Ivey Publishing

International Business: Environments & Operations

Daniels, J.D., Radebaugh, L.H., Sullivan, D.P.,13/e (United States, Prentice Hall, 2011)
Prepared By Chya-Yi (Emily) Liaw, Ph.D. Student
Chapter and Title Chapter Matches: Case Information
Chapter 1:
Globalization and International Business

INTERNATIONALIZATION OF KOYO JEANS FROM HONG KONG
Kevin Au, Bernard Suen, Na Shen, Justine Tang

Product Number: 9B11M053
Publication Date: 9/26/2011
Length: 11 pages

William Cheung owned an apparel wholesaler and a boutique shop that sold his clothing designs in Hong Kong. After attending a fashion exhibition in France, he realized his products were lacking compared to European brands. This experience motivated him to improve his jeans designs, and he soon registered “Koyo” as an independent company. He went on to become the first Hong Kong designer embraced by the French department store Galeries Lafayette. While Cheung had had commendable success, including many franchises in mainland China, he faced challenges related to expansion and funding as Koyo Jeans strove for international success.

Teaching Note: 8B11M053 (13 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Expansion; Brand Management; Franchising; Retail Marketing; Entrepreneurial Business Growth; Hong Kong; Ivey/CUHK
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



OCIMUM BIOSOLUTIONS: FROM BIOINFORMATICS TO INTEGRATED CUSTOM RESEARCH OUTSOURCING
Gita Surie

Product Number: 9B11M083
Publication Date: 9/22/2011
Length: 20 pages

Ocimum Biosolutions, a start-up Indian bioinformatics venture in 2000, had established a presence in Europe and the United States by 2010. The contract research outsourcing industry was expected to continue to grow, as large pharmaceutical companies in industrialized countries were outsourcing work at all stages of the drug development lifecycle — from discovery research to clinical trials designed to accelerate drug development as established drugs came off patent. The current challenges for Ocimum were continued growth and the ability to manage expansion while balancing risk. Anu Acharya, Ocimum’s CEO, was considering possible solutions.

Teaching Note: 8B11M083 (7 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Globalization; Biotechnology; Foreign Entry Strategy; Organizational Structure; Offshoring; United States and India
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



HTC CORPORATION: A SMARTPHONE PIONEER FROM TAIWAN
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B11A031
Publication Date: 8/12/2011
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 22 pages

The case describes how HTC, a pioneer in mobile computing from Taiwan, evolved from a local subcontractor of personal data assistants (PDAs) to a global player in smartphones. It analyzes the successful transition of the company from an anonymous supplier of Western clients (such as HP and Palm) to a brand marketer that is considered a major threat to Apple Computer. The key issue in this case is the introduction of the HTC brand in products delivered to network operators worldwide, such as AT&T, British Telecom, NTT DoCoMo, Rogers, Verizon, and Vodafone. Unlike most subcontractors in Asia that encountered strong resistance or even harsh retaliation from their current clients, HTC had the support of many Western buyers in the introduction of its own brand name. This case identifies the structural issues between a subcontractor and a client that can potentially dictate the branding status of the final product sold to end-users — specifically, when a subcontractor should remain anonymous to end-users and when it should appeal to end-users by branding its own product.

Teaching Note: 8B11A031 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Outsourcing; Branding Strategy; Subcontractors; Smartphones; Personal Data Assistants; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?: AN EXERCISE TO ASSESS YOUR EXPOSURE TO THE REST OF THE WORLD’S PEOPLES
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B11M107
Publication Date: 11/8/2011
Length: 11 pages

This exercise assesses one’s exposure to the rest of the world’s peoples. A series of worksheets require the respondents to check off the number and names of countries they have visited and the corresponding percentage of world population which each country represents. By summing a group’s collective exposure to the world’s people, the result will inevitably be the recognition that together they have seen much, even if individually some have seen little. The teaching note provides assignments and discussion questions which look at: why there is such a high variability in individual profiles; the implications of each profile for one’s business career; and, what it would take for the respondent to change his/her profile.

For marketers, it underscores the need to gather greater base knowledge about opportunities abroad.


Teaching Note: 8B11M107 (6 pages)
Issues: Career Development; Intercultural Relations; Team Building; Internationalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 2:
The Cultural Environments Facing Business

KEDA’S SAP IMPLEMENTATION
Derrick Neufeld, Yulin Fang, Huaiqing Wang, Terrance Fung

Product Number: 9B11E001
Publication Date: 2/18/2011
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 13 pages

Keda, a manufacturer of large-scale machinery in China, had successfully deployed an enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution that was paying for itself through more efficient inventory management. This was significant because despite China’s increasing demand for ERP systems, an estimated 80 per cent of ERP implementation efforts failed in the country. The vice general manager of Keda had a large backlog of other information technology projects, and he wanted to carefully evaluate the ERP project to determine what had gone right, what had gone wrong, and what Keda had achieved through simple luck.

Teaching Note: 8B11E001 (9 pages)
Issues: System Implementation; Enterprise Resource Planning; Information Technology; Project Management; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LOUIS VUITTON IN JAPAN
Justin Paul, Charlotte Feroul

Product Number: 9B10M067
Publication Date: 10/19/2010
Revision Date: 2/22/2017
Length: 20 pages

This case deals with the opportunities and challenges of Louis Vuitton, the leading European luxury-sector multinational firm, in Japan, taking into account the unique features of brand management and integrating culture and consumer behaviour in Japan. In the last decade, Japan has been Louis Vuitton’s most profitable market, but the global economic crisis has presented challenges.

Facing a weak economy and a shift in consumer preferences, Louis Vuitton has been adapting its unique strategy in the Japanese market. The days of relying on a logo and a high price seem to be gone, as there is more interest in craftsmanship and value for money. To promote sales, the company has had to launch less expensive collections made with cheaper materials. The brand has also been opening stores in smaller cities, where the lure of the logo still works.

Over the years, Japanese consumers have demonstrated fascination with and passion for the iconic brand. What have been the keys to Louis Vuitton’s successful business model in the Japanese market?


Teaching Note: 8B10M67 (8 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Marketing; Strategic Management; Brand Management; Luxury Goods; Financial Crisis; Japan; France
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



ROARING DRAGON HOTEL
Stephen Grainger

Product Number: 9B08M004
Publication Date: 3/5/2008
Length: 7 pages

The case looks at the takeover of the Roaring Dragon Hotel (RDH), a state owned enterprise in south-west China, by global hotelier Hotel International (HI) and discusses the cultural collision and organizational adoptions resulting from the intersections of two significantly different business cultures. Specifically in this case, the focus is on the challenge involved with downsizing, redundancy, communication, cultural sensitivity, strategic planning and in developing strategy. In south-west China in 2002, the RDH business environment was just emerging from the shadow of the planned economy and had retained its guanxi-based organizational culture. At RDH, relationship development and the exchange of favors were still important and occurring on a daily basis and there was little system or efficiency in the hotel's domestic management style and processes. In comparison, Hotel International had a wealth of international experience in providing accommodation, marketing and professional management in servicing the needs of a global market steeped in corporate governance. At the commencement of the management contract there was a deep division separating the organizational cultures of RDH and HI.

Teaching Note: 8B08M04 (8 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: China; Cross Cultural Management; Strategic Planning; Cross Cultural Communication; Cultural Sensitivity
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 3:
The Political and Legal Environments Facing Business

BARRICK GOLD CORPORATION - TANZANIA
Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B10M020
Publication Date: 10/20/2010
Revision Date: 11/19/2014
Length: 15 pages

This case examines the giant Canadian mining corporation, Barrick Gold Corporation (Barrick), (called Africa Barrick Gold plc since 2009), and the way it engages in sustainable community developments that surround its mining activities in Tanzania. Following recent organized tensions and heightened criticism from local communities, media, international social lobbyists and local not-for-profit organizations (NFOs), Barrick has attempted to deal with the local communities in a responsible manner. At issue for senior management was whether there was much more that it could reasonably do to resolve the tensions.

The case considers: how MNEs seek social license and local legitimacy; the relevance of hybrid institutional infrastructures; the evolving global roles for MNEs and their subsidiaries. The case is appropriate for use in courses in international management, global corporations and society, and international development and sustainable value creation.


Teaching Note: 8B10M20 (17 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Subsidiaries; Business and Society; Corporate Social Responsibility; Cross Sector Social Partnership; Government Relations
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



BANK OF AMERICA AND THE CHINESE CREDIT CARD MARKET
Charles Dhanaraj, Jing Li, Justin W. Evans

Product Number: 9B10M055
Publication Date: 8/12/2010
Revision Date: 10/19/2010
Length: 11 pages

This case addresses Bank of America Corporation's contemplated joint venture with China Construction Bank to enter the Chinese credit card market. The case builds on the questions of strategic alliances in foreign markets and the state of the banking and credit industries in China generally.

Teaching Note: 8B10M55 (10 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: China; Credit Card Business; Joint Ventures; Strategic Alliances
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TALISMAN ENERGY INC.: THE DECISION TO ENTER IRAQ
Pratima Bansal, Natalie Slawinski

Product Number: 9B09M035
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 7/2/2009
Length: 17 pages

In June 2008, the chief executive officer of Talisman Energy Inc. (Talisman) and his senior executive team met with the company's board of directors. The purpose of this meeting was to debate Talisman's proposed entry into the oil-rich Kurdistan region of Iraq. This move was potentially very lucrative for Talisman but was fraught with risks. These risks were exacerbated by Talisman's previous foray into Sudan; during that expansion Talisman had been accused of complicity in human-rights abuses, stemming from industry-accepted royalties and fees it had paid to the government. This payment of fees was held as an example by public interest groups to allege that Talisman was indirectly funding the Sudanese civil war. Talisman's reputation had suffered to the point where the ire of investors and U.S. and Canadian governments was sufficient for Talisman to exit Sudan in 2003. There were many questions about the proposed move to Iraq, including the political situation, the views of the U.S. and Canadian government, and especially the US$220 million fee payable to the Kurdistan Regional Government. Should Talisman enter Iraq, and if so, could they avoid experiencing the same outcome as Sudan?

Teaching Note: 8B09M35 (11 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Corporate Responsibility; Risk Management; Political Environment; Sustainable Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 4:
The Economic Environments Facing Business

PRIVATIZATION OF THE TIGER LEAPING GUEST HOUSE IN NANJING, PRC
Stephen Grainger

Product Number: 9B10C029
Publication Date: 3/23/2011
Length: 6 pages

The Liang family, experienced family hoteliers in China, had to leave the mainland under the pressure of the forces of Chairman Mao and the Communist Party of China in 1949. They resettled in Taiwan, resumed their hospitality business and now, two generations later, have returned to Nanjing to find that their family’s old guest house has been allowed to run down and deteriorate as a Chinese state-owned enterprise (SoE). They repurchase the old guest house with the intention to redevelop it. How will they deal with this privatization and the inevitable bureaucracy of purchasing, demolishing, and rebuilding the old guest house? How will they convert the existing SoE human resources (trained under planned-economy conditions) into dynamic employees operating in the market economy, while being sensitive to the cultural characteristics and challenges of this mainland Chinese workplace? With more than 6,000 Chinese SoEs still being targeted for privatization, this case is very relevant and provides a real-world opportunity for students to exercise their research, analytical, international management, entrepreneurial, and cross-cultural management skills.

Teaching Note: 8B10C029 (10 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Cultural Customs; Privatization; Cross-cultural Management; Human Resource Management; Hotel China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MACTARA LIMITED AND THE WOOD PRODUCTS INDUSTRY IN NOVA SCOTIA
Julia Sagebien, Rick Shaver

Product Number: 9B07M070
Publication Date: 1/4/2008
Revision Date: 8/26/2008
Length: 12 pages

The case centers around the strategic planning retreat of MacTara Limited (MacTara), the largest wood products company in Nova Scotia. While there are some very good opportunities for the company in some sectors, like wood pellets for fuel (high demand for inexpensively priced renewable energy sources), the Canadian lumber industry as a whole is not attractive at this time (distortionary effects of the Canadian-U.S. softwood lumber dispute, low price of lumber, sales denominated in the free-falling U.S. dollar, inflexible cost structure, etc). The fact that MacTara is a somewhat vertically integrated company - from construction lumber, to chips for paper mills, to fuel pellets made out of wood waste - makes planning very difficult because the health of each sector impacts on the prospects for the others. Company executives need to find a way to make all the various pieces of the business fit together into a profitable whole while they still have money and time. The Canadian lumber industry is in crisis and the eastern Canadian industry is ripe for consolidation.

Teaching Note: 8B07M70 (7 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Industry Analysis; Strategy Development; Crisis and Change; Trade
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 5:
Globalization and Society

TATA POWER: CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY
Rama Deshmukh, Atanu Adhikari

Product Number: 9B10M013
Publication Date: 5/5/2010
Length: 18 pages

HIGHLY COMMENDED CASE - Indian Management Issues and Opportunities Runner-up, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. The case describes the strategic dilemma involved in making a decision on the method of operation of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) department for one of the leading Indian multinational corporations, Tata Power Company (TPC) from Tata Group of Companies. TPC had undertaken the CSR activities for decades, reflecting the company's commitment towards sustainable energy generation without undue compromise to human and environmental development. These activities were undertaken as a voluntary initiative by the employees of TPC, and there was no separate CSR department. However, with large scale expansion, the need to have CSR as a separate entity was felt. The dilemma for the decision manager was whether to create a separate CSR department or continue with the existing set up. Other related issues needed to be addressed strategically as well as tactically to maintain a balance between shareholders' interest and other stakeholders.

Teaching Note: 8B10M13 (13 pages)
Industry: Utilities
Issues: Sustainability; Opportunity Recognition; Corporate Social Responsibility; Stakeholders; Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



FIJI WATER AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - GREEN MAKEOVER OR "GREENWASHING"?
James McMaster, Jan Nowak

Product Number: 9B09A008
Publication Date: 5/13/2009
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

This case analysis traces the establishment and subsequent operation of FIJI Water LLC and its bottling subsidiary, Natural Waters of Viti Limited, the first company in Fiji extracting, bottling and marketing, both domestically and internationally, artesian water coming from a virgin ecosystem found on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu. The case reviews the growth and market expansion of this highly successful company with the brand name FIJI Natural Artesian Water (FIJI Water). The company has grown rapidly over the past decade and a half, and now exports bottled water into many countries in the world from its production plant located in the Fiji Islands. In 2008, FIJI Water was the leading imported bottled water brand in the United States. In the context of great marketing success of the FIJI brand, particularly in the U.S. market, the case focuses on how the company has responded to a number of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, including measuring and reducing its carbon footprint, responsibilities to key stakeholders, and concerns of the Fiji government with regard to taxation and transfer pricing issues. The case provides a compelling illustration of how CSR challenges may jeopardize the sustainability of a clever marketing strategy.

Teaching Note: 8B09A08 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Environment; Corporate Responsibility; Marketing Communication; Transfer Pricing; International Marketing; Greenwashing; Green Marketing; Brand Positioning
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



KILLER COKE: THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST COCA-COLA
Henry W. Lane, David T.A. Wesley

Product Number: 9B07C003
Publication Date: 1/31/2007
Revision Date: 2/24/2010
Length: 23 pages

The CEO of Coca-Cola is faced with increasing criticism over the company's handling of alleged human rights abuses in Colombia. A grass roots protest movement known as The Campaign to Stop Killer Coke has built international support for a boycott of Coca-Cola products on college campuses. The campaign centers specifically on the intimidation and murder of union leaders at a specific Coca-Cola bottling plant in Colombia. Coca-Cola asserted that it was not responsible for such abuses. Rather, the violence at the Coca-Cola plant was the product of a political situation that was beyond the company's control. The company further argued that it was in compliance with local labor laws, and had been dismissed as the defendant in lawsuits filed in Colombia and U.S. courts. At the time of the case, Coca-Cola is faced with anti-Coke campaigns at more than 100 college campuses worldwide and official boycotts of its products at a number of large well-known campuses in the United States. In response, the company has undertaken an audit of its bottling plants in Colombia. It also launched a public relations campaign aimed at refuting accusations of human rights violations. The case can be used to discuss corporate ethics, extraterritoriality, marketing and public relations.

Teaching Note: 8B07C03 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Trade Unions; Ethical Issues; Emerging Markets; Supplier Selection; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 6:
International Trade and Factor-Mobility Theory

FRANZ COLLECTION, INC.: THE ROAD FROM SUBCONTRACTING TO BRAND MARKETING
Shih-Fen Chen, Lien-Ti Bei

Product Number: 9B10M030
Publication Date: 5/28/2010
Revision Date: 7/8/2014
Length: 21 pages

The case describes the three-stage transformation of a Taiwanese company - from an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of small gifts for Western European customers, to an original design manufacturer (ODM) providing design and production of home decor and gifts to customers in Europe and the United States, to an own brand manufacturing (OBM) company launching its brand of porcelain tableware targeted at the global market. The story of Franz Collection is a story of product outsourcing and international cooperation, where OEM subcontractors in Asia have tried to set up their own marketing channels and brand names to bypass their Western clients and appeal directly to consumers. This case describes the managerial dilemmas in establishing a global brand faced by manufacturers in Taiwan and the neighbouring countries.

Teaching Note: 8B10M030 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Inter-firm Cooperation; Global Branding; MNEs From Emerging Markets; Subcontract Manufacture; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



SCOTTS MIRACLE-GRO: THE SPREADER SOURCING DECISION
John Gray, Michael Leiblein, Shyam Karunakaran

Product Number: 9B08M078
Publication Date: 11/14/2008
Revision Date: 6/22/2009
Length: 11 pages

The Scotts Miracle-Gro company is the world's largest marketer of branded consumer lawn and garden products, with a full range of products for professional horticulture as well. Headquartered in Marysville, Ohio, the company is a market leader in a number of consumer lawn and garden and professional horticultural products. The case describes a series of decisions regarding the ownership and organization of the assets used to manufacture fertilizer spreaders. This case is intended to illustrate the application of and tradeoffs between financial, strategic and operations perspectives in a relatively straightforward manufacturing make-buy decision. The case involves a well-known, easily-described product that most students would assume is made overseas. Sufficient information is provided to roughly estimate the direct financial cost associated with internal (domestic) production, offshore (non-domestic) production and outsourced production. In addition, information is included that may be used to estimate potential transaction costs as well as costs associated with foreign exchange risk.

Teaching Note: 8B08M78 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Human Resources Management; Outsourcing; Globalization; Operations Management; Supply Chain Management; Operations Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 7:
Governmental Influence on Trade

RANSOM ON THE HIGH SEAS: THE CASE OF PIRACY IN SOMALIA
Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurra, Michael Train, Jeanne McNett

Product Number: 9B11M104
Publication Date: 11/23/2011
Revision Date: 11/26/2012
Length: 9 pages

In recent years, incidents of piracy have increased dramatically off the coast of the failed state of Somalia. In this case, a group of 14 pirates have hijacked a cargo ship full of machinery, but have yet to make any demands. They hold hostage a multinational crew of 20 (whose captain and two officers are American), the ship, and the cargo. The chief operating officer of an international shipping company must choose among alternative strategies to get the crew, cargo, and ship back safely with as little cost as possible.

Teaching Note: 8B11M104 (6 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Corporate Responsibility; Risk Analysis; Risk Management; Transportation; Crime; Somalia; Africa; Northeastern
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TRADE AND INVESTMENT SANCTIONS: SHERRITT INTERNATIONAL, THE UNITED STATES AND CUBA
David W. Conklin, Danielle Cadieux

Product Number: 9B06M073
Publication Date: 8/22/2006
Revision Date: 8/4/2006
Length: 15 pages

This case presents a summary of U.S. trade and investment sanctions in effect as of 2006. The case examines in detail the U.S. sanctions against Cuba, and it discusses the challenges and opportunities that these sanctions have created for Cuba's largest foreign investor, Sherritt International. The discussion concerning Sherritt presents the wide array of forces that impact a business that is contemplating trade or investment with a country against which sanctions have been imposed. In spite of U.S. sanctions, Sherritt International, based in Canada, developed profitable businesses in Cuba, in mining, oil and gas, hotels and food processing. The U.S. policies, while imposing costs, also reduced the competition that Sherritt would otherwise have faced. The ability to work with the Communist government gave Sherritt a strong competitive advantage and a protected market. Sherritt had positioned itself with a first mover advantage if sanctions were lifted.

Teaching Note: 8B06M73 (5 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Globalization; International Business; Government and Business
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



GOOGLE IN CHINA
Deborah Compeau, Prahar Shah

Product Number: 9B06E019
Publication Date: 5/1/2007
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 9 pages

The case describes the circumstances surrounding the introduction of www.google.cn. In order to comply with Chinese government requirements, google.cn censors web results. This appears to contradict Google’s stated philosophy and its mission to organize and make accessible the world’s information. A public outcry ensues and Google is forced to defend its controversial decision. The case presents both sides of the debate and asks students to consider what they feel is right.

Teaching Note: 8B06E19 (4 pages)
Industry: Other Services
Issues: Information Systems; Government and Business; Ethics; Censorship; Internet; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 8:
Cross-National Cooperation and Agreements

CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY LTD.
Mary M. Crossan, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B02M006
Publication Date: 4/25/2002
Revision Date: 12/1/2009
Length: 16 pages

The president and chief executive officer of a large food manufacturer is preparing his company's strategic agenda for the next five years. One of the top five food manufacturers in Canada, the company went public and restructured its management team six years ago. The efforts were successful, resulting in an increase in the company's market share. Recent food industry trends, however, added box stores and private label brands to the domestic competition. At the same time, the terms of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement are expected to abolish food-related tariffs within two years, opening up competition from across the border. While the company has experienced success in the past five years, the president and chief executive officer needs a strategic plan that will take the company to the next level.

Teaching Note: 8B02M06 (6 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Communications; Crisis Management; Change Management; Strategy Development
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL WARMING AND THE KYOTO PROTOCOL: IMPLICATIONS FOR BUSINESS
David W. Conklin, Darcy Jones, Alan Davenport

Product Number: 9B01M071
Publication Date: 2/12/2002
Revision Date: 12/22/2009
Length: 18 pages

The costs of global warming are enormous. The increase in concentration of greenhouse gases, as a result of growth in industrial activities worldwide, is directly related to the increased frequency of natural disasters. United Nations has estimated that the effects of global warming (namely natural disasters, loss of land due to rising sea levels and damages to fishing stocks, agriculture and water supplies) could cost over US$300 billion annually. The Kyoto Protocol is an international agreement setting out legally-binding levels of greenhouse gas emissions for 160 participating nations. The signatory nations approved the principles of the treaty, leaving the operation and enforcement details to be determined. While the intent of the protocol, to reduce worldwide greenhouse gas emissions to the benefit of all countries, is honorable, the impacts of the Kyoto Protocol are difficult to predict and will affect its stakeholder groups (the insurance industry, developed and developing nations, signatory and non-signatory countries, existing and potential industries) differently. Implementation issues, alternate approaches, the challenges of global environmental problems and possible solutions are discussed. The response of governments and businesses to global environmental issues, in general, and to the Kyoto Protocol, in particular, will determine the strengths and weaknesses of this global initiative.

Teaching Note: 8B01M71 (9 pages)
Issues: Sustainable Development; Business Policy; Globalization
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BEIJING JEEP CO. AND THE WTO
Justin Tan, Michael N. Young

Product Number: 9B01M061
Publication Date: 10/17/2001
Revision Date: 12/22/2009
Length: 20 pages

Beijing Jeep Corporation Ltd. was one of the first joint ventures between an American company, DaimlerChrysler Corporation and a Chinese enterprise, Beijing Automotive Works. Early in its operations, Beijing Jeep was given preferential treatment on tariffs and foreign exchange, and had spent many years developing relationships with senior government officials that protected them from import competition. After several years of negotiations, there was an agreement of terms for China to enter into the World Trade Organization. Terms of this agreement called for a steep reduction in tariffs for imported automobiles, which would lower entry barriers to the Chinese automotive industry, thus creating more competition for the company. Tariffs on components imported from the United States would also be reduced but this would not be enough to offset the flood of imported vehicles into the market. Entry into the World Trade Organization would mean a lot of changes, and Beijing Jeep must determine whether they should continue focusing on the relationships they have built with the government, or approach their joint venture partner for additional support.

Teaching Note: 8B01M61 (4 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Automotive; Cross Cultural Management; Partnership; Manufacturing
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 9:
Global Foreign-Exchange Markets

ACPANA BUSINESS SYSTEMS INC.: EFFECT OF CURRENCY EXPOSURE ON REVENUE
Colette Southam, Robert Schenkel

Product Number: 9B11N010
Publication Date: 7/20/2011
Length: 6 pages

The vice president of operations for Acpana Business Systems Inc., a Canadian software development and backup-as-a-service provider located in Toronto, Canada, is concerned that the recent appreciation of the Canadian dollar is significantly affecting Acpana’s revenue and undermining the company’s organic growth. The case focuses on understanding and quantifying the risks associated with exchange rate fluctuation and its impact on a firm’s revenues and costs. The case introduces instruments available to hedge risk, including forward contracts and put and call options.

Teaching Note: 8B11N010 (10 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Foreign Exchange; Risk Management; Put and Call Options; Forward Contracts
Difficulty: 3 - Undergraduate



ACER INCORPORATED: CORE MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES
David J. Sharp, Lynette Chou, Hsien-Lian Chiu

Product Number: 9B10N034
Publication Date: 11/1/2010
Revision Date: 7/29/2011
Length: 14 pages

The chief financial officer of Acer Incorporated has to decide how to manage the higher level of complexity of the company's exchange risk after their restructuring. This must be done in a way which is consistent with Acer's core principles, one of which is to find simple effective solutions to unavoidable business risks. The case addresses the technical issues of exposure measurement and hedging, the challenge of hedging expected, but not contracted, future foreign currency revenues, and IFRS hedge accounting requirements.

Teaching Note: 8B10N034 (7 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Foreign Exchange; Foreign Currency; Exchange Risk; Restructuring; Corporate Values; CNCCU/Ivey
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 10:
The Determination of Exchange Rates

AIR CANADA - RISK MANAGEMENT
David Wood, Craig Dunbar

Product Number: 9B10N037
Publication Date: 12/13/2010
Length: 11 pages

The chief executive officer (CEO) of Air Canada was reviewing the company's risk management program with the intent to suggest changes to the policy. Risk management was a topic all corporate boards were dedicating time to since the financial collapse of 2008, and boards had come to realize that hard questions needed to be asked about the source of risk, how it was disclosed, how it was to be accounted for and how it was managed. The CEO knew that he needed to consider the impact of his view of the economy, interest rates, exchange rates and the commodity markets on how aggressive Air Canada should be with its appropriate hedges. He decided to start by identifying the most relevant sources of external risk that could materially affect Air Canada's short and long-term financial performance. He then wanted to understand how these risks were managed today and how they compared to West Jet, their main competitor. Finally, he wanted to determine what changes should be made to either eliminate the source of risk or better manage any significant risks that remained.

Teaching Note: 8B10N037 (16 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Operations Management; Corporate Strategy; Risk Exposure; Hedging Risk; Risk Management; Defining Financial Risk
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



WILEY INTERNATIONAL
Robert Higgins, Paul M. Bishop, Stephen Sapp

Product Number: 9B06N001
Publication Date: 11/28/2005
Revision Date: 7/5/2011
Length: 7 pages

The vice-president of a U.S.-based multi-national company must reach a decision regarding a $13 million capital expenditure proposal from the firm's Brazilian division. The proposal is of particular interest because it is considered to be a testcase in the development of a process to evaluate foreign currency-based investment proposals company wide. The vice-president's objective is to establish a process which will measure the relative economic attractiveness of investment proposals worldwide, regardless of the currencies in which these proposals are initially assessed.

Teaching Note: 8B06N01 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Management in a Global Environment; Foreign Exchange; Capital Budgeting
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MASKWA RESOURCES: FINANCING WITH A EURO BOND
Stephen Sapp, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B05N023
Publication Date: 6/30/2008
Revision Date: 10/4/2009
Length: 8 pages

The president of a small mining company is faced with an opportunity to purchase a mining refinery to complement its existing mining operations. It has the potential to bring the company into a situation of positive cashflow, but the small size of the company and high risk of the mining industry has left the president with few alternatives to raise the capital. The case focuses on the issuing of a Euro-denominated bond to finance this purchase and provide funds for future acquisitions. The case discusses the alternatives available in such a situation as well as the risks associated with changes in the price of metals and the value of the U.S. dollar, Canadian dollar and the Euro on the ability to make regular payments on the Euro-denominated bond and other financing alternatives.

Teaching Note: 8B05N23 (10 pages)
Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: Capital Markets; Risk Management; Hedging; Foreign Exchange; Financial Strategy
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 11:
The Strategy of International Business

THE CHALLENGES OF INTERNATIONAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AT EXPATICA.COM
Christopher Williams, Judith vanHerwaarden

Product Number: 9B11M085
Publication Date: 9/23/2011
Revision Date: 5/25/2017
Length: 11 pages

In April 2011, the management team at Expatica Communications B.V. was reviewing the progress of the company and the opportunities for future growth. The management team had to take stock: the external environment was rapidly changing, and threats from competitors were on the rise. Expatica had been founded 11 years earlier to provide English-language information and news to the expatriate community in Europe, delivering its services primarily over the Internet. One of the central issues Expatica faced was how to make its core business model effective across multiple markets. Recent launches of the online platform in new countries were not as successful as hoped and the performance of traditional “bricks and mortar” offerings was also mixed. The company had made tremendous progress over the years but needed to re-evaluate its position and decide which new opportunities for growth, if any, should be pursued.

Teaching Note: 8B11M085 (8 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Company Expansion; Product Development; E-Business; Expatriate Community; the Netherlands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



LEGO GROUP: AN OUTSOURCING JOURNEY
Marcus Moller Larsen, Torben Pedersen, Dmitrij Slepniov

Product Number: 9B10M094
Publication Date: 12/1/2010
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 16 pages

The last year's rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts of the production in high cost countries. Confident with the prospects of the new partnership, the company signed a long-term contract with Flextronics. This decision eventually proved itself to have been too hasty, however. Merely three years after the contracts were signed, LEGO management announced that it would phase out the entire sourcing collaboration with Flextronics. This sudden change in its sourcing strategy posed LEGO management with a number of caveats. Despite the bright forecasts, the collaboration did not fulfill the initial expectations, and the company needed to understand why this had happened. Secondly, what could LEGO management have done differently?

Teaching Note: 8B10M94 (13 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Outsourcing; Management Control; Global Strategy; Supply Chain Management
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MATTEL AND THE TOY RECALLS (A)
Hari Bapuji, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B08M010
Publication Date: 2/21/2008
Revision Date: 5/18/2017
Length: 14 pages

On July 30, 2007 the senior executive team of Mattel under the leadership of Bob Eckert, chief executive officer, received reports that the surface paint on the Sarge Cars, made in China, contained lead in excess of U.S. federal regulations. It was certainly not good news for Mattel, which was about to recall 967,000 other Chinese-made children's character toys because of excess lead in the paint. Not surprisingly, the decision ahead was not only about whether to recall the Sarge Cars and other toys that might be unsafe, but also how to deal with the recall situation. The (A) case details the events leading up to the recall and highlights the difficulties a multinational enterprise faces in managing global operations. Use with Ivey case 9B08M011, Mattel and the Toy Recalls (B).

Teaching Note: 8B08M10 (28 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Offshoring; Outsourcing; Product Quality; Product Recall; Multinational Enterprise Stakeholders; the United States and China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TAMING THE DRAGON: CUMMINS IN CHINA (CONDENSED)
Charles Dhanaraj, Maria Morgan, Jing Li, Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B05M034
Publication Date: 9/22/2005
Revision Date: 10/1/2009
Length: 15 pages

This case documents more than 15 years of U.S.-based Cummins, a global leader in diesel and allied technology, and its investment activities in China. While the macro level indicators seem to suggest the possibility to hit $1 billion in revenues in China by 2005, there were several pressing problems that put into question Cummins' ability to realize this target. Students are presented with four specific situations and must develop an appropriate action plan. They are related to the respective streamlining and consolidation of several existing joint ventures, distribution and service, and staffing. The case presents the complexity of managing country level operations and the role of executive leadership of a country manager.

Teaching Note: 8B05M34 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; International Strategy; International Joint Venture; Country Manager; Global Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 12:
Country Evaluation and Selection

DEVELOPING AN INTERNATIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY AT NEW YORK FRIES
W. Glenn Rowe, Christopher Williams, Sharda Prashad

Product Number: 9B11M082
Publication Date: 8/19/2011
Revision Date: 11/18/2014
Length: 10 pages

New York Fries’ president and executive vice president were preparing for the next biannual meeting of domestic and international franchisees. They planned to provide an update on all aspect of corporate strategy and planning for the year ahead, but they only had a few days to formulate a new international growth strategy. The president and executive vice president were hesitant to expand into new territories partly due to poor experiences in Australia and South Korea, yet international franchisees had encouraged them to investigate promising areas of expansion into China and India. Complicating matters was the future development of the company’s chain of premium hamburger restaurants. While New York Fries was a well-received brand in Canada, it had not yet decided if and how to internationalize the brand. How could the president and executive vice president pursue new opportunities while maintaining their premium brands of French fries and hamburgers?

Teaching Note: 8B11M082 (10 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Location Selection; International Growth; Brand Management; Franchising; Fast Food; Canada
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



STRATEGIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN EMERGING MARKET MULTINATIONALS: MARCO POLO MARINE
Marleen Dieleman, Yue-Jer Lee

Product Number: 9B11M046
Publication Date: 7/7/2011
Length: 15 pages

Marco Polo Marine (MPM) Ltd was a medium-sized Singaporean shipping company listed on the Singapore Stock Exchange that was involved in regional shipping and shipbuilding. The company was part of a larger Indonesian family business group, and had been built from scratch by the CEO. MPM had started off providing barges to transport sand and mining products, initially for the group’s mining operations, but increasingly for third parties. It subsequently entered the shipbuilding industry by establishing a shipyard in Batam, Indonesia, an island near Singapore. As a next step to grow the company, the CEO intended to become an international player in the much more sophisticated offshore marine services sector, but he had yet to decide what strategy to take to achieve it. The case allows students to analyze a global industry and present recommendations to the CEO for positioning the company within this industry. MPM is an example of an aspiring emerging market multinational, and the case discusses the challenges such companies face in catching up with more advanced incumbents in global industries. In order to penetrate the offshore marine services sector, decisions were required as to what types of vessels to build or buy, which countries to target, and how to enter this market given financial constraints and limited technical expertise.

Teaching Note: 8B11M046 (11 pages)
Industry: Transportation and Warehousing
Issues: Entrepreneurial Business Growth; International Expansion; Emerging Markets; Shipbuilding; Family Business; Indonesia; Singapore; Ivey/NUS
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EL MAWARDY JEWELRY: EXPANSION DURING A RECESSION
Marina Apaydin, Hend Mostafa, Sherif Ashraf Salem, Ali Tawfik, Jylan Sekaly, Lila Mehrez

Product Number: 9B11M051
Publication Date: 7/7/2011
Length: 11 pages

El Mawardy Jewelry was an Egyptian jewelry company located in Cairo, Egypt. The company was able to attract many customers due to its variety of designs, high-quality products, and competitive prices. The friendly atmosphere and customized services provided by the salespeople helped the company gain a competitive advantage. The Mawardy family was able to build on its success and open different stores across Egypt. In 2009, the financial crisis hit Egypt and many businesses were negatively affected. Faced with this challenge and a goal to go international, the Mawardy family considered different possibilities. The company had many options, but decided to focus on Qatar and the United Kingdom. It needed to decide whether it was better to expand now or later. It also needed to consider where to expand first — Qatar or the United Kingdom.

Teaching Note: 8B11M051 (11 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Expansion; Growth Opportunities; Gold; Jewelry; United Kingdom; Egypt; Qatar; Middle East
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CHABROS INTERNATIONAL GROUP: A WORLD OF WOOD
Paul W. Beamish, Bassam Farah

Product Number: 9B10M100
Publication Date: 11/30/2010
Revision Date: 4/17/2014
Length: 16 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - MENA Business Cases Award, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. The Chabros International Group case examines how a Lebanese multinational wood company confronts a drastic drop in its largest subsidiary's sales after 2008's global economic crisis. Antoine Chami, Chabros's owner and president, was reviewing his company's 2009 end-of-year financial statements and, in particular, a 30 per cent drop in sales in Dubai. In 2007, a year before the global economic crisis, Chami had invested more than $11 million to acquire and expand a sawmill in Serbia to meet Chabros's growing lumber sales demand. With a much higher capacity to produce lumber and a much lower probability to sell it, Chami had to decide what to do to overcome this challenge. Should he close parts of his Serbian sawmill? Should he try to boost his company's sales to use all of his sawmill's available capacity? If so, should Chabros try to increase sales within the countries where it already operated (UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Egypt) or should it expand into a new country (Algeria, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Syria, Tunisia)? Would Morocco, among other countries, be the best country to expand into? Was it the right time to embark on such an expansion?

Teaching Note: 8B10M100 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: International Expansion; Market Entry; Growth Strategy; Exports
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 13:
Export and Import Strategies

CHINESE FIREWORKS INDUSTRY
Paul W. Beamish

Product Number: 9B11M006
Publication Date: 1/11/2011
Revision Date: 5/4/2017
Length: 13 pages

The Chinese fireworks industry thrived after China adopted the open-door policy in the late 1970s, and grew to make up 90 per cent of the world’s fireworks export sales. However, starting in the mid-1990s, safety concerns led governments both in China and abroad to set up stricter regulations. At the same time, there was rapid growth in the number of small family-run fireworks workshops, whose relentless price-cutting drove down profit margins. Students are asked to undertake an industry analysis, estimate the industry attractiveness, and propose possible ways to improve the industry attractiveness from an individual investor’s point of view. Jerry Yu is an American-born Chinese in New York who has been invited to buy a fireworks factory in Liuyang, Hunan.

Teaching Note: 8B11M006 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Market Analysis; Industry Analysis; International Marketing; Exports; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DABUR INDIA LTD. - GLOBALIZATION
Niraj Dawar, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B09A017
Publication Date: 6/26/2009
Length: 18 pages

Dabur, an Indian consumer package goods company, had established a strong brand equity in India by offering, for decades, a vast portfolio of over-the-counter products. In seeking international expansion in 1987, it first took the export route. It also followed the customer, targeting the Indian diaspora in the Middle East, Africa and the United States, already familiar with the brand. By 2006, Dabur had set up five manufacturing facilities outside India. In June 2007, Dabur had to make, in countries such as Nigeria for example, some critical choices. It had to choose between sticking to the diaspora, a market it understood best, and targeting the mainstream population. It had to choose its growth options between categories like personal care, in which it had built up competencies, and categories such as oral care and home care, which were the new engines of growth in its international markets but in which the company had no track record, either on the home front or overseas. The case study helps students deal with issues of growth and consolidation in a global market from the perspective of the company's chief executive officer and the head of its international operations.

Teaching Note: 8B09A17 (4 pages)
Industry: Wholesale Trade
Issues: Growth Strategy; International Business
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



EURO TELECOM CHINA - THE PARALLEL IMPORT PROBLEM
David J. Sharp, Yasheng Chen

Product Number: 9B03B011
Publication Date: 11/28/2003
Length: 9 pages

The chief executive officer of Euro Telecom China must decide what to do about the unauthorized parallel imports from Malaysia of finished Euro Telecom China's mobile phones by independent mobile phone distributors and retailers. These imported mobile phones appeared to have taken nearly 20 per cent of the company's mobile phone market in China. The case explores quantitatively the complexities of management control in international joint ventures, here between Euro Telecom and groups in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangdong. It provides an opportunity to calculate the relative profitability of manufacturing in two locations and the intra-organizational inter-divisional conflict created.

Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: China; Joint Ventures; Imports; Control Systems; Multinational
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 14:
Direct Investment and Collaborative Strategies

PIONEER CORPORATION: THE NEC PLASMA OPPORTUNITY (A)
Derek Lehmberg

Product Number: 9B11M093
Publication Date: 11/21/2011
Revision Date: 2/13/2013
Length: 15 pages

In 2004, Kaneo Itoh, president of the consumer electronics firm Pioneer Corporation, was considering acquiring the plasma display operations of another Japanese firm, NEC. Pioneer had decided some years ago that plasma display panel (PDP) technology was a good strategic area in which to invest. Recently, Pioneer had been selling increasing numbers of plasma television sets using PDPs. While the company was building a new PDP production facility that would soon become operational if demand continued to increase, additional capacity would become necessary. Buying NEC’s plasma operations would give Pioneer this capacity, the potential for realizing scale economies, and some valuable intellectual property NEC had developed. Itoh had to make a decision: Should Pioneer buy NEC’s plasma business?

Teaching Note: 8B11M093 (11 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Technological Growth; Multi-business Enterprise; Mergers & Acquisitions; Television; Japan
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NTT DOCOMO — JOINT VENTURE WITH TATA IN INDIAN MOBILE TELECOM
Shih-Fen Chen, Ramasastry Chandrasekhar

Product Number: 9B10M107
Publication Date: 2/1/2011
Length: 20 pages

In November 2008, NTT DoCoMo, the largest mobile telecom company in Japan, entered into a joint venture with Tata Tele Services Ltd (TTSL), the fifth-largest mobile telecom company in India. The two partners had come together because both had recognized that they could put complementary capabilities into play. NTT DoCoMo could build on TTSL’s knowledge of the local market and ownership of a telecom licence (given by the federal government only to domestic firms). TTSL could gain access to NTT DoCoMo’s core competence in 3G technology, which was soon being rolled out in India through a spectrum auction. As part of signing the deal, the two partners had to face issues other than business synergies — like the percentage of equity holding of each partner in the joint venture, the price at which NTT DoCoMo would buy its stake to be offloaded by TTSL, and the provision for veto rights that could make up for a minority holding. The case helps students understand the dynamics of the formation of an international joint venture. It also highlights the unique advantages of a joint venture over other forms of international collaboration, such as technology licensing and agency distribution.

Teaching Note: 8B10M107 (14 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: International Collaboration; Globalization; Joint Ventures; Strategic Management; Telecommunications; Japan; India
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



CIBC MELLON: MANAGING A CROSS-BORDER JOINT VENTURE
Paul W. Beamish, Michael Sartor

Product Number: 9B10M091
Publication Date: 11/5/2010
Revision Date: 5/24/2012
Length: 15 pages

During his 10-year tenure, the president and CEO of CIBC Mellon had presided over the dramatic growth of the jointly owned, Toronto-based asset servicing business of CIBC and The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation (BNY Mellon). In mid-September 2008, the CEO was witnessing the onset of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. The impending collapse of several major firms threatened to impact all players in the financial services industry worldwide. Although joint ventures (JVs) were uncommon in the financial sector, the CEO believed that the CIBC Mellon JV was uniquely positioned to withstand the fallout associated with the financial crisis. Two pressing issues faced the JV’s executive management team. First, it needed to discuss how to best manage any risks confronting the JV as a consequence of the financial crisis. How could the policies and practices developed during the past decade be leveraged to sustain the JV through the broader financial crisis? Second, it needed to continue discussions regarding options for refining CIBC Mellon’s strategic focus, so that the JV could emerge from the financial meltdown on even stronger footing.

Teaching Note: 8B10M91 (13 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: Financial Crisis; Joint Ventures; Leadership; Alliance Management; Managing Multiple Stakeholders; Canada; United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



NORA-SAKARI: A PROPOSED JV IN MALAYSIA (REVISED)
Paul W. Beamish, R. Azimah Ainuddin

Product Number: 9B06M006
Publication Date: 11/30/2005
Revision Date: 5/23/2012
Length: 16 pages

This case presents the perspective of a Malaysian company, Nora Bhd, which was in the process of trying to establish a telecommunications joint venture with a Finnish firm, Sakari Oy. Negotiations have broken down between the firms, and students are asked to try to restructure a win-win deal. The case examines some of the most common issues involved in partner selection and design in international joint ventures.

Teaching Note: 8B06M06 (12 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Intercultural Relations; Third World; Negotiation; Joint Ventures; Finland; Malaysia
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 15:
The Organization of International Business

VERTU: NOKIA’S LUXURY MOBILE PHONE FOR THE URBAN RICH
Ken Kwong-Kay Wong

Product Number: 9B11A040
Publication Date: 9/28/2011
Revision Date: 12/1/2011
Length: 22 pages

Nokia, headquartered in Finland, was a global telecommunications equipment manufacturer. It operated Vertu, a luxury mobile phone brand that had pioneered the luxury mobile phone market in the late 1990s by using precious materials such as diamonds, sapphires, titanium, and exotic leather for phone production. The company had enjoyed impressive growth in almost 70 countries and had sold hundreds of thousands of phones in the eight years since its launch. On February 11, 2011, Stephen Elop, the new CEO of Nokia, announced a new mobile strategy to adopt Microsoft’s new but unproven Windows Phone as its primary smartphone operating system. The market reacted poorly, and the company’s share price took a 14 per cent dive on the day of announcement. How should Vertu respond to this new Nokia mobile strategy? Was Vertu well positioned to take the brand forward under the new Nokia? Should this U.K.-based wholly owned subsidiary be left alone and continue to be managed at arm’s length from Nokia? Changes to Vertu were inevitable — it was not a matter of if, but when.

Teaching Note: 8B11A040 (9 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Brand Positioning; Market Segmentation; Product Design; Telecommunications; Luxury Goods; United Kingdom; Finland
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DANIMAL IN SOUTH AFRICA: MANAGEMENT INNOVATION AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PYRAMID
Verity Hawarden, Helena Barnard

Product Number: 9B10M099
Publication Date: 1/21/2011
Revision Date: 8/23/2012
Length: 15 pages

This case focuses on management innovation in the South African dairy industry, describing how an innovative new yoghurt product, Danimal, was created specifically for the market at the base of the pyramid. It explains how management of the product line embodied the various innovation opportunities and challenges presented. The concept was initially introduced in order to assess the feasibility of profitably servicing this market. However, the project was not simply about introducing a cheap brand to the poor but was more about creating brand awareness in the market at the base of the pyramid. The new product took into consideration the nutritional shortcomings in the diet of children in this market and also allowed for the lack of available infrastructure — electricity and refrigeration.

The case illustrates the importance of a product being affordable, relevant, and available to its market. Innovation went further than product design and also took into account the necessity of a lean distribution channel. This took the form of micro-distributors, referred to as Danimamas, who comprised township residents that were unemployed or part-time employed. The case offers insights into the complexity of doing business in developing countries. It concludes with the challenge of how to ensure that the project continued on its upward trajectory.


Teaching Note: 8B10M099 (17 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Positioning; Developing Countries; Innovation; Social Marketing; Brand Development; Dairy; South Africa; GIBS
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



LUNDBECK KOREA: MANAGING AN INTERNATIONAL GROWTH ENGINE
Paul W. Beamish, Michael Roberts

Product Number: 9B10M012
Publication Date: 2/11/2010
Revision Date: 2/12/2010
Length: 16 pages

In 2005, the vice-president of Lundbeck, a Danish based pharmaceutical firm, needed to decide what to do with one of his most promising subsidiaries, Lundbeck Korea. Over its short lifetime, under the leadership of the country manager and the Asia regional manager, the subsidiary had grown well beyond the original goals set for it. The vice-president wanted to create a reporting structure and management mix that would balance the local demands that Lundbeck Korea required for growth with Lundbeck's overall strategy of specialization, speed, integration and results. The case also traces Lundbeck's internationalization efforts in Asia over the past 20 years. The company had grown from pure licensing arrangements to establishing its own country level subsidiaries. This case introduces the dynamic tensions between taking advantage of local management expertise and executing a corporate strategy developed for an entire global group. In addition, it illustrates the importance, but difficulties, of being sensitive to local management goals, while promoting a global corporate culture.

Teaching Note: 8B10M12 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: MNE Reporting Structures; International Strategy; Emerging Markets
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



RESEARCH IN MOTION: MANAGING EXPLOSIVE GROWTH
Rod E. White, Paul W. Beamish, Daina Mazutis

Product Number: 9B08M046
Publication Date: 5/15/2008
Revision Date: 5/24/2017
Length: 19 pages

Research in Motion (RIM) is a high technology firm that is experiencing explosive sales growth. David Yach, chief technology officer for software at RIM, has received notice of an impending meeting with the co-chief executive officer regarding his research and development (R&D) expenditures. Although RIM, makers of the very popular BlackBerry, spent almost $360 million in R&D in 2007, this number was low compared to its largest competitors, both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of sales (e.g. Nokia spent $8.2 billion on R&D). This is problematic as it foreshadows the question of whether or not RIM is well positioned to continue to meet expectations, deliver award-winning products and services and maintain its lead in the smartphone market. Furthermore, in the very dynamic mobile telecommunications industry, investment analysts often look to a firm's commitment to R&D as a signal that product sales growth will be sustainable. Just to maintain the status quo, Yach will have to hire 1,400 software engineers in 2008 and is considering a number of alternative paths to managing the expansion. The options include: (1) doing what they are doing now, only more of it, (2) building on their existing and satellite R&D locations, (3) growing through acquisition or (4) going global.

Teaching Note: 8B08M46 (19 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Telecommunication Technology; Change Management; Globalization; Staffing; Growth Strategy
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 16:
Marketing Globally

EXPERIENCE CHINA: A NATIONAL IMAGE CAMPAIGN IN THE UNITED STATES
William Wei, Yuanfang Lin, Mei Qin Kok

Product Number: 9B11A033
Publication Date: 10/6/2011
Revision Date: 7/26/2017
Length: 8 pages

The China national image film “People Chapter” — officially a sub-series of the “Experience China” campaign — was launched by the Chinese government to coincide with President Hu Jintao’s visit to the United States in mid-January 2011. The one-minute promotional video was played on six giant electronic screens about 300 times per day, and had appeared approximately 8,400 times when the broadcast ended on February 14, 2011. The video showed a series of Chinese people, ranging from ordinary citizens to celebrities. It was a publicity effort aimed at promoting a truer image of China abroad, and signalling that China was opening to embrace the world. However, reactions from both Chinese and overseas audiences had been fairly mixed since the initial release of the promotional film. Experts from China and abroad were skeptical of the effectiveness of the campaign in promoting the national image of modern China to the world. This case presents the opportunity to examine the basic elements in the marketing communication process, analyze how decisions in marketing design affect outcomes, and understand the differences between nation and product promotion.

Teaching Note: 8B11A033 (6 pages)
Industry: Information, Media & Telecommunications
Issues: Advertising Strategy; Advertising Media; Cultural Sensitivity; Public Relations; Target Market; China and United States
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



BESTSELLER — FACING A NEW COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE IN CHINA
Michael W. Hansen, Marcus Moller Larsen, Torben Pedersen

Product Number: 9B11M054
Publication Date: 8/29/2011
Length: 20 pages

In the fall of 1996, Bestseller became one of the first international fashion companies to enter the Chinese retail market. Earlier that year, Allan Warburg and Dan Friis had made contact with the CEO of Bestseller A/S, Troels Holch Povlsen, regarding the prospect of selling Bestseller brands in China, where they felt there were many business opportunities. Holch Povlsen found himself convinced by the two entrepreneurs’ enthusiasm for the Chinese market.

They quickly proved that they had been right about China. A decade after the first store opened, Bestseller China had almost 2,000 stores, and accounted for more than one-third of the total turnover of Bestseller A/S. The secret to Bestseller China’s extraordinary success was its ability to sell price-competitive European designs with a Chinese touch, which was achieved by locating all production in China and modifying Bestseller A/S’s designs to suit the size and tastes of Chinese middle-class consumers. With a 10-year headstart over potential competitors, Bestseller China had by the end of 2007 managed to establish a strong presence in China. However, high economic growth and the growing middle class were making the Chinese market highly attractive for other companies. Although global giants, such as Zara and H&M, were devoting big chunks of their budgets to entering China and capturing market share, these aggressive new entrants were not Bestseller China’s biggest concern. In fact, the competition from local companies was seen as the real threat.


Teaching Note: 8B11M054 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Franchising; Marketing Management; Global Strategy; Fashion; Clothing; Denmark; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



GLOBAL BRANDING OF STELLA ARTOIS
Paul W. Beamish, Anthony Goerzen

Product Number: 9B00A019
Publication Date: 10/19/2000
Revision Date: 5/23/2017
Length: 19 pages

Interbrew had developed into the world's fourth largest brewer by acquiring and managing a large portfolio of national and regional beer brands in markets around the world. Recently, senior management had decided to develop one of their premium beers, Stella Artois, as a global brand. The early stages of Interbrew's global branding strategy and tactics are examined, enabling students to consider these concepts in the context of a fragmented but consolidating industry. It is suitable for use in courses in consumer marketing, international marketing and international business.

Teaching Note: 8B00A19 (10 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Global Product; International Business; International Marketing; Brands
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 17:
Global Manufacturing and Supply Chain Management

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT AT INTERNATIONAL AUTOMOTIVE
Katrin Haarer, Nahide Hannane, Leonardo Zapata-Flores, Joo Y. Jung

Product Number: 9B11D013
Publication Date: 10/31/2011
Length: 9 pages

In 2008, International Automotive Company (IAC), a German manufacturer of automotive parts, acquired a plant in Reynosa, Mexico. This plant produced various types of motors for power windows, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and wipers. At the time of acquisition, the plant was showing record losses. Because the acquisition was internally financed, it was crucial to make the plant profitable quickly. After conducting a deep analysis, the company discovered that a lack of proper management in the supply chain system was leading to a large amount of wasted resources. As a result, managers looked for opportunities to save money and facilitate improvements mainly in areas such as packaging, warehousing, and transportation. One of the greatest obstacles involved IAC’s employees, who were falling short in terms of knowledge and motivation.

Teaching Note: 8B11D013 (5 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Supply Chain Management; Operations Management; Lean Management; Mexico
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DANFOSS — GLOBAL MANUFACTURING FOOTPRINT
Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt

Product Number: 9B11M049
Publication Date: 6/22/2011
Length: 19 pages

AWARD WINNING CASE - Supply Chain Management Award, 2012 European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Case Writing Competition. The case examines the supply chain, managerial, and organizational challenges facing a large European industrial company competing in a mature industry with strong price pressure. Established in the 1930s in Denmark, Danfoss initially produced automatic valves for refrigeration plants. The company has since grown into a major industrial group. Until the mid-1990s, Danfoss had the majority of its sales and production in Europe. This changed, however, with the arrival of a new CEO, who initiated a process to change the company into a global player within all of its main business areas.

Following this process of internationalization, the company was facing three main issues which top management was concerned about: Danfoss’s manufacturing network; its continued global growth; and its highly engineering-based culture. The first issue stemmed from the fact that Danfoss had followed a strategy of one product, one plant. This had created a situation with a lot of highly specialized product lines and very few common features between them. On the other hand, the internationalization strategy had so far been quite successful in Eastern Europe and China. In the United States, however, the company was still experiencing difficulties despite heavy investments in its manufacturing capacity in Mexico. In China, the company had experienced success and wanted to secure long-term growth in the market. The third issue was the very engineering-based culture of the company, which among other things was manifested in the fact that Danfoss previously developed products at the expense of consumer demand and preferences.


Teaching Note: 8B11M049 (12 pages)
Issues: Family Business; Supply Chain Management; Organizational Design; Manufacturing Strategy; Internationalization; Denmark; China
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



MGT GROUP: RECONSTRUCTING THE SUPPLY CHAIN AFTER A CROSS-BORDER FACTORY RELOCATION
Zhiduan Xu, Shi Yun, Xu Yong

Product Number: 9B11D009
Publication Date: 9/19/2011
Length: 15 pages

Established in 1945, MGT Group was headquartered in France. Its LSD factory was a well-known global engineering provider specializing in the design and manufacture of high-precision valves. At the end of 2007, MGT decided to close the LSD factory in France and relocate it to Fuzhou, China. Two people were put in charge of this project: Kevin Lurton, vice chief operations officer of MGT Control Systems Division, and Jian Li, the general manager of MGT Fuzhou Company. Lurton and Li faced a series of challenges, ranging from the need for strategic planning to the need for an implementation policy for supply chain reconstruction during the cross-border factory relocation.

Teaching Note: 8B11D009 (14 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Cross-border Factory Relocation; Supply Chain Reconstruction; Supply Chain Strategy; France; China; Ivey/CMCC
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



ECCO A/S - GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN MANAGEMENT
Bo Bernhard Nielsen, Torben Pedersen, Jacob Pyndt

Product Number: 9B08M014
Publication Date: 5/29/2008
Revision Date: 5/10/2017
Length: 21 pages

ECCO A/S (ECCO) had been very successful in the footwear industry by focusing on production technology and assuring quality by maintaining full control of the entire value chain from cow to shoe. As ECCO grew and faced increased international competition, various value chain activities, primarily production and tanning, were offshored to low-cost countries. The fully integrated value chain tied up significant capital and management attention in tanneries and production facilities, which could have been used to strengthen the branding and marketing of ECCO's shoes. Moreover, an increasingly complex and dispersed global value chain configuration posed organizational and managerial challenges regarding coordination, communication and logistics. This case examines the financial, organizational and managerial challenges of maintaining a highly integrated global value chain and asks students to determine the appropriateness of this set-up in the context of an increasingly market-oriented industry. It is suitable for use in both undergraduate and graduate courses in international corporate strategy, international management, international marketing, supply-chain management, cross-border strategic management and international business studies in general.

Teaching Note: 8B08M14 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Marketing Management; Operations Management; Global Strategy; Vertical Integration; Value Chain; Competitor Analysis
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 18:
International Accounting Issues

STARBUCKS: VENTI LEASES
Vaughan S. Radcliffe, Mitchell Stein, Caleb Yong

Product Number: 9B11B014
Publication Date: 8/19/2011
Length: 19 pages

This case depicts a financial analyst trying to make sense of Starbucks’ finances and drawing from recent projects of the IASB and FASB to identify lease accounting as a key issue for the firm. The case underscores the importance of having a full picture of a company’s obligations in order to understand its overall performance.

In reviewing the case, students examine Starbucks’ extensive use of leases and use spreadsheet tools to understand the full extent of the corporation’s indebtedness. Although heavy users of leases such as Starbucks have argued that lease accounting is complex, an estimation of lease indebtedness can be made using relatively simple tools that are easy for students to understand. The case allows issues of high-level accounting standards to be elucidated, using a well-known company with which students identify. The case illustrates the real-world consequences of accounting policy choices.


Teaching Note: 8B11B014 (3 pages)
Industry: Accommodation & Food Services
Issues: Accounting; Financial Management; Accounting Standards; Leases; Debt; Coffee
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



FORTUNE MINERALS — ADOPTION OF IFRS
Chris Sturby, Melissa Jean

Product Number: 9B11B013
Publication Date: 8/17/2011
Revision Date: 11/1/2013
Length: 15 pages

The controller of a publicly traded mining company must make a series of recommendations to the chief executive officer and chief financial officer of the company as it prepares to adopt international financial reporting standards (IFRS). Major decisions revolve around accounting for the company’s fixed assets and mining properties — specifically, whether to capitalize or expense certain items, whether to record certain assets at their values of historical costs, the company’s depreciation policy, and other issues around impairments of capital assets. The controller also considers the recent International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) discussion paper on accounting for extractive resources and its possible implications to the company in the future.

Industry: Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction
Issues: IFRS; Capital Assets; Asset Impairment; Financial Accounting; Extractive Resources; Mining
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



DAIRY FARM INTERNATIONAL HOLDINGS LIMITED: ANALYSING AN ANNUAL REPORT
Claude P. Lanfranconi, Ken Mark

Product Number: 9B07B009
Publication Date: 8/3/2007
Length: 17 pages

The main objective of this case is to introduce students to the calculation and usage of ratios in a real world environment. Secondly, students will be required to access, read and use an actual annual report. Lastly, Dairy Farm International is an Asian-based multinational and, therefore, by using comparative data from a United Kingdom multinational, Tesco, and a local Canadian company, Sobeys, students will be introduced to issues related to international financial comparisons.

Teaching Note: 8B07B09 (16 pages)
Industry: Retail Trade
Issues: International Financial Accounting; Financial Ratio Analysis; Using an Annual Report
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate


Chapter 19:
The Multinational Finance Function

AT&T WIRELESS: TEXT MESSAGING
Vaughan S. Radcliffe, Mitchell Stein, Michael Lickver

Product Number: 9B11B005
Publication Date: 4/8/2011
Revision Date: 1/18/2012
Length: 16 pages

This case examines AT&T’s wireless business with a focus on its text messaging services. The industry features a high proportion of fixed costs in relation to acquiring spectrum and building a network. Variable costs are relatively low, especially in the case of SMS text messages. Pricing and margins in text messaging have attracted regulatory scrutiny in the Unites States, Canada, and elsewhere. The case requires the use of key concepts in cost behaviour, cost volume profit analysis, and product costing to understand the nature of the business and the profit margins involved. Many service or high-tech businesses exhibit similar cost behaviours, and so the case gives students insight into the management of such enterprises.

Teaching Note: 8B11B005 (4 pages)
Industry: Administrative, Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services
Issues: Pricing; Cost Volume Profit Analysis; Variable and Fixed Costs; Telecommunications
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



TATA STEEL LIMITED: CONVERTIBLE ALTERNATIVE REFERENCE SECURITIES (A)
Vasant Sivaraman, Adithya Anand

Product Number: 9B08N001
Publication Date: 4/1/2008
Revision Date: 1/12/2011
Length: 17 pages

Shortly after the acquisition of Corus in 2007, Tata Steel Limited entered the international markets with a convertible bond offering (CARS) that had distinct features. The offering of US$875 million was the first of its kind from India. The successful issuance reflected investor confidence in the country and the company. This case covers a full analysis of the CARS with a scope that spans valuation, structuring of the financing instrument to suit the issuer's strategic imperatives and investment analysis.

Teaching Note: 8B08N01 (12 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Conversion Option; Differential Shares; Depositary Receipts; Convertible Bonds
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA


Chapter 20:
Human Resource Management

HR AS TRANSFORMATION PARTNER IN MARUTI SUZUKI INDIA LTD.
Anita Ollapally, Asha Bhandarker

Product Number: 9B11C022
Publication Date: 7/27/2011
Length: 20 pages

The Indian business landscape is marked by uncertainty, turbulence, hyper-competition, and non-linear growth, as exemplified by the automobile sector. Increasing competition from foreign automobile organizations and homegrown ones such as Tata Motors are posing a threat to the market leader, Maruti Suzuki India Ltd. A fierce battle for market share is ensuing among these automobile giants. However, Maruti Suzuki has succeeded in maintaining its leadership position. Yet with more companies venturing into the territory of Maruti Suzuki — the small car segment — the threat to Maruti Suzuki’s market share is looming larger than before.

This case illustrates Maruti Suzuki’s journey and depicts the changes in its organizational strategy, HR strategy, and work culture in response to new challenges. Maruti Suzuki had to change from a government-owned organization and a monopoly, to a firm capable of competing with world-class automobile companies. This case describes the various challenges faced by the organization and how HR has assisted in bringing about much-needed transformation. The challenges include having to create a performing workforce, changing the mindset of the employees, coping with cross-cultural issues and, most significantly, engaging in breakthrough innovation. HR needs to create an organizational culture that not only supports breakthrough innovation but also helps retain employees.


Teaching Note: 8B11C022 (16 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Human Resource Management; Organizational Culture; Talent Management; Cultural Differences; Automobile Industry; India; Ivey/ISB
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



MAINTAINING THE “SINGLE SAMSUNG” SPIRIT: NEW CHALLENGES IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT
Shaista E. Khilji, Chang Hwan Oh, Nisha Manikoth

Product Number: 9B11C010
Publication Date: 8/2/2011
Length: 13 pages

This case examines how Samsung has grown to become one of the world’s leading companies. It presents a detailed description of Samsung’s “top priority to the people” philosophy and its strong cultural values, both of which have been instrumental in ensuring its continued success in recent decades. Since 1982, the Samsung Human Resource Development Center (SHRDC) has played a critical role in supporting Samsung’s corporate strategy of achieving global competitiveness through programs that focus on maintaining Samsung values and developing a cadre of effective next-generation leaders. New Employee Orientation (NEO), an intensive four-week in-house program for all Samsung employees, is one example of an SHRD program. NEO aligns employees across Samsung affiliates to its strategic direction, thereby fostering a stronger “Single Samsung” culture.

In recent years, however, NEO has been faced with new challenges. First, Samsung’s pool of new employees has become more diverse, with the recruitment of more experienced and foreign (non-Korean) employees in addition to the fresh college graduates whom Samsung has always relied upon. Second, Samsung has become aware of stark value differences between the older employees, who are obedient and easily follow rules, and the younger “digital native” employees, who are more individualistic and prefer egalitarian and open policies. Managers at SHRDC are concerned that the “Single Samsung” spirit, which forms the core of Samsung culture, is being threatened from within.

Students must address issues related to the need for maintaining a unified organizational culture among diverse groups of employees with conflicting values, and propose ways for Samsung to effectively employ and utilize all of its employees.


Teaching Note: 8B11C010 (15 pages)
Industry: Manufacturing
Issues: Corporate Culture; Generational Differences; Human Resource Development; Consumer Electronics; South Korea
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA



L’OSERAIE — TURNAROUND CHALLENGE
Justin Paul, Marc Chaix, Shruti Gupta

Product Number: 9B11C018
Publication Date: 7/11/2011
Length: 15 pages

This case deals with the challenges faced at L’Oseraie, a nursing home located in the northeast of France. The director of L’Oseraie had to meet her new boss and brief him on the organization’s challenges while offering suggestions. A key obstacle involved employee motivation and engagement, particularly after a recent absenteeism episode. Furthermore, the lack of health care staff in France meant that employees might need to be sourced from abroad, perhaps from Eastern Europe or the French-speaking countries of North Africa. How could the director implement a strategy that would alleviate the day-to-day problems of the nursing home?

Teaching Note: 8B11C018 (8 pages)
Industry: Health Care Services
Issues: Health Care Administration; Organizational Structure; Employee Retention; Human Resource Management; France
Difficulty: 5 - MBA/Postgraduate



HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN MULTINATIONAL BANKS IN TANZANIA
Paul W. Beamish, Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi

Product Number: 9B07C040
Publication Date: 10/30/2007
Length: 18 pages

The case examines how the best practices of two banks were organized and managed to provide financial services to a small niche of foreign customers in the mining, tourism and construction sectors in Tanzania. The two banks claimed to be similar in many ways. They both were from countries whose economies were run broadly on neo-liberal lines, in that there was little state intervention in either economy, however, differences existed with respect to how they managed their operations. The case is ideally suited to illustrate the on-going tension and different types of best practices in cross-market integration. It provides opportunities to explore the challenges faced by multinational company banks in managing global workforces, the evolution of the banking sector, and the influence of technology in shaping work in organizations.

Teaching Note: 8B07C40 (16 pages)
Industry: Finance and Insurance
Issues: International Management; Expatriate Management; Trade Unions; Management Training; Emerging Markets; Performance Evaluation; Recruiting; Subsidiaries; Career Development; Employee Selection
Difficulty: 4 - Undergraduate/MBA