cotte, Megan McCrae

Product Number: 9B04A014
Publication Date: 9/20/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 9 pages

Candym Enterprises is a wholesaler specializing in producing, importing and exporting giftware, and selling these items through independent sales representatives. The president and founder has discovered that performance in one territory is falling. A major trade-show is approaching, and changes need to be made in the territory quickly. The president feels he has several options, including replacing an independent sales rep with a company sales rep, which would be a new strategy for the company. Learning objectives include understanding the pros and cons of salary-based relationship building, the importance of excellent customer relationship management, and recognizing that using distributors/independent sales reps has some risk.

Teaching Note: 8B04A14 (5 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Sales Organization; Sales Strategy; Compensation; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



QUEST FOODS ASIA PACIFIC AND THE CRM INITIATIVE
Allen Morrison, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9B01M011
Publication Date: 4/30/2001
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 15 pages

Quest Foods International is one of the world's largest manufacturers of fragrances, flavors and textures for the food, beverage and consumer products industries. Quest Foods' regional vice-president is in the process of implementing a business process re-engineering project for the company. His current efforts focus on developing an information technology-based customer relationship management (CRM) system that he believes could give the company a sustainable competitive advantage with customers in the region and throughout the world. His ultimate goal is to bring Quest to the next phase of e-business. Despite high ambitions, his initiatives are making little headway. Internal opposition to change is significant and some key customers are growing concerned that Quest's CRM plans might miss the mark. Faced with considerable time and resource pressures, he is wondering how to set priorities and where to focus his energies.

Teaching Note: 8B01M11 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Business; Leveraging Information Technology; Business Process Re-Engineering; Customer Relations
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 4:
Managing Marketing Information

VINCOR: PROJECT TWIST
Niraj Dawar, Kelly Kretz, Eric Singer

Product Number: 9B08A002
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 12/2/2015
Length: 22 pages

The alcohol cooler (refreshment) market in Canada was already crowded, but the marketing manager at Vincor believed there was still room for a new entrant, provided it was sufficiently differentiated. The case provides market research information on which the decision-maker relies to develop a product positioning. Trade-offs need to be made between various positioning options and costs. The case deals with marketing issues from the perspective of the brand manager launching a new product.

Teaching Note: 8B08A02 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Positioning and Differentiation; New Product Development; Brand Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ONTARIO MACHINERY RING (A) - PROBLEM DEFINITION
Thomas Funk

Product Number: 9B04A021
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 9 pages

The Ontario Machinery Ring is a cooperative set up to perform a matchmaking service for farmers who want to have custom work done and farmers who want to do custom work. This concept is widespread in Europe but has not been tried in North America. The general manager of the organization has set up a prototype operation and is looking at expansion opportunities. Expansion will take more funds than are available and the general manager has sought financial assistance from the provincial Ministry of Agriculture and Food. Before committing funds to this project, the ministry requires marketing research to measure demand for the machinery ring concept. Supplemental cases, Ontario Machinery Ring (B) and (C), product 9B04A022 and 9B04A023 look at questionnaire development and data analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B04A21 (7 pages)
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Issues: Marketing Planning; Data Analysis; Sales Forecasting; Marketing Research
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KIDS MARKET CONSULTING
Paul W. Beamish, Stephanie Taylor, Oleksiy Vynogradov

Product Number: 9B04M065
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/15/2009
Length: 8 pages

The founder of Kids Market Consulting, a market research firm dedicated to the kids, tweens and teens segment, was faced with increasing competition and slowing revenue, and was exploring a variety of possibilities for the future strategic direction of the business. In particular, she had to formulate the best plan for protecting the niche market and decide how aggressively to pursue expansion. In addition, there was the existing relationship with her business partner, and Kids Market Consulting was part of his group of marketing firms. Any changes the founder chose had to respect this relationship and she was therefore restricted to a limited number of options. The over-arching corporate objective for the company was to defend the market from larger businesses who were trying to increase their share of the market research industry.

Teaching Note: 8B04M65 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Strategic Change; Strategy Development; Strategic Planning; Market Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Understanding Customers: Business-to-Consumer Markets

WALT DISNEY INTERNET GROUP JAPAN'S DIMO PROJECT
Philip Sugai

Product Number: 9B04A026
Publication Date: 11/23/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 25 pages

The Walt Disney Internet Group Japan has recently launched an entirely new set of interactive mobile character/agents for the NTT DoCoMo iMode platform, called Dimo. Having built Japan's most successful mobile entertainment business using traditional Disney-branded characters and related content, these Dimo characters have been designed to go well beyond entertainment and become valuable guides, assistants and friends for users of the continuously evolving Mobile Internet and the increasingly complex tasks enabled by this platform. Although the Walt Disney Internet Group Japan team feels strongly that these types of character/agents will be the future of human-device interactions, subscription figures six months after Dimo's launch suggest that Japan's mobile consumers may not share this belief.

Teaching Note: 8B04A26 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: E-Business; Brand Management; Competitive Advantage; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHANTALE AND CLINTON CALL FOR SERVICE
Christopher A. Ross

Product Number: 9B09A005
Publication Date: 4/7/2009
Length: 8 pages

Chantale and Clinton have purchased a new refrigerator from The Canadian, one of the largest department store chains in Canada. It subsequently began to malfunction. After receiving poor service from the vendor's repair division, they were wondering what to do next. Do nothing, and assume it was an isolated incident? Vow never again to deal with this vendor and brand? Write a letter of complaint to the vendor and demand an apology or other compensation? Underlying all these questions was the issue: Was it worth the trouble? The case can be used to illustrate consumer behaviour in marketing management, with emphasis placed on controllable and uncontrollable factors that influence individual buyer behaviour. It can also be used in a service marketing setting, where issues of service failure and recovery can be emphasized.

Teaching Note: 8B09A05 (10 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Consumer Behaviour; Customer Service; Service Recovery; Service Quality
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KRAFT FOODS: THE COFFEE POD LAUNCH (A)
Robin Ritchie, Aleem Visram

Product Number: 9B06A019
Publication Date: 11/6/2006
Revision Date: 5/27/2014
Length: 19 pages

The product manager for coffee development at Kraft Canada must decide whether to introduce the company's new line of single-serve coffee pods or await results from the United States. Key strategic decisions include which target market to focus on and what value proposition to signal. Important questions are also raised as to how the new product should be branded, which flavors to offer, whether Kraft should use traditional distribution channels or direct-to-store delivery, and what forms of advertising and promotion to use. The case provides a basis for discussing consumer decision making, and stresses the importance of providing a clear incremental benefit when introducing a new product in an established category. It may be used independently or with the supplement, Kraft Foods: The Coffee Pod Launch (B).

Teaching Note: 8B06A19 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: New Products; Consumer Behaviour; Consumer Marketing; Marketing Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE WIRELESS STRATEGY
Mike Wade, David Hamilton

Product Number: 9B01E001
Publication Date: 3/7/2001
Revision Date: 12/17/2009
Length: 23 pages

The director of business development of the electronic banking division of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) had just won a long-fought battle to implement a wireless banking initiative for customers with mobile devices such as cell phones and personal digital assistants. Now he had to make a number of key decisions relating to the strategy. These decisions included which services to offer (banking as well as non-related services), which devices and standards to support and whether to partner with a third-party content supplier. An extensive glossary of wireless technology terminology is included with this case.

Teaching Note: 8B01E01 (3 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Strategy Implementation; Technological Change; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
Understanding Customers: Business-to-Business Markets

ASIMCO TECHNOLOGIES: 2005
Xi (Lucy) Liu, Taehoo Kim, Liang Liu, Guangyu Nie, Wanhong Shao, Xiaotian Xie

Product Number: 9B10A001
Publication Date: 5/5/2010
Length: 15 pages

In April 2005, the chairman of ASIMCO Technologies, a company headquartered in China and supplying automotive components to both Chinese and global clients, was trying to decide on his company's reaction to the Chinese government's latest regulations on auto emissions. Guo-san (National Standards III) was to take effect on August 1, 2008. By that date, automakers would not be allowed to supply the Chinese market with non-Guo-san-compliant products. ASIMCO's major diesel engine customers had already sent requests for upgraded engine components to ASIMCO as well as other suppliers. While three technologies seemed to provide the Chinese market with a solution, divergent views existed among the management team as to where ASIMCO should focus to enhance the fuel systems that it supplied. The case can be used in an international marketing course (in sessions on product strategy in developing market or customer relations in industrial marketing).

Teaching Note: 8B10A01 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Product Strategy; Automotive; Customer Relations; Tsinghua/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CONCENTRIC NETWORK CORPORATION
Frederik Lindkvist Karavoulias, Elliot Maltz

Product Number: 9B02A011
Publication Date: 6/21/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 32 pages

Concentric Network Corporation provided a full range of Internet services to small- and medium- size businesses. This market was potentially very lucrative, and the demand for full Internet solutions was growing, but the uncertain rate of Internet adoption made the growth trajectory difficult to determine. Success in this market required three fundamentals: product, distribution and capital-intensive infrastructure. Concentric's strength was in the first two. Concentric faced a number of rivals that offered similar services at similar costs. Due to the competitive environment and the need for infrastructure, cooperation and partnerships were of great importance. Concentric's management team recognized that to complete - or even to survive - in the maturing industry, it needed to become more vertically integrated. Concentric announced a merger with Nextlink Communications Inc., a voice and high-speed Internet provider specializing in the business-to-business market. The issue facing the company's chief executive officer and the senior vice-president of marketing was how to compete in the small- and medium-size business market through leveraging the joint capabilities of the merger.

Teaching Note: 8B02A11 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Market Strategy; Value Analysis; Telecommunication Technology; Alliances; Monitor
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GLOBAL SOURCES LTD. - THE EVOLUTION OF B2B
Allen Morrison, Tom Gleave, John Beck

Product Number: 9B01M065
Publication Date: 12/7/2001
Revision Date: 4/25/2012
Length: 21 pages

Global Sources Limited is Asia's leading publisher of business-to-business (B2B) trade-related magazines. In the latter half of the 1990s, the Internet became a powerful force for change in the business world, leading to an explosion of Internet-related activities by both traditional bricks and mortar companies, as well as countless upstart dot.coms. The chairman and chief executive officer of Global Sources had foreseen the opportunities afforded by the Internet early on, and had made it an integral part of the company's strategy. Currently, the level of activity in the B2B portal space has evolved so quickly that a noticeable degree of confusion among suppliers, buyers and investors about the merits and drawbacks of these portals has arisen. Moreover, the sustainability of these ventures has been brought into question, which is causing a dramatic reversal of fortunes for many companies. The result is that there are strong signs that the industry will experience a significant consolidation. This has left Global Sources chairman with the key challenge of generating greater visibility among users and potential users of the companies services, as well as greater interest from the investment community in order to remain viable. The company must be able to educate and convey its value proposition to its users, as well as determine whether it should continue to remain an independent player, purchase a competitor, or enter into a strategic alliance.

Teaching Note: 8B01M65 (21 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Managing Industry Change; Competitor Analysis; Strategic Positioning; Nanyang
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 7:
Segmentation, Target Marketing, and Positioning

HYUNDAICARD'S MARKETING STRATEGY
Chansoo Park, Ronald D. Camp

Product Number: 9B09A028
Publication Date: 12/23/2009
Length: 20 pages

In the competitive South Korean credit card market, a review of the past decade of HyundaiCard's marketing strategies and evaluation of anticipated possible difficulties of being a market follower revealed several challenges for senior management. Despite a tremendously successful creative business model based on customer needs, innovative products and integration of online and offline customers, the company's performance had not progressed in the past seven years. HyundaiCard had difficulty relating its creative business model to the strong personas of the leading players in the credit card industry. How could HyundaiCard, a market follower, successfully position itself as a market leader? Could HyundaiCard's marketing strategy keep enhancing its competitive edge in the market? What future strategy would be best for HyundaiCard?

Teaching Note: 8B09A28 (9 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Market Analysis; Market Segmentation; Consumer Marketing; Credit Card Business; Marketing Management; Promotion Policy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MARKET STRETCH
Gavin Price, Margaret Sutherland

Product Number: 9B09M046
Publication Date: 6/25/2009
Length: 11 pages

Bio-Oil is a multi-purpose skin care product that has gone from being sold only in South Africa to being the No. 1 scar treatment product in 16 of the 17 countries in which it is distributed. Retail sales have jumped from R3 million per annum to R1 billion from 2000 to 2008. Justin and David Letschert made key decisions to eliminate all of the other 119 products that were being manufactured by the company that they took over in 2000, and focused on the mainstay product of Bio-Oil. Union-Swiss accomplished its successful sales through the use of a hybrid distribution model that compelled its distributors in each country to communicate and share knowledge with each other. Union-Swiss also ensured that it remained focused on building the brand through limiting its activities in the value chain to that of marketing. It did this to such an extent that it created a separate entity to run the distribution of Bio-Oil in South Africa.

Teaching Note: 8B09M46 (8 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Market Entry; International Business; Supply Chain Management; Strategic Positioning; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



SHOPPERS STOP: TARGETING THE YOUNG
Shanker Krishnan, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A011
Publication Date: 5/14/2009
Length: 23 pages

The case deals with how Shoppers Stop, a home-grown Indian retailer of branded apparel and accessories closely identified with the adult segment of customers for a decade and a half since inception, looked at the growing segment of the youth population. Against the backdrop of an aging demographic, particularly among countries in North America and Europe, India had an advantage of a largely young population. Thirty-five per cent of Indian were under 15 years of age and 70 per cent under 35 years of age - a profile likely to remain so for the next two decades. Topics of discussion include: Is there a risk for an adult company in targeting the young? Is there a risk in not targeting the young? Is there a business opportunity in the youth segment? What should Shoppers Stop do if it were to seize the opportunity? What is the addressable segment? Is a change in strategy required now or will tweaking the current strategy do? An interview with the Shoppers Stop chief executive officer is available on DVD.

Teaching Note: 8B09A11 (8 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Customer Relationship Management; Retailing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEVI STRAUSS CANADA HOLDING AN EMBER: THE GWG BRAND
Michael R. Pearce, Ken Mark, Jordan Mitchell

Product Number: 9B04A007
Publication Date: 10/13/2004
Revision Date: 10/7/2009
Length: 16 pages

The director of marketing for Levi Strauss Canada needs to decide the future fate of the GWG brand, a fallen giant in the Canadian jeans market. For the last three years, GWG had been licensed to a small manufacturer, who has failed to meet the requirements in the license agreement. While the director is keen to use some of the latent brand equity in GWG, she know that Levi's and Dockers brands come first and that she can not divert marketing dollars towards the brand's revival. As well, she must be careful to manage her small but powerful portfolio of brands in the five main channels without cannibalizing the already declining volumes of the Levi's brand.

Teaching Note: 8B04A07 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Management; Licensing; Marketing Channels; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
The Product Experience: Product Strategy and Building the Brand

A FAMILY OF BRAND CANNIBALS? THE CASE OF OMNICOM AND INTERBRAND
Matthew Thomson, Jared Breski

Product Number: 9B10A009
Publication Date: 4/19/2010
Length: 7 pages

The differences between specialized marketing agencies become blurred as clients increasingly expect these agencies to provide a more comprehensive portfolio of service offerings. The case thrusts students into the roles of three different marketing leaders: the chief executive officer (CEO) of Interbrand (the world's leading brand consultancy), the CEO of DDB Worldwide (the world's largest advertising agency) and the CEO of Omnicom (the world's largest media conglomerate and the parent company of both Interbrand and DDB Worldwide). These leaders are about to meet to discuss the future of the marketing industry, focusing specifically on how the industry's future direction will affect Omnicom's strategic plans. The two agency CEOs will need to defend their own company's value proposition. Will their respective arguments be enough to escape elimination on the Omnicom chopping block?

Teaching Note: 8B10A09 (11 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Advertising versus branding; communications; public relations; consumer-packaged goods; strategic consulting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEST BUY INC. - DUAL BRANDING IN CHINA
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A016
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Revision Date: 5/11/2010
Length: 17 pages

A month after Best Buy Inc. (Best Buy), the largest retailer of consumer electronics in the United States, acquired Five Star, the third largest retailer of appliances and consumer electronics in China in May 2006, the management of Best Buy is weighing in on a branding option. Should Five Star lose its identity and be marketed as Best Buy? Or should Best Buy retain the Five Star brand and let the two brands compete with each other in the Chinese market? The option has a sense of déjà vu because, when it first stepped out of its home turf in January of 2002 by acquiring Future Shop, the largest consumer electronics retailer in Canada, Best Buy was facing a similar dilemma. The company had decided, at the time, in favour of dual brand strategy. It had worked. There was no evidence of cannibalization, the single largest risk in dual branding. Best Buy and Future Shop had both grown together as independent brands in Canada. But, does dual brand strategy work in the vastly different retail environment of China?

Teaching Note: 8B09A16 (9 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: China; Brand Management; Retailing; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK: THE MARKETING AND BRANDING CHALLENGES OF A START-UP
Gavin Chen, Derrick Deslandes

Product Number: 9B05A012
Publication Date: 6/22/2005
Revision Date: 9/24/2009
Length: 17 pages

FirstCaribbean International Bank was the new banking entity created from the combination of the Caribbean operations of two foreign banks, Barclays Bank plc of the United Kingdom and headquarters in London, England and CIBC - formally the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce - of Canada and headquartered in Toronto, Ontario. A marketing team was formed with the specific responsibility of developing the marketing function and the brand strategy, as well as guiding the branding process of the new entity. The head of the marketing team has a number of concerns: Would geography, history and commercial practices support or mitigate against a single, centralized marketing strategy for the entire region, what should the new brand be and how should it be articulated, should the new brand reflect one or both of the heritage banks or should the new brand break with the past and reflect a totally new identity, and how quickly could the new brand be rolled out? This case may be taught on a stand alone basis or in combination with any of the five additional Cross-Enterprise cases that deal with various functional issues associated with the eventual merger: Human Resources - Harmonization of Compensation and Benefits for FirstCaribbean, product 9B04C053; Information Systems - Information Systems at FirstCaribbean: Choosing a Standard Operating Environment, product 9B04E032; General Management - CIBC-Barclays: Should Their Caribbean Operations Be Merged?, product 9B04M067; Accounting and Finance - CIBC-Barclays: Accounting For Their Merger, product 9B04B022; FirstCaribbean International Bank: The Marketing and Branding Challenges for a Start-up, product 9B05A012; and technical note - Note on Banking in the Caribbean, product 9B05M015.

Teaching Note: 8B05A12 (7 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Brand Management; Brand Positioning; Market Strategy; Marketing Planning; University of West Indies
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
The Product Experience: New-Product Development and Service

MICROSOFT AND THE XBOX 360 RING OF DEATH
Gloria Barczak, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B10A005
Publication Date: 4/19/2010
Length: 16 pages

The case chronicles Microsoft's difficulties with the Xbox 360 home video game console. Microsoft launched the Xbox 360 one year ahead of the competition, and used its advantage to gain a solid lead in the market for next generation video game consoles. Despite early technical problems, users were willing to accept a certain degree of unreliability because the Xbox 360 was the only high definition console on the market. Microsoft also had valuable game franchises. To play any of the exclusive video game content available for the Xbox 360, users had no choice but to buy a system. However, Microsoft's early lead quickly disappeared after Nintendo's Wii become all the rage, especially among families and casual gamers. Sony also began to catch up to its Redmond rival following media reports that the PlayStation 3 was far more reliable. When Toshiba abandoned HD-DVD, a high definition movie format supported by Microsoft, Sony's Blu-Ray players (including the PlayStation3) became the de facto standard. Finally, Sony began to release its own exclusive games and began to quickly close the gap between its online service and Microsoft's Xbox Live. Microsoft's inability to resolve the quality problems that had plagued the Xbox 360 since its launch caused a loss of goodwill among its core customers. By extending the console's warranty to an unprecedented three years, Microsoft was able to allay the fears of some buyers. Nevertheless, by the end of the case, Microsoft has fallen to second place in overall console sales and third place in monthly sales. Moreover, it was unable to reverse the huge losses that Microsoft's gaming division had incurred every year since the launch of the original Xbox. The case may be used with The Launch of the Sony PlayStation 3 (Ivey case 9B07A014) and A Note on Computer Games (Ivey case 9B07A013).

Teaching Note: 8B10A05 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Production Management/Control; Market Strategy; Quality Control; Product Design/Development; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MICROSOFT WINDOWS: THE LAUNCH OF WINDOWS 7
Miranda R. Goode, Matthew Ball

Product Number: 9B09A023
Publication Date: 8/14/2009
Length: 25 pages

In early 2009, Microsoft began preparing for the launch of its next operating system, Windows 7. Successfully marketing Windows 7 had become essential for the company, which had faced numerous challenges in recent years, including a commercial and public relation failure of its last operating system, Windows Vista. While Windows 7 had received strong pre-release reviews, its success depended on Microsoft's ability to overcome the lingering skepticism and resentment of Windows Vista. The case presents students with the opportunity to perform a rich analysis of the difficulties in launching a new product following the commercial and public relations failure of the predecessor and provides a platform from which to explore the psychology (from both a consumer and managerial perspective) behind new product adoption. The case is structured to promote an analysis of Vista's relations failure using a psychological framework. Based on this analysis, students are challenged to devise a strategy for the launch of Windows 7 and to make decisions related to advertising communications, pricing, product, target market selection and brand image.

Teaching Note: 8B09A23 (5 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Advertising; Marketing Communication; New Products; Consumer Behaviour
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ACME MEDICAL IMAGING
Donald A. Pillittere

Product Number: 9B08D004
Publication Date: 5/6/2008
Length: 6 pages

After negotiations with a key supplier for lower prices and quicker turnaround go nowhere, two employees of Acme Medical Imaging realize there's no more low-hanging fruit to pick to keep their project on time and on budget -- no more concessions from external parties, no more superficial, short-term fixes. They have to convince their chief executive officer and the project team to take a hard look at internal processes. From the perspective of Operations, this case examines the challenges that can arise - and some steps that can be taken - when the greatest obstacles to a project are the people and procedures responsible for its success.

Teaching Note: 8B08D04 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Commercialization Process; Project Objective; New Product Development; Communications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



THE WII: NINTENDO'S VIDEO GAME REVOLUTION
Gloria Barczak, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B08A004
Publication Date: 1/31/2008
Revision Date: 2/26/2010
Length: 26 pages

In 2007, Nintendo's inexpensive and quirky Wii video game console had become all the rage. Despite its underpowered processor and comparatively basic graphics, it outsold both the Sony PlayStation 3 and the Microsoft Xbox 360. Nintendo's handheld system, known as the DS, also outsold Sony's more advanced PlayStation Portable. Nintendo's products were so successful, retail stores in North America and Japan quickly sold out whenever new shipments arrived, and many consumers were forced to pay premium prices on the grey market. The case examines the characteristics of a successful new product launch, particularly product features, brand loyalty, content availability, third-party support, and adherence to industry standards. The case also considers how radical innovations can be used to win market share from technically superior products focused on incremental innovations. Finally, a 4P marketing analysis is used to compare video game systems offered by Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo. The case may be used with The Launch of the Sony PlayStation 3 (Ivey Case 9B07A014) and A Note on Video and Computer Games (Ivey Case 9B07A013).

Teaching Note: 8B08A04 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Strategy; New Products; Generating Profit from New Technology; Product Design/Development; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
Managing Pricing Decisions

HANSON PRODUCTION: PRICING FOR OPENING DAY
June Cotte, Peter Famiglietti

Product Number: 9B10A011
Publication Date: 5/21/2010
Length: 14 pages

The president of production at Hanson Productions, an off-Broadway production company, was faced with the same situation for every Broadway production: where to locate, how many seats, what to charge and how to promote and market the production. There are three separate venues, with three separate value propositions to the studio, case and audience. While bigger means more seats and more revenue for each show, there is a capacity percentage that must be factored in to the decision due to the increased rental costs. Smaller venues may lead to higher capacity percentages, but ultimately leave money on the table. The ticket prices must be set for advance sales; any change in price after this period will effectively hurt future sales - more so if the price is discounted. Determining a promotion partner may lessen the risk of a potential failure, yet cost more profit and affect the recoup schedule.

Teaching Note: 8B10A11 (8 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Sales Forecasting; Pricing; Pricing Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TERRA BITE LOUNGE: PAY WHAT YOU WANT CAFÉ
June Cotte, Remi Trudel

Product Number: 9B09A013
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Length: 4 pages

In April 2009, the founder and owner of Terra Bite Lounge was considering opening another location. The Terra Bite Lounge was a Kirkland, Washington café with no prices and voluntary payment. The owner believed that Terra Bite was a demonstration of a high level of honesty and trust, between himself and the customer. There were several considerations to evaluate in deciding to open a new location. Where should the new location be? The current location was in an affluent suburb but the owner believed that several types of neighbourhoods would be receptive. What types of consumer characteristics would best be suited towards this model of trusting that payment would be made? Is there anything that could be added to the current model to make Terra Bite more successful? He was careful to consider those changes or additions that were consistent with the current social trust component of the original Terra Bite model.

Teaching Note: 8B09A13 (4 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Marketing Management; Consumer Behaviour; Pricing; Market Segmentation
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SY.MED DEVELOPMENT, INC.
Randle Raggio

Product Number: 9B09A010
Publication Date: 6/10/2009
Length: 20 pages

In March of 2001, the president of Sy.Med Development, Inc. (Sy.Med), a small health-care software firm, was concerned about his company's sales performance in the year-to-date. Nine units were projected, but only three had been sold. As a result, Sy.Med was 66 per cent below the president's unit forecast, 210 per cent below his net income forecast, and had lost $40,000. The president wondered whether a change to the base price of the software was necessary to boost sales. The case introduces the concept of value pricing, that is, pricing on the basis of value received by customers, not pricing on the basis of the cost of providing the product or service. The concept of value pricing at Sy.Med requires the simultaneous consideration of customer segments and sales force allocation in a high-tech setting. With careful calculation, students can determine the benefit to a particular customer of using the OneApp software. Some sensitivity analysis is required because not all practice sizes are equivalent, nor do they face the same labour costs. Although the pricing decision is the focus of the case, strategy (e.g. relating to customer selection, strategic focus) and sales force issues are inextricably linked to this decision. After the class discussion is complete, students should understand that pricing decisions cannot be made in isolation; the strategy and structure of the market must be considered. The case works well in the core MBA marketing course to introduce the concept of value pricing, and equally well in a course focused on pricing to emphasize the interrelations among organizational issues, the competitive market and the pricing decision. The case can also be used in an orientation program or as an introductory case to help train students in the art of preparing a quantitative case analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B09A10 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Value Analysis; Pricing Strategy; Sales Organization; Sales Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 11:
Managing Marketing Channels and the Supply Chain

CANADA GOOSE INC.: AT A RETAIL CROSSROADS
June Cotte, Jesse Silvertown

Product Number: 9B09A012
Publication Date: 5/14/2009
Length: 12 pages

In June 2008, the president and owner of Canada Goose Inc. (Canada Goose), a producer of luxury sport jackets, was contemplating the future of his company. Despite recent years' steady growth in both his company and the industry in general, the president believed that a significant opportunity existed for Canada Goose to further cement itself as a market leader for this industry. The president was intrigued by two separate offers from national retailers in Canada. Both were in the form of long-term contracts; in the past Canada Goose had used such contracts to maintain successful relationships with its many distributors. The offers were lucrative; however, the president needed to consider whether the offers aligned with the company's current marketing strategy. Agreeing to stock its product through a national chain would be a departure from its current method of distribution through independently-owned regional retailers. Accepting either of the offers would not only potentially price these retailers out of the market but could also lead to the devaluation of the brand.

Teaching Note: 8B09A12 (3 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Brand Positioning; Brand Management; Retailing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PHILLIPS FOODS, INC. - INTRODUCING KING CRAB TO THE TRADE
Frederic Brunel, Deborah Utter

Product Number: 9B09A004
Publication Date: 4/7/2009
Revision Date: 4/29/2010
Length: 20 pages

By 2006, Phillips Food Inc. had grown into one of the largest seafood businesses in the United States and was the number one U.S. brand for crab meat. The company comprised a restaurant division, a foodservice products division that sold to restaurants, and a retail products division that sold to grocery stores. In August, 2006, Phillips' product manager was responsible for defining the communication strategy decisions required to launch its new product: first-to-market pasteurized king crab. The product manager had already spent half of his advertising budget promoting the product to buyers in the foodservice and restaurant channels. He had to decide how to spend the remaining portion of his budget to best reach seafood buyers in the consumer retail channel. He had an opportunity to showcase the product at an upcoming major industry food show; however, he had already planned to spend his budget on advertising in a trade publication for the retail grocery channel. He had to examine the relative merits of each option and present an overall recommendation on how to best launch and sell the product. Qualitative, quantitative and financial aspects were to be considered; as well, the product manager had to determine the costs, returns and qualitative benefits that each option provided.

Teaching Note: 8B09A04 (19 pages)
Issues: Sales Management; Distribution; Trade Advertising; New Product Development; Trade Show
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TSC STORES: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT FOR PROFITABLE GROWTH
P. Fraser Johnson

Product Number: 9B09D005
Publication Date: 3/9/2009
Length: 10 pages

In May 2007, the chief operating officer at TSC Stores in London, Ontario, asked the director of distribution to evaluate the company's supply chain strategy and make recommendations to the board of directors. The chief operating officer was concerned about the ability of the company's supply chain to support the corporate business plan, which called for 20 per cent annual growth over the next three years. Preliminary analysis indicated that TSC would need more distribution capacity by first quarter 2008, which gave the director of distribution only six to eight months to evaluate options and implement a plan. The chief operating officer and the board would want to know the process and schedule that the director of distribution intended to follow to deal with the evolving capacity demands in distribution.

Teaching Note: 8B09D05 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Supply Chain Strategy; Capacity Planning; Distribution
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Points of Customer Interface: Bricks and Clicks

MUSICJUICE.NET: THE CHALLENGES OF STARTING UP A NEW INTERNET VENTURE
Simon Parker, Rocky Liu

Product Number: 9B10A013
Publication Date: 5/21/2010
Length: 6 pages

MusicJuice.net is a new website designed to bring together musicians and a fan-base in order to raise finance for new bands. It enables musicians to bypass the large established record companies and their high royalty takes, while giving fans direct contact and involvement with exciting new acts. It is an example of a venture idea transported from one country (the Netherlands) and applied in a new and larger geographical setting (North America). The case illustrates the novel crowd-sourcing business model, which is designed to raise finance from customers rather than the entrepreneur. Most importantly, the case illustrates the challenges of starting new Internet ventures and the early stage founding issues that are involved. After a long and costly delay in establishing their website, the two founders of MusicJuice.net have struggled to generate any interest or even awareness amongst online musicians and fans, despite only limited competition from other players in the marketplace - a situation, which is already beginning to change. Students are asked what the entrepreneurs behind MusicJuice.net can do to raise awareness of their service and to generate enough customers to survive.

Teaching Note: 8B10A13 (8 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Internet; Competition; Dominant Designs; New Venture Challenges; Startups
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SELLING GREEN DOTS IN SECOND LIFE
Wade Halvorson, Michael Parent, Leyland Pitt

Product Number: 9B09A033
Publication Date: 12/8/2009
Length: 10 pages

An Irish Air Lines pilot has re-created his home city of Dublin on Second Life. His Second Life alter ego, Ham Rambler, is busy running the site, and selling office space and advertisement on the property. The property includes a popular bar, a venue for live music performances, as well as a realistic rendering of Dublin's core. Second Life residents flock to the site for its entertainment and to experience Dublin. Mahon/Rambler needs to decide if the innovative business model he has developed is sustainable, or whether he should sell the business to other developers. The case is useful to introduce the concept of immersive Internet-based environments, and Internet advertising and selling.

Teaching Note: 8B09A33 (10 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Advertising Effectiveness; Internet Culture; Internet; Sales Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



PACIFICLINK IMEDIA: BECOMING A FULL SERVICE INTERACTIVE AGENCY
Andrew Karl Delios

Product Number: 9B09M023
Publication Date: 8/27/2009
Length: 13 pages

This case presents the decisions facing the managing director/executive director of PacificLink iMedia (PacificLink), more than 10 years after he founded the company. The company had experienced periods of growth and decline since its founding and was facing a period of uncertain growth given the turmoil in world markets in 2009, following several years of strong growth and expansion. The director anticipated that the company could continue to grow into new geographic or product markets, or perhaps become fundamentally altered in its governance structure and financial resource base, through an initial public offering. The case involves analysis of these alternatives for growth. It can be used to teach about sources of competitive advantage and evaluations of growth alternatives. See also the first and third cases in the three-part series, 9B00M024 and 9B16M202.

Teaching Note: 8B09M23 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Internet Marketing; International Business; Growth Strategy; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DOUBLECLICK INC.: GATHERING CUSTOMER INTELLIGENCE
Scott L. Schneberger, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B01E005
Publication Date: 3/5/2001
Length: 16 pages

DoubleClick Inc., with global headquarters in New York City and over 30 offices around the world, was a leading provider of comprehensive Internet advertising solutions for marketers and Web publishers. It combined technology, media and data expertise to centralize planning, execution, control, tracking and reporting for online media companies. DoubleClick was able to track Internet-users' surfing habits (but not the surfers' identities) allowing it to personalize ads for specific market groups. When DoubleClick announced it was merging with Abacus Direct, a direct marketing company with a database of consumer names, addresses and retail purchasing habits of 90 per cent of American households, it raised many privacy-related questions and concerns. Several Internet privacy activists had filed a formal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission after being informed by media sources that DoubleClick had the ability to divulge a person's identity by merging the databases of the two companies and matching the information in cookies with a surfer's profile. The president of DoubleClick was confident that its internal practices were sound, but he wondered if they would placate advertising clients afraid of consumer backlash, the concerns of Internet surfers and the company's investors.

Teaching Note: 8B01E05 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: High Technology Products; E-Commerce; Privacy Issues; Risk Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Integrated Marketing Communications: Promotional Strategy, Advertising, Sales Promotion, and Public Relations

AIR MILES CANADA: REBRANDING THE AIR MILES REWARDS PROGRAM
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07A009
Publication Date: 11/21/2007
Revision Date: 4/3/2008
Length: 11 pages

Air Miles, the largest third party loyalty program in Canada, has more than nine million subscribers. Competition in the loyalty card market is heating up with the entry of Aeroplan and myriad proprietary loyalty programs launched by retailers and other brands, and Air Miles seeks to tighten its relationship with customers. Paradoxically, for a data-driven company focused on influencing consumers individually, Air Miles opts to develop and launch a mass advertising campaign to reconnect with consumers, and just as importantly, to re-energize internally.

Teaching Note: 8B07A09 (4 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: Advertising; Customer Loyalty; Brand Repositioning; Data-driven Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MMI PRODUCT PLACEMENT, INC.
Robin Ritchie, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B07A006
Publication Date: 4/2/2007
Length: 9 pages

The president of a national placement agency is preparing to make a final pitch to sign Greyhound Canada as a client. Greyhound wants to reposition its brand as a mainstream travel option, particularly for suburban commuters, and needs cost-effective ways to get its message to consumers. The company views product placement as a viable tool for building brand awareness, but worries about losing control over its brand image. Even more serious are concerns about the absence of reliable metrics to assess the overall effectiveness of product placement. The case covers fundamentals of product placement, particularly with respect to strengths and weaknesses, and provides an excellent basis for discussing its value as part of an overall marketing communications strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B07A06 (8 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brand Positioning; Marketing Communication; Advertising
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CAPITAL ONE: LAUNCHING A MASS MEDIA CAMPAIGN
Robert J. Fisher, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B06A005
Publication Date: 4/11/2006
Revision Date: 9/9/2009
Length: 18 pages

The senior Brand Manager for Capital One Canada is developing the firm's strategy for its first mass media advertising campaign in Canada. He had been provided with a menu of U.S. and U.K. advertisements - with test results for each - which he can adapt for a Canadian audience. The key decisions the Senior Brand Manager faces includes which customer segment to focus on, what value proposition to signal to this segment, what advertisements should be used to deliver these messages, and what customization efforts are necessary. He has a presentation to Capital One's senior management team and needs to back up his recommendations with numbers and logic.

Teaching Note: 8B06A05 (6 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Brand Management; Advertising Media; Advertising Strategy; Consumer Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NIKE INC.: DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE PUBLIC RELATIONS STRATEGY
Kathleen E. Slaughter, Donna Everatt

Product Number: 9A99C034
Publication Date: 5/29/2000
Revision Date: 1/14/2010
Length: 20 pages

It had been almost a decade since the first article surfaced in the media alleging that factories sub-contracted by Nike in China and Indonesia were forcing workers to work long hours for low pay, and for physically and verbally abusive managers. The article was the seed of a media campaign that created a public relations nightmare for the company. A financial crisis in Asia and intense competition in the domestic market contributed to a decline in Nike's revenue and market share after three years of record performance. Though no direct correlation could be proven between the consumer's negative perceptions of Nike and the company's decline in market share and stock, it certainly did not help in their efforts to establish themselves as the global leader in a hotly competitive industry. A linear overview of the adverse publicity that Nike received, and the perspectives of Nike senior management, demonstrates to students the importance and elements of the timely development of an effective media and consumer relations campaign.

Teaching Note: 8A99C34 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Public Relations; Consumer Relations; Management Philosophy; Corporate Responsibility
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Integrated Marketing Communications: Personal Selling, Direct Marketing, and Interactive Marketing

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT INC. IN SAUDI ARABIA
Joerg Dietz, Ankur Grover, Laura Guerrero

Product Number: 9B07C042
Publication Date: 3/17/2008
Revision Date: 3/24/2009
Length: 14 pages

A recently hired U.S.-trained sales account manager at Medical Equipment Inc. (Medical Equipment) returned to his office after meeting with the head of the cardiology department at a specialist hospital and research center in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He had worked very hard to secure his first sale of US$725,000 for healthcare equipment, but was disheartened when the head of cardiology told him that the hospital's purchasing director intended to give the order to Medical Equipment's main competitor. The competition's sales representative and the purchasing director had known each other for 10 years and the head cardiologist implied that there might be side payments involved. The sales account manager knew Medical Equipment's product was superior and wondered how he could secure the order without having a history with the purchasing director or without engaging in practices he found ethically questionable.

Teaching Note: 8B07C42 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Sales Management; International Business; Ethical Issues
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SPECTRUM BRANDS, INC. - THE SALES FORCE DILEMMA
Donald W. Barclay, Joe Falconi

Product Number: 9B06A035
Publication Date: 2/26/2007
Length: 20 pages

In 2005, the vice-president of sales and marketing for the Canadian division of Spectrum Brands Inc. must determine his next steps regarding the structure of his sales force. Spectrum Brands (Spectrum), a global consumer products company formerly known as Rayovac Corporation, had made a number of acquisitions to diversify and expand its product and brand portfolio. With these changes, Spectrum had become a leading supplier of consumer batteries, lawn and garden care products, specialty pet supplies, and shaving and grooming products. The vice-president of sales and marketing was charged with the task of creating a national sales force from the teams of the newly merged companies. Knowing the importance of the sales function to each of these companies, he wanted to ensure; despite the differences among the diverse groups, that he still maintained a team which would effectively and efficiently continue to increase the sales of each business unit.

Teaching Note: 8B06A35 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Sales Organization; Acquisitions; Change Management; Sales Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BRAND IN THE HAND: MOBILE MARKETING AT ADIDAS
Andy Rohm, Fareena Sultan, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B05A024
Publication Date: 9/26/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 22 pages

The Global Media manager for adidas International is responsible for developing and championing a new marketing strategy at adidas called brand in the hand that is based on the convergence of cell phones and wireless Internet. The case presents company background information, data on the penetration of mobile devices such as cell phones, the growth of global mobile marketing practices, and several mobile marketing communications campaigns that adidas launched in 2004, such as a mobile newsticker for the 2004 European soccer championship. The case then introduces a specific campaign - Respect M.E. - featuring Missy Elliott, a popular female hip-hop artist, and discusses the company's mobile marketing strategy to support MissyElliott's new line of sportswear. This case can be used to highlight the role of new technology in overall marketing strategy and integrated marketing communications.

Teaching Note: 8B05A24 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Channels; Marketing Communication; International Marketing; Telecommunication Technology; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LONDON JETS
Michael R. Pearce, Joel Bycraft, Chad Hensler

Product Number: 9B02A022
Publication Date: 11/29/2002
Revision Date: 10/28/2009
Length: 11 pages

The marketing manager for a hockey team has been told by senior management that revenues for the next season must increase or the franchise will be sold. The previous year's high-budget advertising campaign did not bring in the single-ticket sales results he expected. A database of past ticket holders is available and the question arises how to use this database. Using pivot tables, and recency, frequency and monetary value analyses, he must determine how to increase the return on the marketing investment. An Excel spreadsheet, product 7B02A022, is also available.

Teaching Note: 8B02A22 (26 pages)
Industry: Arts, Entertainment, Sports and Recreation
Issues: Database Marketing; Sports Marketing; Analysis; Direct Marketing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA